Maia Atlantis: Ancient World Blogs

http://planet.atlantides.org/maia

Tom Elliott (tom.elliott@nyu.edu)

This feed aggregator is part of the Planet Atlantides constellation. Its current content is available in multiple webfeed formats, including Atom, RSS/RDF and RSS 1.0. The subscription list is also available in OPML and as a FOAF Roll. All content is assumed to be the intellectual property of the originators unless they indicate otherwise.

September 23, 2017

David Gill (Looting Matters)

Aydin Dikmen and the forging of antiquities

Suzan Mazur has published a timely piece on Aydin Dikmen ("Anatolian Stargazer Fakes?—The Aydin Dikmen Connection", Huffington Post September 22, 2017). She raises the spectre that some of the more complete Anatolian "Stargazer" figures could be modern creations. 

Mazur notes the presence of such figures in the hands of Aydin Dikmen who was separately reported as having made the "best fakes" (though not specifically of Anatolian figures). Dikmen's basement in Konya was also reported to have been equipped to make objects from marble.

There are clear intellectual consequences if the insecure "Stargazers" are allowed to join the corpus of Anatolian figures that have been recovered from scientific excavations.

Owners of "Stargazers" that surfaced on the market since 1960 need to check their full histories.

It needs to be stressed that some of these "Stargazers" could indeed be ancient, but the absence of contextual information will make it difficult for their date to be authenticated.

Bookmark and Share so Your Real Friends Know that You Know

BiblePlaces Blog

Weekend Roundup, Part 1

The biblical Feast of Trumpets, usually observed now as the Jewish New Year, was celebrated on Thursday. Ferrell Jenkins shares some photos of the ram’s horn.

With the ending of year 5777, the Temple Mount Sifting Project identifies the “top 10 topics” over the past year.

Ferrell Jenkins explains how Dr. James Turner Barclay is honored in the Cathedral of St. George in Jerusalem.

Israel’s Good Name describes his experience on the Horvat Midras excavation.

The re-dating of the Gihon Spring fortifications is the topic on this week’s edition of The Book and the Spade.

The latest issue of Tel Aviv includes an article on the “Monumentality of Iron Age Jerusalem Prior to the 8th Century BCE.”

There have been a number of wolf attacks in the Judean wilderness in recent months. The article includes a video of a wolf chasing a young ibex.

“Dr. Scott Stripling and Dr. Craig Evans headline the upcoming Text and Trowel symposium on archaeology and the Bible at the University of Pikeville on Oct. 20-21, 2017.”

HT: Agade

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Catalogus Philologorum Classicorum (CPhCl)

 [First posted in AWOL  20 January 2011. Updated 23 September 2017]

Catalogus Philologorum Classicorum (CPhCl)

THE CATALOGUS

The Catalogus Philologorum Classicorum (CPhCl) provides a reference tool for all those who study greek and latin antiquity, specifically useful for studies on the history of classical scholarship in the modern age. It is an encyclopaedic lexicon collecting the bio-bibliographical data about classical philologists and it is a continuation and improvement of W. Pökel’s Philologisches Schriftstellerlexikon, Leipzig 1882. Only deceased scholars are included.

THE HISTORY OF THE CATALOGUS

The Catalogus started off with the 1984 CNR international conference "La filologia classica nel secolo XX" (strongly supported by Scevola Mariotti) and with its proceedings, published in Pisa in 1989. Subsequently the preparation of a Catalogus Philologorum Classicorum has begun at the Dipartimento di Filologia Classica of the University of Pisa, with the financial support of CNR, and has been on-line since 2003, within the web-site Aristarchus, thanks to a cooperation between the Dipartimento di Filologia Classica of the University of Pisa and the Dipartimento di Archeologia e Filologia Classica (D.AR.FI.CL.ET.) of the University of Genoa.

THE CATALOGUS TODAY

The CPhCl has become an international network since 2009. The central unit, which has its head office at the Dipartimento di Archeologia e Filologia Classica of the University of Genoa, is responsible for the coordination and supervision of the whole project, as well as the administration of the website. The cards concerning the scholars have been attributed to the local units according to geographic and linguistic criteria. A three-letter abbreviation identifies the country of the unit which is responsible for each card.

For specific information about the cards you can write an e-mail to the relevant unit, provided it has started its activity. Since CPhCl is a work in progress the units are continually developing their competence and skills. In the meantime you can write an e-mail to the central unit about the whole project or about cards that have not yet been attributed to a specific unit.

You should be aware that mistakes and shortcomings of various kinds are inevitable at this stage: we are sorry for them and very grateful for any suggestion on your part.

To display a file example click here
  • Total cards: 7428
  • Available cards: 902
  • Programmed cards: 6526
  • Last update: 13/09/2017

The CRANE Project: Computational Research on the Ancient Near East Project

[First posted in AWOL 13 December 2013, updated 23 September 2017]

The CRANE Project: Computational Research on the Ancient Near East Project
http://www.crane.utoronto.ca/images/crane.png

CRANE (Computational Research on the Ancient Near East) is an international and interdisciplinary research project that is changing our understanding of archaeology in the Near East.

Over 150 years of research – where humans developed agriculture,  interregional trade, the first sedentary communities, state-level societies and political networks – has resulted in a huge amount of complex and interrelated data ranging from settlement patterns to ceramics.

ArcheoNet BE

Ruben Willaert bvba werft aan

willaert3Ruben Willaert bvba is momenteel op zoek naar een junior archeoloog (m/v), intern op te leiden als RTS -medewerker. Hij/zij is onder meer verantwoordelijk voor de digitale opmetingen op het terrein, het invoeren van gegevens in de databank en de opmaak van kaartmateriaal. Het gaat om een contract van bepaalde duur (6 maanden), met kans op verlenging. Solliciteren voor deze functie kan nog tot en met 6 oktober.

Download de volledige vacature (pdf)

Archaeological News on Tumblr

Archaeologists: More protections needed for Chaco region

Archaeologists, professors and other researchers on Friday called for more protections of an...

Jim Davila (Paleojudaica.com)

The Hannibal pen series

<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/76IYf4piEg0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

Conference on Syriac in the Early Modern World

<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/Y132pViS4b8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

Congratulations to Dr. Jones

<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/nbXpBA_BFJ0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

Paul Barford (Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues)

To a Collector


I was contacted by a collector who also dabbles as a small-time dealer about some artefacts he had bought, he sent me photos and asked for an opinion. Whoah. Obviously slippery ground. He had stressed how 'responsible' he tries to be in buying, and for a number of reasons, I decided to answer him despite my misgivings, requesting that he does not use my opinion in any sales spiel. I am not going to post up my whole reply as I do not want to give the game away on what I think of the actual artefacts he showed me - primarily because I see nothing wrong with him selling them as almost all look from the photos to be fakes. I do not see anything particularly wrong with him selling them, because if I can see from his photos that they are fakes, a buyer who knows what he's looking at will too. The rest should just keep well away from the antiquities market. 'Caveat emptor and if he cannot properly caveat, he should buzz off because he'll only do damage' is my position. Anyway, here's part of my longer reply:
I am really sorry it has taken so much time to reply to your enquiry [...] Thanks for showing me these pieces. It’s an interesting challenge to say something about such items just from the photos, and of course in such cases I can only offer what is really a subjective opinion. Please do not quote my opinion in any sales offers.
You sent me seven photos asking for an opinion:[....] 
 [...]You tell me that [...] were sold by tarb2011. This seller seems to be offline at the moment, but has sold other objects which are ‘not-as-described’. But that does not mean everything he sells is fake, the middlemen who supply dealers mix fakes with authentic items. The purchase of antiquities on today’s market is very risky for a number of reasons. Take your [...] (if that is what it is). Bought from an online seller based in Dubai who has now disappeared (accountability?) who said it was found in Jordan. Now, while Dubai has rather lax laws about import and export of antiquities, Jordan has very strict ones. I bet Tarb2011 did not give you a photocopy of any export documents from Jordan, did he? And what if the object had been smuggled out of Egypt (after having been illegally excavated or removed from a museum store) by a Jordanian lorry driver taking agricultural produce across the border? On the other hand, if it is a fake, into whose money is Tarb2011 putting money? And so on. Even where the legalities are clear (and they often are not), the ethical issues are extremely foggy.
 One thing about beads, unless they have been excavated (legally or otherwise) from a grave, they are pretty difficult to find under normal conditions in Egypt. If they were excavated from a grave in the period after partition of excavation finds stopped (1920s) then they cannot be legally on the market (see below). I think we have to imagine how loose beads arrive on the market. Finding a small bead in the dust of the Egyptian western desert using the naked eye is actually quite difficult, the dust tends to cling to small objects. When it rains they are visible (but rain is very rare in the desert). Finding them in the agricultural soil of the Nile valley and delta is equally difficult. How, then, do we imagine hundreds of thousands of them are on the market?  A peasant may find four or five, a middleman may buy them and make up larger groups. That’s not a very good way of making money from something that is sold on to you for a few dollars… it could take him a few weeks or months to find enough to make up a batch big enough to attempt to smuggle out of Egypt (risks involved, bribes to be paid). Far more economical would be to find somebody (a local potter for example) who can make good copies of these minor antiquities, beads, amulets, shabtis and mix them in with some genuine artefacts and convince a dealer to buy the lot. Somehow those fakes will surface onto the market alongside the genuine ones…. Then there is the ‘old collection’ argument. We are told by all dealers that the items they sell are legal because they came from ‘an old collection’ made in the nineteenth or early twentieth century. But they will never give you documentation of that claim. A few moments thinking about it will show what a nonsense that is. I do not know how many antiquities collectors there are in the middle classes of the world’s richer countries (that is something for somebody to work out), but (a) collecting is easier now since the internet, and thus becoming more popular, (b) that middle class is expanding [...], and (c) the world population is expanding exponentially. So if today in Europe there are – let us say – 80 000 collectors or antiquities, and in the USA the same number, it is quite obvious that these collection cannot be supplied from artefacts coming from those collections made when there were many fewer collectors in the nineteenth century or even earlier twentieth century: http://www.kivu.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/human-pop-growth.jpg  we must also remember that part of the material from those earlier private collections disappeared due to war, simple neglect, and also donations to public collections. There is also a problem authenticating objects by comparing them with others (most easily online). Most of the objects online are being sold by dealers (who will all claim to be respectable/reputable) and know what they are selling (because of many years ‘experience’). So you would in many case be comparing objects being sold by one dealer with objects sold by another. But there are many fakes on the market, some are really obvious even to a novice. Some are pretty good fakes (and as such, collectable in their own right), but the disturbing thing is that there are an unknown number of fakes out there that are undetectable and will remain undetected. There is an interesting book you should know about if you do not already (I would suggest borrow/ read online rather than buy as it is the thesis that is important rather than the cases that ‘support’ it). This is Oscar Muscarella’s ‘The Lie became Great. The Forgery of AncientNear Eastern Cultures’ (2000). On a similar theme are several papers by my colleague David Gill and Christopher Chippindale: ‘Material and Intellectual Consequences of Esteem for Cycladic Figures’  American Journal of Archaeology Vol. 97, No. 4 (Oct., 1993), pp. 601-659 .  Both of these texts point out that the antiquities market, by paying no attention to documenting where items come from and how they arrive on the market, allow fakes to contaminate the available data so that we can no longer tell what is what. The same goes for museums, many of which created collections from what private collectors donated (or sold) them. Those collectors obtained the material from a number of (now unknown) sources and fake items enter even esteemed public collections. In the same way a dealer may have sold you an object as authentic even though another opinion will tell you on the basis of their knowledge and experience is not (in their opinion) authentic. A dealer tends to have experience of what is on the market – and some of the objects he is handling are fakes. So it is not important that he thinks a piece ‘looks right’, if he is comparing it with other items that ‘looked right’ even though some of them (though sold to him as authentic) were made in 1983 or 2012 in a garage in Beirut. The coin dealer who sold you those beads may have been cheating you, more likely he over-estimated his own ability to tell real from fake. 
The result of this is that we should be very aware that the market today, in order not to shrink, but instead continue expanding, therefore MUST contain very many objects which have ‘surfaced’ much more recently, either because they are freshly looted and smuggled, or have been newly-made to look old. There is no other way today’s market could exist. Paul Barford
 


James F. McGrath (Exploring Our Matrix)

88 Reasons Why The Rapture Will Be In 1988 (and not today)

Good morning, and welcome to yet another end of the world. As you have probably heard, the end of the world has been predicted as occurring today, as has been done so many times before. This time the one offering the prediction is a man named David Meade, and it involves the non-existent planet Nibiru. […]

Jim Davila (Paleojudaica.com)

Daniel in the manuscripts

<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/v2g-gIdkBRw" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

Bryn Mawr Classical Review

2017.09.42: La déesse Korè-Perséphone: mythe, culte et magie en Attique. Recherches sur les rhétoriques religieuses 18

Review of Alexandra Dimou, La déesse Korè-Perséphone: mythe, culte et magie en Attique. Recherches sur les rhétoriques religieuses 18. Turnhout: 2016. Pp. 552. €90.00. ISBN 9782503565088.

2017.09.41: Le funzioni del silenzio nella Grecia antica: antropologia, poesia, storiografia, teatro: Convegno del Centro internazionale di studi sulla cultura della Grecia antica: Urbino, 9-10 ottobre 2014. Biblioteca di "Quaderni urbinati di cultura classica," 12

Review of Paola Angeli Bernardini, Le funzioni del silenzio nella Grecia antica: antropologia, poesia, storiografia, teatro: Convegno del Centro internazionale di studi sulla cultura della Grecia antica: Urbino, 9-10 ottobre 2014. Biblioteca di "Quaderni urbinati di cultura classica," 12. Pisa; Roma: 2015. Pp. 232. €72.00 (pb). ISBN 9788862278294.

Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

MUSIWACAER Reminder. Abstract, photo Deadline

musiwacaer-reminder-abstract-photo-deadline

Deadline for submitting the abstracts of the works to be presented at the Musiwacaer Conference (Mosaic, Lime and Ceramic: Art and Science) was postponed to October 13, 2017. You can find instructions and abstract template on website www.musiwa.org (International Conference, abstract submission).

Compitum - événements (tous types)

Census. Recenser et identifier les manuscrits par langue et par pays

Titre: Census. Recenser et identifier les manuscrits par langue et par pays
Lieu: IRHT, centre Félix Grat / Paris
Catégorie: Colloques, journées d'études
Date: 12.10.2017 - 13.10.2017
Heure: 18.30 h
Description:

Information signalée par Jacques Elfassi

 

Census. Recenser et identifier les manuscrits par langue et par pays

Paris, 12-13 octobre 2017

 

La rencontre internationale « Census », du 12 au 13 octobre 2017, réunit de nombreux experts européens, du monde universitaire et des bibliothèques, pour réfléchir aux pratiques actuelles de recensement des manuscrits au sein des bases de données de référence et au sein des catalogues en ligne de bibliothèques. Ce partage d’expériences est l’occasion de mettre en lumière les nouveaux enjeux de recherche et les améliorations proposées au sein des différents outils et catalogues.

Les entreprises de recensement et de catalogage des manuscrits sont aujourd’hui en pleine évolution : les travaux sur support papier sont accompagnés, et de plus en plus souvent supplantés, par des outils électroniques.

Face à l’extrême diversité des solutions techniques et des modes de description mis en oeuvre, nous proposons une réflexion collective associant les chercheurs et les établissements de conservation. Le but de la rencontre, dont l’occasion est fournie par le 80e anniversaire de l’IRHT, est d’abord de confronter les expériences dans les divers pays et les divers champs linguistiques, afin de réfléchir ensemble aux moyens de mutualiser et de mettre en lien recensements et descriptions de manuscrits par langues, par pays, par type de manuscrits.

Ce colloque est organisé par François Bougard, Matthieu Cassin (IRHT) et Amandine Postec (BnF) en partenariat et avec le soutien de l’École pratique des hautes études (EA SAPRAT) et des laboratoires d'excellence HASTEC et RESMED.

