Maia Atlantis: Ancient World Blogs

http://planet.atlantides.org/maia

Tom Elliott (tom.elliott@nyu.edu)

This feed aggregator is part of the Planet Atlantides constellation. Its current content is available in multiple webfeed formats, including Atom, RSS/RDF and RSS 1.0. The subscription list is also available in OPML and as a FOAF Roll. All content is assumed to be the intellectual property of the originators unless they indicate otherwise.

October 18, 2017

Paul Barford (Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues)

MoB Galatians Fragment Shelved


At DC presser, Museum of Bible's David Trobisch says it won't display disputed Galatians fragment until it can resolve provenance questions.
see my: 'Green Collection Objects "Yet to find a questionable piece"...'. PACHI Saturday, 5 September 2015
 and PACHI Saturday, 10 May 2014, 'Green Collection, well, there are collecting histories, and collecting histories'.


As for why there are problems, see here:
 PACHI Friday, 16 January 2015:
'Sappho and the Peripatetic Papyri (1) Introduction',
'Sappho and the Peripatetic Papyri (2) Pap.Robs',
'
Sappho and the Peripatetic Papyri (3) 2011 AnonStash at Christie's',
'Sappho and the Peripatetic Papyri (4) "The Trusted Mister X"',
I see I never managed to complete the fifth in the series.

PACHI Friday, 23 January 2015
'Sappho Pap. Obbink: Further Painting into Corners'.

Then PACHI Thursday, 27 November 2014,
'Mixantik and his 'Connections' with Christies'

 

Can the Museum of the Bible overcome the sins of the past?


Lizzie Wade, 'Can the Museum of the Bible overcome the sins of the past?' Science Magazine Oct. 16, 2017
In the forthcoming book Bible Nation: The United States of Hobby Lobby, Joel Baden, a Hebrew Bible scholar at Yale Divinity School, and Candida Moss, an expert on the New Testament at the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom, take the Green collection to task for having commissioned inexperienced scholars to analyze ancient texts. The duo also complains that the museum has not published a complete catalog of its objects, making it impossible for scholars to know whether it owns artifacts worthy of study, or how many may have problematic provenance. The Museum of the Bible is trying to allay scholars’ fears and establish itself as a legitimate academic enterprise.
No truly legitimate academic enterprise would base any of its work on recently purchased artefacts of 'problematic' (ie lacking) provenance. How many of the latter are in the institution's research collection and exhibits?

The Dirt on the Dubious Dead Sea Scrolls


Alex Macdonald, Researcher at Macquarie University (Oct 16 2017) summarises 'The Dirt on the Dubious Dead Sea Scrolls: curiosities to consider as more information emerges'.
everyone thought that all the manuscripts and fragments from Qumran had been excavated and sold; the dominant dealer (known as Kando) suggested that the days of buying and selling DSS material were past. Nonetheless, since 2002 when an American dealer was offered an opportunity to buy more DSS, we have seen some 76 fragments come through the market for huge prices — hundreds of thousands of dollars, up to tens of millions. They seem to have come largely via one of Kando’s sons. Many of these are now in the collection of Martin Schøyen, and others are owned by various American evangelical institutions including the SouthWestern Baptist Theological Seminary and the new almost-open Museum of the Bible backed by the Hobby Lobby family (the Greens). All these fragments were bought on the premise that they were authentic antiquities, and volumes publishing the Schøyen fragments and the Museum of the Bible fragments have been published this year — but some of those papyri have been proven to be fake! In numerous instances this is through papyrological/ palaeographical methods, but in some cases (i.e. six fragments from the Schøyen collection) scientific testing has been conducted and confirmed the verdict of the scholars. This raises all sorts of questions including questions about how documents with no legitimate provenance information came into such collections.
This is followed up by the author presenting 'a few things that I think are worth noting', and indeed they are. Including this one:

There’s another enigma, a group with a cluster of related entities: “Ancient Discovery Investment Group”, “The American Judeo-Christian Heritage Foundation”, the “Artifact Research and Translation Foundation.” They want to bring a “priceless” collection of Dead Sea Scrolls — that is, the rest of William Kando’s scrolls — to America and thus “prove that mankind once enjoyed a relationship with deity.” The price is upward of THREE HUNDRED MILLION DOLLARS! Despite the lack of overt reference to the fact, they seem to be a group of Mormons.

Archaeology Magazine

Climate May Have Contributed to the Fall of Egyptian Dynasty

Egypt volcano NileDUBLIN, IRELAND—According to a report in The Guardian, an analysis of environmental records and historic documents suggests a volcanic eruption may have contributed to the Roman victory over Cleopatra at the Battle of Actium in 30 B.C. Egypt’s defeat has long been blamed on the shortcomings of the 300-year-long Ptolemaic dynasty, including infighting, decadence, and incest. But ice core data, Islamic records of water levels in the Nile River, and ancient Egyptian histories written on papyrus suggest a volcanic eruption somewhere in the world in 44 B.C. may have disrupted the annual flooding of the Nile and triggered famine, plague, and social unrest. Historian Joe Manning of Yale University and climate historian Francis Ludlow of Trinity College Dublin say failure of the Nile floodwaters, and the resulting social stresses, could have weakened Cleopatra’s power and left her reign vulnerable to the Romans. For more on archaeology in Egypt, go to “In the Time of the Rosetta Stone.”

Possible Missing Jewelry Box Piece Found at Viking Fortress

Denmark silver boxKØGE, DENMARK—A small silver artifact has been uncovered at Borgring, a Viking fortress in eastern Denmark. According to a report in Science Nordic, the object resembles one of the three parts known to be missing from an elaborate box brooch discovered in a Viking woman’s grave at the Fyrkat fortress in Hobro, which is located to the north of Borgring. “It will be incredible if this fitting is connected with the find from Fyrkat,” said Jeanette Varberg of the Moesgaard Museum. “If this really is where it comes from then it’s like finding a needle in the ocean.” The woman in the grave at Fyrkat is thought to have been a high-status shaman or sorceress. Analysis of her “well-used and highly treasured” box suggests it held white lead, which appears to have been used as a sealant to waterproof the box. Perhaps she traveled between the two castles, which are both thought to have been built by Harald Bluetooth, who was king of Denmark between A.D. 958 and 987. Analysis of the metal could offer more information on the origins of the two pieces. For more, go to “Bluetooth's Fortress.”

Bronze Age Toys Recovered in Southeastern Turkey

SANLIURFA, TURKEY—The International Business Times reports that 5,000-year-old toys have been discovered in one of the 120 tombs in the necropolis at the ancient religious center of Sogmatar, which was dedicated to Sin, the god of the moon. Excavation leader Celal Uludag said the first toy, found in a child’s grave, is an earthenware horse carriage with four wheels. The front of the vehicle was decorated with incised lines. Uludag thinks it was made for the children of the city’s ruler or administrators. The second toy from the tomb is a rattle with a bird motif. All of the tombs in the necropolis were situated around a large, central mound. For more on archaeology in Turkey, go to “The Price of a Warship.”

October 17, 2017

ArcheoNet BE

Contactdag prehistorie op zaterdag 16 december in Ramioul

Op zaterdag 16 december zal de jaarlijkse contactdag van de ‘Contactgroep Prehistorie’ plaatsvinden in het Prehistomuseum in Ramioul. Een internationale keur aan prehistorici zal er de resultaten van hun onderzoek voorstellen. Nog tot 30 oktober kunnen alle geïnteresseerden voorstellen voor een voordracht of poster indienen. Volume 37 van de ‘Notae Praehistoricae’ zal opnieuw zowel in gedrukte als elektronische vorm verschijnen. De deadline voor bijdragen is 27 november.

Naast de jaarlijkse gewoonte om recent steentijdonderzoek in België te belichten, ook dit jaar weer ruimte gecreërd om Belgische onderzoekers die niet of niet zo strikt met België bezig zijn aan het woord te laten. Daarnaast blijft de traditie behouden om een buitenlandse gastspreker uit te nodigen.

Potentiële sprekers of auteurs van een poster sturen voor 30 oktober een titel en samenvatting naar GdContactPrehist@ulg.ac.be en Ivan.Jadin@naturalsciences.be. Ook niet-gepresenteerd onderzoek kan in de ‘Notae Praehistoricae’ worden opgenomen. Dit kan tot 27 november via Ivan.Jadin@naturalsciences.be.

Paola Arosio and Diego Meozzi (Stone Pages' Archaeonews)

First evidence of dismemberment in prehistoric Ireland

A new analysis of bones taken from an old excavation at 5300 years-old passage tomb complex at Carrowkeel, in County Sligo has revealed evidence of the burial practices and death...

Dolmens dating back to around 3,000 years found in southern India

A team of archaeologists has discovered more than 300 dolmens reportedly dating back to 3,000 years near Mallasandram (Krishnagiri district, southern India). They said it was for the first time...

Illuminating discovery at megalithic tomb in Kerry

A hillwalker in west Kerry (Ireland) has made a stunning discovery which connects a 4,000-year-old tomb with the equinox. The megalithic tomb, known as the Giant's Grave, is situated in...

8,000-year-old paint workshop discovered in Turkey

One of the oldest paint workshops of the world have been found at an ancient settlement in northwestern Turkish province of Eskişehir. Archaeologists working at the ancient settlement mound of...

David Gill (Looting Matters)

Looting of archaeological sites in East Anglia

BBC Look East 17 October 2017
BBC Look East has covered the problem of looting on archaeological sites in East Anglia (October 17, 2017). The report covers the problem of illegal metal-detecting on the site of Great Chesterford, the response from the police (including PC Andy Long of Essex Constabulary) and landowners, as well as from metal-detectorists. Police will be installing cameras at key sites, as well as deploying drones to identify criminal activity.

The message that needs to get through is that archaeological contexts are being lost, and key pieces are not being reported.

The programme is available here for 24 hours.

BBC Look East 17 October 2017
Bookmark and Share so Your Real Friends Know that You Know

Compitum - publications

D. Lenfant (éd.), Pseudo-Xénophon, Constitution des Athéniens, texte établi, traduit et ...

couv.pseudo-xen.jpg

Dominique Lenfant (éd.), Pseudo-Xénophon, Constitution des Athéniens, texte établi, traduit et commenté, Paris, 2017.

Éditeur : Les Belles Lettres
Collection : Collection des Universités de France
443 pages
ISBN : 978-2-251-00618-5
45 €

La Constitution des Athéniens est un pamphlet contre la démocratie athénienne, rédigé à la fin du Ve siècle av. J.-C., à l'époque où Périclès faisait au contraire l'éloge de ce régime. Longtemps attribuée à tort à Xénophon, elle est due à un Athénien anonyme de la classe supérieure, partisan d'un régime oligarchique, que les modernes surnomment parfois « le vieil oligarque ». L'auteur dénonce la démocratie comme un régime injuste, dont les victimes sont les riches, les bien nés, ceux qu'il appelle « les honnêtes gens » et qui sont les mieux qualifiés pour gouverner, tandis que les « fripons », les pauvres, la masse profitent d'un système qui vise à leur seul profit. L'opuscule détaille les spécificités du régime et ses conséquences pour les uns et les autres. Il présente la démocratie athénienne comme un régime immoral, mais très cohérent. Considéré par les historiens actuels comme une œuvre majeure, il est une mine d'informations sur la démocratie athénienne, son fonctionnement et les attaques dont elle a fait l'objet.

Lire la suite...

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Open Access Publications of the Center for Hellenic Studies

[First posted in AWOL 10 January, 2011. Most recently updated 17 October 2017]

Center for Hellenic Studies Online Publications

Before you get started, we recommend that you review our Introduction to Online Publications.
The CHS website has other research publications not listed here:
  • Classics@ Online Journal features dynamic issues, each dedicated to a particular topic, often with guest editors, which provide an in-depth exploration of salient issues in the field of Classics.
  • Classical Inquiries (CI)⬀ is a rapid-publication project devoted to the frequent sharing of insights into the ancient world with researchers and the general public alike.
  • The CHS Research Bulletin⬀ is an e-journal dedicated to sharing the work of current fellows at the CHS. The Bulletin contains the fellows’ symposium papers and videos of their presentations.
Citation information for books printed by the Center for Hellenic Studies in the Hellenic Studies Series can be found here. For citation information for other books click here; for essays click here; and for short writings by Director Gregory Nagy click here

Books or Monographs:

Acosta-Hughes, Benjamin, Elizabeth Kosmetatou, and Manuel Baumbach, eds. Labored in Papyrus Leaves: Perspectives on an Epigram Collection Attributed to Posidippus (P.Mil.Vogl. VIII 309).
Aitken, Ellen Bradshaw. ὁπάων and ὁπάζω: A Study in the Epic Treatment of Heroic Relationships.
Alexiou, Margaret, The Ritual Lament in Greek Tradition.
Bakker, Egbert J., Pointing at the Past: From Formula to Performance in Homeric Poetics.
Bazzaz, Sahar, Yota Batsaki, and Dimiter Angelov, eds., Imperial Geographies in Byzantine and Ottoman Space.
Beck, Deborah, Homeric Conversation.
Benveniste, Emile, Indo-European Language and Society.
Bergren, Ann, Weaving Truth: Essays on Language and the Female in Greek Thought.
Berry, Steven M., Vico's Prescient Evolutionary Model for Homer.
Bers, Victor, GENOS DIKANIKON: Amateur and Professional Speech in the Courtrooms of Classical Athens
Bers, Victor, et al., eds., Donum natalicium digitaliter confectum Gregorio Nagy septuagenario a discipulis collegis familiaribus oblatum
Bierl, Anton, Ritual and Performativity: The Chorus in Old Comedy.
Bird, Graeme D., Multitextuality in the Homeric Iliad: The Witness of the Ptolemaic Papyri
Bocchetti, Carla, El espejo de las Musas: El arte de la descripción en la Ilíada y Odisea.
Bollack, Jean, The Art of Reading: From Homer to Paul Celan.
Bonifazi, Anna, Homer's Versicolored Fabric: The Evocative Power of Ancient Greek Epic Word-Making.
Bonifazi, Anna, Annemieke Drummen, Mark de Kreij, Particles in Ancient Greek Discourse: Five Volumes Exploring Particle Use Across Genres.
Calame, Claude, Choruses of Young Women in Ancient Greece.
Calame, Claude, Poetic and Performative Memory in Ancient Greece: Heroic Reference and Ritual Gestures in Time and Space.
Cameron, Averil, Dialoguing in Late Antiquity
Capra, Andrea, Plato's Four Muses: The Phaedrus and the Poetics of Philosophy.
Compton, Todd M., Victim of the Muses: Poet as Scapegoat, Warrior and Hero in Greco-Roman and Indo-European Myth and History.
Davies, Malcolm, The Theban Epics
Davies, Malcolm, The Aethiopis: Neo-Neoanalysis Reanalyzed.
Detienne, Marcel, Comparative Anthropology of Ancient Greece.
Dué, Casey, The Captive Woman's Lament in Greek Tragedy.
Dué, Casey, Homeric Variations on a Lament by Briseis.
Dué, Casey, Recapturing a Homeric Legacy: Images and Insights from the Venetus A Manuscript of the Iliad (3.5 MB PDF download). 
Dué, Casey, and Ebbott, Mary, Iliad 10 and the Poetics of Ambush.
Ebbott, Mary, Imagining Illegitimacy in Classical Greek Literature.
Edmunds, Susan, Homeric Nēpios.
Fisher, Elizabeth A., Michael Psellos. On Symeon the Metaphrast and On the Miracle at Blachernae: Annotated Translations with Introductions.
Frame, Douglas, Hippota Nestor.
Frame, Douglas, The Myth of Return in Early Greek Epic.
Franklin, John Curtis, Kinyras: The Divine Lyre
Funke, Peter, and Nino Luraghi, eds. The Politics of Ethnicity and the Crisis of the Peloponnesian League.
Garcia, Lorenzo F., Jr., Homeric Durability: Telling Time in the Iliad.
Giesecke, Annette, The Epic City: Urbanism, Utopia, and the Garden in Ancient Greece and Rome.
González, José M., The Epic Rhapsode and His Craft: Homeric Performance in a Diachronic Perspective.
Greene, Ellen, and Marilyn B. Skinner, eds. The New Sappho on Old Age: Textual and Philosophical Issues.
Hitch, Sarah, King of Sacrifice: Ritual and Royal Authority in the Iliad.
Hollmann, Alexander, The Master of Signs: Signs and the Interpretation of Signs in Herodotus' Histories.
Jacob, Christian, The Web of Athenaeus.
Jeffré, Friedrich Bernhard, Der Begriff τέχνη bei Plato.
Johnson, Aaron, and Jeremy Schott, eds., Eusebius of Caesarea: Tradition and Innovations.
Johnson, Scott Fitzgerald, editor, Greek Literature in Late Antiquity: Dynamism, Didacticism, Classicism.
Johnson, Scott Fitzgerald, The Life and Miracles of Thekla: A Literary Study.
Jones, Prudence J., Africa: Greek and Roman Perspectives from Homer to Apuleius.
Kalvesmaki, Joel, The Theology of Arithmetic: Number Symbolism in Platonism and Early Christianity.
Lesher, James, Debra Nails, and Frisbee Sheffield, editors, Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception.
Levaniouk, Olga, Eve of the Festival: Making Myth in Odyssey 19.
Lord, Albert Bates, Epic Singers and Oral Tradition.
Lord, Albert Bates, The Singer of Tales.
Lord, Albert Bates, The Singer Resumes the Tale.
Luraghi, Nino and Susan E. Alcock, eds., Helots and Their Masters in Laconia and Messenia: Histories, Ideologies, Structures.
Marks, J., Zeus in the Odyssey.
Martin, Richard P. The Language of Heroes: Speech and Performance in the Iliad.
Munson, Rosario Vignolo, Black Doves Speak: Herodotus and the Languages of Barbarians.
Muellner, Leonard Charles, The Anger of Achilles: Mênis in Greek Epic.
Muellner, Leonard Charles, The meaning of Homeric εὔχομαι through its formulas.
Nagy, Gregory, The Ancient Greek Hero in 24 Hours.
Nagy, Gregory, The Best of the Achaeans: Concepts of the Hero in Archaic Greek Poetry.
Nagy, Gregory, Comparative Studies in Greek and Indic Meter.
Nagy, Gregory, Greek: An Updating of a Survey of Recent Work.
Nagy, Gregory, Greek Mythology and Poetics.
Nagy, Gregory, Homer the Classic.
Nagy, Gregory, Homer the Preclassic.
Nagy, Gregory, Homeric Questions.
Nagy, Gregory, Homeric Responses.
Nagy, Gregory, Homer's Text and Language.
Nagy, Gregory, Masterpieces of Metonymy: From Ancient Greek Times to Now.
Nagy, Gregory, Pindar's Homer: The Lyric Possession of an Epic Past.
Nagy, Gregory, Plato's Rhapsody and Homer's Music: The Poetics of the Panathenaic Festival in Classical Athens.
Nagy, Gregory, Poetry as Performance: Homer and Beyond.
Nagy, Gregory, Short Writings, Volume 1.
Nagy, Gregory, Short Writings, Volume 2.
Nagy, Gregory, Short Writings, Volume 3.
Nagy, Gregory, Short Writings, Volume 4.
Olson, Ryan S., Tragedy, Authority, and Trickery: The Poetics of Embedded Letters in Josephus.
Papadogiannakis, Yannis. Christianity and Hellenism in the Fifth-Century Greek East: Theodoret's Apologetics against the Greeks in Context.
Papadopoulou, Ioanna, and Leonard Muellner, eds., Poetry as Initiation: The Center for Hellenic Studies Symposium on the Derveni Papyrus.
Parmegianni, Giovanni, editor, Between Thucydides and Polybius: The Golden Age of Greek Historiography.
Parry, Milman, L'Épithète Traditionnelle dans Homère : Essai sur un problème de style Homérique.
Parry, Milman, Les formules et la métrique d'Homère.
Pathak, Shubha, Divine Yet Human Epics: Reflections of Poetic Rulers from Ancient Greece and India.
Pepper, Timothy, editor, A Californian Hymn to Homer.
Peradotto, John, Man in the Middle Voice: Name and Narration in the Odyssey (3.7 MB PDF download).
Petropoulos, J. C. B., Heat and Lust: Hesiod’s Midsummer Festival Scene Revisited.
Petropoulos, J.C.B., Kleos in a Minor Key: The Homeric Education of a Little Prince.
Platte, Ryan, Equine Poetics.
Power, Timothy, The Culture of Kitharôidia.
Roilos, Panagiotis, Amphoteroglossia: A Poetics of the Twelfth-Century Medieval Greek Novel.
Roth, Catharine P., "Mixed Aorists" in Homeric Greek.
Rouvelas, Marilyn, A Guide to Greek Traditions and Customs in America (32.2MB PDF download).
Sandridge, Norman B., Loving Humanity, Learning, and Being Honored: The Foundations of Leadership in Xenophon's Education of Cyrus.
Scholtz, Andrew, Concordia discors: Eros and Dialogue in Classical Athenian Literature.
Schur, David, Plato's Wayward Path: Literary Form and the Republic.
Schwartz, Daniel L., Paideia and Cult: Christian Initiation in Theodore of Mopsuestia.
Shayegan, M. Rahim, Aspects of History and Epic in Ancient Iran: From Gaumāta to Wahnām.
Slatkin, Laura, The Power of Thetis and Selected Essays.
Soliman, Sameh Farouk, ΤΑ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΑ ΓΡΑΜΜΑΤΑ ΕΙΣ ΤΑΣ ΑΝΑΤΟΛΙΚΑΣ ΕΠΑΡΧΙΑΣ ΤΟΥ ΒΥΖΑΝΤΙΟΥ ΚΑΤΑ ΤΟΥΣ ΔΥΟ ΠΡΩΤΟΥΣ ΑΙΩΝΑΣ ΤΗΣ ΑΡΑΒΟΚΡΑΤΙΑΣ (Ζ & Η). (In Greek)
Tell, Håkan, Plato's Counterfeit Sophists.
Tsagalis, Christos, From Listeners to Viewers: Space in the Iliad.
Tsagalis, Christos, The Oral Palimpsest: Exploring Intertextuality in the Homeric Epics
Tzifopoulos, Yannis, 'Paradise' Earned: The Bacchic-Orphic Gold Lamellae of Crete.
Walker, Cheryl, Hostages in Republican Rome.
Walsh, Thomas R., Fighting Words and Feuding Words: Anger and the Homeric Poems.
Wareh, Tarik. The Theory and Practice of Life: Isocrates and the Philosophers.
Wells, James Bradley, Pindar's Verbal Art: An Ethnographic Study of Epinician Style.
Wesselmann, Katharina, Mythical Structures in Herodotus' Histories.
West, William Custis, III, Greek Public Monuments of the Persian Wars.
Winkler, Daniela, Ankle and Ankle Epithets in Archaic Greek Verse.
Yatromanolakis, Dimitrios, Sappho in the Making: The Early Reception.

Articles, Essays, and Lectures

Bierl, Anton, "Der neue Sappho-Papyrus aus Köln und Sapphos Erneuerung. Virtuelle Choralität, Eros, Tod, Orpheus und Musik." 
Bierl, Anton, "'Ich aber (sage), das Schönste ist, was einer Liebt': Eine pragmatische Deutung von Sappho Fr. 16 LP/V."
Bierl, Anton, "Space in Xenophon of Ephesus: Love, Dreams, and Dissemination."
Bultrighini, Ilaria, "Gli horoi rupestri dell’attica."
Connor, W. Robert, "Great Expectations: The Expected and the Unexpected in Thucydides and in Liberal Education."
Connor, W. Robert, "The Pygmies in the Cage: The Function of the Sublime in Longinus."
Connor, W. Robert, "We Must Call the Classics before a Court of Shipwrecked Men."
Dué, Casey, "Maneuvers in the Dark of Night: Iliad 10 in the Twenty-First Century."
Edmonds, Radcliffe G. III, "Recycling Laertes' Shroud: More on Orphism and Original Sin."
Ferrari, Gloria, "Anthropological Approaches."
Frame, Douglas, "Achilles and Patroclus as Indo-European Twins: Homer’s Take."
Frank M. Snowden Jr., Lectures at Howard University:
Hitch, Sarah, "Hero Cult in Apollonius Rhodius."
Marwede, David, "A Structural Analysis of the Meleagros Myth."
Muellner, Leonard, "The Simile of the Cranes and Pygmies: A Study of Homeric Metaphor."
Nagy, Gregory, "Achilles and Patroklos as Models for the Twinning of Identity."
Nagy, Gregory, "The Aeolic Component in Homeric Diction."
Nagy, Gregory, "Alcaeus in Sacred Space." 
Nagy, Gregory, "Ancient Greek Elegy."
Nagy, Gregory, "An Apobatic Moment for Achilles as Athlete at the Festival of the Panathenaia."
Nagy, Gregory, "Asopos and his Multiple Daughters: Traces of Preclassical Epic in the Aeginetan Odes of Pindar."
Nagy, Gregory, "Comments on Plutarch's Essay On Isis and Osiris."
Nagy, Gregory, "Convergences and divergences between god and hero in the Mnesiepes Inscription of Paros."
Nagy, Gregory, "Copies and Models in Horace Odes 4.1 and 4.2."
Nagy, Gregory, "The Delian Maidens and their Relevance to Choral Mimesis in Classical Drama."
Nagy, Gregory, "Diachronic Homer and a Cretan Odyssey."
Nagy, Gregory, "Diachrony and the case of Aesop."
Nagy, Gregory, "On Dialectal Anomalies in Pylian Texts."
Nagy, Gregory, "Did Sappho and Alcaeus Ever Meet?"
Nagy, Gregory, "'Dream of a Shade': Refractions of Epic Vision in Pindar’s Pythian 8 and Aeschylus’ Seven against Thebes."
Nagy, Gregory, "The Earliest Phases in the Reception of the Homeric Hymns."
Nagy, Gregory, "Epic."
Nagy, Gregory, "The Epic Hero."
Nagy, Gregory, "The fire ritual of the Iguvine Tables: Facing a central problem in the study of ritual language."
Nagy, Gregory, Foreword to Born of the Earth: Myth and Politics in Athens, by Nicole Loraux. Trans. Selina Stewart. Cornell University Press, 2000.
Nagy, Gregory, Foreword to Mothers in Mourning, by Nicole Loraux. Trans. Corinne Pache. Cornell University Press, 1998.
Nagy, Gregory, "The Fragmentary Muse and the Poetics of Refraction in Sappho, Sophocles, Offenbach."
Nagy, Gregory, "Genre and Occasion."
Nagy, Gregory, “Genre, Occasion, and Choral Mimesis Revisited—with special reference to the ‘newest Sappho’.”
Nagy, Gregory, "Herodotus and the Logioi of the Persians."
Nagy, Gregory, "Hesiod and the Ancient Biographical Traditions."
Nagy, Gregory, "The Homer Multitext Project."
Nagy, Gregory, "Homer and Greek Myth."
Nagy, Gregory, "Homer as Model for The Ancient Library: Metaphors of Corpus and Cosmos."
Nagy, Gregory, "Homeric Echoes in Posidippus."
Nagy, Gregory, "Homeric Poetry and Problems of Multiformity: The 'Panathenaic Bottleneck'."
Nagy, Gregory, "Homo ludens in the world of ancient Greek verbal art."
Nagy, Gregory, "Hymnic Elements in Empedocles."
Nagy, Gregory, "The Idea of the Library as a Classical Model for European Culture."
Nagy, Gregory,  Greek Literature: Introductions and Suggested Bibliographies
Nagy, Gregory, "The Library of Pergamon as a Classical Model." 
Nagy, Gregory, "Language and Meter."
Nagy, Gregory, "Lyric and Greek Myth."
Nagy, Gregory, "The meaning of homoios (ὁμοῖος) in verse 27 of the Hesiodic Theogony and elsewhere."
Nagy, Gregory, "The 'New Sappho' Reconsidered in the Light of the Athenian Reception of Sappho."
Nagy, Gregory, "Observations on Greek dialects in the late second millennium BCE."
Nagy, Gregory, "Orality and Literacy."
Nagy, Gregory, "Performance and Text in Ancient Greece."
Nagy, Gregory, "Poetics of Repetition in Homer."
Nagy, Gregory, "A poetics of sisterly affect in the Brothers Song and in other songs of Sappho."
Nagy, Gregory, "Reading Bakhtin Reading the Classics: An Epic Fate for Conveyors of the Heroic Past."
Nagy, Gregory, "Reading Greek Poetry Aloud: Evidence from the Bacchylides Papyri."
Nagy, Gregory, "Review (part I) of M. L. West's Indo-European Poetry and Myth (Oxford 2007)."
Nagy, Gregory, "Review (part II) of M. L. West, Indo-European Poetry and Myth (Oxford 2007)."
Nagy, Gregory, "Review of Writing Homer. A study based on results from modern fieldwork, by Minna Skafte Jensen."
Nagy, Gregory, "A Sampling of Comments on the Iliad and Odyssey."
Nagy, Gregory, "A second look at a possible Mycenaean reflex in Homer: phorēnai."
Nagy, Gregory, "A Second Look at the Poetics of Re-enactment in Ode 13 of Bacchylides." 
Nagy, Gregory, "The Sign of the Hero: A Prologue to the Heroikos of Philostratus."
Nagy, Gregory, "Signs of Hero Cult in Homeric Poetry."
Nagy, Gregory, "The Subjectivity of Fear as Reflected in Ancient Greek Wording."
Nagy, Gregory, "Theognis and Megara: A Poet's Vision of his City."
Nagy, Gregory, "Things said and not said in a ritual text: Iguvine Tables Ib 10-16 / VIb 48-53."
Nagy, Gregory, "Transformations of Choral Lyric Traditions in the Context of Athenian State Theater."
Nagy, Gregory, "Transmission of Archaic Greek Sympotic Songs: From Lesbos to Alexandria."
Nagy, Gregory, "Virgil’s verse invitus, regina … and its poetic antecedents."
Parry, Milman, "Studies in the Epic Technique of Oral Verse-Making: I. Homer and Homeric Style."
Parry, Milman, "Studies in the Epic Technique of Oral Verse-Making: II. The Homeric Language as the Language of an Oral Poetry."
Rousseau, Philippe, "The Plot of Zeus."
Woodard, Roger D., "Dialectal Differences at Knossos."

Primary Texts

Aeschylus, Agamemnon
Aeschylus, Eumenides
Aeschylus, Libation Bearers
Alcman, Partheneion
The Derveni Papyrus
The Epic Cycle
Euripides, Bacchae
Euripides, Hippolytus
Euripides, Medea
Herodotus, Selections, Part I and Part II

Hesiod, Theogony

Hesiod, Works and Days
Homeric Iliad
Homeric Odyssey
Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite
Homeric Hymn to Demeter
Pausanias, Description of Greece: A Pausanias Reader in Progress
Philostratus, On Heroes
Pindar, Pythian 8
Plato, The Apology of Socrates
Plato, Phaedo
Sophocles, Oedipus at Colonus
Sophocles, Oedipus Tyrannos
Theognis of Megara

Roger Pearse (Thoughts on Antiquity, Patristics, putting things online, and more)

The only surviving handwriting of an emperor: Theodosius II and a petition from Aswan

How many of us know that there is a papyrus with the handwriting of a Roman emperor on it?  I certainly did not, until I learned of it from a tweet by Richard Flower.  But so it is.

The papyrus comes from Elephantine in Egypt, the island of Philae, opposite the modern town of Aswan, which is ancient Syene.  Papyri from the island were sold to dealers throughout the 19th century; some excavation took place in the early 20th, first by a German expedition, then a French.  Shockingly, while the Aramaic and Greek papyri discovered by the German excavators have been published, most of the Demotic, hieratic and Coptic papyri remain unpublished.[1]

The writing is by Theodosius II, who died in 450 AD after falling off his horse, and is dated to 425-430 AD.  The bishop of Syene, who had an Egyptian name, Appion, had written to the emperor (in Greek).  Nubian raiders were attacking the town.  The bishop asked for soldiers to protect it.

The emperor’s reply is not preserved, but a copy of the petition was attached to it, and on it some words in Latin, which are generally thought to be the emperor’s own hand.

The papyrus is now at Leiden, where the papyri were given letters, A-Z.  This is Leiden Papyrus Z (P. Leid. II. Z), catalogued here.  The papyrus is online at the Rijksmuseum in Leiden here.

It’s hard to even see the lettering on the papyrus, which is only written on the recto side.  Click on the image for a larger one, or visit the Rijksmuseum site for more photographs.

The emperor’s handwriting is at the top right of the sheet.  I’ve autoleveled an extract here:

Apparently the emperor wrote, “…bene valere te cupimus”, i.e. “…we desire that you be well.”

The document is translated for us in B. Porten &c, The Elephantine Papyri in English, 1996, p.441, entry D 19.  It is in two columns.  The first consists of an unreadable line, followed by the emperor’s words.  This is all that is left of the imperial reply.  The second column, headed by a Latin title “copy of the petition” contains the Greek text, written by a scribe.

For interest, here is the translation, slightly smoothed out:

[ . . . ] we desire that you be well.

Copy of Petition.