Programme

Jeudi 12 octobre – Salle Jeanne-Vielliard, IRHT, Paris 16e

  • 9h15 – Accueil
  • 9h30 – Introduction : François Bougard et Matthieu Cassin (IRHT)

Recenser les manuscrits par langue : langues anciennes et médiévales – Présidence : François Bougard (IRHT)

  • 9h45 – M. Depauw (KU Leuven) : Trismegistos: cataloguing all ancient texts (BC 800 BC - AD 800)
  • 10h15 – M. Cassin (IRHT) : Pinakes (recenser et décrire les manuscrits grecs) et Diktyon (identifier les manuscrits grecs)

10h45 – Pause

Présidence : Brigitte Mondrain (SAPRAT, EPHE)

  • 11h – M. Rosenau (Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Göttingen) : Digital Coptic – DH Projects in Coptic Studies
  • 11h30 – A. Binggeli (IRHT) : E-ktobe : une base pour les manuscrits syriaques
  • 12h – J. Olszowy-Schlanger (SAPRAT, EPHE, IRHT) – Classer les manuscrits hébreux par leur aire de production : enjeux et problèmes méthodologiques

Recenser les manuscrits par pays – Présidence : Claudia Fabian (Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, München)

  • 14h – R. Giel (Berlin, Staatsbibl. zu Berlin – Preussischer Kulturbesitz, Handschriftenabteilung) : Cultural objects and descriptions. Towards a new German Manuscript Portal
  • 14h30 – Ch. Flueler (Université de Fribourg) : Local – National – Global : How e-codices has made a national manuscript portal in Switzerland
  • 15h – Ch. Glassner (Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften) : manuscripta.at – Manuscrits médiévaux en Autriche
  • 15h30 – L. Fagin Davis (Medieval Academy of America) : Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts in North America : Identification, Digitization, and Discoverability

16h – Pause

Présidence – Pierre-Jean Riamond (Ministère de la Culture)

  • 16h20 – M. Maniaci (Università degli studi di Cassino) : Documentare i manoscritti greci d'Italia : riflessioni in margine ad un lavoro in corso
  • 16h50 – L. Negrini (ICCU, Roma) : Nuovi strumenti per la catalogazione in ManusOnLine: le Linee Guida per l’Authority File e la tastiera virtuale
  • 17h20 – A. Postec (BnF), C. Poiret (CCFr), P. Latour (Calames) : Recenser et décrire les manuscrits des bibliothèques publiques de France : les catalogues en ligne

Vendredi 13 octobre – Petit auditorium de la Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris 13e

  • 9h30 – Accueil et Introduction : Isabelle le Masne de Chermont (BnF)

Recenser les manuscrits par langue : langues modernes – Présidence : Isabelle le Masne de Chermont (BnF)

  • 9h45 – N. Busch (Universität Siegen) : Handschriftencensus. Medieval German Manuscripts
  • 10h15 – M.-L. Savoye (IRHT) : Les deux visages de Jonas : répertoire « exhaustif » des manuscrits contenant du français ou de l’occitan et outils d'analyse de corpus de recherche

10h45 – Pause

Présidence : Marie-Laure Savoye (IRHT)

  • 11h – G. Avenoza (Universitat de Barcelona) : Philobiblon (péninsule Ibérique : espagnol, catalan, galicien et portugais)
  • 11h30 – S. Bertelli (Università degli studi di Ferrara) : Les manuscrits de la littérature italienne des origines : une mise à jour
  • 12h – A. Bouwman (University Library, Leiden) et B. Besamusca (Universiteit Utrecht) : The Past, Present and Future of the Bibliotheca Neerlandica Manuscripta (BNM)

Ressources transversales et projets en cours – Présidence : Charlotte Denoël (BnF)

  • 14h – B. Giffard (IRHT, Biblissima), A.-M. Turcan (SAPRAT, EPHE, Biblissima) : Biblissima
  • 14h30 – C. Fabian (Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, München) : Les manuscrits en réseau – réinvention, réorganisation et visibilité dans un nouvel écosystème
  • 15h – M. Cassin et H. Seng (IRHT) : Pour des identifiants uniques des manuscrits (ISMSN) : présentation d’un projet en cours

15h30 – Pause

Présidence : Anne-Marie Turcan (SAPRAT, EPHE, Biblissima)

  • 16h – Ch. Denoël et F. Siri (BnF) : Le programme Polonsky (BnF-British Library) : aspects scientifiques et interopérabilité des métadonnées
  • 16h30 – M. Bonicel (BnF) – L’innovation au service du partage des données : IIIF à la BnF
  • 17h – Conclusions


Jeudi 12 octobre 2017
Institut de recherche et d’histoire des textes
Site Iéna, Salle Jeanne-Vielliard
40 avenue d’Iéna, 75116 Paris

Vendredi 13 octobre 2017
Bibliothèque nationale de France,
Petit auditorium du site François Mitterrand
avenue de France, 75013 Paris

Source : IRHT

 

 

 

Salimbene de Adam e la «Cronica»

Titre: Salimbene de Adam e la «Cronica»
Lieu: Palazzi Comunali / Todi
Catégorie: Colloques, journées d'études
Date: 08.10.2017 - 10.10.2017
Heure: 18.00 h
Description:

Information signalée par Jacques Elfassi

Cinquantaquattresimo Convegno storico internazionale

Salimbene de Adam e la «Cronica»

Todi, 8 - 10 ottobre 2017


PROGRAMMA
DOMENICA 8 OTTOBRE
Presso la Sala del Consiglio - Palazzi Comunali
Ore 10,30 — Cerimonia di apertura del Convegno
Ore 11,00 — Relazione Menestò, La figura di Salimbene de Adam

Presso la Sala Affrescata del Museo - Palazzi Comunali
Ore 15,30 — Relazione Brufani, Salimbene de Adam frate Minore
Ore 16,00 — Relazione Giovè, Il manoscritto della Cronica
Ore 16,45 — Relazione Cremascoli, Le fonti bibliche
Ore 17,15 — Discussione sulle relazioni Brufani, Giovè, Cremascoli

LUNEDÌ 9 OTTOBRE
Ore 9,00 — Relazione Bartòla, Salimbene e i suoi autori: compresenze e intertestualità nella Cronica
Ore 9,30 — Relazione Gamberini, Sicardo di Cremona: un cronista universale tra le fonti di Salimbene
Ore 10,00 — Relazione Scalia, L’edizione della Cronica: problemi e soluzioni
Ore 10,45 — Relazione Besson, «Vidi per somnium»: le vocabulaire du sommeil, du rêve et de la vision chez Salimbene
Ore 11,15 — Relazione Bourgain, Langue et style chez Salimbene, entre prétentions savantes et spontanéité
Ore 11,45 — Discussione sulle relazioni Bartòla, Gamberini, Scalia, Besson, Bourgain
Ore 15,00 — Relazione Bisanti, La fortuna della Cronica
Ore 15,30 — Relazione Zabbia, La cronachistica cittadina e Salimbene de Adam
Ore 16,00 — Relazione Nobili, La Cronica e la pluralità dei generi letterari
Ore 16,45 — Relazione Ronzani, Salimbene tra poteri universali e realtà comunali
Ore 17,15 — Relazione Dolso, Frati Mendicanti e città nella Cronica
Ore 17,45 — Discussione sulle relazioni Bisanti, Zabbia, Nobili, Ronzani, Dolso

MARTEDÌ 10 OTTOBRE
Ore 9,00 — Relazione Montesano, Profezie e visioni
Ore 9,30 — Relazione Santi, Spiritualità e letteratura in Salimbene
Ore 10,00 — Relazione Paravicini Bagliani, Salimbene e la natura
Ore 10,30 — Discussione sulle relazioni Montesano, Santi, Paravicini Bagliani
Ore 11,00 — Grado Giovanni Merlo, Conclusioni

Source : CISAM

Sirmium chrétienne

Titre: Sirmium chrétienne
Lieu: MESHS / Lille
Catégorie: Séminaires, conférences
Date: 05.10.2017
Heure: 18.00 h
Description:

Information signalée par Dominic Moreau

Édition 2017-2018 du Séminaire de l'UMR 8164-HALMA sur Constantinople dans l'Antiquité tardive

Constantinople, Rome et la défense de la pars Orientis

 

2017

Rome, le modèle de Constantinople (2e partie)

28 septembre – Introduction / Le Liber pontificalis (3e partie) / Les basiliques de Rome – D. Moreau

5 octobre à 18h, en salle 2 de la MESHS (Lille) – Conférence sur les Balkans : Sirmium chrétienne – Ivana Popović (Institut archéologique de Belgrade)

26 octobre – Rome au VIe siècle – D. Moreau

Constantinople et la défense de la pars Orientis

23 novembre – Considérations introductives : les sources de l'histoire militaire protobyzantine – Dominic Moreau

21 décembre – Le limes est-il une réalité historique ? – Dominic Moreau

2018

16 janvier – Les Horrea et l'armée romaine de la pars Orientis : l'exemple des Balkans – Javier Arce

23 janvier – Conférence : Structures et évolutions de l'armée romaine tardive (IVe-VIe siècles) – Sylvain Janniard (Unviersité François-Rabelais de Tours)

30 janvier – Les donativa à l'armée dans l'Antiquité tardive – Javier Arce

6 février – Conférence : Antioche, le centre névralgique de l'Orient – Grégoire Poccardi ** date à confirmer

13 février – Les scholae palatinae: troupes au service de l'Empereur – Javier Arce

20 février – Les illustrations de la Notitia dignitatum: étude iconographique (1ère partie) – Dominic Moreau et Javier Arce

6 mars – Les illustrations de la Notitia dignitatum: étude iconographique (2e partie) – Dominic Moreau et Javier Arce

13 mars – Conférencier invité ** (sous réserve)

20 mars – Conférence sur Constantinople : Statues et références au monde païen dans l'illustration de la ville de Constantinople - Bernadette Cabouret-Laurioux (Université Jean Moulin - Lyon 3)

27 mars – Conférence : Tableau général des fortifications en Orient – Brahim M'Barek (Eveha, Strasbourg) ** date à confirmer

4 avril – Une forteresse parmi tant d'autres : Zaldapa – Dominic Moreau

10 avril – Conférence : Fortifications et armée dans le Code théodosien – Pierre Jaillette ** date à confirmer

17 avril – Conclusion : « La grande stratégie de l'Empire romain tardif » – Javier Arce et Dominic Moreau

Lieu de la manifestation : Villeneuve d'Ascq, Univ. Lille 3, Bât. E, salle de séminaire HALMA
Organisation : Dominic Moreau et Javier Arce
Contact : marie-pierre.sampson[at]univ-lille3.fr

Ce qui se murmure à la villa Kerylos

Titre: Ce qui se murmure à la villa Kerylos
Lieu: ENS Ulm / Paris
Catégorie: Séminaires, conférences
Date: 26.09.2017
Heure: 20.45 h - 22.30 h
Description:

Information signalée par Mathilde Simon

Ce qui se murmure à la villa Kerylos

 

soirée de rentrée du département des Sciences de l'Antiquité de l'ENS, discussion et intermèdes musicaux autour de la Villa Kérylos.
Avec Karol Beffa, Adrien Goetz, Agnès Rouveret, Véronique Schiltz

Lieu de la manifestation : Paris, Ecole normale supérieure, salle des Actes
Organisation : Bérénice Bouty, Mathilde Simon, Agathe Bonnin
Contact : mmahe[at]ens.fr

Colloque Relire Tite-Live, 2000 ans après

Titre: Colloque Relire Tite-Live, 2000 ans après
Lieu: Université Paris Ouest - Nanterre - La Défense / Nanterre
Catégorie: Colloques, journées d'études
Date: 05.10.2017 - 06.10.2017
Heure: 17.00 h - 18.30 h
Description:

Information signalée par Pauline Duchêne

Colloque Relire Tite-Live, 2000 ans après

 

Jeudi 5 (Nanterre, bâtiment M. Weber)

MATIN

09h : Accueil des participants

09h15 : mot d'accueil d'Etienne Wolff

09h25 : Introduction (Charles Guittard, Mathilde Simon, Marine Miquel)


1/ L'Ab Vrbe condita : autour d'un texte

09h45 : Stephen Oakley :  Livy and the battle of Cannae

10h05 : Georgios Vassiliades : « La mort de Tite-Live, la mort d'Auguste et la publication des livres CXXI-CLXII de l'Ab Vrbe condita »


2/ L'histoire romaine revue et corrigée par Tite-Live

10h25 : Jean-Paul Thuillier : « Tite-Live, I, 35 : equi pugilesque »

10h45-11h05 : discussion
11h05-11h20 : pause

11h20 : Gaius Stern : « Livy on prisonners of war in the early days of the Republic »

11h40 : Alexandr Koptev : « Early legislative practice and the leges sacratae in Livy »

12h : Dominique Briquel : « Les vengeurs romains des Fourches caudines »


12h20-12h40 : discussion

12h40 : déjeuner


APRÈS-MIDI


14h30 : Alain Meurant : Place et rôle du schéma de la violence mimétique dans le premier livre de Tite-Live



3/ L'Ab Vrbe condita, de la République au Principat : quelle philosophie livienne du pouvoir ?


14h50 : Michèle Ducos : « Une remarquable élection (Tite-Live, XXVI, 22) »

15h10 : Fanny Cailleux : « Le thème du refus du pouvoir chez Tite-Live : du rejet des honneurs à la recusatio imperii »


15h30-15h50 : discussion
15h50-16h05 : pause


16h05 : Régine Utard : « Tite-Live et l'imperium Romanum : analyse et signification de la défaite de Persée aux livres XLIV et XLV de l'Ab Vrbe condita ».

16h25 : Elisa Della Calce, Simone Mollea : « Humanitas liviana e imperium Romanum : una relazione possibile »


16h45-17h05 : discussion
17h05 : fin de la première journée



Vendredi 6 (ENS Paris, salle Dussane)

MATIN


4/ L'écriture de l'histoire au carrefour de choix littéraires et idéologiques :

09h : Alexandre Grandazzi : « Les rois de Rome selon Tite-Live : une galerie d'archétypes ? »

09h20 : Nicolas Meunier : « La représentation narrative de Spurius Cassius : un personnage aux multiples contradictions »

09h40 : Oliviers Devillers : « La bataille d'Herdonéa (210 a. J.-C.) : un exemple d'itinéraire de l'information »

10h-10h20 : discussion
10h20-10h35 : pause

10h35 : Luca Beltramini : « La voce dei vinti, Capua e Siracusa nella terza decade di Livio »

10h55 : Vincenzo Casapulla : « Storia e oratoria in Livio : il caso di studio di Pleminio nel libro XXIX »

11h15 : Pierre-Luc Brisson : « Le rôle de Flamininus dans la quatrième décade de Tite-Live : perspectives sur le héros romain livien »

11h35-11h55 : discussion
11h55 : déjeuner


APRÈS-MIDI


14h30 : Lisa Méry : Enargeia et écriture picturale dans l'Ab Vrbe condita : l'exemple des récits de batailles


5/ Postérités liviennes

14h50 : Thomas Baier : Le bellum iustum chez Tite-Live

15h10-15h30 : discussion
15h30-15h45 : pause

15h45 : Christophe Burgeon : « Les Punica de Silius Italicus et la tradition livienne »
16h05 : Vasileios Pappas : « Livy in Greek : the transmission of Ab Vrbe condita in Greece »

16h05-16h25 : discussion
16h25-16h40 : pause

16h40 : Conclusion (Charles Guittard, Pauline Duchêne)

Lieu de la manifestation : Nanterre (Université Paris Nanterre), Paris (ENS)
Organisation : Ch. Guittard, E. Wolff, M. Simon, P. Duchêne, M. Miquel
Contact : pduchenepro[at]gmail.com

Que faire de l'Iliade ?

Titre: Que faire de l'Iliade ?
Lieu: Lycée Louis-le-Grand / Paris
Catégorie: Séminaires, conférences
Date: 10.10.2017
Heure: 18.30 h
Description:

Information signalée par Cecilia Suzzoni

Que faire de l'Iliade ?

 

Conférence de Pierre Judet de La Combe, Helléniste, Directeur d'études à l'EHESS, auteur de L'Avenir des Anciens. Oser lire les Grecs et les Latins :

"Que faire de l'Iliade ?"

Mardi 10 octobre 2017 à 18h30
Lycée Louis-le-Grand Paris 75005

Lieu de la manifestation : Paris Louis -le-Grand
Organisation : Association ALLE
Contact : contacter.alle[at]gmail.com

La réception d'Ausone dans les littératures européennes

Titre: La réception d'Ausone dans les littératures européennes
Lieu: Université Paris Ouest - Nanterre - La Défense / Nanterre
Catégorie: Colloques, journées d'études
Date: 26.10.2017 - 27.10.2017
Heure: 18.30 h
Description:

Information signalée par Étienne Wolff

La réception d'Ausone dans les littératures européennes

Université Paris Nanterre, Bâtiment Max Weber
jeudi 26 et vendredi 27 octobre 2017

Colloque international


Organisé par Étienne WOLFF, Équipe THEMAM, UMR 7041 ArScAn
Contact : ewolff[at]parisnanterre.fr


Jeudi 26 octobre
9h00 accueil et introduction

Matin 6 communications

Présidence : Virginie Leroux

9h30 Jean-Louis Charlet (Aix-Marseille) : « La réception d'Ausone par Claudien »
10h00 Marco Onorato (Messine) : « L'arte della concinnatio da Ausonio a Sidonio Apollinare »
10h30 Sara Fascione (Naples) : « Si bene quid facias, facias cito. Gli ‘adagi' di Ausonio »

Pause

Présidence : Jean-Louis Charlet

11h30 Franz Dolveck (Genève) : « Qui a connu Ausone au Moyen Âge ? »
12h00 Frédéric Duplessis (Fondation Thiers, Paris) : « Diffusion et réception médiévales des épigrammes d'Ausone consacrées à Diogène »
12h30 Luciana Furbetta (Rome) : « De Paul Diacre à Alain de Lille : aperçus de recherche sur la présence cachée d'Ausone dans le Moyen Âge (textes, intertextes, contextes) »

Pause 13h00-14h30

Après-midi 6 communications

Présidence : Marisa Squillante

14h30 Armando Bisanti (Palerme) : « Petrarca e Ausonio »
15h00 Camille Bonnan-Garçon (Lyon) et Gaëtan Lecoindre (Rouen) : « En aspice lusus. Sannazar, lecteur d'Ausone ? Le jeu de la citation dans les Eclogae Piscatoriae »
15h30 Hélène Cazes (Victoria) : « Les renaissances du Centon Nuptial d'Ausone »

Pause

Présidence : Hélène Cazes

16h30 Stefano Di Brazzano (Trieste) : « L'influsso degli epigrammi ausoniani ex Graeco sulle riscritture latine umanistiche di epigrammi planudei »
17h00 Anne Vial-Logeay (Rouen) : « Naissance des roses : traductions et recréations »
17h30 Marisa Squillante (Naples) : « Elapsam disces me tibi de manibus. Un' ‘occasione' inafferrabile »

Vendredi 27 octobre

Matin 6 communications

Présidence Giampiero Scafoglio

9h00 Sylvie Fontaine (Dijon) : « L'Ausone du sodalitium Lugdunense »
9h30 Andrea Balbo (Turin) : « Scrittori tradotti da scrittori (e disegnatori): Giuseppe Pontiggia e Leo Lionni alle prese con la Mosella di Ausonio »
10h00 Florence Garambois-Vasquez (Saint-Étienne) : « La postérité des épigrammes ausoniennes sur Écho et sur Occasion »

Pause

Présidence : Sylvie Fontaine

11h00 Virginie Leroux (EPHE, Paris) : « Des Césars romains aux Césars germaniques : fortune des Caesares d'Ausone chez Caspar Ursinus Velius, Georgius Sabinus et Jacobus Micyllus »
11h30 Marie-Françoise Caumont (Nice) : « Une étape dans la fortune de la Bissula d'Ausone dans la littérature contemporaine : le roman de Felix Dahn »
12h00 Giampiero Scafoglio (Nice) : « Ausone et Bissula dans le roman Danube de Claudio Magris »

12h30 conclusion du colloque

Lieu de la manifestation : Université Paris Nanterre
Organisation : Etienne WOLFF
Contact : ewolff[at]parisnanterre.fr

La Main et l'Écrit (2e journée)

Titre: La Main et l'Écrit (2e journée)
Lieu: Maison Méditerranéenne des Sciences de l'Homme / Aix-en-Provence
Catégorie: Séminaires, conférences
Date: 06.10.2017
Heure: 18.00 h
Description:

Information signalée par Patricia Zuntow

Atelier doctoral inter-laboratoires "La Main et l'Écrit, approches et méthodes pour l'étude des sources écrites"

mardi 3 octobre et vendredi 6 octobre

 



L'atelier doctoral “La Main et l'Écrit” entend initier les étudiants d'Aix Marseille Université (étudiants de masters, doctorants, post-doctorants), et tous les publics qui le souhaiteraient, à la diversité des écrits produits dans l'Histoire avant l'ère typographique, et à la diversité des approches quant à leur étude scientifique, dans les domaines disciplinaires relevant de l'UFR Arts Langues Lettres et Sciences humaines.