Address to the masters of land and sea and every nation of mankind, Theodosius and Valentinianus, the eternal Augusti, petition and supplication

From Appion, bishop of the legion of Syene and of Contra Syene and of Elephantine, in your province of Upper Thebaid.

Your Benevolence is accustomed to stretch out a right hand to all who are in need. Therefore I too, having learned this clearly, have come to these petitions, the matter being thus:

Situated with my churches in the midst of the sinful Barbaria[ns], the Blemmyes and the Nobadae, we are subject to many stealthy attacks by them, with no soldier protecting our places.

Therefore, since the churches under me have been humbled and are unable to protect the very ones who flee to them , I prostrate myself, rolling on the ground before your divine and immaculate footsteps so that you deem it right to decree that the holy churches [under me] be guarded by the soldiers among us, and that they obey me and heed me in all matters, just as the soldiers stationed in the fortress so-called “of Philae” in your Upper Thebaid will be at the service of the holy churches of God in Philae.

For thus we will be able to live without fear […] and follow […] most stern decree […] being issued against those who have transgressed […] what has been divinely ordained by you, every deceit of an opposing party, past or future, being null and void, with your divine [… and] special grace in this matter being addressed to the most magnificent and conspicuous count and duke of the frontier district of the Thebaid.

And having obtained this, I shall send up the customary prayers for your eternal power for all (time).

Apparently nothing in the archive of other papyri suggests that the request was honoured.

The request reminds me a little of the Donation of Constantine.  It has been suggested that this was originally composed in the 6th century during the Lombard invasions of Italy.  The idea is that it was a way for the Bishop of Rome to gain control of the remaining Byzantine garrisons, in order to protect the city.  Bishops were figures of authority in their communities in the late empire, and perhaps this story could be replicated wherever the secular power began to fail.

But how exciting to see the handwriting of a Roman emperor!

  1. [1]The Elephantine Papyri in English, p.4.

Paola Arosio and Diego Meozzi (Stone Pages' Archaeonews)

New exciting discoveries at the Ness of Brodgar dig

This year at the Ness Brodgar excavation in Orkney (Scotland), two remarkable finds were made. The first discovery being that of an incense pot as well as a 'butterfly-like' motif...

AIA Fieldnotes

20th International Rock Art Congress IFRAO 2018

Event Type (you may select more than one): 
other
Start Date: 
Wednesday, August 29, 2018 to Sunday, September 2, 2018

20th International Rock Art Congress IFRAO 2018

Location

Name: 
IFRAO2018
Telephone: 
Call for Papers: 
yes
Right Header: 
Right Content: 
CFP Deadline: 
November 30, 2017

Penn Museum Blog

Encounters in the Cathedral: Revisiting the 1676 Huron-Wendat Wampum Belt at Chartres, France

Every year the Penn Museum provides support to Penn undergraduates and graduate students as they deepen their understanding of the human experience outside the Museum’s walls. Follow these blog posts from our intrepid young scholars as they report on the sights and sites that they encounter throughout their travels in the field.


Report from the field by LISE PUYO.

In 1676, Huron-Wendat converts at the Jesuit mission of Lorette in Quebec, Canada, created a large wampum belt bearing the words “Virgini Pariturae Votum Huronum” (“Gift from the Hurons to the Virgin who shall give birth”). The members of this First Nation Indigenous community then sent this object to the Chartres Cathedral in France, accompanied by a transcription of a speech recording their diplomatic requests, translated into Latin and into French. The material and text of this belt offer a remarkable example of an Indigenous group conducting wampum diplomacy, not just with French missionaries, but also with Christian deities.

The cathedral of Chartres attracts many pilgrims who come to pay respects to the relics of the Virgin Mary. Tourists also visit to see the architecture, stained-glass windows, and paved labyrinth. Photo by Lise Puyo.

In 1699, twenty years after the chapter of Chartres sent a silver reliquary to Lorette to thank them for their gift, the Cathedral received another wampum belt. The Abenaki converts at the Saint-François de Sales mission (present-day Odanak, Quebec) also crafted a gigantic wampum belt which they sent to Chartres in accompaniment with transcribed and translated speeches. In January 1700, the chapter published a printed version of these letters, recording the Huron and Abenaki alliances.

The 1674 Huron-Wendat belt at Chartres Cathedral, France. Photo by Lise Puyo.

These belts have remained together at Chartres for four centuries and, like so many other wampum belts, their histories haves come in and out of local interest and memory. As we have noted in other research from the Wampum Trail project, wampum belts are powerful objects, indispensable to conduct diplomacy in the Native Northeast. Yet, they are often (mis)interpreted as museum relics, which obscures their importance to the Indigenous communities that created them. The Huron-Wendat wampum belt provides an interesting example of an object that has been repeatedly “lost” in collections and “re-discovered” by scholars.

Unexpected Discoveries

In 1841, Ignace Bourget, the bishop of Montreal, made a pilgrimage to Chartres Cathedral to visit the relics of the Virgin Mary. While descending into the crypt to gaze upon the statue of “the Virgin who shall give birth,” he is taken aback: he sees two wampum belts suspended near the statue, bearing the names of two First Nations he is very familiar with, in a place where he least expected them. Bourget’s meeting with these two belts inspires a renewed alliance between Chartres and the clergy at Montreal, who receives a piece of the famous fabric relic housed at the Chartres cathedral. This meeting does not, however, seem to have inspired any meaningful reconnection with the Huron-Wendat and Abenaki communities who created these objects, or any reassurance that (as the belts were originally intended to signal) the Jesuits and the First Nations would treat one another as equals.

Chartres is famous for its relic of the Holy Shirt, the shirt in which the Virgin Mary became pregnant with and gave birth to Jesus Christ. It has become a symbol for the cathedral, and you can find this shape on medals, books, and seals at Chartres. Given to the cathedral in the 800s, it was identified as a “shirt” until the 1710s, when the clergy opened the reliquary and realized it was a single piece of fabric, a “veil” more than a “shirt.” Photo by Lise Puyo.

From this moment, it took sixteen years to re-discover the original letters that were sent by the Wendat and Abenaki. In 1857 and 1858, two local historians—Jules Doublet de Boisthibault and Lucien Merlet—issued new editions of these documents, and the belts seemed to resurface in scholarly publications.[1] A few decades later, they were mentioned in the broad survey of wampum collections by New York State archaeologist William Beauchamp.[2]

In the summer of 1921, George B. Gordon, the director of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, made a remarkable “discovery.” While on a vacation trip to Europe, he visited Léon Legrain, the French ecclesiastic recently recruited to be the curator of the Museum’s Babylonian Section. Similarly to Ignace Bourget a century earlier, they visit the Chartres Cathedral together. Gordon is extremely surprised when he encounters two wampum belts on display in the crypt. A few days after his return to Philadelphia, he writes to Legrain:

“I have often recalled our visit together to Chartres and it is curious how certain small details stick in one’s mind. The two Indian wampum belts stick in my mind because of the surprise they gave me and I have been wondering whether you have been able to find out their date. It is a matter about which I am very curious.”
– George B. Gordon to Léon Legrain, October 21 1921[3]

Legrain was commissioned to make the very first photographs of these two belts for publication in the Museum Journal. The short article by William C. Farabee, Curator of the American Section (issued in 1922),[4] mainly borrows from Lucien Merlet’s 1858 publication. Although the photographs invite consideration of these objects’ materiality, Farabee, like many scholars since (e.g. Gobillot 1957;[5] Sanfaçon 1996; [6] Becker 2001;[7] Lainey 2004;[8] Vélez 2011[9]), tends to focus on the documentary evidence, rather than the ways in which the alliance is materialized by the belt.

The two wampum belts were photographed at Chartres for the first time by Léon Legrain for publication in the Museum Journal (volume 8(1), 1922).

In 2015, after joining the Wampum Trail research team at Penn, I visited the Chartres Cathedral while working on my master’s thesis in Ethnology and Social Anthropology at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) in Paris.[10] As part of this survey, I conducted close material examinations of the Huron-Wendat and Abenaki wampum belts at Chartres and “encountered” details that had been overlooked by previous researchers.

Material Matters

Superficially, the Huron-Wendat wampum belt looks like other historic wampum belts. Its background and most of its text are composed of traditional tubular white and purple shell beads carved from whelk and quahog, similar to other wampum belts of the era used by both Algonkian and Iroquoian peoples.

Detail of the 1674 Huron-Wendat wampum belt. Photo by Lise Puyo.

However, this belt also features a selection of oval glass beads instead of the usual tubular glass beads available at that time to imitate wampum. The Wampum Trail project director, Dr. Margaret Bruchac, suggested those might be rosary beads, as they are very similar in their shape, size, and material. The placement of these beads and what they mean in the Catholic dogma lead us to a new interpretation that reinforces and sheds new light on the historical documents associated with this Huron-Wendat wampum belt.

The glass beads appear only in the Latin words that pertain to Catholic doctrine; they do not appear in the word “Huronum,” which could reflect Indigenous territory. The specificity of this design suggests more than a merely decorative choice. These beads appear to signify a deep understanding of Catholic dogmas, echoing the diplomatic demands expressed by the Indigenous community to Mary and, by extension to the Catholic Church, to France.

During the summer of 2017, with field research funding from the Penn Museum and from the American Philosophical Society’s Phillips Fund for Native American Research, I set out to test the hypothesis that the glass beads are crucial elements in this object. I consulted with Huron-Wendat scholars, visited both the Musée Huron-Wendat and the Musée des Abénakis, examined 17th century rosary beads in historical collections, visited the Ursulines Museum, and searched the Jesuit Archives for additional clues. By examining material and textual evidence, and by comparing that data with contemporary oral histories, I sought to better understand the semiotics of both wampum and glass beads in the practice of Indigenous Catholicism in the 17th century Saint Lawrence River Valley.

Lise Puyo examining 17th-century rosaries at the Ursulines Museum, Trois-Rivières, Quebec, Canada. Photo by Josée Grandmont.

All of the objects examined during this field research—including a 1674 embroidered altarpiece made by the Ursulines of Québec city for the Huron-Wendat community at Lorette, multiple examples of rosary beads, and other historic wampum belts—provided new insights into the 1676 Huron-Wendat belt at Chartres. I learned, for example, that both shell wampum beads and glass wampum beads (glass beads blown and cut to mimic shell wampum beads) were abundant at Lorette in the 1670s. Why then, had so many scholars interpreted the glass beads as merely replacements, and not as selective choices? And what of the belts themselves? Are these merely “Christian” wampum belts, Catholic ex-votos that signal a break from Indigenous traditions? Or do these items represent something more: living objects that embody and evoke the strategic incorporation of both Indigenous and Catholic signals? Might they also represent an unfulfilled political agreement?

The research on recovering the histories and relationships embodied in these belts continues—watch the Penn Museum blog and the Wampum Trail blog for future findings.

Sources:

[1] Doublet de Boisthibault, Jules. 1857. Les Voeux des Huros et des Abnaquis à Notre-Dame de Chartres Publiés pour la Première Fois d’après les Manuscrits des Archives d’Eure-et-Loir. Chartres: Noury-Coquard. And Merlet, Lucien. 1858. Histoire des Relations des Hurons et des Abnaquis du Canada avec Notre Dame de Chartres, Suivie de Documents Inédits sur la Sainte Chemise. Chartres: Pétrot-Garnier.

[2] Beauchamp, William M. 1901. “Wampum and Shell Articles Used by the New York Indians.” Bulletin of the New York State Museum 41(8):327-480.

[3] George B. Gordon’s Letter book #29. Letter 478. University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology Archives.

[4] Farabee, William Curtis. 1922. “Recent Discovery of Ancient Wampum Belts.” Museum Journal 8(1).

[5] Gobillot, René. 1957. “Les Trois Ex-Voto Candaiens de Chartres.” Revue d’Histoire de l’Amérique Française. 11(1):42-46.

[6] Sanfaçon, André. 1996. “Objets Porteurs d’Identité dans les Consécrations Améridiennes à Notre-Dame de Chartres, 1678-1749,” pp. 449-466 in Turgeon, Laurier, Delâge, Denys, and Ouellet, Réal (eds.): Transferts Culturels et Métissages, Amérique/Europe, XVIe-XXe siècle/Cultural Transfer, America and Europe: 500 Years of Interculturation. Ste-Foy: Laval University Press.

[7] Becker, Marshall J. 2001. The Vatican Wampum Belt: An Important American Indian Artifact and Its Cultural Origins and Meaning within the Category of “Religious” or “Ecclesiastical-convert” Belts. Vatican City: Tipografia Vaticana.

[8] Lainey, Jonathan. 2004. La Monnaie des Sauvages: Les Colliers de Wampum d’Hier à Aujourd’hui. Sillery, Quebec: Septentrion.

[9] Vélez, Karin. 2011. “’A sign that we are related to you:’ The Transatlantic Gifts of the Hurons of the Jesuit Mission of Lorette, 1650-1750.” French Colonial History 12:31-44.

[10] Puyo, Lise. 2015. Les Collections de Wampum en France. Master’s Thesis, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris, France.

—————————–

For more information on the “Wampum Trail” project, see the Wampum Trail Research Blog and Wampum Trail Facebook page for reports on research discoveries and travels. For a brief summary report, also see “Wampum Research: Notes From the Trail 2014-2015” on the Penn Museum Blog.

ArcheoNet BE

De Klijtberg in Rollegem onthult zijn eeuwenoude geheimen

Op zaterdag 21 oktober kun je in Rollegem (Kortrijk) kennismaken met de rijke geschiedenis van de Klijtberg. Een gratis tentoonstelling presenteert de resultaten van de opgraving die in juli werd uitgevoerd, samen met de vondsten uit de verschillende veldprospecties. Archeologen van BAAC Vlaanderen en Philippe Despriet zullen aanwezig zijn om al je vragen te beantwoorden.

Een van de meest opmerkelijke vondsten van het archeologisch onderzoek was een grote ronde kringgreppel met een diameter van ongeveer 80 meter. Het zou gaan om de restanten van een middeleeuwse walgracht. Verder wetenschappelijk onderzoek moet uitsluitsel brengen over de juiste datering. Binnen deze gracht ontdekten de archeologen een woonstalhuis uit de middeleeuwen, waar mens en dier tussen de 10de en 12de eeuw samen onder één dak leefden. Daarnaast werd er eveneens een Romeins brandrestengraf aangetroffen. Andere sporen wijzen op landindeling en landgebruik vanaf de middeleeuwen tot de nieuwste tijd.

Veldprospecties tussen 1977 en 2005 brachten heel wat gelijkaardige vondsten aan het licht. Het gaat onder meer om materiaal uit het midden-neolithicum, aardewerk afkomstig van een fort uit de 17de eeuw en sporen die wijzen op een heuse veldslag uit de nieuwe tijd. Via metaaldetectie kwamen hoofdzakelijk vondsten uit de 18de en 19de eeuw aan het licht, die de aanwezigheid van een Frans leger verraden.

Praktisch: de tentoonstelling vindt plaats op zaterdag 21 oktober van 9u tot 17u op de Klijtberg aan de Rollegemseweg in Rollegem. Meer info: Facebook-evenement.

Carole Raddato (Following Hadrian)

17 October 117 – Hadrian arrives in Tyana (#Hadrian1900)

On this day 1,900 years ago, Hadrian reached the city of Tyana situated at the foot of the Taurus mountains near the Cilician Gates. We know from a fragment of an itinerary found in Rome that Hadrian left Antioch in the beginning of October 117 AD and travelled northwards towards Ancyra (modern Ankara). The inscription… Continue reading 17 October 117 – Hadrian arrives in Tyana (#Hadrian1900)

ArcheoNet BE

Legenden en Romeinse scherven op Nacht van het Kempens Erfgoed

Tijdens de ‘Nacht van het Kempens Erfgoed’ op vrijdag 20 oktober worden ook enkele interessante archeologische activiteiten georganiseerd. In Ravels laat Collectief MOOS je op een archeologische site uit de ijzertijd proeven van sagen, legenden en volksverhalen, en van posteleinsoep uit grootmoeders tijd. In de kerk van Grobbendonk kan je de archeologische tentoonstelling van Mercurius over Romeins Grobbendonk voor het laatst bezoeken. Een nieuwe tentoonstelling en een panelgesprek vertellen je alles over de recente opgravingen aan de Van de Wervelaan in Vorselaar. Je vindt alle informatie op nachtkempenserfgoed.be.

ASOR Blog (American Schools of Oriental Research)

The Antikythera Device – A Working Model of the Cosmos

All cultures create models of the cosmos in words and images; the ancient Greeks were the first to make a mechanical working model of the cosmos [...]

The post The Antikythera Device – A Working Model of the Cosmos appeared first on The ASOR Blog.

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Volcanic suppression of Nile summer flooding triggers revolt and constrains interstate conflict in ancient Egypt

Volcanic suppression of Nile summer flooding triggers revolt and constrains interstate conflict in ancient Egypt
Nature Communications 8, Article number: 900 (2017)
doi:10.1038/s41467-017-00957-y
Received: 10 November 2016
Accepted: 08 August 2017
Published online: 17 October 2017 

Abstract

Volcanic eruptions provide tests of human and natural system sensitivity to abrupt shocks because their repeated occurrence allows the identification of systematic relationships in the presence of random variability. Here we show a suppression of Nile summer flooding via the radiative and dynamical impacts of explosive volcanism on the African monsoon, using climate model output, ice-core-based volcanic forcing data, Nilometer measurements, and ancient Egyptian writings. We then examine the response of Ptolemaic Egypt (305–30 BCE), one of the best-documented ancient superpowers, to volcanically induced Nile suppression. Eruptions are associated with revolt onset against elite rule, and the cessation of Ptolemaic state warfare with their great rival, the Seleukid Empire. Eruptions are also followed by socioeconomic stress with increased hereditary land sales, and the issuance of priestly decrees to reinforce elite authority. Ptolemaic vulnerability to volcanic eruptions offers a caution for all monsoon-dependent agricultural regions, presently including 70% of world population.

AMIR: Access to Mideast and Islamic Resources

Open Access Manuscripts Collection: Manuscripts in the Libraries of the Greek and Armenian Patriarchates in Jerusalem

https://www.loc.gov/collections/greek-and-armenian-patriarchates-of-jerusalem/about-this-collection/


 Manuscripts in the Libraries of the Greek and Armenian Patriarchates in Jerusalem 
1009 manuscripts digitized by Library of Congress from the set of microfilms.
"As Jerusalem, the location of Christ’s Passion, has been central to the Christian religion since its inception, all the early churches sought a presence in that storied and holy city. The Greek Orthodox Church and the Armenian Apostolic Church, for example, both maintain ancient patriarchates in Jerusalem and both have created renowned libraries in them..."
 Languages:
 See also: Alphabetical List of Open Access Islamic Manuscripts Collections

    Open Access Books by Irfan Shahid from Dumbarton Oaks

    Open Access Books by Irfan Shahid from Dumbarton Oaks
    Irfan Shahîd
    Byzantium and the Arabs in the Sixth Century, volume 1, part 1, Political and Military History is devoted to the main Arabian tribes that federates of the Byzantine Roman Empire. In the early sixth century Constantinople shifted its Arab alliance from the Salahids to the Kindites and especially the Ghassanids, who came to dominate Arab-Byzantine relations through the reign of Heraclius. Arranged chronologically, this study, the first in-depth account of the Ghassanids since the nineteenth century, draws widely from original sources in Greek, Syriac, and Arabic. Irfan Shahîd traces in detail the vicissitudes of the relationship between the Romans and the Ghassanids, and argues for the latter’s extensive role in the defense of the Byzantine Empire in its east.
    Irfan Shahîd
    Byzantium and the Arabs in the Sixth Century, volume 1 part 2, Ecclesiastical History provides a chronologically ordered account of the involvement of the Ghassanids in ecclesiastical affairs in the eastern region of the Byzantine Empire. Tracing the role of Arab tribes both inside and outside the Roman limes, Irfan Shahîd documents how the Ghassanids in particular came to establish and develop a distinct non-Chalcedonian church hierarchy, all the while remaining allies of the Chalcedonian emperors. Ghassanid phylarchs such as Mundir emerge not merely as loyal foederati but devout Christians. Shahîd extensively and critically analyzes the Greek, Syriac, and Arabic sources, including many obscure or unfamiliar texts to illuminate the religious landscape of the Arabs of the sixth century.
    Irfan Shahîd
    Byzantium and the Arabs in the Sixth Century, volume 2, part 1, Toponymy, Monuments, Historical Geography, and Frontier Studies is a topical study of the military, religious, and civil structures of the Ghassanids. Irfan Shahîd’s detailed study of Arab buildings of the sixth century illuminates how Byzantine provincial art and architecture were adopted and adapted by the federate Arabs for their own use. As monuments of Christian architecture, these federate structures constitute the missing link in the development of Arab architecture in the region between the earlier pagan (Nabataean and Palmyrene) and later Muslim (Umayyad). Drawing from literary and material evidence, Shahîd argues that the Gassanids were not nomadic, as traditionally believed, but thoroughly sedentary both in their roots and in the late Roman frontier zone they inherited. The third of four volumes dedicated to the sixth century, this book extensively depends upon the previous two volumes (volume 1, part 1, Political and Military History; volume 1, part 2, Ecclesiastical History).
    Irfan Shahîd
    Byzantium and the Arabs in the Sixth Century, volume 2, part 2, Economic, Social, and Cultural History is a topical study of Arab economic, social, and cultural history in the sixth century. Irfan Shahîd focuses on the economy of the Ghassanids and presents information on various trade routes and fairs. He reconstructs Ghassanid daily life by discussing topics as varied as music, food, medicine, the role of women, and horse racing. Shahîd concludes the volume with an examination of cultural life, including descriptions of urbanization, Arabic script, chivalry, and poetry. Throughout the volume, the author reveals the history of a fully developed and unique Christian-Arab culture. Shahîd exhaustively describes the society of the Ghassanids, and their contributions to the cultural environment that persisted in Oriens during the sixth century and continued into the Umayyad caliphate.
    Irfan Shahîd
    Just as the Tanūkhids rose and fell as the principal Arab foederati of Byzantium in the fourth century, so too in the fifth did the Salīḥids. The century, practically terra incognita in the history of Arab-Byzantine relations, is explored by Irfan Shahîd, who recovers from the sources the political, military, ecclesiastical, and cultural history of the Arab foederati in Oriens and the Arabian Peninsula during this period. Unlike their predecessors or successors, the foederati of the fifth century lived in perfect harmony with Byzantium. Federate-imperial relations were smooth: the Arab horse reached as far as Pentapolis in the West and possibly took part in Leo’s expedition against the Vandals. They were staunchly orthodox and participated in two ecumenical councils, Ephesus and Chalcedon, where their voice was audible. But their more enduring contributions were cultural, and may be associated with Dāwūd (David), the Salīḥid king; Petrus, the bishop of the Parembole; and possibly also Elias, patriarch of Jerusalem (494–516), a Roman Arab. The federate culture gave impetus to the rise of the Arabic script, Arabic poetry, and a simple form of an Arabic liturgy—the foundation for cultural achievements in subsequent centuries.
    Irfan Shahîd
    The fourth century, the century of Constantine, witnessed the foundation and rise of a new relationship between the Roman Empire and the Arabs. The warrior Arab groups in Oriens became foederati, allies of Byzantium, the Christian Roman empire, and so they remained until the Arab conquests. In Byzantium and the Arabs in the Fourth Century, Irfan Shahîd elucidates the birth of the new federate existence and the rise of its institutional forms and examines the various constituents of federate cultural life: the phylarchate, the episcopate, the beginnings of an Arab Church, an Arabic liturgy, and the earliest attested composition of Arabic poetry. He discusses the participation of the Arab foederati in Byzantium’s wars with her neighbors—the Persians and the Goths—during which those Arab allies, most notably the Tanūkhids, contributed to the welfare of the imperium and the ecclesia. The Arab federate horse galloped for Byzantium as far as Ctesiphon, Constantinople, and possibly Najrân in Arabia Felix. In the reign of Valens, the foederati appeared as the defenders of Nicene Orthodoxy: their soldiers fought for it; their stern and uncompromising saint, Moses, championed it; and their heroic and romantic queen, Mavia, negotiated for it.
    Irfan Shahîd
    The Arabs played an important role in Roman-controlled Oriens in the four centuries or so that elapsed from the Settlement of Pompey in 64 B.C. to the reign of Diocletian, A.D. 284–305. In Rome and the Arabs Irfan Shahîd explores this extensive but poorly known role and traces the phases of the Arab-Roman relationship, especially in the climactic third century, which witnessed the rise of many powerful Roman Arabs such as the Empresses of the Severan Dynasty, Emperor Philip, and the two rulers of Palmyra, Odenathus and Zenobia. Philip the Arab, the author argues, was the first Christian Roman emperor and Abgar the Great (ca. 200 A.D.) was the first Near Eastern ruler to adopt Christianity. In addition to political and military matters, the author also discusses Arab cultural contributions, pointing out the role of the Hellenized and Romanized Arabs in the urbanization of the region and in the progress of Christianity, particularly in Edessa under the Arab Abgarids.

    He has a wife you know

    #NightoftheLivyDead yep - even these guys get featured in my...



    #NightoftheLivyDead yep - even these guys get featured in my podcast on werewolves in antiquity. What links them with Petronius? Listen and find out.

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    Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

    Open Access Books by Irfan Shahid from Dumbarton Oaks

    Open Access Books by Irfan Shahid from Dumbarton Oaks
    Irfan Shahîd
    Byzantium and the Arabs in the Sixth Century, volume 1, part 1, Political and Military History is devoted to the main Arabian tribes that federates of the Byzantine Roman Empire. In the early sixth century Constantinople shifted its Arab alliance from the Salahids to the Kindites and especially the Ghassanids, who came to dominate Arab-Byzantine relations through the reign of Heraclius. Arranged chronologically, this study, the first in-depth account of the Ghassanids since the nineteenth century, draws widely from original sources in Greek, Syriac, and Arabic. Irfan Shahîd traces in detail the vicissitudes of the relationship between the Romans and the Ghassanids, and argues for the latter’s extensive role in the defense of the Byzantine Empire in its east.
    Irfan Shahîd
    Byzantium and the Arabs in the Sixth Century, volume 1 part 2, Ecclesiastical History provides a chronologically ordered account of the involvement of the Ghassanids in ecclesiastical affairs in the eastern region of the Byzantine Empire. Tracing the role of Arab tribes both inside and outside the Roman limes, Irfan Shahîd documents how the Ghassanids in particular came to establish and develop a distinct non-Chalcedonian church hierarchy, all the while remaining allies of the Chalcedonian emperors. Ghassanid phylarchs such as Mundir emerge not merely as loyal foederati but devout Christians. Shahîd extensively and critically analyzes the Greek, Syriac, and Arabic sources, including many obscure or unfamiliar texts to illuminate the religious landscape of the Arabs of the sixth century.
    Irfan Shahîd
    Byzantium and the Arabs in the Sixth Century, volume 2, part 1, Toponymy, Monuments, Historical Geography, and Frontier Studies is a topical study of the military, religious, and civil structures of the Ghassanids. Irfan Shahîd’s detailed study of Arab buildings of the sixth century illuminates how Byzantine provincial art and architecture were adopted and adapted by the federate Arabs for their own use. As monuments of Christian architecture, these federate structures constitute the missing link in the development of Arab architecture in the region between the earlier pagan (Nabataean and Palmyrene) and later Muslim (Umayyad). Drawing from literary and material evidence, Shahîd argues that the Gassanids were not nomadic, as traditionally believed, but thoroughly sedentary both in their roots and in the late Roman frontier zone they inherited. The third of four volumes dedicated to the sixth century, this book extensively depends upon the previous two volumes (volume 1, part 1, Political and Military History; volume 1, part 2, Ecclesiastical History).
    Irfan Shahîd
    Byzantium and the Arabs in the Sixth Century, volume 2, part 2, Economic, Social, and Cultural History is a topical study of Arab economic, social, and cultural history in the sixth century. Irfan Shahîd focuses on the economy of the Ghassanids and presents information on various trade routes and fairs. He reconstructs Ghassanid daily life by discussing topics as varied as music, food, medicine, the role of women, and horse racing. Shahîd concludes the volume with an examination of cultural life, including descriptions of urbanization, Arabic script, chivalry, and poetry. Throughout the volume, the author reveals the history of a fully developed and unique Christian-Arab culture. Shahîd exhaustively describes the society of the Ghassanids, and their contributions to the cultural environment that persisted in Oriens during the sixth century and continued into the Umayyad caliphate.
    Irfan Shahîd
    Just as the Tanūkhids rose and fell as the principal Arab foederati of Byzantium in the fourth century, so too in the fifth did the Salīḥids. The century, practically terra incognita in the history of Arab-Byzantine relations, is explored by Irfan Shahîd, who recovers from the sources the political, military, ecclesiastical, and cultural history of the Arab foederati in Oriens and the Arabian Peninsula during this period. Unlike their predecessors or successors, the foederati of the fifth century lived in perfect harmony with Byzantium. Federate-imperial relations were smooth: the Arab horse reached as far as Pentapolis in the West and possibly took part in Leo’s expedition against the Vandals. They were staunchly orthodox and participated in two ecumenical councils, Ephesus and Chalcedon, where their voice was audible. But their more enduring contributions were cultural, and may be associated with Dāwūd (David), the Salīḥid king; Petrus, the bishop of the Parembole; and possibly also Elias, patriarch of Jerusalem (494–516), a Roman Arab. The federate culture gave impetus to the rise of the Arabic script, Arabic poetry, and a simple form of an Arabic liturgy—the foundation for cultural achievements in subsequent centuries.
    Irfan Shahîd
    The fourth century, the century of Constantine, witnessed the foundation and rise of a new relationship between the Roman Empire and the Arabs. The warrior Arab groups in Oriens became foederati, allies of Byzantium, the Christian Roman empire, and so they remained until the Arab conquests. In Byzantium and the Arabs in the Fourth Century, Irfan Shahîd elucidates the birth of the new federate existence and the rise of its institutional forms and examines the various constituents of federate cultural life: the phylarchate, the episcopate, the beginnings of an Arab Church, an Arabic liturgy, and the earliest attested composition of Arabic poetry. He discusses the participation of the Arab foederati in Byzantium’s wars with her neighbors—the Persians and the Goths—during which those Arab allies, most notably the Tanūkhids, contributed to the welfare of the imperium and the ecclesia. The Arab federate horse galloped for Byzantium as far as Ctesiphon, Constantinople, and possibly Najrân in Arabia Felix. In the reign of Valens, the foederati appeared as the defenders of Nicene Orthodoxy: their soldiers fought for it; their stern and uncompromising saint, Moses, championed it; and their heroic and romantic queen, Mavia, negotiated for it.
    Irfan Shahîd
    The Arabs played an important role in Roman-controlled Oriens in the four centuries or so that elapsed from the Settlement of Pompey in 64 B.C. to the reign of Diocletian, A.D. 284–305. In Rome and the Arabs Irfan Shahîd explores this extensive but poorly known role and traces the phases of the Arab-Roman relationship, especially in the climactic third century, which witnessed the rise of many powerful Roman Arabs such as the Empresses of the Severan Dynasty, Emperor Philip, and the two rulers of Palmyra, Odenathus and Zenobia. Philip the Arab, the author argues, was the first Christian Roman emperor and Abgar the Great (ca. 200 A.D.) was the first Near Eastern ruler to adopt Christianity. In addition to political and military matters, the author also discusses Arab cultural contributions, pointing out the role of the Hellenized and Romanized Arabs in the urbanization of the region and in the progress of Christianity, particularly in Edessa under the Arab Abgarids.

    He has a wife you know

    ancientblogger's podcast by Ancient Blogger on Apple Podcasts

    ancientblogger's podcast by Ancient Blogger on Apple Podcasts:

    #NightofTheLivyDead (Part One).

    New podcast on iTunes, ahead of Halloween we look at werewolves and vamps from antiquity. If you like it please review and give a rating!

    Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

    Plato’s Similes: A Compendium of 500 Similes in 35 Dialogues

    Plato’s Similes: A Compendium of 500 Similes in 35 Dialogues
    By John Ziolkowski

    Preface

    In Plato’s Dialogues there are many vivid comparisons. The soul is compared to a sieve, or a tomb, or a shooting star. The Greeks are like ants or frogs living around a marsh. Socrates calls himself a philosophical mid-wife and a gadfly that pesters Athenians. These similes have become familiar images in our literary and philosophical tradition. They also reveal to us an aspect of Platonic writing that is humorous, imaginative, and subtle. They provide an insight into Plato’s efforts to explain philosophic topics in an appealing manner to his audience. Similes are also an important but by no means obvious source of our impressions of Socrates, who is the speaker of most of the famous comparisons found in Plato.
    Although there are studies of similes in Homer and other poets, no such work exists for Plato—or indeed for any ancient prose writer.[1] In order to fill this gap for Plato at least, the following compendium lists and analyzes over five hundred similes taken from the Platonic corpus of thirty-five Dialogues. From this survey emerges an interesting perspective of Plato’s portrait of Socrates: the ways Socrates describes himself and others as well as the opinions of various speakers about Socrates. Because some of the examples presented here may seem to be metaphors according to the traditional definition going back to Aristotle, the Introduction will discuss the definition of simile, the distinction between this figure and metaphor, and a new proposal to clarify the difference. As an aid to non-specialists all passages are cited in English (with significant Greek words added and transliterated in parentheses). Greek texts may be found on the Perseus website (www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper).
    [1] See D. J. N. Lee, The Similes of the Iliad and the Odyssey Compared (Melbourne University University Press 1964); Carroll Moulton, Similes in the Homeric Poems, Hypomnemata 49 (Goettingen 1977); and William C. Scott, The Artistry of the Homeric Simile (Dartmouth College press 2009).