Cet atelier se déroule sur deux jours, une fois par semestre, selon une programmation thématique. Il représente une initiation à l'analyse -par les méthodes et les approches de la recherche actuelle - d'artefacts portant de l'écrit (principalement des documents et codices, mais pas uniquement), datant de l'Antiquité, du Moyen Âge jusqu'à l'invention de l'imprimerie. Il s'agira par exemple de présenter les protocoles d'observation, en codicologie et en paléographie, en diplomatique, en épigraphie, dans le but de l'édition et de l'étude philologique, de l'histoire et/ou de l'histoire des textes, de la transmission des textes, littéraires ou non. La question du devenir des ‘objets manuscrits' au moment de l'invention de l'imprimerie et à l'heure du numérique pourra être abordée.

Les intervenants présenteront des introductions méthodologiques et des recherches ou un travail d'observation réalisé sur une source si possible disponible en région PACA, ou qu'il juge intéressantes de valoriser et qui fait écho à ses recherches.
Des présentations théoriques et des mises en situation concrètes d'enquête scientifique au contact des documents visibles en archives ou bibliothèques partenaires seront organisées.

Coordinatrice de l'atelier
Élodie Attia, chargée de recherche, AMU - attia@mmsh.univ-aix.fr
Projet ANR “Manuscripta Bibliae Hebraicae” projet qui dispose d'un volet “diffusion des savoirs”
https://mbh.hypotheses.org/

Frais d'inscriptions : gratuit pour les étudiants AMU. 40 euros pour les externes.
Date limite d'inscription : 30 septembre 2017.

Inscription avant le 30/09, auprès d'Élodie Attia (attention nombre de places limitées) : attia@mmsh.univ-aix.fr
Les doctorants AMU doivent s'inscrivent directement sur la plateforme ADUM : https://www.adum.fr/index.pl


PROGRAMME PREMIÈRE SESSION OCTOBRE 2017

- Téléchargez le programme version PDF

MARDI 3 OCTOBRE 2017

Matinée - Maison méditerranéenne des sciences de l'homme Salle Georges Duby - 5 Rue Château de l'Horloge, 13090 Aix-en-Provence

>9h-12h | Élodie Attia, Christian Boudignon, Aix Marseille Université
Centre Paul-Albert Février - Textes et documents de la Méditerranée antique et médiévale, AMU, CNRS
- Les manuscrits avant l'invention de l'imprimerie, leur support, les méthodes de préparation des codices et leur signification ; exemples : codices hébreux (Bible) et codices grecs (palimpsestes)

>12h-13h | Pause déjeuner (offerte aux participants)

Après-midi - Bibliothèque Méjanes, Aix-en-Provence 8 Rue des Allumettes, 13100 Aix-en-Provence

>14h-15h | Élodie Attia, Christian Boudignon, Aix Marseille Université
Centre Paul-Albert Février - Textes et documents de la Méditerranée antique et médiévale, AMU, CNRS
- Mise en pratique : petites enquêtes sur différents manuscrits conservés à la Bibliothèque Méjanes

>15h-17h | Valérie Lauze, Aix Marseille Université
Centre interdisciplinaire d'étude des littératures d'Aix-Marseille (CIELAM), AMU
Florence Boulc'h, Aix Marseille Université
- Matériaux Divisés, Interfaces, Réactivité, Electrochimie (MADIREL), AMU, CNRS
Le manuscrit 1800 de la bibliothèque Méjanes – une analyse croisée littérature/chimie


VENDREDI 6 OCTOBRE 2017

Matinée - Archives départementales 13 - Marseille 18, rue Mirès 13003 Marseille

>9h-10h30 | Claude Denjean, Université de Perpignan
Centre de recherche sur les sociétés et les environnements méditerranéens, Université de Perpignan
- Du réemploi du papier à la découverte de nouvelles sources documentaires : les documents de Perpignan et Gérone

>10h30-12h | Brigitte Marino, CNRS
Institut de recherches et d'études sur le monde arabe et musulman (IREMAM), AMU, CNRS
- Écrire dans les registres ottomans de Damas

>12h-13h | Pause déjeuner (offerte aux participants)

Après-midi - AD13, Marseille

>14h-17h | Anne Mailloux, Aix Marseille Université
Laboratoire d'archéologie médiévale et moderne en Méditerranée (LA3M), AMU, CNRS
Élodie Attia, Aix Marseille Université
Centre Paul-Albert Février - Textes et documents de la Méditerranée antique et médiévale, AMU, CNRS
- Mise en pratique : protocoles d'enquête sur les papiers et documents conservés aux AD13


Prochaine session, Avril 2018 : La graphie. Écrire, avec quoi, comment, pourquoi ?

Lieu de la manifestation : Aix en Provence
Organisation : Elodie ATTIA
Contact : Elodie ATTIA

La Main et l'Écrit

Titre: La Main et l'Écrit
Lieu: Maison Méditerranéenne des Sciences de l'Homme / Aix-en-Provence
Catégorie: Séminaires, conférences
Date: 03.10.2017
Heure: 17.00 h - 18.30 h
Description:

Information signalée par Patricia Zuntow

Atelier doctoral inter-laboratoires "La Main et l'Écrit, approches et méthodes pour l'étude des sources écrites"

mardi 3 octobre et vendredi 6 octobre

 



L'atelier doctoral “La Main et l'Écrit” entend initier les étudiants d'Aix Marseille Université (étudiants de masters, doctorants, post-doctorants), et tous les publics qui le souhaiteraient, à la diversité des écrits produits dans l'Histoire avant l'ère typographique, et à la diversité des approches quant à leur étude scientifique, dans les domaines disciplinaires relevant de l'UFR Arts Langues Lettres et Sciences humaines.

Cet atelier se déroule sur deux jours, une fois par semestre, selon une programmation thématique. Il représente une initiation à l'analyse -par les méthodes et les approches de la recherche actuelle - d'artefacts portant de l'écrit (principalement des documents et codices, mais pas uniquement), datant de l'Antiquité, du Moyen Âge jusqu'à l'invention de l'imprimerie. Il s'agira par exemple de présenter les protocoles d'observation, en codicologie et en paléographie, en diplomatique, en épigraphie, dans le but de l'édition et de l'étude philologique, de l'histoire et/ou de l'histoire des textes, de la transmission des textes, littéraires ou non. La question du devenir des ‘objets manuscrits' au moment de l'invention de l'imprimerie et à l'heure du numérique pourra être abordée.

Les intervenants présenteront des introductions méthodologiques et des recherches ou un travail d'observation réalisé sur une source si possible disponible en région PACA, ou qu'il juge intéressantes de valoriser et qui fait écho à ses recherches.
Des présentations théoriques et des mises en situation concrètes d'enquête scientifique au contact des documents visibles en archives ou bibliothèques partenaires seront organisées.

Coordinatrice de l'atelier
Élodie Attia, chargée de recherche, AMU - attia@mmsh.univ-aix.fr
Projet ANR “Manuscripta Bibliae Hebraicae” projet qui dispose d'un volet “diffusion des savoirs”
https://mbh.hypotheses.org/

Frais d'inscriptions : gratuit pour les étudiants AMU. 40 euros pour les externes.
Date limite d'inscription : 30 septembre 2017.

Inscription avant le 30/09, auprès d'Élodie Attia (attention nombre de places limitées) : attia@mmsh.univ-aix.fr
Les doctorants AMU doivent s'inscrivent directement sur la plateforme ADUM : https://www.adum.fr/index.pl


PROGRAMME PREMIÈRE SESSION OCTOBRE 2017

- Téléchargez le programme version PDF

MARDI 3 OCTOBRE 2017

Matinée - Maison méditerranéenne des sciences de l'homme Salle Georges Duby - 5 Rue Château de l'Horloge, 13090 Aix-en-Provence

>9h-12h | Élodie Attia, Christian Boudignon, Aix Marseille Université
Centre Paul-Albert Février - Textes et documents de la Méditerranée antique et médiévale, AMU, CNRS
- Les manuscrits avant l'invention de l'imprimerie, leur support, les méthodes de préparation des codices et leur signification ; exemples : codices hébreux (Bible) et codices grecs (palimpsestes)

>12h-13h | Pause déjeuner (offerte aux participants)

Après-midi - Bibliothèque Méjanes, Aix-en-Provence 8 Rue des Allumettes, 13100 Aix-en-Provence

>14h-15h | Élodie Attia, Christian Boudignon, Aix Marseille Université
Centre Paul-Albert Février - Textes et documents de la Méditerranée antique et médiévale, AMU, CNRS
- Mise en pratique : petites enquêtes sur différents manuscrits conservés à la Bibliothèque Méjanes

>15h-17h | Valérie Lauze, Aix Marseille Université
Centre interdisciplinaire d'étude des littératures d'Aix-Marseille (CIELAM), AMU
Florence Boulc'h, Aix Marseille Université
- Matériaux Divisés, Interfaces, Réactivité, Electrochimie (MADIREL), AMU, CNRS
Le manuscrit 1800 de la bibliothèque Méjanes – une analyse croisée littérature/chimie


VENDREDI 6 OCTOBRE 2017

Matinée - Archives départementales 13 - Marseille 18, rue Mirès 13003 Marseille

>9h-10h30 | Claude Denjean, Université de Perpignan
Centre de recherche sur les sociétés et les environnements méditerranéens, Université de Perpignan
- Du réemploi du papier à la découverte de nouvelles sources documentaires : les documents de Perpignan et Gérone

>10h30-12h | Brigitte Marino, CNRS
Institut de recherches et d'études sur le monde arabe et musulman (IREMAM), AMU, CNRS
- Écrire dans les registres ottomans de Damas

>12h-13h | Pause déjeuner (offerte aux participants)

Après-midi - AD13, Marseille

>14h-17h | Anne Mailloux, Aix Marseille Université
Laboratoire d'archéologie médiévale et moderne en Méditerranée (LA3M), AMU, CNRS
Élodie Attia, Aix Marseille Université
Centre Paul-Albert Février - Textes et documents de la Méditerranée antique et médiévale, AMU, CNRS
- Mise en pratique : protocoles d'enquête sur les papiers et documents conservés aux AD13


Prochaine session, Avril 2018 : La graphie. Écrire, avec quoi, comment, pourquoi ?

Lieu de la manifestation : Aix en Provence
Organisation : Elodie ATTIA
Contact : Elodie ATTIA

Archaeology Magazine

Archaeologists Search for Oxford's Ancient Past

OXFORD, UNITED KINGDOM—Researchers from Oxford Archaeology have uncovered a 6,000-year-old stone flake that a neolithic hunter may have whittled from a flint tool, according to a report in the Oxford Mail. They will seek to discover more clues to Oxfordshire's ancient past as they begin to excavate 200 trenches across South Oxford ahead of construction of a flood alleviation channel. The area that is now Oxford has history that goes back millenia and was mostly wet marshland until the Normans drained much of it sometime in the 11th and 12th centuries. The team also hopes to learn more about the Oxen Ford, the original route that gave Oxford it's name, long thought by scholars to have been covered by the city's Medieval-era North Hinksey Causeway. To read more about archaeology in England, go to “The Scientist's Garden.

Black Sea's Dead Zone Reveals Shipwrecks

Photogrammetric model of a Byzantine wreck with Surveyor ROV Credit Rodrigo Pacheco Ruiz.jpg SIA JPG fit to width XLSOZOPOL, BULGARIA—Underwater archaeologists have spotted dozens of Roman, Byzantine, and Ottoman shipwrecks in the Black Sea off the coast of Bulgaria, Newsweek reports. The Black Sea Maritime Project (MAP), a two-year investigation of Bulgaria's Black Sea coast, seeks to document shipbuilding and port activity in the waters dating back 2,500 years. Since beginning the project in 2015, researchers have ventured as deep as 5,900 feet and have benefited from the unique composition of the Black Sea. The lower levels of the sea are anoxic, meaning that they do not contain oxygen and therefore provide an ideal environment for preserving wood, metal, and other materials that are damaged in oxygenated water. In addition to remaining uniquely well preserved, according to the team, the diverse range of styles of the vessels they have found attests to Bulgaria's location as a geographic and cultural crossroads throughout the centuries. To read more about the archaeology of shipwrecks, go to “History's 10 Greatest Wrecks.”

September 22, 2017

Archaeology Magazine

Nero Tiles Discovered in England

England Nero Tiles DiscoveredENGLEFIELD, ENGLAND—A number of artifacts bearing the stamp of the Roman emperor Nero have been discovered at a tile production site at the Englefield Estate in southern England, according to a report from the Basingstoke Observer. The three Nero tiles were found during excavation of a series of Roman kiln structure that include large brick and tile production facilities. The project’s director, Mike Fulford, of the University of Reading, noted that the kilns were very well preserved and the scale of the operation suggested the Roman military had a role in running it. Nero was emperor from A.D. 54-68 and renowned for his extravagance and tyranny. There is no record of Nero having visited England, but the new discoveries at the site suggest a link to the nearby Roman town of Silchester. To read more about Roman England, go to “A Villa under the Garden.”

Megalithic Tombs Discovered in India

India Dolmens

 

KRISHNAGIRI, INDIA—The Times of India reports that researchers have discovered more than 300 megalithic tombs on a rocky hilltop in the southern state of Tamil Nadu. A team from the Aram Historical Research Center made the discovery, and speculates that the dolmens may date back some 3,000 years, to India’s Iron Age. The large size of the tombs suggests they may have once held the remains of village headmen. The team is now working to secure government protection of the dolmens, since most of them have sustained damage at the hands of vandals. To read more about Iron Age megalithic monuments in India, go to “India’s Village of the Dead.”

Peter Tompa (Cultural Property Observer)

Just What One would Expect from a Military Dictatorship That Respects Neither Private Property Rights Nor Human Rights

Egyptian government officials have attacked an edict of a religious scholar approving of landowners keeping treasure found on their own land as long as part is given to charity.  Meanwhile, a member of the country's parliament seeks the death penalty for anyone caught with illicit antiquities.  Just what one would expect in a military dictatorship with a rump parliament that respects neither private property rights nor human rights.

Dickinson College Commentaries

Dickinson Latin Workshop 2018: Maffeius, Historiae Indicae

Dickinson Latin Workshop 2018: Maffeius, Historiae Indicae

July 12–17, 2018

The Dickinson Summer Latin Workshop is intended for teachers of Latin, as a way to refresh the mind through study of an extended Latin text, and to share experiences and ideas with Latinists and teachers. Sometimes those who are not currently engaged in teaching have participated as well, including retired teachers and those working towards teacher certification.

Moderators:
Christopher Francese (Dickinson College)
Leni Ribeiro Leiti (Federal University of Espírito Santo, Vitória, Brazil)

The text for 2018 will be taken from the Historiae Indicae of Giovanni Pietro Maffei (1536–1604, Latin name Maffeius). This 16-book history tells the story of the Portuguese voyages of conquest and discovery in the sixteenth century around the coast of Africa, to the Malabar Coast of India, on to Malacca, China, and Japan. It was widely read and admired all over Europe in its time, and draws on a variety of sources, some of which are now lost. We plan to read the sections of the work that describe the wonders of China, Brazil, and the Indian Ocean.

Jacques de Sève, “Le Pangolin,” illustration from Georges-Louis Leclerc, comte de Buffon, Histoire Naturelle, générale et particulière, avec la description du Cabinet du Roi (1749–1804). Source: Gallica http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b105279332/f1.item

Jacques de Sève, “Le Pangolin,” illustration from Georges-Louis Leclerc, comte de Buffon, Histoire Naturelle, générale et particulière, avec la description du Cabinet du Roi (1749–1804). Source: Gallica http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b105279332/f1.item

Maffei’s Latin is elegant, but not difficult. Contemporaries compared his style to that of Caesar. Yet he is no humble imitator, and the hallmarks of his writing are clarity and variety. In the words of fellow historian Faminio Strada, “nothing anywhere unkempt or careless; indeed, elegant perfection from beginning to end—unless his only fault is that he has no faults.” His vocabulary is strictly classical, except when he needs terms for unfamiliar items, such as “tea” (chia) or “pangolin” (cabim); even so, for “chopstick” he manages to find an appropriate word in Varro and Pliny the Elder, paxillus (“small stake, peg”). Though no full commentary exists, the moderators will supply notes on such special usages.