    Shawn Graham (Electric Archaeology)

    Call for Collaborators: The Open Digital Archaeology Textbook Environment (ODATE)

    The Open Digital Archaeology Textbook Environment is a collaborative writing project led by myself, Neha Gupta, Michael Carter, and Beth Compton. (See earlier posts on this project here).  We recognize that this is a pretty big topic to tackle. We would like to invite friends and allies to become co-authors with us. Contact us by Jan 31st; see below.

    Here is the current live draft of the textbook. It is, like all live-written openly accessible texts, a thing in the process of becoming, replete with warts, errors, clunky phrasing, and odd memos-to-self. I’m always quietly terrified to share work in progress, but I firmly believe in both the pedagogical and collegial value of such endeavours. While our progress has been a bit slower than one might’ve liked, here is where we currently stand:

    1. We’ve got the framework set up to allow open review and collaboration via the Hypothes.is web annotation framework and the use of Github and gh-pages to serve up the book
    2. The book is written in the bookdown framework with R Markdown and so can have actionable code within it, should the need arise
    3. This also has the happy effect of making collaboration open and transparent (although not necessarily easy)
    4. The DHBox computational environment has been set up and is running on Carleton’s servers. It’s currently behind a firewall, but that’ll be changing at some point during this term (you can road-test things on DHBox)
    5. We are customizing it to add QGIS and VSFM and some other bits and bobs that’d be useful for archaeologists. Suggestions welcome
    6. We ran a test of the DHBox this past summer with 60 students. My gut feeling is that not only did this make teaching easier and keep all the students on the same page, but the students also came away with a better ability to roll with whatever their own computers threw at them.
    7. Of six projected chapters, chapter one is in pretty good – though rough – shape

    So, while the majority of this book is being written by Graham, Gupta, Carter and Compton, we know that we are leaving a great deal of material un-discussed. We would be delighted to consider additions to ODATE, if you have particular expertise that you would like to share. As you can see, many sections in this work have yet to be written, and so we would be happy to consider contributions aimed there as well. Keep in mind that we are writing for an introductory audience (who may or may not have foundational digital literacy skills) and that we are writing for a linux-based environment. Whether you are an academic, a professional archaeologist, a graduate student, or a friend of archaeology more generally, we’d be delighted to hear from you.

    Please write to Shawn at shawn dot graham at carleton dot ca to discuss your idea and how it might fit into the overall arc of ODATE by January 31st 2018. The primary authors will discuss whether or not to invite a full draft. A full draft will need to be submitted by March 15th 2018. We will then offer feedback. The piece will go up on this draft site by the end of the month, whereupon it will enjoy the same open review as the other parts. Accepted contributors will be listed as full authors, eg ‘Graham, Gupta, Carter, Compton, YOUR NAME, 2018 The Open Digital Archaeology Textbook Environment, eCampusOntario…..

    For help on how to fork, edit, make pull requests and so on, please see this repo

     

    Featured Image: “My Life Through a Lens”, bamagal, Unsplash


    Archaeological News on Tumblr

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    BiblePlaces Blog

    Inside the Photo Companion: Cultural Scenes

    When we started taking photos in the Holy Land, our gaze was mostly fixed on the sites. That, after all, is the basis for most tour itineraries. This was reflected in our earliest photo collections, as they were organized by country, region, and site.

    But as we began thinking about illustrating each verse of the Bible, we knew that we would need much more than photographs of piles of rocks at various sites. In this post we want to draw your attention to some of the many cultural scenes that we have illustrated in the new Gospels volumes of the Photo Companion to the Bible.

    farmer-plowing-donkey-mt-gerizim

    This scene shows a farmer plowing his field with his donkey. We captured this scene one day as we were passing through the Michmethath Valley on the way to Mount Gerizim (visible in the distance). While certain elements like the headdress differ from the biblical period, we’re still amazed that we can see scenes like this that are so similar to ancient times.

    father-and-son-carpenter-jesus-joseph

    I was walking through the suq (market) in Nablus last year (my first-ever visit there) and I saw through one doorway a father and son working on a carpentry project. This brought to mind another famous pair of father-son carpenters and I snapped a couple of pictures. While this scene too differs from what first-century Nazareth looked like, it’s still helpful to me in imagining how Jesus worked together with Joseph.

    villagers-gathered-welcome-Luke15

    Some scenes are just difficult or impossible to capture today. The scene above was taken by an American Colony photographer in 1940, showing a scene of men gathered in a traditional village. There are a number of biblical passages this could illustrate, but we’ve used it here to illustrate the story in Luke 15:1-7 where the rejoicing shepherd returns home to tell his neighbors that he has found his lost sheep.

    fattened-calf-luke15

    When the prodigal son returned home, his father held a lavish feast, even slaughtering the fattened calf in his son’s honor (Luke 15:27). This American Colony photograph, taken in 1935, shows a group of Bedouin men preparing an animal for the fire. This image will also serve to illustrate other passages, including Abraham’s killing of a choice calf when three “men” came to visit (Gen 18:7).

    oil-lamp-broom-woman-lost-coin-luke15

    I’ll close with a favorite. I took this picture at the Qatzrin Village in the Golan Heights (a worthwhile stop if you haven’t been). This display illustrates well the verse about the woman who lost one of her coins and in an effort to find it lit an oil lamp and swept the house (Luke 15:8). Many children (and adults) today would be hard pressed to picture what an oil lamp and a broom looked like in the time of Jesus.

    It is a lot of fun to photograph these scenes or to find just the right image to illustrate a verse or concept. In creating the Photo Companion to the Bible, we intend to make Scripture not only more understandable but also more engaging and exciting.

    Bill Caraher (The New Archaeology of the Mediterranean World)

    Another One for The Punk [Archaeology] Bookshelf

    I finally got a chance to finish reading Brian James Schill’s This Years Work in the Punk Bookshelf, or, Lusty Scripts (2017). It is a vital component to any collection of recent punk rock literature and holds its own next to Zach Furness’s Punkademics, Beer’s Punk Sociology, and, even (modestly of course), Punk Archaeology.

    Unlike those books which tend to deal more with the performative aspects of the punk movement, their radical politics, DIY aesthetic, or their general ambivalence toward convention, Schill’s book considers the intellectual roots of punk rocks and reconstructs a punk bookshelf filled with the works of Nietzsche, Freud, Marx, Dostoevsky, Henry Miller, Genet, and Philip K. Dick. While, I won’t do too much of a review here, because I’m interviewing him for a longer piece over at North Dakota Quarterly that’ll appear next week, I wanted to draw some attention to this book, especially among my punk archaeology friends.

    One of the key things that I learned from Schill’s careful reading of punk lyrics and punk literature – from the genuine literary outputs of Richard Hell and Exene Cervenka to the myriad interviews in often ephemeral punk and music zines of the day, is the tremendous ambivalence in punk. For every moment of Dionysian fervor on stage, there’s an equal moment of contemplative reflection on genuinely challenging texts that fueled their transgression. The careful reading of Marx and the frequent commitment to radical politics belied their sometimes bourgeois upbringing and tastes in literature. Their rejection of convention often did not extend to their rejection of education with numerous punks going on to receive graduate degrees. Schill’s work explores and attempts in many ways to resolve this tension and to demonstrate certain broad patterns in punk bookshelf that both elucidate and run counter to the prevailing view of punk as an anti-intellectual movement.

    The book is very much an exploration of punk as a field of literary expression that is only gently tethered to social, economic, cultural or political life of the day, the grind of the music industry, or even the musicality of punk in general. But this is not a bad thing, necessarily, because it shows that however much punks were sellouts, products of their era, poor or untrained or just uninteresting musicians, or posers, they were well-read, thoughtful, and reflective. In a word, no matter how much their music seemed and sounded derivative, uncontrolled, and angry, they were not superficial and in their own way they sought to be genuine.

    When Kostis Kourelis and I started talking about punk archaeology, we began with the simple question of why so many archaeologists found something significant in punk rock music. Pursuing that across a blog and a book, we argued that it was the DIY aesthetic, the critique of convention, or even the explicitly performative character of archaeological work that drew us to punk. We didn’t say as much about the intellectual side of punk rock. Maybe we recognized the Marxist, collectivist character of the Mekons, the presence of entropy and destruction in the work of the Velvet Underground or Iggy Pop, or the focus on materiality in Philip K. Dick, William Gibson, and other cyberpunk authors, but we certainly didn’t dig as deeply (see what I did there?) into the intellectual roots of punk rock to find cross currents with archaeological work (or at least I didn’t). Even the allusions to Freud that Schill excavates from numerous punk songs passed through the collective sieves of our punk archaeological imaginations.  

    Schill’s book brings the intellectual aspects of punk rock into a greater focus, and in that way deserves a place on the punk [archaeology] bookshelf. Stay tuned for a conversation with the author over at the North Dakota Quarterly page next week!


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    Van godshuis tot hedendaags woonerf: de Blindeliedenstraat in Ieper

    Eerder dit jaar voerde het agentschap Onroerend Erfgoed een opgraving uit aan de Blindeliedenstraat in de binnenstad van Ieper. Het terrein, dat ontwikkeld wordt als woonerf, grenst aan de Ieperlee, die er rond 1850 werd ingekokerd. Marc Dewilde bespreekt de resultaten van het onderzoek in deze blog op onroerenderfgoed.be.

    James F. McGrath (Exploring Our Matrix)

    Star Trek Discovery: Choose Your Pain

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    Jim Davila (Paleojudaica.com)

    Jerusalem's lost theater found

    <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/zz5gZ7gLJKM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

    The rebellious elder in the Talmud

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    Review of Burns, The Christian Schism in Jewish History and Jewish Memory

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    The Te’omim Cave

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    American School of Classical Studies in Athens: Events

    A Protocorinthian Aryballos with a Mythological Scene from Tegea

    October 25, 2017 - 11:21 AM - LECTURE Prof. Em. Erik Østby (University of Bergen)

    Laura Gibbs (Bestiaria Latina Blog)

    Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: October 17

    Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

    HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem sextum decimum Kalendas NovembresXX.

    MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Phaethon, and there are more images here.


    TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

    3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Memento semper finis (English: Always keep the goal in mind).

    3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Scarabeus aquilam quaerit (English: The beetle is looking for the eagle, alluding to the famous Aesop's fable).


    RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Os qui non claudit, quod non vult, saepius audit (English: He who doesn't close his mouth, often hears what he does want to).

    VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Sicut fecisti, fiet tibi (Ob. 1:15). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

    BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Scientia et Caritas. Click here for a full-sized view.


    And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



    Carcer numquam pulcher.
    Prison is never pretty.

    Mens alitur discendo et cogitando.
    The mind is nourished by learning and thinking.

    TODAY'S FABLE:

    MILLE FABULAE: The English translation for today from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Leo et Acies Eius, a story about a leader who embraces diversity!

    Leo Imperator


    Tom Matrullo (Classics in Sarasota)

    Jarring note, asymptote: Par. 29

    The last canto before the Empyrian presents artistic as well as interpretive challenges. Paradiso 29 opens in a heightened moment, right before the pilgrim and his guide leave the Created world. And it speaks of some of the highest things, as well as several of the lowest.

    If one steps back from the interpretive musings of the commentators, the canto exhibits odd choices on the level of style and narration. It deals with weighty matters, including
    • how, when, and why Creation occurred;
    • the first moment of the angels' existence;
    • the fall of Satan and his followers, and 
    • the relation of grace and merit, intellect and affect, with regard to the angels who didn't fall. 
    Each of these moments could have filled its own canto (or more, if you're Milton). Instead, this extraordinary matter is stated in summary form by Beatrice in a calm, authoritative manner. The sublime opening of Genesis is elided, none of the acts of creation, pride and fall are dramatized. Dante chose to move quickly and in summary fashion through this material, instead lavishing poetic exuberance on the image of equilibrium that heads the canto - the myth of Latona and the lights in our sky.

    One needs to consider the reasons for such a choice. Recall the rich creation of the beasts in Paradise Lost. Surely Dante entertained such potent options, but in the end seems to have preferred a kind of askesis -- sacrificing poetic sublimity for something else. Why, and what something?

    In terms of narrative arc, a problem loomed. If he took the time and space here to dazzle us with the way it all began, there'd be precious little room for the Empyrean. Plus, a heightened account of the Creation could weaken the impact of that final climactic scene. Narrative art necessitated something modest here, though the content involves big things.

    There might be another reason as well. Throughout this canto (excluding the opening image), Beatrice is the sole speaker. If one were to graph her tone, a curious change would be noticeable. The descriptions of Creation and the angels' first moments are presented in a serene mode that bears none of the emotional or intellectual excitement of human witness. Beatrice is recounting what she has been given to see in the divine vision for a long, long time. Interestingly, Dante the pilgrim, who often describes his craving for knowledge as physical need - thirst, desire, etc. -- is silent. It's as if he's reaching the capacity to take in - to see -- what Beatrice sees, and to do so calmly, deeply, completely. Speaker and auditor share the wonders of origin in dispassionate, apodictic tranquility.

    Suddenly, that spell gives way. Beatrice launches into a far more engaged diatribe against, among other things, poor readers, showy, self-aggrandizing preachers, fanciful and bogus interpretive curlicues performed for the sake of local adulation, and profound acts of fraud perpetrated by porcine churchmen in the act of peddling fake indulgences, which acts exploit and encourage the ignorance of their flocks.

    She ticks off vivid examples of presumptuous readers spinning elaborate explanations of events told in the Gospels:
    One sayeth that the moon did backward turn,
      In the Passion of Christ, and interpose herself
      So that the sunlight reached not down below; 
    And lies;                (29:97-100)
    A palpable gasp runs through the commentaries at this take-down of revered teachers: Dionysus, Albertus Magnus, Thomas Aquinas. It's suggested that mente in Italian of the day might just have meant "erred." Still, it's a barb, and rather acute.

    But this sort of learned misreading bothers Beatrice less than the "fables" (favole) spewed forth from the pulpits, filling the preachers' flocks with wind:
    Now men go forth with jests and drolleries
      To preach, and if but well the people laugh,
      The hood puffs out, and nothing more is asked.
    But in the cowl there nestles such a bird,
      That, if the common people were to see it,
      They would perceive what pardons they confide in, 
    For which so great on earth has grown the folly,
      That, without proof of any testimony,
      To each indulgence they would flock together. 
    By this Saint Anthony his pig doth fatten,
      And many others, who are worse than pigs,
      Paying in money without mark of coinage.
    Beatrice here is working up a lather -- the endless varieties of deforming the Word, using it to get laughs, or nice meals, or money -- exercise her in a way that seems out of place. Consider the context: We're nearly at the edge of time and space, and instead of looking back with some cumulative, totalizing gaze -- as we saw the pilgrim do twice, in cantos 22 and 27 -- we get a sardonic lambasting of hypocritical scumbags. It feels jarring.

    Dante (the poet) never seems anything but sure-handed. One can look at virtually any scene, any tercet in the entire Commedia and find a mature artist who knows exactly what's called for at every metric step. Yet here, as the pilgrim is about to exit the created world, that masterful balance seems to be jolted. We've dashed through some of the biggest questions of existence, then excoriated a bunch of Boccaccian scoundrels at nearly the last instant before the pilgrim is ripped Marsyas-like from the sheath of his muscles, tendons, and skin.

    Within the larger movement of the narrative, something seems off. Where is the reassuring sense of closure, the triumphal achievement, the anticipatory excitement that one might expect here at the asymptotic edge? Has Dante finally missed a beat?

    Or, is this disequilibrium, this apparent loss of total control -- both on the part of Dante's serene mediatrix, and of the text itself -- precisely the right thing? Nothing is more obvious in terms of tone and style than that this canto began with the most exquisitely balanced series of binary oppositions -- a polished classical vision of a totally symmetrical system in the moment of ineluctable eclipse. But we're leaving that, and doing so in jangled, heated discord. What if that apparent dislocation of tone and control, from a certain angle, is entirely the point?