The participation fee for each participant will $400. The fee covers lodging, breakfast, lunch and dinner in the Dickinson cafeteria, the facilities fee, which allows access to the gym, fitness center, and the library, as well as wireless and wired internet access while on campus. The fee does not cover the costs of books or travel, or of dinners, which are typically eaten in the various restaurants in Carlisle. Please keep in mind that the participation fee, once it has been received by the seminar’s organizers, is not refundable. This is an administrative necessity.

Lodging: accommodations will be in a student residence hall near the site of the sessions. The building features suite-style configurations of two double rooms sharing a private bathroom, or one double and one single room sharing a private bathroom.

The first event will be an introductory dinner at 6:00 p.m., July 12. The final session ends at noon on July 17, with lunch to follow. Sessions will meet from 8:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. each day, with the afternoons left free for preparation.

Application deadline: May 1, 2018.

Fee deadline: June 1, 2018.

TO APPLY: please contact Mrs. Terri Blumenthal, blumentt@dickinson.edu by the application deadline. The fee is due in a check made out to Dickinson College, by the fee deadline.

For more information please contact Prof. Chris Francese (francese@dickinson.edu).

 

The Archaeology News Network

Reconstructing how Neanderthals grew, based on an El Sidrón child

How did Neanderthals grow? Does modern man develop in the same way as Homo neanderthalensis did? How does the size of the brain affect the development of the body? A study led by the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) researcher, Antonio Rosas, has studied the fossil remains of a Neanderthal child's skeleton in order to establish whether there are differences between the growth of Neanderthals and that of sapiens. Neanderthal...

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Faculty of Classics, Cambridge

Postgraduate Open Day Saturday 18 November 2017

Details of the 2017 Faculty of Classics Postgraduate Open Day are now available online:

Dickinson College Commentaries

Conventiculum Dickinsoniense 2018

CONVENTICULUM DICKINSONIENSE

July 5-11, 2018

The Conventiculum Dickinsoniense is an immersion seminar designed for those who want to acquire some ability at ex-tempore expression in Latin. A wide range of people can benefit from the seminar: professors in universities, teachers in secondary schools, graduate students, undergraduates, and other lovers of Latin, provided that anyone who considers applying has a solid understanding of the grammatical essentials of the Latin language. A minimum requirement for participation is knowledge of Latin grammar and the ability to read a Latin text of average complexity – even if this reading ability depends on frequent use of a dictionary.  But no previous experience in speaking Latin is necessary. Sessions will be aimed at helping participants to increase their ability to use Latin effectively in spoken discourse and to understand others speaking in Latin. After the first evening reception (in which any language may be spoken), Latin will be the language used throughout the seminar.

head shot of Terence Tunberg

Terence Tunberg

Participants will be involved in intensive activity each day from morning until early evening (with breaks for lunch and mid-afternoon pauses). They will experience Latin conversations on topics ranging from themes in literature and art all the way to the routines and activities of daily life, and will enjoy the benefits of reading and discussing texts in the target language. Activities will involve both written and spoken discourse, both of which engage the active faculties of expression, and each of which is complementary to the other. The seminar will not merely illustrate how active Latin can be a useful tool for teachers, it will show how developing an active facility in Latin can directly and personally benefit any cultivator of Latin who wishes to acquire a more instinctive command of the language and a more intimate relationship with Latin writings.

Head shot of Milena Minkova

Milena Minkova

Moderators:

Prof. Milena Minkova, University of Kentucky

Prof. Terence Tunberg, University of Kentucky

We can accept a maximum number of 40 participants. Deadline for applications is May 1, 2018. The participation fee for each participant will $400. The fee includes lodging in a single room in campus housing (and please note that lodging will be in a student residence near the site of the sessions), two meals (breakfast and lunch) per day, as well as the opening dinner, and a cookout at the Dickinson farm. Included in this price is also the facilities fee, which allows access to the gym, fitness center, and the library, as well as internet access. The $400 fee does not include the cost of dinners (except for the opening dinner and the cookout at the Dickinson farm), and does not include the cost of travel to and from the seminar. Dinners can easily be had at restaurants within walking distance from campus.  Please keep in mind that the participation fee of $400, once it has been received by the seminar’s organizers, is not refundable. This is an administrative necessity.

camp fire at the farm, Conventiculum farm dinner

camp fire at the Dickinson farm, Conventiculum Dickinsoniense

Registered participants should plan to arrive in Carlisle, PA on July 5, in time to attend the first event of the seminar. This first event is an opening dinner and welcoming reception for all participants, which will begin at about 6:00 p.m., in which all languages are acceptable. The actual workshop sessions (in which Latin will the exclusive language) will begin early the next morning on July 6.

For more information and application instructions write to: Professor Terence Tunberg:

terence.tunberg@gmail.com

Archaeological News on Tumblr

Ancient textiles reveal differences in Mediterranean fabrics in the 1st millennium BC

Textiles represent one of the earliest human craft technologies and applied arts, and their...

The Archaeology News Network

Nymphaion in ancient city of Side undergoing restoration

Restoration and conversation is set to start again at the Monumental Fountain (Nymphaion) in the ancient city of Side in the southern Turkish province of Antalya. The Nymphaion of Side [Credit: AA]The Monumental Fountain dates back to the 2nd century AD and has undergone a series of restorations since 2004. Antalya Surveying and Monuments Director Cemil Karabayram, who recently visited the ancient site, said only 20 percent of the...

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AIA Fieldnotes

International Archaeology Day at Hopewell Culture NHP

Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
Sponsored by Hopewell Culture National Historical Park
Event Type (you may select more than one): 
nad
education
Start Date: 
Saturday, October 21, 2017 - 10:00am to 2:00pm

Celebrate Ohio Archaeology Month and International Archaeology Day!

Date of program:  Saturday, October 21, 2017
Time:  10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Location:  Mound City Group visitor center

Join us for the following events:

Artifact Identification.  Experts will be on-hand to identify artifacts.  This is a great opportunity to bring out those rocks, relics and artifacts that you have been curious about!

Location

Name: 
Susan Knisley
Telephone: 
740-774-1126
Call for Papers: 
no

Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

Forum TECHNOLOGYforALL - Roma 17-19 Ottobre 2017 - PROGRAMMA e Iscrizioni gratuite

forum-technologyforall-roma-17-19-ottobre-2017-programma-e-iscrizioni-gratuite

Manca poco al via del Forum TECHNOLOGYforALL che si svolgerà a Roma dal 17 al 19 ottobre 2017, è disponibile il programma in versione quasi definitiva. Iscriviti ora!

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

EAGLE Storytelling Application (ESA) for WordPress: Create multimedia narratives on epigraphic content

EAGLE Storytelling Application (ESA) for WordPress
https://ps.w.org/eagle-storytelling-application/assets/banner-772x250.png?rev=1366860
The EAGLE Storytelling Application (ESA) is a tool designed by the Deutsches Archäologisches Institut. It allows users to create multimedia narratives on epigraphic content. It was created in the context of the EAGLE project, a European project which started in 2013 and aimed to connect and collect data sources and projects related to the topic of digital epigraphy, ancient history or archeology.
Being a Plug-In for WordPress the ESA allows you to embed multimedia content from a wide variety of data sources in your posts in a form of nicely drawn boxes ESA-Items. For example, you can paste a Wikipedia-URL to your text and it is rendered as a preview Box to the Wikipedia page. But It does not only extend the built-in embed (and oEmbed) functions that are well knows and beloved for working with services like Youtube, Flickr much more.
The ESA-Items are neither iframes nor are they generated with ajax or any other way that would result in API calls to the corresponding web service every time the containing post is displayed. Instead, the embedded content is stored in cache table and refreshed automatically after two weeks. That makes the items also usable for searching, drawing a map of used ESA-Items in the database and so on.
You can not only embed content as ESA-Items by posting URLs from known data sources but also search the data sources directly from the WordPress text editor.
In this way you can integrate Maps, Wikipedia Articles, Images from Wikimedia Commons and a lot of specialized data sources for epigraphy. The ESA has has a modular sub-plugin architecture which makes it quite easy for developers to add some other data sources via their Web-APIs. Thus it might be no only of interest for those who work in epigraphy or the ancient world but also for those who want to show the content of any Web-API in their blog.
Currently available Sub-Plugins are:

The Archaeology News Network

Continued excavations of the Minoan Neopalatial complex at Sissi, Crete

A team of the Université Catholique de Louvain under the auspices of the Ephorate of Antiquities of Lasithi and the Belgian School at Athens, aided by experts and students from many Greek and foreign universities, continued the excavation of a monumental court-centered building on the Kephali-hill at Sissi (Lassithi, Crete) during the summer of 2017. Aerial view of the court-centred complex at Sissi  [Credit: © EBSA/N. Kress]The...

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ASOR Blog (American Schools of Oriental Research)

The Christian Monks Who Saved Jewish History

One of the most remarkable anomalies of Jewish history is that its most popular literature...one of the most remarkable anomalies of Jewish history is that its most popular literature [...]

The post The Christian Monks Who Saved Jewish History appeared first on The ASOR Blog.

Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

Il MIBACT si dota del più nuovo georadar per lo studio e la conservazione dei Beni Culturali.

il-mibact-si-dota-del-piu-nuovo-georadar-per-lo-studio-e-la-conservazione-dei-beni-culturali

Il Ministero per i Beni Culturali ha acquistato il più preciso georadar in commercio per il rilievo dentro strutture in cemento e calcestruzzo.

Bill Caraher (The New Archaeology of the Mediterranean World)

Friday Varia and Quick Hits

Rain and wind seem to always mark the arrival of fall on the Northern Plains. It works out well, though, because it tends to coincide with the ramping up of the semester and cooler days and nights. I feel late-September and October offers a nice segue into the long winter hibernation.

IMG 1169

The best thing about the fall here is that there are diminishing excuses to do anything other than hunker down in a comfortable chair with a writing project or a book.

To get you headed in that direction, here are some quick hits and varia:

 

MiloDaysMilo Days!

SunnyBargeSun in the Face


Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

Indagini diagnostiche e restauro degli affreschi provenienti dalla “Casa delle Maschere” di Solunto

indagini-diagnostiche-e-restauro-degli-affreschi-provenienti-dalla-casa-delle-maschere-di-solunto

Il Museo Archeologico “A. Salinas” di Palermo ha recentemente presentato i risultati del restauro delle pitture parietali provenienti dalla “Casa delle Maschere” di Solunto eseguito grazie alla sponsorizzazione ad opera del Rotary Club di Palermo Nord.

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Open Access Monograph Series (Partial): Documents de fouilles de l’Institut français d’archéologie orientale (DFIFAO)

Documents de fouilles de l’Institut français d’archéologie orientale (DFIFAO)
Eighteen early issues of DFIFAO are avaialable at the Internet Archive:







by Bisson De La Roque, Fernand (1885-1958); Contenau, Georges (1877-1964); Chapouthier, Fernand (1899-1953)
texts







Archaeological News on Tumblr

Ancient Mayans playing ball pictured on remarkable 1,300-year-old stone panels

Two 1,300-year-old stone panels show Mayans playing with nine-handspan balls while carrying fancy...

Sphinx, Baboon and Cat Statues Found in Ancient Egyptian Burial

After years of being washed, perfumed and fed in ancient Egypt, the statue of a revered Egyptian...

House “older than Stonehenge” found in East Ayrshire field

The remains of a pre-historic dwelling older than Stonehenge or the Callanish Stones have been found...

Neanderthal boy's skull grew like a human child's: study

The first analysis of a Neanderthal boy’s skull uncovered in Spain suggests that he grew much...

Joint Library of the Hellenic & Roman Societies / Institute of Classical Studies Library

Library Lobby Renovations 3!

We have some exciting news - the lobby renovations are almost complete.

We are due to return to the main entrance on the 3rd floor this Monday (25th September).

The library will be open as usual on Monday. However, since library equipment will be being moved throughout the day, there may be some disruption. We apologise in advance for this and thank you for your patience.

We will have some photos of our new lobby to share with you soon!
The Library Team

ArcheoNet BE

Agentschap stelt Erfgoedbalans voor

Het agentschap Onroerend Erfgoed stelt vandaag de Erfgoedbalans 2017 voor. De Erfgoedbalans, die al werd aangekondigd in de beleidsnota onroerend erfgoed van 2009, is een eerste stap naar een nieuwe manier van monitoren en naar een effectieve beleidseffectenmeting. Het rapport is een momentopname, dat de grote tendensen in het beleid zichtbaar maakt en hiaten in de beleidsinzichten toont.

Meer informatie over de Erfgoedbalans 2017 vind je op www.onroerenderfgoed.be. Je kunt er het document ook digitaal downloaden.

James F. McGrath (Exploring Our Matrix)

By the Company

The phrase in the meme – “You can tell a lot about a person by the company they keep working for” – is inspired by a similar quip shared by Horace Jeffery Hodges on the blog Gypsy Scholarship. I really loved the way his mind worked, starting with the phrase “you can tell a lot about someone by […]

AIA Fieldnotes

International Archaeology Day

Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
Sponsored by Institute of Classical Archaeology
Event Type (you may select more than one): 
nad
Start Date: 
Saturday, October 21, 2017 - 9:00am

Have no fear, classical archaeology is here!

You will have the opportunity to glimpse into the world of ancient Greeks and Romans not only via student projects from the Institute of Classical Archaeology but also through replicas of real finds. The rich program is suitable for people of all ages, the youngest ones can play ancient games and adults can enjoy short lectures on interesting topics. You can try how difficult it was to build a Roman mosaic, wear replicas of ancient armour and much more! 

Location

Name: 
Johana Tlustá
Telephone: 
00420739743338
Call for Papers: 
no

Compitum - publications

P. Morantin, Lire Homère à la Renaissance. Philologie humaniste et tradition grecque

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Patrick Morantin, Lire Homère à la Renaissance. Philologie humaniste et tradition grecque, Genève, 2017.

Éditeur : Librairie Droz
Collection : Travaux d'Humanisme et Renaissance
407 pages ; 1016 pages avec les annexes (contenues dans le PDF vendu sur le site de la Librairie Droz) pages
ISBN : 9782600119115
Livre broché : 98.00€ TTC ; PDF : 78.40€ TTC ; livre broché + PDF : 117.60€ TTC

A partir de l'examen des annotations apposées par les humanistes Vettor Fausto et Guillaume Budé sur leur exemplaire personnel de l'editio princeps d'Homère, l'ouvrage s'attache à comprendre le mode de lecture et la démarche philologique des deux humanistes. Considérant qu'une certaine philosophie de l'histoire, marquée par l'idée de progrès et par l'historicisme, biaise notre compréhension du travail philologique des humanistes, la recherche se propose de sortir de toute démarche évolutionniste et de renverser la perspective historique en prenant pour point de comparaison la démarche de la philologie antique, en particulier celle des érudits de l'époque hellénistique : l'empeiria (la « connaissance empirique ») alexandrine. L'étude montre ainsi que le travail philologique de Vettor Fausto et de Guillaume Budé participe de la redécouverte de la philologie antique, d'une lecture « grammaticale » qui conduit les deux humanistes à constituer, selon le modèle de l'empeiria alexandrine et conformément aux composantes de la grammatike, un livre personnel qui se rapproche de l'ekdosis des érudits alexandrins.
L'ouvrage offre un nouveau regard sur la valeur de la philologie humaniste, grâce notamment à l'apport de la philosophie herméneutique. Il conclut que le modèle interprétatif sous-jacent à la critique de la philologie humaniste relève d'un paradigme qu'il convient de mettre en cause afin de pouvoir mieux comprendre la lecture et la réception d'un auteur tel qu'Homère à la Renaissance.
Le corpus des annotations transcrites et analysées (un millier de notes), issues en grande partie du plus fameux manuscrit de l'Iliade,le Venetus A, et d'une source inconnue qui lui est rivale, est proposé en annexe, dans le PDF vendu sur le site de la Librairie Droz.


Source : Librairie Droz

Jim Davila (Paleojudaica.com)

Retrospective on Himmelfarb's "Ascent to Heaven in Jewish and Christian Apocalypses"

<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/TDZRO5E7xvo" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

Interview with Philip Jenkins

<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/L95nFBUHPG8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

Compitum - publications

P.-G. Delage (éd.), Grégoire de Nazianze - Le passeur de monde

pjp_ix_-_grgoire_de_nazianze.jpg

Pascal-Grégoire Delage (éd.), Grégoire de Nazianze - Le passeur de monde, Saintes, 2017.

Éditeur : CaritasPatrum
Collection : Petite Journée de Patristique
162 p. pages
ISBN : 979-10-95732-02-0
16 €

Grégoire de Nazianze est probablement avec Augustin celui des Pères que nous connaissons le mieux « de l'intérieur ». Car, s'il ne nous a pas laissé à proprement parler de « Confessions » comme Augustin, l'homme et le spirituel sont bien là, tout entiers, dans sa correspondance, l'une des plus importantes que nous ait léguée l'Antiquité, tout comme dans ses poèmes autobiographiques ou moraux.
Derrière le verbe ciselé et l'expression hautement maîtrisée, nous rencontrons un homme profondément humain, laissant court à l'expression de sentiments très personnels comme la déception ou la désillusion quant à la vérité de l'amitié, la profondeur du combat théologique ou même les ambitions de certains prélats qu'il n'hésite pas à traiter « d'épiciers de la foi » ou de « faussaires d'impôts »… Ne nous y trompons pas. Ce mal d'insatisfaction qui le fit par deux fois renoncer à un siège épiscopal (d'abord d'une toute petite bourgade de Cappadoce, Sasimes, où il n'est jamais allé, puis du prestigieux siège de Constantinople en 381) n'est que la trace en creux de quelque chose de bien plus fort, comme de cet absolu de sa passion pour le Verbe divin.
Prêtre du Logos, Grégoire se sentira parfois dépassé, incapable de guider ses frères dans la contemplation de ce Mystère si ancien et si nouveau même si sa prédication à la veille du concile de Constantinople en 381 s'avéra décisive pour le triomphe de l'orthodoxie et lui vaudra la fière épithète de « Grégoire le Théologien »… Ce sera alors le temps de la retraite et du silence mais pour une fécondité dont nous vivons encore, l'enfantement de la culture antique au Christ-Logos. C'est à la rencontre de cette prodigieuse et déconcertante personnalité que nous a conviés cette dernière Petite Journée de Patristique consacrée à Grégoire de Nazianze.

Lire la suite...

Jim Davila (Paleojudaica.com)

Dates on ancient Jewish inscriptions

<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/FCHu0KHQ2Hc" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

A midrash on transmitting the Torah

<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/KhhtbqDht3c" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

Bryn Mawr Classical Review

2017.09.40: The Rhetoric of Seeing in Attic Forensic Oratory. Ashley and Peter Larkin Series in Greek and Roman Culture

Review of Peter A. O’Connell, The Rhetoric of Seeing in Attic Forensic Oratory. Ashley and Peter Larkin Series in Greek and Roman Culture. Austin: 2017. Pp. xviii, 282. $55.00. ISBN 9781477311684.

2017.09.39: Ovid’s Women of the Year. Narratives of Roman Identity in the ‘Fasti’

Review of Angeline Chiu, Ovid’s Women of the Year. Narratives of Roman Identity in the ‘Fasti’. Ann Arbor: 2016. Pp. ix, 209. $70.00. ISBN 9780472130047.

2017.09.38: The So-Called Eighth ‘Stromateus’ by Clement of Alexandria: Early Christian Reception of Greek Scientific Methodology. Philosophia antiqua, 144

Review of Matyáš Havrda, The So-Called Eighth ‘Stromateus’ by Clement of Alexandria: Early Christian Reception of Greek Scientific Methodology. Philosophia antiqua, 144. Leiden; Boston: 2016. Pp. x, 373. $162.00. ISBN 9789004310087.

2017.09.37: Julius Caesar's Disease

Review of Hutan Ashrafian, Francesco M. Galassi, Julius Caesar's Disease. Barnsley: 2016. Pp. 192. £19.99. ISBN 9781473870789.

Compitum - publications

F. Schnoor, Das lateinische Tierlobgedicht in Spätantike, Mittelalter und Früher Neuzeit

schnoor.jpg

Franziska Schnoor, Das lateinische Tierlobgedicht in Spätantike, Mittelalter und Früher Neuzeit, Berne, 2017.

Éditeur : Peter Lang
Collection : Lateinische Sprache und Literatur des Mittelalters, 52
X-465 pages
ISBN : 9783034329323
89 €

Das lateinische Tierlobgedicht, eine poetische Untergattung des Enkomiums, ist in der Forschung bislang kaum beachtet worden. Die vorliegende Arbeit will diese Forschungslücke schließen. Sie schlägt einen weiten Bogen von den einflussreichen antiken Vorbildern aus der Feder von Catull und Ovid bis zur neulateinischen Dichtung im 17. Jahrhundert und präsentiert damit ein Textkorpus, das so vielgestaltig ist wie die Tierwelt selbst.
Im Mittelpunkt der Arbeit stehen die am häufigsten gepriesenen Tiere: die Nachtigall sowie Vögel im Allgemeinen, der Hund und das Pferd. Als Vertreter für Exoten wird der Elefant vorgestellt, und mit dem Floh kommt ein Tier zur Sprache, das vor allem Gegenstand von ironischem Lob ist. Neben den typischen Eigenschaften der Tiere werden die poetischen Mittel des Tierlobs und das intertextuelle Beziehungsnetz der Gedichte analysiert.
Die zahlreichen Berührungspunkte des Tierlobgedichts mit anderen poetischen Gattungen sowie seine sozio-funktionalen Aspekte werden ebenfalls betrachtet. Insgesamt zeigt sich, dass unter der Oberflächenschicht des Tierlobs meist eine Tiefenschicht verborgen ist, in der es um das menschliche Miteinander geht.

 

Source : Peter Lang

American School of Classical Studies in Athens: News

SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER POSITION

The American School of Classical Studies at Athens seeks a Social Media Manager, resident in Athens, Greece, at the main campus.

Archaeology Magazine

Teotihuacán’s Grid System Analyzed

Mesoamerica city planningTEMPE, ARIZONA—Michael Smith of Arizona State University compared the city of Teotihuacán with other Mesoamerican cities built before and after it, and found Teotihuacán to be unique, according to a report in The International Business Times. Mesoamerican cities usually had a well-planned central area of temples, a palace, a ball court, and a plaza surrounded by a residential area. Smith says the residential areas were often haphazardly arranged, but all of Teotihuacán was arranged on a grid system, making it easier to navigate. Between A.D. 100 and 650, Teotihuacán was home to as many as 100,000 people, making it the largest city in the Americas at the time, yet it seems to have lacked a royal palace, a ball court, and central areas. Teotihuacán also had well-planned residential areas with spacious, well-designed apartment buildings. Some 1,000 years after it was abandoned, Teotihuacán was revered by the Aztecs, who gave the city its name, which means “the birthplace of the gods.” The Aztecs repeated many of Teotihuacán’s innovations in their capital, Tenochtitlan, founded in the early fourteenth century. For more, go to “The Rabbit Farms of Teotihuacán.”

“Ancient Genomics Revolution” Now Includes Africa

Africa genome migrationCAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS—An international team of scientists has extracted fragments of DNA from the remains of 16 ancient sub-Saharan Africans and compared them to the genomes of living Africans and populations on other continents, according to a report in The New York Times. The oldest sample in the study, which also included the genome extracted from 4,500-year-old bones found in a cave in Ethiopia in 2015, came from 8,100-year-old bones recovered in caves in the highlands of Malawi. Geneticist David Reich of Harvard Medical School and his colleagues think the branches on Africa’s family tree may be older than previously thought. The study also suggests that genes did not flow between Africans and non-Africans for tens of thousands of years. But the 3,100-year-old genes of a girl whose remains were found in Tanzania have been linked to early farmers in the Near East. “This puts a time stamp on this connection,” explained team member Pontus Skoglund. Eventually the Near Eastern farmers reached Africa’s southern edge, where their DNA was found in a 1,200-year-old skeleton. Archaeologists had previously tracked the migration of the Bantu through their iron tools. The new genetic study suggests they may have pushed hunter-gatherers off prime farming land as they traveled. To read about another application of genetics to study of the past, see “The Heights We Go To.”

Paul Barford (Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues)

Archaeologist Layla Salih



An extended piece about archaeologist Layla Salih from the Smithsonian Magazine by Joshua Hammer, Photographs by Alice Martins  'The Salvation of Mosul An Iraqi archaeologist braved ISIS snipers and booby-trapped ruins to rescue cultural treasures in the city and nearby legendary Nineveh and Nimrud'.
Dodging sniper fire and mortar blasts in a three-minute sprint down rubbled streets, she clambered through a hole that the terrorists had blasted into the Mosul Museum [...] Salih, a curator at the museum for a decade before the invasion, methodically documented the damage they had inflicted before fleeing. [...] The terrorists had cleaned out the Hatra Gallery, once filled with Greco-Roman-influenced marble statuary from Hatra, a pre-Islamic trading city on the major trading routes between the Roman Empire in the west and the Parthians in the east. They had also stolen 200 smaller objects—priceless remnants of the Assyrian, Akkadian, Babylonian, Persian and Roman empires—from a storage room. “I had had an idea about the destruction, but I didn’t think that it was this kind of scale,” said Salih, who had inventoried many of the artifacts herself over the years and knew precisely what had been stolen.  [...] This past January, Iraqi troops discovered a trove of 3,000-year-old Assyrian pottery stashed in a house in Mosul occupied by the Islamic State. Salih rushed into this combat zone after midnight to retrieve 17 boxes of stolen artifacts, including some of the world’s earliest examples of glazed earthenware, and arranged their shipment to Baghdad for safekeeping. “She is a very active person,” Muzahim Mahmoud Hussein, Iraq’s most famous archaeologist, who worked closely with Salih while serving as head of museums in Nineveh province before the Islamic State invasion, told me. “She has always been like that.” Maj. Mortada Khazal, who led the unit that recovered the pottery, said that “Layla is fearless.”
Were the Jonah's Tomb tunnels dug to loot or for military purposes?


Archaeology Magazine

Neanderthal Children May Have Matured Slowly

Neanderthal growth rateMADRID, SPAIN—Live Science reports that the paleoanthropology group at Spain’s National Museum of Natural Sciences studied the rate of Neanderthal development by analyzing the nearly complete skeleton of a young male Neanderthal discovered at the site of El Sidrón. The scientists estimated the boy’s age at 7.7 years old at the time of death, some 49,000 years ago, based upon the growth layers in his teeth. They also noted that the boy’s skull was still growing when he died. “We think this Neanderthal boy’s brain was still growing in volume,” said Antonio Rosas. The team estimated that the boy’s brain was about 87.5 percent of the size of the brain of a fully grown Neanderthal adult. In contrast, Rosas said modern humans of the same age have brains about 95 percent of the size of an adult’s brain. The team of researchers also noted that some veterbrae in modern human children have fused between the ages of four and six, but those same bones had not yet fused in the Neanderthal boy’s remains. The study suggests that, overall, Neanderthals shared a common pattern of growth with modern humans, which may have been inherited from a common ancestor. For more, go to “A Traditional Neanderthal Home.”

Neolithic House Unearthed in Southern Scotland

Scotland Neolithic houseEAST AYRSHIRE, SCOTLAND—The Scotsman reports that a 6,000-year-old dwelling has been found in a field in southwestern Scotland. Kenneth Green of GUARD Archaeology said the building’s post holes indicate it measured about 45 feet long by 25 feet wide. Neolithic pottery, hazelnut shells, and charcoal were also recovered at the site. Green noted that just the deepest sections of some post holes remain after thousands of years of plowing, but that the width and depth of the holes suggest they once held very large upright posts. Early farmers are thought to have lived in the structure with extended family or groups of families. They probably grew wheat and barley, and kept cattle, sheep, goats, and pigs. The excavation also uncovered evidence of a stream that ran by the house. For more on archaeology in Scotland, go to “Viking Treasure Trove.”

September 21, 2017

AIA Fieldnotes

Making and Identifying Stone Tools

Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
Sponsored by Locality Research and Preservation and the Laguna de Santa Rosa Foundation
Event Type (you may select more than one): 
workshop
Start Date: 
Sunday, November 5, 2017 - 11:00am

This workshop will address the fundamentals of Lithic Analysis (the study of stone tool technology).  Participants will learn the basics of how to produce sharp-edged flakes from raw rock, how to identify markers on these flakes that demonstrate it was produced by a human, and will interact with examples of stone tool technology that spans 2.5 million years of human evolution.  Hot drinks and light snacks will be provided, and participants are welcome to bring their own picnic lunch to enjoy on-site after the workshop.

Location

AIA Society: 
Name: 
Mara Vejby
Call for Papers: 
no

Using Archaeology to Reconstruct Trade Patterns

Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
Sponsored by Locality Research and Preservation and the Laguna de Santa Rosa Foundation
Event Type (you may select more than one): 
lecture
Start Date: 
Thursday, November 2, 2017 - 7:00pm

This lecture will address methods that archaeologists use to assess how groups of people interacted and traded with one another in the past.  Dr. Reti will discuss how artifacts, rocks, and bones tell a complex story of where people are from, where they have traveled, and who they have interacted with.  Discussions will range from local Sonoma County obsidian sources, to methods of stone tool manufacture, and reconstructing diets of people in the past.  These concepts will be broadly applied to Sonoma County examples.

Location

AIA Society: 
Name: 
Mara Vejby
Call for Papers: 
no

What's in a Name: Stories Behind Northbay Place Names

Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
Sponsored by Locality Research and Preservation and the Laguna de Santa Rosa Foundation
Event Type (you may select more than one): 
lecture
Start Date: 
Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 3:00pm

Place names are an important, and often overlooked, part of our cultural environment. They act as anchors on the land and are important markers of territory. Place names also store knowledge of ecology, people, stories, and events of our past. Even as their origins are slowly forgotten or embellished, the names of these places are remembered. Dr. Vejby will take us on a short tour through the Northbay and share with us some of the origins behind the names we use today.

Location

AIA Society: 
Name: 
Mara Vejby
Call for Papers: 
no

The People Dance! With the Indigenous Enterprise Dancers

Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
Sponsored by Pueblo Grande Museum & Archaeological Park, Canyon Records
Event Type (you may select more than one): 
other
Start Date: 
Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 6:00pm

The Indigenous Enterprise Dancers will perform colorful and high-energy Northern-style pow-wow dances to the brilliant vocals of pow-wow music and the modern rhythyms of beat driven contemporary music. Kenneth Shirley (Navajo) will be joined by Ty Lodgepole (Navajo), Ike Owens (Blackfoot/Navajo) and George Gonzales (Pima). These young dancers have been making a name for themselves as representatives of their cultures by honoring the traditional music of the pow-wow as they explore new, creative expressions using contemporary music.

Location

Name: 
Renee Aguilar
Telephone: 
602-495-0901
Call for Papers: 
no

Pottery for Kids Class

Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
Sponsored by Pueblo Grande Museum & Archaeological Park
Event Type (you may select more than one): 
other
Start Date: 
Saturday, November 4, 2017 - 9:30am

Creative kids can unleash their inner artist with fun, hands-on pottery making activities based on the pottery of the past! Get to know the prehistoric people of the Southwest and the beautiful types of pottery they created. With a focus on the Hohokam, discover how pottery was made and decorated, what it was used for and much, much more. This class also gives kids a chance to see artifacts from the Museums’ collection to help inspire their own pottery. Advanced registration is required by November 2. Visit pueblogrande.com to register. Three-hour class is $15 for children ages 7 to 12.

Location

Name: 
Renee Aguilar
Telephone: 
602-495-0901
Call for Papers: 
no

12th Annual Navajo Art & Rug Auction

Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
Sponsored by Pueblo Grande Museum & Archaeological Site
Event Type (you may select more than one): 
other
Start Date: 
Saturday, November 4, 2017 - 9:00am

Pueblo Grande Museum Auxiliary is hosting its 12th Annual Navajo Rug and Indian Art Auction on Saturday, November 4.  The auction, conducted by Bruce Burnham, of Burnham Trading Company in Sanders, Arizona, is a one day fundraising event begins with a preview at 9 a.m., followed by the auction from noon to 5 p.m.  A portion of the proceeds from the auction will benefit the Pueblo Grande Museum Auxiliary, a support group for the Pueblo Grande Museum which supplements the museums’ preservation efforts, educational programs and special events, exhibits and artifact collections care.

Location

Name: 
Renee Aguilar
Telephone: 
602-495-0901
Call for Papers: 
no

presentation A Boot in the Door: Pioneer Women Archaeologists of Arizona

Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
Sponsored by Pueblo Grande Museum & Archaeological Park
Event Type (you may select more than one): 
lecture
Start Date: 
Wednesday, October 4, 2017 - 6:30pm

Join the Pueblo Grande Museum Auxiliary and Dr. Nancy J. Parezo, Professor of American Indian Studies and Anthropology at the University of Arizona, for her presentation A Boot in the Door: Pioneer Women Archaeologists of Arizona on October 4, 2017 at 6:30 p.m. at Pueblo Grande Museum.

Location

Name: 
Renee Aguilar
Telephone: 
602-495-0901
Call for Papers: 
no

Park of Four Waters Tour

Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
Sponsored by Pueblo Grande Museum & Archaeological Park
Event Type (you may select more than one): 
other
Start Date: 
Friday, October 27, 2017 - 10:00am

The Hohokam people lived in the Salt River area in Arizona from approximately 450AD to 1450AD.  They were an agricultural society, growing corn, beans, squash and cotton.  In order to support their extensive agricultural system, the Hohokam people constructed miles of canals in order to direct water from the Salt River to their fields.  The Park of Four Waters tour at Pueblo Grande Museum will take you on a tour through undeveloped, natural desert to the ruins of some of these canal systems.  This is a first come, first serve tour. Cost is $5 in addition to regular museuma admission.

Location

Name: 
Renee Aguilar
Telephone: 
602-495-0901
Call for Papers: 
no

Fragments: Broken Bowls Tell More Tales Exhibit Opening

Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
Sponsored by Pueblo Grande Museum & Archaeological Park
Event Type (you may select more than one): 
exhibition
Start Date: 
Thursday, October 26, 2017 - 7:00pm

Come to the opening night of Pueblo Grande Museums' newest exhibit, Fragments: Broken Bowls Tell More Tales on October 26 at 7 p.m.

Location

Name: 
Renee Aguilar
Telephone: 
602-495-0901
Call for Papers: 
no

The Story of Modern Water in the Valley

Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
Sponsored by Pueblo Grande Museum & Archaeological Park
Event Type (you may select more than one): 
lecture
Start Date: 
Friday, October 20, 2017 - 9:30am

Pueblo Grande Museum pays homage to the incredible prehistoric canal irrigation system upon which Phoenix was built with a free lunch time lecture series, Water Works: Settling the Salt River Valley, at the Museum in October. Commemorating the 150-year anniversary of Swilling’s Ditch and the engineering legacy of canals left by the Hohokam, these lectures also coincide with the recognition of Indigenous People’s Day by the City of Phoenix and will be filmed by PHXTV Channel 11. Come celebrate these significant achievements of our shared Arizona history.