    One thing seems clear: the magnificent picture of equilibrium that opens this canto is not the model Beatrice follows. She herself calls her tirade a digression, pulls up short, and returns us to a contemplative moment that deserves more attention than it perhaps has received. She turns us from the fat fraudulent friars to consider the relation of "the act of conception" to love and sweetness:
     Onde, però che a l'atto che concepe segue
    l'affetto, d'amar la dolcezza 
    diversamente in essa ferve e tepe.  
    Vedi l'eccelso omai e la larghezza 
    de l'etterno valor, poscia che tanti 
    speculi fatti s'ha in che si spezza,
    uno manendo in sé come davanti.” 
    Hence, inasmuch as on the act conceptive
      The affection followeth, of love the sweetness
      Therein diversely fervid is or tepid. 
    The height behold now and the amplitude
      Of the eternal power, since it hath made
      Itself so many mirrors, where 'tis broken,
    One in itself remaining as before."     (29:139-145)
    Another post will consider the resonance of this last image in light of the extraordinary gamut run by this canto, its tranquility and febrile censoriousness, and ponder whether that seeming lapse in decorum and control might serve an unexpected artistic purpose.

    Noel Tan (The Southeast Asian Archaeology Newsblog)

    Kingsman banned in Cambodia for portraying temple as hideout for film’s villains

    via Phnom Penh Post, 12 October 2017 Cinemagoers, be warned: the blockbuster sequel Kingsman: The Golden Circle won’t be playing in a theatre near you after all, with government officials yanking the action flick from the Kingdom’s screens over an allegedly negative portrayal of Cambodia deemed unacceptable for local audiences. The light-hearted romp chronicles a … Continue reading "Kingsman banned in Cambodia for portraying temple as hideout for film’s villains"

    CFP: Asian Studies Association of Australia Conference

    Asian Studies Association of Australia Conference, 3-5 July 2018, University of Sydney Proposal submissions are now open for the 22nd biennial Asian Studies Association of Australia (ASAA) Conference 2018. This conference will bring together academics from across disciplines with a shared interest in Asia. The conference is open to scholars, students and community members wishing … Continue reading "CFP: Asian Studies Association of Australia Conference"

    Borobudur archives listed in UNESCO Memory of the World Register

    via Antara News, 11 October 2017: Four national archives were included in the UNESCO Memory of the World Register, according to Bambang Subiyanto, chief executive of the Indonesian Institute of Sciences. “The four archives on the Borobudur temple restoration, Panji Story, Non-Aligned Movement, and Tsunami had been registered in 2016, and the results will be … Continue reading "Borobudur archives listed in UNESCO Memory of the World Register"

    Archaeology Magazine

    Pacopampa Skeletons Bear Healed Injuries

    KANAGAWA PREFECTURE, JAPAN—According to a report in The Asahi Shimbun, archaeologists have found evidence of brutal injuries on skeletons dating from between the thirteenth and sixth centuries B.C. at Peru’s ceremonial center of Pacopampa. Tomohito Nagaoka of St. Marianna University School of Medicine said the remains of seven of the 104 individuals uncovered by the joint Peruvian-Japanese excavation team bore evidence of severe injuries, including fractures to the skull, facial features, and limbs, and a dislocated elbow joint. The bodies lacked signs of defensive wounds, and they were recovered in ceremonial areas of Pacopampa. Some of the traumatic injuries had healed, and no signs of malnutrition was found in the bones. All of the injured were aged 35 or older. Yuji Seki, head of the investigation, speculates that elite groups living at Pacopampa may have fought each other to ward off disaster and pray for good harvests. “These elite groups, such as oracles, might have repeatedly taken part in combat by throwing stones and using clubs,” Seki said. For more on archaeology in Peru, go to “Painted Worlds.”

    Three-Kingdoms Period Statue Found in South Korea

    Gilt bronze triadGANGWON PROVINCE, SOUTH KOREA—The Korea Joongang Daily reports that a gilt-bronze statue thought to date to the sixth century A.D. has been recovered in the northern corner of the Three-story Stone Pagoda at Jinjeon Temple. The statue measures about three and a half inches tall, and depicts a Buddha triad, or two Hyupsi bodhisattvas on either side of an Avolokitesvara bodhisattva, who embodies the compassion of all Buddhas. The figures’ facial expressions and the patterns on their garments are well preserved. The engraving also depicts the light emanating from the Avolokitesvara’s head and body. To read about another recent discovery in South Korea, go to “Doll Story.”

    Ramses II Temple Uncovered in Abusir Necropolis

    Abusir Ramses templeCAIRO, EGYPT—According to a report in Ahram Online, a temple dedicated to Ramses II has been uncovered in the Abusir necropolis by a team of Egyptian and Czech archaeologists. Archaeologist Mohamed Megahed said the temple, which measured about 170 feet long by 100 feet wide, had a large forecourt and was flanked by storage buildings. At least some of the mudbrick walls enclosing the court had been painted blue. The side walls were lined with stone columns. An elevated three-chambered sanctuary was accessed by a ramp or staircase located at the rear of the court. “The remains of this building, which constitutes the very core of the complex, were covered with huge deposits of sand and chips of stone of which many bore fragments of polychrome reliefs,” said Mirsolave Barta, director of the Czech mission. Two engravings—one of the different titles of Ramses II, and the other relating to the cult of solar deities such as Re, Amun, and Nekhbet—were also found. For more, go to “Egypt’s Final Redoubt in Canaan.”

    October 16, 2017

    Archaeology Magazine

    Roman-Period Structure Found Near Jerusalem’s Western Wall

    Jerusalem stone coursesJERUSALEM, ISRAEL—Reuters reports that Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologists have exposed eight courses of stone wall in the Western Wall Tunnels, some 26 feet below the surface of the Old City. The excavation has also uncovered an unfinished, theater-like structure dated to the Late Roman period with pottery and coins. (The results of radiocarbon testing are expected in a few months.) Such a theater was mentioned by Josephus Flavius and other ancient sources. The structure was found under Wilson’s Arch, one of a series of arches that supported a passageway to the Temple Mount, and may have been intended for musical performances or city council meetings. “This is the first time that a theater-like structure has been exposed in Jerusalem, so it’s extremely exciting,” said Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologist Joe Uziel. The theater and the area around the arch were covered with dirt and debris after an earthquake around A.D. 360. For more on archaeology in Israel, go to “Reading Invisible Messages.”

    Peter Tompa (Cultural Property Observer)

    Little Public Support for Renewed MOU with Cambodia

    Low numbers of comments to CPAC suggest low public support for a renewed MOU with Cambodia.  Indeed, though most of the twenty-one (21) comments were supportive of the renewed MOU, virtually all these came from archaeologists who depend on Cambodian excavation permits or their associated archaeological advocacy groups.  Meanwhile, it is finally dawning on some in Congress that MOUs have devolved into special interest programs for archaeologists.  Significantly, Congressional appropriators have required CPAC to report on the expenditures MOU partner countries make in securing their own cultural patrimony.  Hopefully, this will help change a culture that has vilified collectors to help divert attention away from poor stewardship of archaeological resources by source countries.

    Martin Rundkvist (Aardvarchaeology)

    Aard Is Moving

    As I learned a few hours ago, and as a few other Sb bloggers have already announced, Scienceblogs.com will shut down at the end of this month. I’m going to move Aard and continue my blogging, but I haven’t figured out where to move it yet. Suggestions from you, Dear Reader, are most welcome.

    It needs to be done soon, because while I have exported all the blog entries and comments safely to my laptop, I can’t do that with the images and PDFs. I have to import the blog onto a new WordPress site and then instruct it to grab all the non-text files from Scienceblogs.com. Which will not be available for very much longer.

    Onward and upward!

    Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

    Editorial: The Future of the Past



    I am repeatedly asked for the source of the image of "books being churned into a machine and somehow transmitted electronically to boys in a classroom setting" (in the words of one anonymous correspondent today).

    I note first of all that it is identified in the right-hand sidebar on the main page of AWOL, but the identifying metadata seems to be removed by the automated process of bundling the AWOL digests for email transmission and for syndication to Facebook, Twitter, and elsewhere.

    The image in question is this one:

    http://www.ufunk.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/an-2000-1910-illustration-09.jpg

    It appears online in a variety of places, but is nicely contextualized here at the Public Domain Review:

    A series of futuristic pictures by Jean-Marc Côté and other artists issued in France in 1899, 1900, 1901 and 1910. Originally in the form of paper cards enclosed in cigarette/cigar boxes and, later, as postcards, the images depicted the world as it was imagined to be like in the then distant year of 2000. As is so often the case their predictions fell some way off the mark, failing to go far enough in thinking outside the confines of their current technological milieu (hence the ubiquity of propellors, not to mention the distinctly 19th-century dress).

    There are at least 87 cards known that were authored by various French artists, the first series being produced for the 1900 World Exhibition in Paris. Due to financial difficulties the cards by Jean-Marc Côté were never actually distributed and only came to light many years later after the science-fiction author Isaac Asimov chanced upon a set and published them in 1986, with accompanying commentary, in the book Futuredays: A Nineteenth Century Vision of the Year 2000.
    Go have a look at them, they're quite charming.

    Open Access Journal: Chronika: The Institute for European and Mediterranean Archaeology Graduate Student Journal

    [First posted in AWOL 5 May 2014, updated 16 October 2017]

    Chronika: The Institute for European and Mediterranean Archaeology Graduate Student Journal
    ISSN: 2159-9904
    EISSN: 2159-9912
    http://www.chronikajournal.com/resources/cover.jpg.opt499x729o0%2C0s499x729.jpg 
    Chronika is an interdisciplinary journal for graduate students studying the art and archaeology of the Mediterranean world. 
    Chronika, like its parent organization The Institute for European and Mediterranean Archaeology (IEMA), promotes interdisciplinary dialogues and innovative approaches to the study of the past. Chronika is an open access journal and aims to publish cutting edge research in a timely fashion and make it widely available to the scholarly community. We encourage collaborative, interdisciplinary scholarship by making the content of our journal freely available online.
    Chronika is produced by University at Buffalo graduate students, but welcomes submissions from graduate students at other colleges and universities worldwide. Students are encouraged to submit an article here.
     Current Issue:
    Chronika, Volume 6, Full Text
    Letter from the Editor: 
    letter from the editor.pdf letter from the editor.pdf
    Size : 430.419 Kb
    Type : pdf
    Articles: 
    Lina Diers, University of Vienna 
    "Space and Identity in Roman Moesia: Rethinking Military and Civilian Spheres in a Frontier Province"
    Diers 2016.pdf Diers 2016.pdf
    Size : 2312.056 Kb
    Type : pdf
    Sylvain Vanesse, University of Liege 
    "Between Street Vendors, Singing Slaves, and Envy"
    Vanesse 2016.pdf Vanesse 2016.pdf
    Size : 1182.087 Kb
    Type : pdf
    Andy Lamb, University of Leicester
    "The Rise of the Individual in Late Iron Age Southern Britain and Beyond"
    Lamb 2016.pdf Lamb 2016.pdf
    Size : 1772.539 Kb
    Type : pdf
    Rachel McCleery, Florida State University
    "Being Roman, Writing Latin? Consumers of Latin Inscriptions in Achaia"
    McCleery 2016.pdf McCleery 2016.pdf
    Size : 1878.585 Kb
    Type : pdf

    Kaja J. Tally-Schumacher and Nils Paul Niemeier, Cornell University
    "Through the Picture Plane: Movement and Transformation in the Garden Room at the Villa ad Gallinas at Prima Porta"
    Tally-Schumacher&Niemeier 2016.pdf Tally-Schumacher&Niemeier 2016.pdf
    Size : 2737.709 Kb
    Type : pdf
    Heather Menz, University at Buffalo
    "Insights Into the Function of Ireland's Souterrains"
    Menz 2016.pdf Menz 2016.pdf
    Size : 1769.441 Kb
    Type : pdf

    Katerina Glaraki, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
    "Minoan Peak Sanctuaries of East Crete: A Walking Perspective"
    Glaraki 2016.pdf Glaraki 2016.pdf
    Size : 3209.504 Kb
    Type : pdf
    IEMA Travel Grant Reports: 
    Erika Ruhl, University at Buffalo
    "Textile Analysis in Northern Finland"
    Ruhl travel report 2016.pdf Ruhl travel report 2016.pdf
    Size : 835.367 Kb
    Type : pdf
    Kathryn Grow Allen, University at Buffalo
    "An Ottoman Cemetery in Romania: Report of Research Conducted with the IEMA Research and Travel Scholarship"
    Grow Allen travel report 2016.pdf Grow Allen travel report 2016.pdf
    Size : 1280.67 Kb
    Type : pdf
    Interview: 
    Ashlee Hart, University at Buffalo 
    "Interview with Dr. Attila Gyucha, 2015-2016 IEMA Postdoctoral Fellow"
    Interview with Attila Gyucha 2016.pdf Interview with Attila Gyucha 2016.pdf
    Size : 533.975 Kb
    Type : pdf
    Back Issues:
    Chronika, Volume 5
    Chronika, Volume 4
    Chronika Volume 3
    Chronika Volume 2
    Chronika Volume 1

    AIA Fieldnotes

    International Archaeology Week at Benchley-Weinberger Elementary

    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by San Diego Society of the AIA
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    education
    Start Date: 
    Monday, October 16, 2017 to Friday, October 20, 2017

    Officers from the San Diego Society of the AIA are leading a week-long workshop with a group of 5th-graders at Benchley-Weinberger Elementary School in San Diego, California.  Students will work in groups throughout the week (10/16 through 10/20) to investigate a range of archaeological sites in order to learn more about what the site is, the drama of its discovery, and why the site is significant.  Students will compile resources (images, videos, links) and compose text that will be brought together on 10/20/2017 in an interactive multi-media Story-Map that explores world archaeology.  Thi

    Location

    AIA Society: 
    Name: 
    Elizabeth Pollard
    Call for Papers: 
    no

    He has a wife you know

    Night of the Livy Dead (Part One)


    The first part of my Halloween special, we look at vampires and werewolves in the ancient sources. I say ‘we’ as I have a guest who certainly keeps me on my toes.

    If you want to hear about partial nudity around tombstones, Sweet Valley High tangents, cheese festivals and, oh, the bits involving spooky goings on then tune in.


    Check out this episode!

    AMIR: Access to Mideast and Islamic Resources

    Open Access Manuscripts Collection: Manuscripts in St. Catherine's Monastery, Mount Sinai

    https://www.loc.gov/collections/manuscripts-in-st-catherines-monastery-mount-sinai/about-this-collection/

     Manuscripts in St. Catherine's Monastery, Mount Sinai
    1694 manuscripts digitized by Library of Congress from the set of microfilms.
    "The renowned Eastern Orthodox Monastery of St. Catherine’s on Mt. Sinai was constructed by the Byzantine Emperor, Justinian I, in the late sixth century AD over the relics of the martyred saint and the place of the biblical burning bush as identified by St. Helena, the mother of the Roman Emperor, Constantine.  It is home to reputedly the oldest continuously run library in existence today. Its holdings of religious and secular manuscripts are legendary and allegedly second only in number to the collection held by the Vatican: from bibles, to patristic works, to liturgies and prayers books, and on to legal documents such as deeds, court cases, Fatwahs (legal opinions).  The greater proportion of the manuscripts were copied in Greek, and then in Syriac, Georgian, Coptic, Armenian, Arabic, Ottoman Turkish, and Ethiopic, as well as Old Church Slavonic..."


    Languages:
    See also: Alphabetical List of Open Access Islamic Manuscripts Collections

    Roger Pearse (Thoughts on Antiquity, Patristics, putting things online, and more)

    Did Origen record the burning of Marcionite literature?

    Academic books have many failings, but usually we can rely on them for certain things.  In particular, if an author says that an ancient source says X, and gives a footnote and a quote, then we can be pretty sure that it does indeed contain those words, or something very much like it.  The readers of academic publishing tend to make sure of this.  We may not always agree as to the author’s interpretation of the text.  But it is rare that we find statements which, regardless of interpretation are simply not correct.

    This week I encountered a book where a reference failed that test, and did so on the second page of the introduction, no less.[1]

    This is a pity; because the statement was a truly interesting one!  Here it is:

    Commenting on the biblical Book of Numbers, Origen explains the role of heretics within God’s creation, suggesting, as other Christian authors do, that the fire of biblical truth is not only able to refute heretics, but does also shine brighter if elucidated by false, heretical interpretations. While this is a somewhat metaphorical picture, Origen does mention at least one heretical author (Marcion) whose works were actually ordered to be burnt.[3] This shows that the idea of true faith burning and purifying false interpretations was close to the actual act of refuting and literally destroying heretical works, while the act of refutation itself helped to shape orthodoxy. In other words, there is no need for the refuted material to survive.