Location

Name: 
Renee Aguilar
Telephone: 
602-495-0901
Call for Papers: 
no

Behind the Scenes Tour

Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
Sponsored by Pueblo Grande Museum & Archaeological Park
Event Type (you may select more than one): 
other
Start Date: 
Thursday, October 19, 2017 - 10:00am

Join Pueblo Grande Museum collections staff for a “behind the scenes” tour of the museums’ artifact collection areas. Take an intimate tour of the lab, storage, and archival rooms not open to the public. See how museums process, organize, and care for their collections.  Space is limited on a first come, first serve basis. Reserve your spot at the front desk. Cost: $5, free for Museum Members

Location

Name: 
Renee Aguilar
Telephone: 
602-495-0901
Call for Papers: 
no

Ancient Waterways of Life: Hohokam Irrigation Systems of the Salt River Valley

Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
Sponsored by Pueblo Grande Museum & Archaeological Park
Event Type (you may select more than one): 
other
Start Date: 
Friday, October 13, 2017 - 12:00pm

Pueblo Grande Museum pays homage to the incredible prehistoric canal irrigation system upon which Phoenix was built with a free lunch time lecture series, Water Works: Settling the Salt River Valley, at the Museum in October. Commemorating the 150-year anniversary of Swilling’s Ditch and the engineering legacy of canals left by the Hohokam, these lectures also coincide with the recognition of Indigenous People’s Day by the City of Phoenix and will be filmed by PHXTV Channel 11. Come celebrate these significant achievements of our shared Arizona history.

Location

Name: 
Renee Aguilar
Telephone: 
602-495-0901
Call for Papers: 
no

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Open Access Journals: Τεκμήρια

[First posted in AWOL 23 September 2009. Updated 21 September 2017]

Τεκμήρια
ISSN: 1106-661x
Online ISSN:1791-7573
Τα Τεκμήρια δημοσιεύουν επιστημονικά άρθρα από το ευρύτερο γνωστικό πεδίο της αρχαιογνωσίας, με ιδιαίτερη έμφαση στην αρχαία ιστορία, την επιγραφική, τη νομισματική, την τοπογραφία και την ιστορική γεωγραφία, καθώς και στη δημοσίευση, αναδημοσίευση ή αξιοποίηση επιγραφικών και νομισματικών τεκμηρίων. Όλες οι υποβαλλόμενες εργασίες, που εμπίπτουν στο πεδίο ενδιαφερόντων του περιοδικού, εξετάζονται υπό τον όρο ότι είναι πρωτότυπες και έχουν αποσταλεί προς δημοσίευση μόνο στα Τεκμήρια. Προς το παρόν, τα Τεκμήρια δεν δημοσιεύουν μεμονωμένες βιβλιοκρισίες. Οι γλώσσες δημοσίευσης είναι η ελληνική, αγγλική, γαλλική, γερμανική και ιταλική.


The journal Tekmeria publishes scholarly articles pertaining to the study of the ancient world, with particular emphasis on Ancient Greek history, epigraphy, numismatics, topography and historical geography, and especially on the publication, republication or exploitation of epigraphic and numismatic materials. All submitted articles that are relevant to the thematic areas covered by the journal are considered by the editorial board, provided they are original and have only been sent to Tekmeria for publication.

Volume: 13

Volume: 12

Volume: 11




AIA Fieldnotes

Archaeology For Kids

Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
Sponsored by Pueblo Grande Museum & Archaeological Site
Event Type (you may select more than one): 
other
Start Date: 
Saturday, October 7, 2017 - 9:30am

Children ages 7 to 12 can become a Junior Archaeologist and explore the science of archaeology by doing a simulated excavation of a Hohokam pit house. Learn how to identify artifacts in the field, and discover how archaeologists use these artifacts to find out more about past cultures. Cost is $15; advanced registration is required by October 5. Register Today!

Location

Name: 
Renee Aguilar
Telephone: 
602-495-0901
Call for Papers: 
no

Calixtlahuaca Archaeological Project

Regional Clay Sampling

Angela Huster

This summer, I spent a week taking twenty-eight clay samples from across the Toluca Valley and immediately adjacent areas for INAA analysis. Don Cato, one of our local crew members from the excavation, helped by driving in incredibly convoluted loops around the area, and patiently explaining to  bystanders about what I was doing.

I kept crossing the construction route of another major water line to supply Mexico City. Occasionally, it was useful, such as here, where I needed a sample from below substantial modern fill.
These samples should help us identify where our previously sourced archaeological ceramics were made. Because there are only three other sites in the region with sourced ceramics, we have several chemical clusters in our archaeological ceramics that probably represent particular subregions, but we don't know where on the physical landscape those subregions are. More specifically, the new clay samples should help with three specific questions:

What chemical elements are the most geographically variable across the Toluca Valley and therefore the most useful for identifying source areas within the region?

Are the areas immediately to the south and west of the Toluca Valley likely sources for several of our "probably non-local" groups?

Are clays from the west (Toluca Valley) side of the mountain range between the Basin of Mexico and the Toluca Valley similar enough to Basin clays that they could explain some of our groups of Aztec-style ceramics that don't quite match local the very large existing reference data set for the Basin of Mexico?

Soil color and texture recording

David Gill (Looting Matters)

The Guennol Stargazer and its findspot

There has been much attention paid to Turkey's claim on the Guennol Stargazer. It needs to be remembered that Pat Getz-Gentle (Getz-Preziosi) appeared to confirm that the figure was found in central Anatolia, i.e. Turkey.

Incidentally, the Guennol Stargazer is reported to have been found with the Stargazer in the Shelby White collection as well as other figures in several other North American private collections.

The authority for Getz-Gentle's statement is unclear. How did she know that the six figures were found together? Did they pass through common hands?

Bookmark and Share so Your Real Friends Know that You Know

ArcheoNet BE

Infodag over archeologie in Vlaams-Brabant op 21 oktober

De informatiedag archeologie in Vlaams-Brabant vindt dit jaar plaats in Zoutleeuw, op zaterdag 21 oktober. De lezingen in de voormiddag werpen een licht op enkele belangrijke opgravingen in Vlaams-Brabant. In de namiddag staat een gegidste wandeltocht langs de vesten en de beschermde citadel op het programma. Op deze dag, die speciaal bedoeld is voor amateurarcheologen, verenigingen en vrijwilligers, zijn alle geinteresseerden welkom. Er is ook ruimte om vondsten te melden.

De infodag is volledig gratis, inschrijven is echter wel verplicht. Het volledige programma en een inschrijvingsformulier vind je op www.vlaamsbrabant.be

Irene Hahn and Bingley Austin (Roman History Books and More)

online book chats

Exlibris logo, click for website This blog is an adjunct to The Roman History Reading Group which meets on the first and third Wednesday of each month except August in our chat room from 9:30 to 11:00 p.m. US EDT (UTC/GMT -04).  This means that in Asia and Australia/Pacific, it's daytime. Here is a world time clock as a general assistance for non-USAns.

Chat room location (with instructions) at Skype IM.
New members are always welcome!

2017 Reading Schedule

978-1631492228October 4 & 18, November 1
SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome by Mary Beard
also as eBook

LacuscurtiusNovember 15
The War with Jugurtha by Sallust
at LacusCurtius

Find us on Facebook and Twitter

october 4, 18 & november 1 online chats - SPQR by mary beard

SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome 978-1631492228by Mary Beard
also as eBook

9:30 - 11:00 PM U.S. Eastern

10/4: through Chapter Five (A Wider World)
10/18: through Chapter Nine (The Transformations is Augustus)
11/1: through the end

Review by Emily Wilson 


New members are always welcome!
Chat room location (with instructions) at Skype IM (text, no video).

The Archaeology News Network

Ancient textiles reveal differences in Mediterranean fabrics in the 1st millennium BC

Textiles represent one of the earliest human craft technologies and applied arts, and their production would have been one of the most important time, resource and labour consuming activities in the ancient past. Twill example from Civita Castellana, Italy, seventh century BC [Credit: Margarita Gleba]In archaeological contexts, textiles are relatively rare finds, especially in Mediterranean Europe where conditions are unfavourable for...

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Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

SIGNS OF LIFE: Welcome to the The EAGLE Virtual Exhibition!

SIGNS OF LIFE: Welcome to the The EAGLE Virtual Exhibition!
This is a dedicated Epigraphy Virtual Exhibition to bring highlights of the EAGLE collections to the attention of a wider audience.

You shall find in it a good overview of what are Ancient Greek and Roman Epigraphy and what they deal with.

There are two views of the EAGLE Virtual Exhibition Signs of Life. If you like reading, start browsing the website version. If you like walking (and jumping), the Virtual Museum is what you are looking for, but be careful not to break any object! Children must be supervised at all times.

Signs of Life - Website version Signs of Life - Virtual Museum

If you change your mind you can always go back and forth from the two, they are fully synced! Click on the 3D button (HD000604) anywhere in the website version and you will enter the Virtual Museum.

The Archaeology News Network

Ancient human DNA in sub-Saharan Africa lifts veil on prehistory

The first large-scale study of ancient human DNA from sub-Saharan Africa opens a long-awaited window into the identity of prehistoric populations in the region and how they moved around and replaced one another over the past 8,000 years. Mount Hora in Malawi, where the oldest DNA in the study, from a woman who lived more than 8,000 years ago,  was obtained [Credit: Jessica C. Thompson/Emory University]The findings, published Cell...

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Archaeological News on Tumblr

Ancient human DNA in sub-Saharan Africa lifts veil on prehistory

The first large-scale study of ancient human DNA from sub-Saharan Africa opens a long-awaited window...

The Archaeology News Network

3-D analysis of dog fossils sheds light on domestication debate

In an effort to settle the debate about the origin of dog domestication, a technique that uses 3-D scans of fossils is helping researchers determine the difference between dogs and wolves. 3D plot of PC1–3 mandible shape variation. Black: dogs, dark grey: Alaskan wolves, light grey: European wolves,  dark red: Ivolgin fossils, green: Ust’-Polui fossils, purple: Pleistocene Alaskan wolves, cyan: 1600CE fossil dogs,  orange:...

[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

Viking boat burial found in Norway

On one of the last days of the excavation in the market square, archaeologists from the Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research (NIKU) became aware of a feature with a somewhat special shape. The boat dates between the seventh and 10th centuries, around the time the Vikings began exploring and raiding Europe  [Credit: Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research (NIKU)]The feature, which was dug into the natural...

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Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Online Critical Pseudepigrapha

 [First posted in AWOL 16 November 2010. Updated most recently 21 September 2017]

Online Critical Pseudepigrapha
 http://ocp.stfx.ca/objects/OCP/The_Application/The_Banner/img%7B0%7D@src.png
The mandate of the Online Critical Pseudepigrapha is to develop and publish electronic editions of the best critical texts of the "Old Testament" Pseudepigrapha and related literature.

Note that in a few cases it has not yet been feasible to publish the best eclectic text of a given document. In other cases the OCP edition of a document does not yet include all of the textual evidence. Readers should consult the "text status" information on the introductory page for each document to determine whether a better or more complete text exists elsewhere.

Texts should be cited in scholarly references according to the persistent URL for the OCP site (http://www.purl.org/net/ocp), rather than the address which appears in the address bar of your web browser, as this address may change in future years.

Documents

Contributors

Texts with critical apparatus

2 (Syriac Apocalypse of) Baruch (NEW edition)
The Testament of Job
1 Enoch (In progress)
Testament of Adam (In progress)

Texts without critical apparatus

Testament of Abraham
The Life of Adam and Eve
Visions of Amram (NEW)
The Letter of Aristeas
Aristeas the Exegete
Aristobulus
Artapanus
3 (Greek Apocalypse of) Baruch
4 Baruch (Paraleipomena Ieremiou)
Cleodemus Malchus
Eldad and Modad
Eupolemus
The Apocryphon of Ezekiel
Ezekiel the Tragedian
Vision of Ezra (NEW)
The History of the Rechabites (NEW edition)
Jubilees
The Lives of the Prophets
Assumption of Moses (Testament of Moses) (NEW)
3 Maccabees
4 Maccabees
Philo the Epic Poet
Pseudo-Eupolemus
Testament of Solomon
Theodotus
And from the other platform for the project

Revised and Corrected Texts of Walker and Dick's Induction of the Cult Image in Mesopotamia (2001)

 Revised and Corrected Texts of Walker and Dick's Induction of the Cult Image in Mesopotamia (2001)

Updated Critical Edition of Mīs by Michael B. Dick
What follows are thoroughly updated files based on the Walker & Dick 2001 Critical Edition. These are temporarily available on this Siena College Web Page; eventually they will be part of the University of Pennsylvania’s Oracc collection. The files here are in PDF format. Some editing on them continues, e.g. I am continuing to place the English translation side by side with the Akkadian/ Sumerian rather than following as in the Book.Thoughthese texts show page numbers, they do not correspond to those of the 2001 book.
  • Use of these texts in scholarship should follow the Budapest Convention of November 2001.
  • I ask you to send me corrections, new readings, new bibliography, and new texts for incorporation (with due credit to you): dick@siena.edu
  • For incantation Tablet V, I have also included the Word 2010© file so that somebody familiar with Oracc’s *.ATF file format might help me in my gradual converting the text to that standard. If some kind soul could please send me several files or parts of that file showing the various steps in that conversion so I can use that as a template n all the files.


Texts and Photos:

Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

Giornata Studio dedicata alle Tecniche Archeometriche

giornata-studio-dedicata-alle-tecniche-archeometriche

La giornata di studio del 10 ottobre fa parte di una serie di incontri organizzata dal Laboratorio di Spettroscopia Laser e Applicata dell'Istituo di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici (ICCOM) del Centro Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR) di Pisa.

Archaeological News on Tumblr

WWI German U-Boat Found Nearly Intact Off Belgium Coast

Marine archaeologists have uncovered the wreck of a World War I German U-Boat off the coast of...

The Archaeology News Network

Urartian necropolis reveals burial customs

Excavations in a Urartian necropolis in the eastern province of Van’s Çavuştepe Castle, which has been plundered by treasure hunters in recent years, provide important details about Urartian burial customs. AA PhotoThe Culture and Tourism Ministry has initiated excavations to rescue the necropolis in the castle. During the excavations, a tomb was unearthed with the skeletons of a man and a woman. Officials believe they were husband...

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Archaeological News on Tumblr

Rescuing the Rooswijk

An international team of maritime archaeologists is working to excavate and record the remains of...

Bones, ancient artifacts dating to 2500 B.C. found at three Fredericksburg sites

Some interesting discoveries have been uncovered in recent weeks at a trio of work sites in downtown...

Bill Caraher (The New Archaeology of the Mediterranean World)

Three Cypriot Thing Thursday

Just a quick post today centered on three interesting Cypriot related things that have come through my news feed recently.

First, if you’re looking for funding to do research on Cyprus and at the Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute (CAARI), go and check out their website for a glorious gaggle of fellowship opportunities. As anyone who has worked on Cyprus for any length of time will attest, CAARI is the institutional heart of foreign archaeological work on the island. Its recently improved facilities include a spectacular new library for paper books and a air conditioners (egg nishnahs for our Australian colleagues) in the hostel. 

Second, if you find yourself on Cyprus this October, be sure to check out the Nea Paphos and Western Cyprus Colloquium. It is being held in celebration of Paphos being named a European cultural capital for 2017. My colleagues, Scott Moore, Brandon Olson, and I, will have a paper presented by the inestimable Joanna Smith who will probably single handedly represent the recent flurry of activity at Polis in Western Cyprus. Here’s a link to the program.

Finally, my buddy David Pettegrew sent along a little article from the Cyprus Mail recently that announced that the tennis courts which have long stood to north of the Larnaka District Archaeological museum and the to the east of the excavated area of the ancient harbor of Kition. The goal is to make this site more visible to visitors and, perhaps, expand the excavated areas while also creating a new welcome area. The site of Kition is among the most under appreciated on Cyprus largely because its tucked in and around the modern city of Larnaka. The last few years, however, have seen a concerted effort to make the site more visible and understandable to the visit and when the museum reopens with redesigned and expanded displays, I suspect the Kition will return to its rightful place among the ancient cities of Cyprus.

UPDATE: To this we can add a conference to celebrate the centenary of Honor Frost’s birth to be held at the University of Cyprus from October 19-24! Titled “Under the Mediterranean” the program looks at Frost’s legacy of underwater research on ancient harbors across the Levant and Cyprus.  


Archaeological News on Tumblr

Medieval porpoise 'grave' on Channel island puzzles archaeologists

Archaeologists digging at an island religious retreat have unearthed the remains of a porpoise that,...

AIA Fieldnotes

Richard Seager Fellowship

Listing: 
non-AIA
Type: 
fellowship
Deadline(s): 
November 1, 2018

"The INSTAP Study Center for East Crete is pleased to announce the availability of one Doctoral fellowship to be awarded on a competitive basis to an eligible candidate for work to be done at the Study Center in Pachei a Ammos, Crete during the year that the fellowship is awarded. A minimum of four weeks should be spent working at the Center. The fellowship is intended for scholars in the field of the Aegean Bronze Age/Early Iron Age who are working to complete their PhD Dissertations. The fellowship will be awarded in the amount of $4,000."

Recipients: 
Contact Name: 
INSTAP Study Center for East Crete
Telephone: 

Archaeological News on Tumblr

Urartian necropolis reveals burial customs

Excavations in a Urartian necropolis in the eastern province of Van’s Çavuştepe Castle, which has...

Roger Pearse (Thoughts on Antiquity, Patristics, putting things online, and more)

Byzantine science – Botany

Here are some notes on sources for Byzantine Science; in this case botany.

Botany was not a subject of real interest to the Byzantines.  The Byzantine interest in plants was entirely practical. As such they compiled lists of plants useful for medicine – materia medica -, or for magical use. They are also noted for the copying of ancient botanical texts such as Dioscurides, with its copious illustrations of plants and their properties. (An example appears at the foot of this post).

Studies: Hunger, Die hochsprachliche profane Literatur der Byzantiner, Vol. 2, Series: Handbuch der Altertumswissenschaft, XII.5 (Munich, 1978): pp.271-6.