    [3] Orig. hom. 9 in Num. 1 (GCS 30, Orig. 7:54–5): Ubi enim vera fides est et integra verbi Dei praedicatio, aut argentea dicuntur aut aurea, ut fulgor auri declaret fidei puritatem et argentum igni probatum eloquia examinata significet. … ista ergo batilla aerea, id est haereticorum voces si adhibeamus ad altare Dei, ubi divinus ignis est, ubi vera fidei praedicatio, melius ipsa veritas ex falsorum comparatione fulgebit. Si enim, ut verbi gratia dicam, ponam dicta Marcionis aut Basilidis aut alterius cuiuslibet haeretici et haec sermonibus veritatis ac scripturarum divinarum testimoniis velut divini altaris igne confutem, nonne evidentior eorum ex ipsa comparatione apparebit impietas? (The use of u/v in the Latin and of upper/lower case in sentence openings and proper names has been adapted for consistency throughout).

    That’s fascinating, if true.  In the days of Origen, a synod ordered that Marcionite books should be burned?  Well, this I had to look into!

    But immediately I was perplexed, as soon as I read the footnote.  I could see no mention in the footnote of anyone ordering books to be burned; certainly not Origen.  It’s all about bringing the heretical literature to the altar, to be examined in the light of the “divine fire”, and compared to the scriptures.  Nothing is being burned.  It’s all about the light of God.  Breaking down the reference:

    Si enim, ut verbi gratia dicam,

    For if, in theory,

    ponam dicta Marcionis aut Basilidis aut alterius cuiuslibet haeretici

    I put the sayings of Marcion or Basilides or some other heretics

    et sermonibus veritatis ac scripturarum divinarum testimoniis

    and with the words of truth and with the testimonies of the divine scriptures

    haec confutem

    refute them

    velut divini altaris igne,

    as if with the fire of the divine altar

    nonne evidentior eorum ex ipsa comparatione apparebit impietas?

    won’t the impiety of them appear more evident from that comparison?

    Well, I thought, perhaps I am misunderstanding the Latin.  Fortunately the homilies on Numbers have been translated by no less than Thomas P. Scheck, and a preview is visible online here.  This allows us to see the full context.  And … it too is interesting, as we shall see.

    Homily 9 begins on p.35 as follows:

    Homily 9.
    Numbers 17:1-28 (Heb, LXX) = 16:36-17:13 (RSV) [1]

    Concerning the censers[2] of Korah[3] and the sedition of the people against Moses, and concerning the rods among which the rod of Aaron sprouted.

    1.1. With God, as it is granted that he is to be understood, there is nothing that is nor beneficial, there is nothing pointless, but even the things that seem alienating to people and worthy of rejection are found to play some necessary role. Now the present reading suggests this understanding to us, which speaks of the censers of Korah and of the rest who sinned with him. For God does not command even these censers to be rejected, but to make them into “beaten plates” and “to surround the altar with them.”[4] So Scripture relates that by the command of God, “Eleazar the son of Aaron the priest took the bronze censers,” it says, “which those who had been burned had offered, and they made disks of these, and they placed them on the altar as a commemoration to the sons of Israel, so that no foreigner who is not of Aaron’s seed would approach to put incense before the Lord, lest he become as Korah and his conspiracy, just as the Lord said by the hand of Moses.”[5]

    1.2. Through the prophet the Lord says manifestly in a certain passage: “My counsels are not like your counsels, nor are my thoughts like your thoughts.” [6]

    If this case were judged today among men and if an examination were held among the rulers of the churches concerning those who have endured the penalty of divine vengeance, because, for instance, they teach things that are different from the churches, would it not be judged that, whatever they have said, whatever they have taught, whatever they have left behind in writing, all of it should utterly perish equally with their own ashes?

    But God’s judgments are not like our judgments. For listen to how he commands the censers of those who have risen up against God’s prophet to be made into beaten plates and to be affixed around the altar.[7] Korah contains a figure of those who rise up against ecclesiastical faith and the teaching of the truth. Thus it is written of Korah and his company that they offered the incense of “strange fire” in bronze censers.[8] God commands the strange fire to be dispersed and poured out, “but the censers,” it says, “since they have been sanctified, make them into beaten plates, and surround the altar with them, since they were offered before the Lord and have been sanctified.”[9]

    Well, to me what seems to be shown through this figure is that these censers, which the Scripture calls “bronze,” contain a figure of the divine Scripture. On this Scripture, the heretics place a “strange fire” by introducing a meaning and an interpretation that is estranged from God and contrary to the truth. They do not offer a sweet incense to the Lord, but a detestable kind. And therefore this example [forma] is given to the priests of the churches, that if at some time some such thing should arise, those things that are indeed alien from the truth should be immediately expelled from the church of God.

    But if some things from the meanings of the divine Scripture are found inserted into the words even of heretics, let these things not be rejected equally with those things that are contrary to the truth and to the faith. For the things that are brought forth from the divine Scripture have been sanctified and offered to the Lord.[10]

    1.3. Yet the command to join and associate with the altar things that come from the censers of sinners can be understood in still another way. First of all, the fact that they are called “bronze” does not seem to be superfluous. For when the faith is true and the proclamation of the word of God is whole, they are called either silver or gold. Thus the gleam of the gold declares the purity of the faith, and the “silver tested by fire” signifies “utterances that have been examined.” [11] But those that are called “bronze” consist in the mere sound of the voice, nor in the power of the Spirit, and they are, as the apostle says, like “a sounding bronze or a clashing cymbal.”[12] So if we bring these “bronze censers,” that is, the words of the heretics, to the altar of God, where there is divine fire, where the true proclamation is, the truth itself will gleam more brightly in comparison with what is false.

    Let me give an example. Suppose I take the statements of Marcion[13] or Basilides[14] or any other heretic and refute them using words of the truth and testimonies from the divine Scriptures, as if I were using the fire of the divine altar. Will not their impiety appear more clearly by the very comparison? For if the reaching of the church were simple and not surrounded from without by assertions from the teachings of the heretics, our faith would not be able to seem as clear and as examined. But the reason why catholic teaching undergoes attacks from those who contradict it is so that our Faith will not grow sluggish from inactivity, but will be refined by such exercises.

    1.4. This, after all, is the reason that the apostle said: “Now there must be heresies among you, in order that those who are proven [14]. This, after all, is the reason that the apostle said: “Now there must be heresies among you, in order that those who are proven may be manifested among you.”[15] This means it is necessary to surround the altar with the censers of the heretics,[16] so that the distinction between believers and unbelievers may become certain and manifest to all. For when ecclesiastical faith begins to shine like gold and her proclamation gleams before those who behold it like silver that has been tested by fire, then the words of the heretics, obscured with baseness and disgrace, will appear dim …

    (I place the portions from the footnote in bold).

    This confirms what I thought.  In fact it shows that Origen is taking a liberal view of the matter.

    Origen is not saying that the books of the heretics have been ordered to be burned.  This is not present in the passage.

    He says that if you assembled a synod, and asked if the words and writings of those like Korah who have been killed by divine vengeance should likewise be burned, then they would say “yes”.  But Origen says that God says “no”.  He says examine them by the light of the divine altar.  If you do this, and compare them to the genuine teaching, their shabbiness will become evident.  But whatever is true within them should not be rejected just because it is in bad company.

    Let’s get rid of a possible canard here: that this is a matter of interpretation.

    The author does not write that Origen’s words suggest that Marcionite works were burned.  That would be a possible, if dubious, interpretation of the text earlier in the homily.  But he does not say that.

    The author writes simply that the works were actually ordered to be burnt.     But as we have seen, the reference definitely contains no such statement.

    It’s very odd.  I think this is the first case that I have ever encountered where a book published by a highly reputable publisher contains a statement with a false footnote.  I wouldn’t blame the author, who perhaps simply had had a long day. But surely the publisher’s reader ought to have caught this?

    Or … horrible thought … do the readers for academic publishers no longer understand Latin?

    Whatever the reason, it is a valuable reminder that we need to verify references.

    UPDATE: Dr Rohmann has kindly added a comment below to say that he did not believe that he said that the order to burn Marcionite books was contemporary with Origen.  The order he has in mind is the edict of Constantine referred to in Eusebius’ Vita Constantini III, chapter 56.

    1. [1]The work is the otherwise interesting D. Rohmann, Christianity, Book-burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, De Gruyter (2016).  I have not looked further into it at the moment.  The author is not writing in his native language, and something must be allowed for this.  I have no intention here to pillory the author, of course.  I am concerned that such a glitch was not picked up in proof.

    Byzantine News

    Free to Download: Rome and the Arabs by Irfan Shahid


    Dumbarton Oaks has made available I .Shahid's  book on Rome and the Arabs. Click here to download
    The Arabs played an important role in Roman-controlled Oriens in the four centuries or so that elapsed from the Settlement of Pompey in 64 B.C. to the reign of Diocletian, A.D. 284–305. In Rome and the Arabs Irfan Shahîd explores this extensive but poorly known role and traces the phases of the Arab-Roman relationship, especially in the climactic third century, which witnessed the rise of many powerful Roman Arabs such as the Empresses of the Severan Dynasty, Emperor Philip, and the two rulers of Palmyra, Odenathus and Zenobia. Philip the Arab, the author argues, was the first Christian Roman emperor and Abgar the Great (ca. 200 A.D.) was the first Near Eastern ruler to adopt Christianity. In addition to political and military matters, the author also discusses Arab cultural contributions, pointing out the role of the Hellenized and Romanized Arabs in the urbanization of the region and in the progress of Christianity, particularly in Edessa under the Arab Abgarids.

    L’Association Française pour l’étude de l’âge du Fer (Le Blog de l'AFEAF)

    Passeurs des Alpes. La culture de Golasecca : entre Méditerranée et Europe continentale à l’âge du fer.

    Publication de la thèse de notre collègue Veronica Cicolani. Les Alpes ont toujours été perméables aux échanges. De part et d’autre de ses versants, hommes, objets et idées y circulent et se croisent rapprochant d’une façon complexe mondes celtique et méditerranéen. En Italie du Nord, la culture celtophone de Golasecca...

    Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

    #TFA2017 Rilievi 3D con carattere d’emergenza: il supporto della tecnologia mobile mapping di GeoSLAM

    tfa2017-rilievi-3d-con-carattere-d-emergenza-il-supporto-della-tecnologia-mobile-mapping-di-geoslam

    Il mondo della misura è in continua evoluzione: le nuove tecnologie hanno fatto spazio a nuove modalità operative che, seppur hanno accorciato i tempi sul campo, hanno richiesto finora una maggiore concentrazione di know-how ed energie per l’elaborazione di moli di dati importanti, con il supporto di hardware sempre più potenti e performanti.

    Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

    Newly added to Orbis Biblicus et Orientalis Online

    Newly added to Orbis Biblicus et Orientalis Online

    The Archaeology News Network

    New stone courses, Roman theatre uncovered at base of Jerusalem's Western Wall

    Eight stone courses of the Western Wall that had been buried under an 8-meter layer of earth were recently uncovered in excavations conducted by the Israel Antiquities Authority in the Western Wall Tunnels in Jerusalem.  These stone courses, completely preserved, are built of massive stones and are outstanding in the quality of their construction. Israel Antiquities PhotoFurthermore, after the removal of this layer of soil, the...

    [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

    Archaeological News on Tumblr

    Roman theater uncovered at base of Jerusalem's Western Wall

    Israeli archaeologists on Monday announced the discovery of the first known Roman-era theater in...

    BiblePlaces Blog

    Roman Theater Discovered Next to Western Wall

    Archaeologists working in Jerusalem today announced the results of the last two years of excavation underneath Wilson’s Arch next to the Western Wall. The most exciting find is a small Roman theater.

    The story is being reported by a number of news sources. The quotations below are from The Times of Israel. The article includes several photos.

    “Israel Antiquity Authority archaeologists announced Monday that for the past two years they have been excavating and exposing a massive eight-meter deep section of Jerusalem’s Western Wall, unseen for 1,700 years.

    And in the course of their work, which has been quietly proceeding directly beneath Wilson’s Arch — the area immediately adjacent to the men’s section of the Western Wall — they unexpectedly discovered a small Roman theater.

    […]

    The work is set to continue for another six months, and the expectation is that First Temple-era findings will be uncovered. When the work is completed, the site will be opened to the public.

    The findings of the archaeologists are interesting, and as is often the case, not entirely clear or consistent. Here are a few highlights:

    • The dating of the theater is not clearly stated, but it appears that it was built after the destruction of the temple in AD 70.
    • The theater went out of use following an earthquake in 360.
    • The construction of the theater was never finished.
    • The theater seated 200-300 people.
    • The theater may have been used as a bouleuterion or as an odeon.
    • Wilson’s Arch served as the roof for the theater.
    • Excavations will continue below the theater with hopes of discovering remains from the First Temple Period.
    • The archaeologists will present more of their findings at a conference this week at Hebrew University.

    Read the full story here. High-resolution photos are available here.

    HT: Joseph Lauer

    Roman-theater-Western-Wall-IAA

    Roman theater with archaeologist Joe Uziel
    Photograph: Yaniv Berman, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

    Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

    #TFA2017 workshop SISMABONUS incentivi fiscali per il recupero del patrimonio edilizio

    tfa2017-workshop-sismabonus-incentivi-fiscali-per-il-recupero-del-patrimonio-edilizio

    Il 18 Ottobre durante il Forum TECHNOLOGYforALL la DEI, Tipografia Del Genio Civile, farà il punto sulle incentivazioni del SISMABONUS.  Le Linee guida per la classificazione del rischio sismico delle costruzioni sono state emanate con il decreto del MIT n.58 del 28 febbraio 2017, modificato dal decreto ministeriale del 7 marzo 2017 n. 65.

    #TFA2017 workshop Leica Geosystems: laser scanner per il BIM e i beni culturali, ottimizzare la gestione del rilievo 3D

    tfa2017-workshop-leica-geosystems-laser-scanner-per-il-bim-e-i-beni-culturali-ottimizzare-la-gestione-del-rilievo-3d

    Leica Geosystems, parte del gruppo Hexagon, produce e fornisce soluzioni di misura 3D hardware e software che trovano impiego in vari campi di applicazione. In particolare nella conservazione e valorizzazione del patrimonio culturale, i professionisti del settore traggono numerosi vantaggi dalla digitalizzazione dello stato di fatto mediante tecnologia laser scanner terrestre, che consente di acquisire nuvole di punti altamente accurate e dense.

    Bill Caraher (The New Archaeology of the Mediterranean World)

    Hybridizing Paper

    This is probably too grandiose a title for this blog post, but after my post last week, I realized that I had some odds and ends that I meant to include, but for various reasons did not. Most of these focus on the idea that the potential of digital media and digital books has tended to be set in opposition to paper books and traditional media. If hybridization occurred, as I proposed in my post last week, it tended to be in the creation of digital media that formally adopted some of the characteristics of paper books. This is best manifest in the continued currency of the PDF files as probably the most common and perhaps the most functionally useful way to circulate digital content. They look like a page, act like a book, yet are open to external hyperlinks, video, audio, and 3D content, and relatively seamless linear and nonlinear organization that does not compromise the basic structure of the page or the codex.

    I’m more interested right now in the flip side of this situation. This past week a paper book that I wrote with Bret Weber has appeared from North Dakota State University Press. It is published only in paper, and as far as I know, there are no plans to make the book available in a digital format. As I’ve blogged on before, I have an interest in expanding the paper book to include both updates to the itineraries, but, more important, updates to the ideas present in the work. In effect, I want to wrap the book in a new context that allows the original paper volume to continue to stand as a unit, but can also offer new ways of thinking about it through updated research, reading, and thinking.

    The desire to move from digital to paper and to digital again, I think is one of the intriguing challenges facing publishing these days. As I outlined with my new project in collaboration with the digital journal Epoiesen, establishing ties that link paper to digital content is both an aesthetic and practical challenge. 

    It is interesting to note that there are some recent ventures in commercial publishing that have wrestled with the exact same issue. In my little corner of the world, for example, the watch blog Hodinkee recently published its first paper magazine. Carrying over many of the key aesthetic features from the blog, including the high quality color photography and genteel style, the magazine runs to $27.00. There are, of course, branding issues here that suggest that perhaps serve to distance the premium periodical from the more lowly blog while at the same time demonstrating a family resemblance.

    My favorite audiophile blog, Parttime Audiophile, has recently initiated a similar venture with a downloadable .pdf called The Occasional. While this is a clever play on the “part-time” name, it sets itself apart with its higher production quality and its explicit print orientation, although at present, it is only available as a download. The presence of two page spreads, the organization of the text in difficult to read (and non-justified!) columns, and the absence of hyperlinks makes it more difficult to read as a digital document, but also clearly echoes the paper page. 

    As I’m looking ahead to new ways to bring North Dakota Quarterly to a new and expanded audience, I’m likewise facing the challenge of integrating regular digital content appearing on our website with ab annual paper version.  