Botanical lexicons / glosses. The lexicon or glossary became the usual form of botanical knowledge transfer in late antiquity and Byzantium. These were usually only alphabetic to the extent of the first letter. The botanical glossaries preserved in Byzantine manuscripts often give the impression of private notes, made more or less ad hoc on blank pages of manuscripts. They are usually short, and anonymous, except for those of ps.Galen, Nikomedes, and Neophytos Prodromenos. The manuscripts are usually 15-16th century. It is rare that these texts can be assigned a date, or read without difficulty because of the careless handwriting, and the use of terms from Latin or Arabic.

Editions: A. Delatte, Anecdota Atheniensia 2, (1939), 273-454, includes 15 botanical glossaries, including ps.Galen, ps.Symeon Seth, Neophytos, Nikomedes, Nicholas Hieropais. (Review here) M. H. Thomson, Textes grecs inedits relatifs aux plantes, Paris 1955, Nr. 10, p. 139-168. With French translation.
Studies: A. Delatte, “Le Lexique de botanique du Parisinus Graecus 2419”, in: Serta Leodensia, Bibl. Fac. Philos. Lettr. Univ. Liege 44 (1930) 59-101; A. Delatte, Herbarius. Recherches sur le ceremonial usite chez les anciens pour la cueillette des simples et des plantes magiques, Liege-Paris 1936; J.Stannard, “Byzantine Botanical Lexicography”, Episteme 5 (1971), 168-87.

Neophytos Prodromenos. A 14th century monk and scribe of Albanian origin in the circle of Manuel II Paleologus. He wrote a compendium of Aristotelean logic, also on the 24 letters of the alphabet and on Indian numbers, as well as theological works, and works on medicine. He compiled a lexicon / botanical glossary probably for the needs of the hospital founded by the Serbian king Uros II Milutin in the monastery of Petra in Constantinople. He also did research on cancer and oral and teeth diseases, and proposed strengthening by binding the teeth with woolen thread.

Edition: V. Lundstrom, “Neophytos Prodromenos’ botaniska namnförteckning”, Eranos 5 (1903-04) 129-155. Info here.
Dental text: De dentibus: Neophytos Prodromenos, Πρόχειρος καὶ χρήσιμος σαφήνεια καὶ συλλογὴ κατὰ στοιχεῖον περὶ βοτανῶν καὶ ἄλλων παντοίων εἰδῶν θεραπευτικῶν, ed. A. Delatte, Anecdota Atheniensia et alia, Band 2, Textes grecs relatifs a l’histoire des sciences. Liege-Paris 279-302, 1939. Details here.
Studies: Hunger, p.272-3, p.308-9; Michel Cacouros, “Néophytes Prodromènos copiste et responsable (?) de l’édition quadrivium-corpus aristotelicum du 14e siècle”, Revue des études byzantines 56 (1998) pp. 193-212. Online here; E. Bollingier, Essai sur l’oeuvre de Neophytos Prodromenos. Thesis, 1966. Info here.

A 7th century Dioscurides. Bibl. Naz. Naples MS Suppl. gr. 28.

Byzantine science: where to start and where to look

Where do we start, if we want to know about Byzantine science?  Well, you start here!

The history of science in the Byzantine empire is a neglected field of investigation, even more so than the same subject in the ancient world. It has suffered because few scholars with the language skills also possess an understanding of the scientific area. In addition Byzantine studies was neglected until recently because the subject matter was considered as merely derivative of ancient work. But this was always an over-simplification, not least because only 5% of Byzantine scientific works extant in manuscript have been published.

Byzantine science may be defined as the study of the history of knowledge of subjects which today mainly form part of the science faculties, in the period from 500 AD to 1453. This consists mainly of working with authors and sources transmitted in manuscripts, as few scientific instruments have been preserved from the period. The sources consist both of practical handbooks of “how to do stuff”, and also more theoretical treatises.

Introductory articles

  • Karl Vogel, “Byzantine Science”, in: The Cambridge Medieval History, volume 4, part 2 (revised ed. J. Hussey), 1967, p.264-305.  Online here (PDF, 11mb).[1]  This is 40 pages, and gives a massive overview of the main Byzantine scientists and their work.  Unfortunately it was written in a period when Byzantine studies as a whole tended to be dismissed as derivative and of no special interest.  But the material presented by Vogel actually contradicts the received wisdom of his day, as may easily be seen.  Not a lot of bibliography tho.
  • H. Hunger, Die hochsprachliche profane Literatur der Byzantiner. 2 vols., Series: Handbuch der Altertumswissenschaft, XII.5 (Munich, 1978). Volume 2 is the one of interest to us.  It contains chapters on mathematics and astronomy (astrology), natural sciences (zoology, botany, lapidaries, alchemy), and medicine, and gives a bibliography for each.  Unfortunately this is in German.  But I find that it can be understood OK with Google Translate.
  • Anne Tihon, “Numeracy and Science”, In: Oxford Handbook of Byzantine Studies, 2009, p.803-819. Brief introduction. Includes a useful bibliography.
  • Anne Tihon, “Science in the Byzantine Empire”, in: Lindberg D.C., Shank M.H. (eds.), The Cambridge History of Science, Vol. 2: Medieval Science, Cambridge University Press (2013), p.190-206.  Brief introduction.
  •  M. Mavroudi, “Science, Byzantine”, in: Roger Bagnall &c (eds), The Encyclopedia of Ancient History, Blackwell (2013), pp. 6063-6065.  Brief two-page overview of current views on the field, plus useful bibliography.

Let’s finish by quoting Anne Tihon from her Cambridge History of Science article:

In the field of Byzantine science, so many texts remain unedited or simply ignored that one cannot claim to give a complete account of Byzantine scientific achievements. Nevertheless, we can say that the scientific efforts of Byzantium have often been underestimated by modern historians of science. Although Byzantine scholars were deeply concerned with the preservation of the priceless scientific inheritance from antiquity, they were also receptive to the progress made by their nearest neighbors, especially Arabic, Persian, or Hebrew scientists. The European Renaissance owes to the efforts of the Byzantine scholars the preservation of major scientific texts from antiquity. But they did much more than just copying the ancient inheritance in many manuscripts. They kept it alive, attempting to understand the texts exactly, making new editions, training themselves in mathematical procedures or geometrical demonstrations, and commenting on and explaining endlessly mathematical treatises, astronomical tables, and musical theories. This is especially true in astronomy.

A Byzantine sundial
  1. [1]The original Cambridge Medieval History volumes, edited by H. Gwatkin, are now public domain and appear online.  However volume 4 was reissued in two volumes in 1967, edited by J. Hussey.  These volumes are offline, as far as I know.  A new edition was issued more recently as The New Cambridge Medieval History, which is also freely accessible online.  However it contains no article on “Byzantine Science”.  The Vogel article therefore languishes in an obscure volume of a now superseded encyclopedia, and is not at all easy to obtain.  My thanks to the kind gentleman who tracked down a copy for me.

Archaeological News on Tumblr

Iconic Temple of Olympian Zeus in central Athens to get structural makeover

The colossal Temple of Olympian Zeus or ‘Olympeion’ in central Athens, one of the...

Ancient Greek fortress discovered in Southern Russian Krasnodar region

Archaeologists have discovered a fortress in Russia’s Krasnodar Region, which was supposedly founded...

Tom Matrullo (Classics in Sarasota)

Excerpt from Delancey Place

Today's encore selection -- from The Pursuit of Italy by David Gilmour. In 1861, when the Italian peninsula was finally united into a single political entity, only 2.5 percent of "Italians" spoke the Italian language. In fact, the citizens of every major Italian city -- Rome, Venice, Florence, Milan and others -- each spoke a different language. The situation was similar in the other countries of Europe:
"The posthumous role of Dante Alighieri in the development of Italian has long been treated with reverence and solemnity. The great Florentine poet was, according to one scholar, not only 'the father of the Italian language' but also 'the father of the nation and the symbol of national greatness through the centuries'. It is doubtful that Dante would have thought the second part of the description applicable to him, especially as he believed Italy should be part of the Holy Roman Empire and not a nation by itself. Yet he did write The Divine Comedy (or, as he himself called it, simply La Commedia) in Italian and extolled the virtues of the vernacular, the 'new sun' that would put Latin in the shade, in De vulgari eloquentia, a book he wrote in Latin. More . . . 

The Archaeology News Network

Early trilobites had stomachs, new fossil study finds

Exceptionally preserved trilobite fossils from China, dating back to more than 500 million years ago, have revealed new insights into the extinct marine animal's digestive system. Published in the journal PLOS ONE, the new study shows that at least two trilobite species evolved a stomach structure 20 million years earlier than previously thought. A specimen of the trilobite Palaeolenus lantenoisi from the Guanshan Biota in southern...

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Big herbivorous dinosaurs ate crustaceans as a side dish

Some big plant-eating dinosaurs roaming present-day Utah some 75 million years ago were slurping up crustaceans on the side, a behavior that may have been tied to reproductive activities, says a new University of Colorado Boulder study. CU Boulder Associate Professor Karen Chin excavating dinosaur coprolites at Grand Staircase-Escalante National  Monument in Utah. The new study shows herbivorous dinosaurs also were eating...

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ArcheoNet BE

Middeleeuwse boomstamwaterput gevonden in Merelbeke

In Merelbeke voerden de archeologen van De Logi & Hoorne de afgelopen weken in opdracht van het OCMW Merelbeke een kleine opgraving uit naar aanleiding van de aanleg van een nieuw lokaal dienstencentrum. Op het aangrenzende terrein werd in 2001-2003 al een middeleeuwse nederzetting en vroegmiddeleeuws grafveld opgegraven. Een proefsleuvenonderzoek eind 2015 wees ook op de aanwezigheid van archeologische restanten op de OCMW-site.

Een groot deel van het terrein bleek verstoord door recente zandwinning, maar toch konden twee vroegmiddeleeuwse sporen van belang onderzocht worden. Een brede gracht blijkt de mogelijke afbakening te vormen van één van de vroegmiddeleeuwse fasen van de nederzetting of het grafveld. Vlakbij vond het team een eveneens vroegmiddeleeuwse waterput. De structuur was opgebouwd uit een uitgeholde eik die in vier segmenten was gedeeld.

Deze vondst is vooral belangrijk omdat het zal toelaten om via verder natuurwetenschappelijk onderzoek een pak bij te leren over de natuurlijke omgeving van de vroegmiddeleeuwse nederzetting.

James F. McGrath (Exploring Our Matrix)

Revealing Lost Texts Through Tech at #AARSBL17

I am delighted to circulate the poster below, to help spread the word about an exciting session at AAR/SBL this year, with a strong digital humanities focus, and co-sponsored by several program units within both the American Academy of Religion and the Society of Biblical Literature: This promises to be a fantastic session as far […]

Jim Davila (Paleojudaica.com)

Gnosticism, Kabbalah, and "mother!"

<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/q3mNCtHcX8E" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

Still more from Novenson on The Grammar of Messianism

<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/ksfULzWyRVE" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

Rosh HaShanah and God's memory

<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/2UM2B-IZiGY" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

Review of Norelli and Cameron, Markion und der biblische Kanon

<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/O6Jan7EzlWU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

Archaeology Magazine

15th-Century Epitaph Tablet Returned to South Korea

SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA—The widow of a Japanese collector has returned a rare Joseon-era epitaph tablet, or myoji, to South Korea, according to a report in the Korea JoongAng Daily. “This myoji will act as a crucial material for studies on the history of ceramics,” said Lee Su-kyung of the National Museum of Korea. The blue-gray tablet, made of buncheong celadon, stands 11 inches tall, and is inscribed on all four sides with the biographical information of a scholar named Yi Seon-je, who lived from A.D. 1390 to 1453. It would have been placed in his grave, as was customary during the Joseon Dynasty. To read about another recent discovery in South Korea, go to “Doll Story.”

Temple of Artemis Found on Greek Isle of Euboea

Greece Euboea Artemis Temple Aerial

 

AMARYNTHOS, GREECE—Swissinfo reports that a team of Swiss researchers led by Karl Reber of the University of Lausanne has discovered the lost temple of Artemis at the foot of the Paleoekklisies hill, on the Greek island of Euboea. The site, identified with artifacts inscribed with the name “Arthemidos,” is located about six miles from the place where the temple was previously thought to have stood. Archaeologist Denis Knöpfler of the University of Neuchâtel found a key clue to the temple’s location in a nearby Byzantine church that had pieces of the temple’s Doric columns and blocks in its façade. So far, the foundations of the building’s portico and inner courtyard have been uncovered. The temple was the end point of an annual procession from the city of Eretrea and home to a festival in honor of the goddess of hunting. To read about another recent discovery in Greece, go to “A Surprise City in Thessaly.”

Possible Viking Boat Burial Uncovered in Norway

Norway boat burialTRONDHEIM, NORWAY—According to a report in Live Science, a possible boat burial dating to between the seventh and tenth centuries A.D. has been discovered in a market square in Trondheim. The burial, which may have at one time been covered with a mound, was damaged by later construction. Ian Reed of the Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage said nails and lumps of rust are all that remain of what could have been a flat-bottomed, wooden boat built to travel the shallow waters of the Nidelven River. Two long bones were found in the boat, but they were not well preserved. DNA tests may be able to determine whether the bones came from a human. A piece of bronze, part of a spoon, and the remains of a key that would have opened a chest were also found in the grave. For more, go to “Hoards of the Vikings.”

September 20, 2017

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Ras Shamra Tablet Inventory at OCHRE

Ras Shamra Tablet Inventory
RS 2.004, Aqhatu 1
The Ras Shamra Tablet Inventory (RSTI) aspires to be the foremost online resource for Ugarit Studies. From the celebrated myths to the more quotidian administrative lists, the texts from Ras Shamra-Ugarit are of great interest to students and scholars of Biblical studies and Ancient Near Eastern studies. These ancient texts, discovered by archaeologists beginning in 1929, provide insight into the religious, administrative, and daily life of the kingdom of Ugarit, some 3,200 years after its fall. After over 80 years of Ugarit studies, researchers like those at the Oriental Institute are still establishing reliable text editions of the thousands of texts. Printed volumes are an inadequate solution. The field needs an innovative, collaborate, and ambitious solution. The primary goal of RSTI is to integrate archaeological, textual, lexical, and philological research in a single database and present this data to researchers and the public through a simple, widely accessible, online digital interface.

This project builds on many years of research, including research from a pre-digital age. In 1978, Pierre Bordreuil and Dennis Pardee set out to document critical information about every inscribed object from Ras Shamra-Ugarit. In 1989, “La Trouvaille Epigraphique de l’Ougarit” (TEO) appeared in the series Ras Shamra-Ougarit, volume 5 (Éditions Recherche sur les civilisations, volume 86). This volume presents the archaeological context of every inscribed object, a description of the object size and type of writing, museum numbers, publications, text editions, and general remarks. Of course, the printed volume lacks information about the objects discovered after 1988. During his doctoral research, Prosser endeavored to create a relational database that included digitized TEO data, text transcriptions, translations, glossaries, bibliographic references, and notes. This database functioned well but was very limited. Through his work at the Persepolis Fortification Archive project at the Oriental Institute, Prosser became familiar with the OCHRE database system and immediately perceived its superiority for archaeological and philological analysis. See below for more on the OCHRE database system. Work began on RSTI in 2011, importing data from Prosser’s relational database and adding new data.

Deployed through both Java and familiar HTML user interfaces, RSTI presents dynamic and interactive text editions, prosopography research, bibliography, and related resources. RSTI uses the Online Cultural and Historical Research Environment (OCHRE) at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago. The OCHRE database system was developed specifically for research in archaeology and philology. The underlying data model is well-suited to the heterogeneous and semi-structured nature of philological data. For more about the OCHRE database, see www.ochre.uchicago.edu.

LAUNCH RSTI

OCHRE Data Service Publications

OCHRE Data Service Publications
OCHRE is an online service available to anyone who wishes to use it for a legitimate academic purpose. Although it is a centralized database, OCHRE does not present itself as a single, anonymous authority. All data are organized according to "projects" conducted by one or more researchers. Any number of projects can join OCHRE and add their data to the database

OCHRE Resources

OCHRE: An Online Cultural and Historical Research Environment by J. David Schloen and Sandra R. Schloen, Eisenbrauns, 2012
The OCHRE Wiki, maintained by Miller C. Prosser and Sandra R. Schloen

Related Articles

Two Perspectives on the Digital Humanities with Steven Rings and David Schloen, Tableau: the magazine of the Division of the Humanities at the University of Chicago, Spring 2016
Ancient Civilizations, Modern Computation by Benjamin Recchie, Research Computing Center, University of Chicago, March 2016
Back, and to the Future by Elizabeth Station, Tableau: the magazine of the Division of the Humanities at the University of Chicago, Spring 2014
Digital Dig by Elizabeth Station, Tableau: the magazine of the Division of the Humanities at the University of Chicago, Spring 2014
Beyond Gutenberg: Transcending the Document Paradigm in Digital Humanities by David Schloen and Sandra Schloen, Digital Humanities Quarterly 2014: v8 n4
Data Integration Without Taxation: A Revolutionary Approach to Collaboration by Sandra R. Schloen, ASOR blog, December 13, 2013

Presentations

OCHRE Data Service: State of the Service 2013 by Miller C. Prosser and Sandra R. Schloen, January 10, 2014

Posters and Brochures

Rhapsody in Green, Database Variations on a Theme; CAA Siena session, April 2015
OCHRE Data Service; Mind Bytes Expo and Symposium, October 2014
OCHRE; exhibit poster ASOR 2016
GEOchre; tri-fold brochure 2016

The Archaeology News Network

Racism behind outlandish theories about Africa’s ancient architecture

Some of the most impressive buildings and cities ever made by humans can be found in Africa: the ruined city of Great Zimbabwe, Mapungubwe in South Africa, Kenya’s Gedi Ruins and Meroe in Sudan. Perhaps the most awe-inspiring of these are the last remaining of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, the Great Pyramid of Giza, in Egypt. The pyramids of Giza on the outskirts of Cairo, Egypt [Credit: Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters]This...

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New scientific dating research unravels the story of life in prehistoric Orkney

A new study, published today in Antiquity journal, is challenging the previously understood narrative for prehistoric life on Orkney. It was led by Professor Alex Bayliss of Historic England and is based on the interrogation of more than 600 radiocarbon dates, enabling much more precise estimates of the timing and duration of events in the period c.3200-2500 BC. Excavating the Smerquoy Hoose [Credit: © Colin Richards]The study is...

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Compitum - publications

A.-I. Bouton-Touboulic (éd.), L'amour de la justice, de la Septante à Thomas d'Aquin

Anne-Isabelle Bouton-Touboulic (éd.), L'amour de la justice, de la Septante à Thomas d'Aquin, Bordeaux, 2017.

Éditeur : Ausonius Éditions
Collection : Scripta Antiqua
373 pages
ISBN : 1298-1990
25 €

Ce volume rassemble vingt-deux contributions consacrées aux représentations antiques et médiévales de la justice, de la Septante à Thomas d'Aquin, soit pour l'essentiel du IIIe siècle a.C. au XIIIe s. p.C.. Il examine comment les auteurs chrétiens de l'Antiquité, apportant avec eux les acceptions bibliques de la “justice”, ont modifié les cadres conceptuels et les pratiques socio-politiques attachés à l'idée de justice. On y explore sur une période longue l'évolution des différentes facettes de cette notion, entendue à la fois comme vertu individuelle et idéal éthique, mais aussi comme valeur politique, incarnée dans des lois, des règles et des institutions. Pour mesurer l'apport en ce domaine de la littérature chrétienne – considérée ici de Tertullien à Ferrand de Carthage –, on interroge d'abord ses sources bibliques et antiques sur cette question, puis sa postérité médiévale. Dans quelle mesure cette tradition de pensée témoigne-t-elle d'un renouvellement des perceptions de la justice, divine tout autant qu'humaine, et de l'injustice ? Quelles marques a-t-elle à son tour laissées sur les représentations de la justice dans le monde médiéval, qu'elle s'exprime dans des traités, ou dans la littérature de fiction ?
Ce volume est au confluent des sciences de l'Antiquité, des études bibliques et de la patristique, de la littérature et de la philosophie médiévales.

Lire la suite...

Archaeological News on Tumblr

Early Viking Boat Grave Discovered in Norway

Archaeologists excavating a market square in Trondheim, Norway, have discovered the remains of a...

The Archaeology News Network

2017 excavations at Minoan cemetery in Petras Siteia concluded

The excavation of the unplundered Pre- and Proto-Palatial Minoan cemetery (2800-1800 BC) at Petras Siteia in eastern Crete continued for the 12th season under the direction Dr. Metaxia Tsipopoulou, with excellent results. Minoan site of Petras [Credit: Petras Excavations Facebook]In previous years some 17 monumental tombs, a funerary rock shelter, three pits and two extensive ritual spaces erected and used by prominent families of the...

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Solving the Easter Island population puzzle

Easter Island, known as Rapa Nui by its inhabitants, has been surrounded in mystery ever since the Europeans first landed in 1722. Early visitors estimated a population of just 1,500-3,000, which seemed at odds with the nearly nine hundred giant statues dotted around the Island. How did this small community construct, transport and erect these large rock figures? Easter Island Moai [Credit: Arian Zwegers/Flickr]A new study, published...

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ArcheoNet BE

Kipdorpbastion in Antwerpen komt na 150 jaar weer aan het licht

Na 150 jaar komt de Kipdorpsite in Antwerpen weer aan het licht. Momenteel is het bastion volledig te zien en wordt het startschot gegeven om de brug vrij te graven. De kazematvloeren van het bastion worden eind deze week verwijderd. De brug maakt vanaf 2019 onderdeel uit van het vernieuwde Operaplein.

De opgraving van de Kipdorpsite is van groot archeologisch belang voor Antwerpen. Dit was namelijk dé oostelijke toegangsweg tot de stad van de 16de eeuw tot 1865 voor iedereen die uit de Kempen kwam.

De Kipdorpbrug en poort werden beschermd door een bastion. De zuidflank wordt momenteel door archeologen onderzocht en geeft haar geheimen prijs. Ten eerste zijn er de twee wanden van de poterne, de ondergrondse doorgang waarlangs de 19de-eeuwse kazemat werd bereikt. Ten tweede is er de kazemat zelf, de ruimte met drie geschutsvloeren waar de kanonnen werden opgesteld. Twee van deze vloeren liggen vrij en geven een idee van hoe de stadstoegang werd verdedigd.

Later deze week worden de vloeren verwijderd om de 16de-eeuwse bastionfase te onderzoeken. Er wordt ook gestart met de uitgraving van de Kipdorpbrug. Uit bronnen en eerder onderzoek weten de archeologen dat deze 90 meter lang, 7 meter breed en 7 meter diep was. Ze liep in twee grote bochten over de stadsgracht en verbond zo de landszijde ter hoogte van Borgerhout met de stad. De komende weken zal de brug tot 3,5 meter diep worden uitgegraven.

Lees meer op www.antwerpen.be.

Het Wijnpershuis in Leuven. Een leven vol herbestemmingen

Naar aanleiding van de recent afgeronde restauratie van het Wijnpershuis in Leuven publiceerde OKV een erfgoedgids over het 16de-eeuwse gebouw. Aan de hand van historisch beeldmateriaal en nieuwe bouwhistorische en archeologische inzichten biedt de publicatie de lezer een geschiedenis van de functionele en stilistische ingrepen aan het sinds 1938 beschermde Wijnpershuis.

In 1551 verreest het Wijnpershuis boven op de kelder van het voorgaande pershuis van de Sint-Geertruiabdij, aan de voet van haar wijngaarden op de noordwestelijke heuvelflank van Leuven. Door het verval van de wijnbouw op het einde van de 17de eeuw verloor het pand zijn functie. Nadat het een periode als boerderijwoning dienst deed, kocht de stad Leuven het gebouw om er een Provinciale Groenten- en Moesteeltschool te huisvesten. Vanaf 1938 verhuisden de onderwijsactiviteiten echter naar nieuwe gebouwen op de schoolsite. Dit bood ruimte voor medegebruik, onder andere door ‘De Hagelandse wijnbouwers’ in de jaren 1970. Ook nadien toonde het wijnpersgebouw zich flexibel inzetbaar, tot in 2003 de leegstand volgde.

De erfgoedgids over het Wijnpershuis kan besteld worden via www.tento.be.

The Archaeology News Network

How Teotihuacan's urban design was lost and found

Name one civilization located in the Americas that pre-dates the arrival of Europeans. You probably replied with the Aztecs, the Inca or perhaps the Maya. A new paper, published in De Gruyter's open access journal Open Archeology, by Michael E. Smith of Arizona State University shows how this view of American civilizations is narrow. It is entitled "The Teotihuacan Anomaly: The Historical Trajectory of Urban Design in Ancient Central...

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Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

The Ancient World in JSTOR

This is the full list of journals in JSTOR with substantial focus on the Ancient World.

[Originally posted 6/24/09. Most recently updated 20 September 2017]

JSTOR is not open access, but many will have access to it through institutional licenses.  JSTOR also offers a free limited-reading option, Register & Read, for those without institutional access, and has lanched JPASS - a monthly or annual pass that provides access to 1,500 journals from JSTOR's archive collection. For open access journals dealing with antiquity, See AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies.

The African Access Initiative eliminates archival journal fees on JSTOR across all of Africa. All not-for-profit institutions in Africa are eligible to participate, including colleges, universities, secondary schools, government and non-profit organizations, and museums.

Eligible institutions receive unlimited free access to all archival journal content on JSTOR. This includes more than twenty archival journal collections, as well as JSTOR’s four primary source collections.

And see also Open Access Early Journal Content In JSTOR

266 titles

                                                                                    The Archaeology News Network

                                                                                    Lost temple of Artemis found on Greek island of Euboea

                                                                                    A Swiss-led team of archaeologists in Greece has made a spectacular find: the temple of Artemis, a famous open-air sanctuary of antiquity. Credit: Greek Ministry of CultureResearchers have been looking for the sanctuary for more than a century. The site was found at the foot of the Paleoekklisies hill near the small fishing town of Amarynthos on the Greek island of Euboea. It’s about 10km from the place where the temple was wrongly...

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                                                                                    Bill Caraher (The New Archaeology of the Mediterranean World)

                                                                                    Ottoman Peasants and their Local Elite

                                                                                    I’m always excited to read something my Michael Given who has published a series of intriguing articles unraveling the complexities of the Cypriot landscape during the Ottoman period. I was particularly intrigued by his recent piece in the Journal of Islamic Archaeology 4.1 (2017) titled “Global Peasant, Local Elite: Mobility and Interaction in Ottoman Cyprus.”

                                                                                    As the title suggest, the article looks to invert the old paradigm of local peasants and global elite by observing that peasants on Cyprus understood their place in an economy that was far from local. By looking at the way in which peasants speculated on their cotton crops, moved goods to profitable markets across the island, and negotiated rents and loans from landowners, Given contributes to a larger conversation that recognizes peasants as active participants in their own economic lives. Recent scholarship in the Mediterranean has sought to revise the idea that peasants were “people without history” or, more frequently in the eastern Mediterranean, figments of history that had somehow persisted in the Early Modern era. Given’s peasants are unapologetically historical individuals who recognize the contingencies present in their own economic strategies and existence. 

                                                                                    Given’s work has recently interested me for two reasons. First, as I’ve blogged about before, he has explored Ivan Illich’s idea of conviviality in the context of Mediterranean landscapes.

                                                                                    More importantly, in this case, is Given’s interest in mobility in the Mediterranean landscapes and particularly the role of monopati, cart tracks, and roads not only in linking together communities but creating spaces for economic and social activities. That these routes were more than simply passive links between communities and activated opportunities for interaction along their routes offers a way to understand the formation of seasonal settlements along these routes as preserving and building upon the common space of the roads. While it may be self-evidence, a model that understand roads themselves as space of interaction reminds us that road do more than manifest interaction between settlement “nodes”; they create settlement “nodes” as well. (My work in the Bakken allowed me to observe this phenomenon accelerated into hypermodern realty (in a kind of literal dromology); I’m now eager to read Erin Gibson’s work on roads that I first noticed in the Journal of Mediterranean Archaeology and which I now see that she’s expanded to North American cart roads!).    

                                                                                    Our work in the Western Argolid Regional Project has likewise focused on road and tracks through our survey area that preserved the course of Early Modern routes that were partly bypassed by modern paved roads. The appearance of seasonal settlements along these routes tied the season movement of flocks from villages outside the region demonstrated the dynamism and movement present in the early modern landscape. The presence of threshing floors around the larger of these indicated that these settlements were more than simply winter pastures for flocks, but also served as anchors for fields in the region and the processing of the late summer harvest. These seasonal settlements also provided access to markets at Argos (and the Aegean) and further diversified opportunities for villages like Frousiouna which stands at the head of a north-south valley oriented toward the Corinthian Gulf. 


                                                                                    Archaeological News on Tumblr

                                                                                    Teotihuacan’s unique urban design

                                                                                    Name one civilization located in the Americas that pre-dates the arrival of Europeans, and you would...

                                                                                    News, Blogposts and Jobs on aiegl.org (Association Internationale d’Épigraphie Grecque et Latine: AIEGL)

                                                                                    Digital Edition of IGCyr and GVCyr

                                                                                    The Inscriptions of Greek Cyrenaica and Greek Verse Inscriptions of Cyrenaica have been published and are now available at https://igcyr.unibo.it/

                                                                                    Images are also separately available at http://amshistorica.unibo.it/epigrafi

                                                                                    Martin Rundkvist (Aardvarchaeology)

                                                                                    September Pieces Of My Mind #2

                                                                                    • Planting a gingko and listening to early Black Sabbath.
                                                                                    • Sailboat owners around Älgö have a lot of trouble with their wind indicators. The local crows use them as merry-go-rounds, which messes them up.
                                                                                    • Me: “I am daft today.” Autocorrect: “I am Daddy Toast.”
                                                                                    • Friendly local fellow gladly gave us permission to stash our excavation gear overnight behind his garden shed.
                                                                                    • Heavy downpour making loud whoosh noise on the roof.
                                                                                    • Rented a van, collected excavation gear and two students, deposited gear at site, bought extra gear, had lunch, returned van, am now in no hurry to airport. Everything went as planned. (But then a storm hit and my flight was delayed for almost six hours.)
                                                                                    • Went out of the house at 05:15 heading for Gothenburg, was greeted by a beautiful conjunction of Venus and the crescent moon in the south-east.
                                                                                    • Opening three trenches today in Kungahälla’s Viking Period predecessor. Weights & spindlewhorls tell of trade & textile crafts.
                                                                                    • Mars Society’s scifi writer debate panel on humankind’s future in space consists of four white men aged 62 and over. Ouch.
                                                                                    • Have a feeling that a lot of web sites keep re-asking me if I’ll accept their goddamn cookies.
                                                                                    • How can you figure out the average volume of a hole in Blackburn, Lancashire simply by counting them? I mean, you don’t know their total volume to begin with. Makes no sense. Lennon was clearly tripping.
                                                                                    • The damn fire alarm in my hotel room has a bright green blinking LED that keeps me from sleeping. Last night I put a sticky plaster on it, but tonight I decided to take it down. Wearing headphones with loud riff rock in them. So I couldn’t hear the angry beeping from the alarm box in the hallway. So security had to come visit. *sigh*

                                                                                    The Archaeology News Network

                                                                                    Fly away home? Ice Age may have clipped bird migration

                                                                                    The onset of the last ice age may have forced some bird species to abandon their northerly migrations for thousands of years, says new research led by a University of Nebraska-Lincoln ornithologist. A study led by Nebraska's Robert Zink proposes that many bird species, such as the Canada warbler, may have  completely stopped migrating during the last ice age [Credit: University of Nebraska-Lincoln]Published in the journal Science...

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                                                                                    Dinosaur evolution: Lumbering giants had agile ancestors

                                                                                    The best known sauropod dinosaurs were huge herbivorous creatures, whose brain structures were markedly different from those of their evolutionary predecessors, for the earliest representatives of the group were small, lithe carnivores. A couple of predator Mapusaurus try to isolate a herd of sauropods [Credit: Sergey Krasovskiy]The sauropod group of dinosaurs included the largest animals that have ever walked the Earth -- up to 40...

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                                                                                    10,000 year-old DNA proves when fish colonized lakes

                                                                                    DNA in lake sediment forms a natural archive displaying when various fish species colonized lakes after the glacial period. This according to researchers at the Department of Ecology and Environmental Science at Umeå University in a study published in the journal Methods in Ecology and Evolution. Their analyses of the prevalence of whitefish DNA in sediment reveal that the whitefish came to Lake Stora Lögdasjön in Västerbotten already...

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                                                                                    James F. McGrath (Exploring Our Matrix)

                                                                                    The Federation vs. the Borg

                                                                                    I made a Star Trek reference at last night’s public lecture, in response to a question about whether it was self-defeating or self-contradictory to be intolerant of intolerance. But not wanting to lose an audience that might or might not have appreciated the analogy, I held back, and in the end I didn’t feel that […]

                                                                                    Jim Davila (Paleojudaica.com)

                                                                                    Rosh HaShanah 2017

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                                                                                    Where did the Temple menorah go?

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                                                                                    DSS in Denver

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                                                                                    Szabó Csaba (About Roman Religion)

                                                                                    Jupiter Dolichenus in the Kunsthistorisches Museum

                                                                                    In the Romanian literature focusing on the cult of Jupiter Dolichenus there is a wrong interpretation of a monument, copied and repeated in the last 40 years.

                                                                                    9568-1Ion Miclea and Radu Florescu published a book in 1979 presenting the Transylvanian monuments of the Kunsthistorisches Museum from Vienna (fig.1.). In this book, the authors presented a beautiful Dolichenian statue. The authors presented the monument as originated from Surducu Mare (Nagyszurduk) Caras-Severin (Krassó-Szörény), identified as the Roman settlement of Centum Putei. Their interpretation was based on the wrong reading of the original inventory sheet. Radu Florescu (1925-2014) was one of the prominent historians of his age, but he probably didn’t read Hungarian and German very well. The same was true for Ion Miclea (1931-2000), the Communist photograph of Nicolae Ceausescu. They interpreted the toponym of Szlankamen with Szurduk, mostly based on the phonetic similarities.

                                                                                    Unfortuantely, their mistake was repetedly copied later: all the major works on the so called Oriental cults (the works of Silviu Sanie, Sorin Nemeti, Carbó-Garcia and Imola Boda) mentioned the famous statue of Jupiter Dolichenus from the Kunsthistorisches Museum as discovered in Nagyszurduk (Surducu Mare).

                                                                                    _j_k_p_3_Actually, the statue was discovered in the first half of the 19th century in Zalánkemén (Стари Сланкамен / Sztari Szlankamen / Stari Slankamen), today Serbia. The settlement was identified as Acumincum already by Th. Mommsen. The monument was later bought and donated by Dr. Kiss Ferenc from Pest and it is part of the Kunsthistorisches Museum since 1851. The monument first was published shortly by Katancs and in 1854 by Seidl in his seminal work on the cult of Dolichenus (fig. 2, 3.). It was published also in the CIL (CIL III 3253) and in the major corpus of the Dolichenian monuments (Merlat, CCID) too. This is why it is highly surprizing that nobody from the Romanian scholars observed till now, that the “monument from Surducu Mare” is actually, the statue from Acumincum. The CIL III 3252 was probably also discovered in the same time and same spot, as part of a possible Dolichenum from Acumincum.

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                                                                                    9568-2