    There are reasons, of course, for the persistence of paper. In the case of Hodinkee or (perhaps hinted at by The Occasional), there is a prestige associated with print even if it is digitally mediated. For upscale commodities like watches and high-end stereo equipment people expect a certain kind of luxury even in the media surrounding these products. My colleagues at NDQ have tended to emphasize the physicality of the paper book and the character of the final product as evidence for having MADE something. I admit that this feeling of making has carried over into my love of producing paper books as well. 

    For academic work, there is another important and more practical aspect to producing paper that hybridizes with the digital. In academic culture it is still easier to cite paper (or paper-like) versions of books and article according to page numbers. Reviewers continue to prefer paper books – when given the option – and libraries remain better equipped to catalogue, preserver, and circulate print copies even as their book budgets continue to shrink. Paper copies, whether on the desk of an editor or on a library shelf, conform to certain institutional expectations for how knowledge looks physically. Of course, this might be a temporary or transitional stage in how knowledge looks and circulates as we come to terms with a more robust and complex digital future, but the massive history and continued ubiquity of printed media suggests that these paradigms will be slow to change.

    All this is to say that one of key challenges facing publishing these days is not making digital less like paper, but making paper more like digital. There is a present need to create hybrid forms of paper media that push the boundaries of how the paper codex has traditionally functioned and to blur the lines between paper and digital. This under-appreciated and under-recognized form of hybridity will be part of what The Digital Press at the University of North Dakota explores.


    ArcheoNet BE

    Offers aan de goden in Grote-Brogel

    Op woensdag 18 oktober organiseert de Antwerpse Vereniging voor Romeinse Archeologie (AVRA) een lezing over de opgraving van een openluchtcultusplaats uit de Vroeg-Romeinse tijd in Grote-Brogel (Peer). Gastspreker is Marleen Martens.

    In 2015 en 2016 legden archeologen in alle discretie een belangrijke cultusplaats uit de Vroeg-Romeinse periode vrij in Grote-Brogel. Het gaat om een offerplaats uit de turbulente periode na de veroveringen van onze gebieden door Caesar. De melding van honderden munten en mantelspelden door metaaldetectoristen brachten de site onder de aandacht van de archeologen. Wellicht heeft de offerplaats een oudere “Keltische” oorsprong. Mogelijk liggen nog oudere offers verborgen in de moerassige sprenkzone van de Abeek. De cultusplaats geeft samen met deze van Wijshagen een uniek zicht op de mysterieuze offerrituelen van de bevolking in de Kempen in de Voor-Romeinse en de Romeinse periode.

    Praktisch: de lezing start om 20u in de UA-Stadscampus (Rodestraat 14, Antwerpen). De toegang is gratis. De lezing wordt georganiseerd i.s.m. de Vakgroep Geschiedenis van de Universiteit Antwerpen.

    Joint Library of the Hellenic & Roman Societies / Institute of Classical Studies Library

    Monster Books - Part 2

    The Institute of Classical Studies is holding a free public event entitled Why do we need monsters? on Tuesday 17th October. In honour of this, we went on a heroic hunt for the monsters, beasts and demons hidden away in our library. The fruits of our Herculean labours can be found below - whether you’re interested in art, literature, language or history, there’s something for you. In case you missed part 1, you can find it here.




    Monsters and monstrosity in Augustan poetry, Lowe, D
    Dr Lowe looks at how poets, such as Ovid and Virgil, reinvented the monsters of Greek myth to explore political, social and aesthetic developments in Rome. The monsters discussed include the Centaurs and the Minotaur in their role as hyper-masculine, brutish beast-men, and the desirable, but dangerous, Medusa. Dr Lowe will be speaking at the Why do we need Monsters? event on ‘Real monsters in ancient Rome’, so why not go along to hear more?

    Mythical monsters in classical literature, Murgatroyd, P
    Want to know more about Sirens, Cyclopes and Vampires? This book covers the representation of all your favourite monsters in literature, from the ancient world all the way up the to the 21st century.


    This reference book details the gods, demons, angels, spirits and semi-divine heroes who feature in the bible. The entries include discussions of the name’s meaning and etymology; the individual’s role outside the bible; the individual’s role in Biblical texts; bibliographical information.

    The fish-tailed monster in Greek and Etruscan art, Shepard, K
    In this book, Shepard discusses the depiction of the merman, the hippocamp and the ketos in Greek and Etruscan art across a range of media, including tomb paintings, jewellery and monuments.

    The animal part: human and other animals in the poetic imagination, Payne, M
    This book examines how verse writers, from antiquity to the present day, have explored animal experiences and suffering, and communicated them to a very different kind of beast in their human audience.


    James F. McGrath (Exploring Our Matrix)

    A Complicated Pregnancy

    Let me share my blurb endorsing Kyle Roberts’ new book: In A Complicated Pregnancy, Kyle Roberts offers a dramatic, sincerely honest, and deeply personal exploration of the question of Jesus’ virginal conception. While many other books wrestle with this topic primarily from another angle (that of historical uncertainty and Gospel discrepancies, which Roberts does also […]

    Jim Davila (Paleojudaica.com)

    Reynolds on Jewish apocalyptic and the NT

    <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/srJw_SqEU0o" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

    Compitum - événements (tous types)

    Giocare tra medioevo ed età moderna. Modelli etici ed estetici per l'Europa

    Titre: Giocare tra medioevo ed età moderna. Modelli etici ed estetici per l'Europa
    Lieu: Fondazione Benetton Studi Ricerche / Trévise
    Catégorie: Colloques, journées d'études
    Date: 17.11.2017 - 18.11.2017
    Heure: 18.00 h
    Description:

    Information signalée par Francesca Aceto

    Giocare tra medioevo ed età moderna. Modelli etici ed estetici per l'Europa

    Treviso, Fondazione Benetton Studi Ricerche, 17 et 18 novembre 2017

     


    Argumentaire:
    Des études récentes sur l'histoire de la « ludicità » dans l'espace européen ont montré dans quelle mesure ‘le jouer' en tant qu'acte de parole et d'image représente un observatoire privilégiée permettant de s'interroger sur des questions primordiales dont la portée intellectuelle, politique et sociale a été largement sous-estimée par les historiens. Cette rencontre, organisée par la Fondazione Benetton Studi e Ricerche, le Centre de recherche historique (CRH, EHESS) et l'University College Dublin se propose de fournir un parcours historiographique et une nouvelle interprétation critique de la culture éthique du jeu comme forme et norme du vivre social dans l'histoire de l'Europe entre moyen Age et modernité (XIVe-XVIIe siècle). L'histoire de la normalisation du jeu comme phénomène anthropologique et social, qui tient notamment une place fondamentale dans la genèse des sociétés de l'Ancien Régime, mérite en effet d'être inscrite dans le cadre d'un long parcours spécialement occidental, voué ‘à la recherche de la norme' sous la forme d'un codex moral destiné à régler les conduites verbales et non verbales de l'homme en société. D'où la nécessité d'acquérir ici une perspective interdisciplinaire autour de l'histoire de la performativité des discours et des pratiques du jeu et sur le jeu par l'étude de plusieurs typologies de sources (scholastiques, normatives, littéraires, iconographiques, scientifiques), de méthodologies et d'approches historiographiques différents.

    17 novembre

    Il gioco tra norma e devozione
    presiede ALESSANDRO ARCANGELI (Università di Verona)
    SILVANA VECCHIO (Università di Ferrara) e CARLA CASAGRANDE (Università di Pavia)
    Vizi e virtù del gioco: l'eutrapelia fra XIII e XV secolo
    ALESSANDRA RIZZI (Fondazione Benetton, Treviso-Università Ca' Foscari, Venezia)
    Chiesa, gioco e interazioni sociali nel Rinascimento
    GHERARDO ORTALLI (Fondazione Benetton, Treviso-Università Ca' Foscari, Venezia)
    Giovani, etica, gioco: l'insegnamento scolastico della Compagnia di Gesù

    Il gioco nella e della letteratura
    Presiede AMEDEO QUONDAM (Sapienza Università di Roma)
    PAOLO GARBINI (Sapienza Università di Roma)
    Coniugazione del verbo giocare. Grammatici e gioco nel Medioevo latino
    PAOLO PROCACCIOLI (Università della Tuscia, Viterbo)
    Verso l'Indice e il declino del libro di sorti. L'Oracolo di Girolamo Parabosco
    FRANCESCO LUCIOLI (University College Dublin)
    Giochi cortigiani, moralità e poesia cavalleresca nel Cinquecento

    Il gioco e il genere
    Presiede ALESSANDRA RIZZI (Fondazione Benetton, Treviso-Università Ca' Foscari, Venezia)
    VANINA KOPP (Institut historique allemand, Paris)
    Le genre dans la cité. Les compétitions poétiques et la mise en scène des relations
    interpersonnelles dans les villes en France
    ALESSANDRO ARCANGELI (Università di Verona)
    Genere dei giochi e giochi di genere nella cultura ludica del Rinascimento europeo
    UMBERTO CECCHINATO (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa)
    Danza, comportamenti di genere e violenza nella Repubblica di Venezia nel Rinascimento
    L'azzardo del sorteggio: storia dei giochi di fortuna
    mostra aperta da venerdì 17 novembre 2017 a domenica 14 gennaio 2018
    spazi Bomben, Fondazione Benetton Studi Ricerche
    sabato 18 novembre 2017

    Gioco e rappresentazione
    Presiede PAOLO PROCACCIOLI (Università della Tuscia, Viterbo)
    PIERRE-OLIVIER DITTMAR (École des hautes études en sciences sociales, Paris)
    Sociabilità ludica nello spazio domestico: un corpus di soffitti dipinti nel sud della Francia
    FRANCESCA ACETO (École des hautes études en sciences sociales, Paris)
    “La spirituale ricreazione del buon geometra”. Note su ludicità, arti e scienze tra Quattrocento
    e Cinquecento
    ANTONELLA FENECH KROKE (CNRS, Centre André Chastel, Paris)
    “Mattaccin tutti noi siamo”. Giochi acrobatici e distorsioni corporee

    conferenza conclusiva
    Presiede GHERARDO ORTALLI (Fondazione Benetton, Treviso-Università Ca' Foscari, Venezia)
    AMEDEO QUONDAM (Sapienza Università di Roma)
    Il gioco della Corte

    Plus d'infos:
    Conseil scientifique
    Francesca Aceto (École des hautes études en sciences sociales, Paris) ; Francesco Lucioli (University College Dublin) ; Gherardo Ortalli (Fondazione Benetton, Treviso-Università Ca' Foscari, Venezia); Paolo Procaccioli (Università della Tuscia) ; Alessandra Rizzi (Fondazione Benetton, Treviso-Università Ca' Foscari, Venezia) ; Jean-Claude Schmitt (École des hautes études en sciences sociales, Paris)

    Organisation
    Francesca Aceto, francesca.aceto@ehess.fr
    Francesco Lucioli, francesco.lucioli@ucd.ie
    Fondazione Benetton Studi Ricerche:
    Patrizia Boschiero, patrizia.boschiero@fbsr.it Nicoletta Fermi, nicoletta.fermi@fbsr.it

    Lieu de la manifestation : Trèvise, Italie (Fondazione Benetton Studi Ricerche)
    Contact : francesca.aceto@ehess.fr

    Noel Tan (The Southeast Asian Archaeology Newsblog)

    Food vendors cleared from Angkor Wat lawns

    via Khmer Times, 10 October 2017: The Apsara Authority bans food vendors from setting up on the grass in front of Angkor Wat. Source: Food vendors cleared from Angkor Wat lawns – Khmer Times

    Jim Davila (Paleojudaica.com)

    Hershel Shanks is retiring as BAR editor

    <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/l2o8HW906qY" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

    Rohr Institute course on Great Debates

    <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/VVQ1rfNOXjw" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

    Septuagint Studies Supervision (2)

    <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/P_5qdXcoh4Y" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

    AIA Fieldnotes

    Mikulčice Open Day

    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Masaryk Museum in Hodonín
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    education
    other
    Start Date: 
    Sunday, October 15, 2017

    Mikulčice Early Medieval Settlement Open Day - International Archaeology Day 2017

    We offer you an Open day at our site and free entrance as well as guided tours around the site. You are welcome!

    Location

    Name: 
    Irena Chovančíková
    Call for Papers: 
    no

    Samuel Hardy (Conflict Antiquities)

    antiquities trafficking and espionage in the Cold War and the New Cold War

    State financing and assassination in the Cold War As I noted on my doctoral research blog on Cultural Heritage in Conflict (and as Peter Campbell found elsewhere), there is secure evidence of conflict antiquities trafficking by Communist Bulgaria (the People’s Republic of Bulgaria) during the Cold War. There is also secure evidence of connections between […]

    AIA Fieldnotes

    In Search for Chrudim Medieval City Wall

    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Regional Museum in Chrudim
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    lecture
    education
    other
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 21, 2017 - 10:00am

    Regional museum in Chrudim inveites you for a walk along the newly and still discovered medieval city wall of our town.

    Museum archaeologist Jan Musil will guide you along the visible and hidden parts of the town unique fortification and will give you all necessary up to date information on it. He will expect you at Ressel square at 10:00am.

    Location

    Name: 
    Jan Musil
    Call for Papers: 
    no

    Noel Tan (The Southeast Asian Archaeology Newsblog)

    Wall built to protect Ayutthaya historical sites from flooding

    via Bangkok Post, 09 October 2017: We’ve been getting heavy rains in Bangkok and other parts of Thailand, with some floods already reported. Ayutthaya has previously been susceptible to floods, and there have been some mitigation measures put in place – it remains to be seen if they can last this year’s downpour. Ayutthaya local … Continue reading "Wall built to protect Ayutthaya historical sites from flooding"

    Bryn Mawr Classical Review

    2017.10.38: Corpus der römischen Rechtsquellen zur antiken Sklaverei (CRRS), Teil 4.3: Erbrecht: Aktive Stellung, Personeneigenschaft und Ansätze zur Anerkennung von Rechten. Forschungen zur antiken Sklaverei – Supplement 3.4.3

    Review of Martin Avenarius, Corpus der römischen Rechtsquellen zur antiken Sklaverei (CRRS), Teil 4.3: Erbrecht: Aktive Stellung, Personeneigenschaft und Ansätze zur Anerkennung von Rechten. Forschungen zur antiken Sklaverei – Supplement 3.4.3. Stuttgart: 2017. Pp. xxxviii, 418. €72.00. ISBN 9783515115797.

    2017.10.37: Julius Caesar's 'Bellum Civile' and the Composition of a New Reality

    Review of Ayelet Peer, Julius Caesar's 'Bellum Civile' and the Composition of a New Reality. Farnham; Burlington: 2015. Pp. x, 200. $124.95. ISBN 9781472452078.

    2017.10.36: Aineias / Aeneas Tacticus: Stadtverteidigung / Poliorketika. Griechisch-deutsch. Sammlung Tusculum

    Review of Kai Brodersen, Aineias / Aeneas Tacticus: Stadtverteidigung / Poliorketika. Griechisch-deutsch. Sammlung Tusculum. Berlin; Boston: 2017. Pp. 200. $45.99. ISBN 9783110544237.

    2017.10.35: Inscriptiones Coi insulae: tituli sepulcrales urbanae. Inscriptiones Graecae, Vol. XII: Inscriptiones insularum maris Aegaei praeter Delum; Fasc. 4: Inscriptiones Coi, Calymni, insularum Milesiarum; Pars 3

    Review of Dimitris Bosnakis, Klaus Hallof, Inscriptiones Coi insulae: tituli sepulcrales urbanae. Inscriptiones Graecae, Vol. XII: Inscriptiones insularum maris Aegaei praeter Delum; Fasc. 4: Inscriptiones Coi, Calymni, insularum Milesiarum; Pars 3. Berlin; Boston: 2016. Pp. 420. $489.00. ISBN 9783110451726.

    Compitum - publications

    R. Burns, Origins of the Colonnaded Streets in the Cities of the Roman East

    9780198784548.jpg

    Ross Burns, Origins of the Colonnaded Streets in the Cities of the Roman East, Oxford-New York, 2017.

    Éditeur : Oxford University Press
    432 pages
    ISBN : 9780198784548
    100 £

     

    The colonnaded axes define the visitor's experience of many of the great cities of the Roman East. How did this extraordinarily bold tool of urban planning evolve? The street, instead of remaining a mundane passage, a convenient means of passing from one place to another, was in the course of little more than a century transformed in the Eastern provinces into a monumental landscape which could in one sweeping vision encompass the entire city.
    The colonnaded axes became the touchstone by which cities competed for status in the Eastern Empire. Though adopted as a sign of cities' prosperity under the Pax Romana, they were not particularly 'Roman' in their origin. Rather, they reflected the inventiveness, fertility of ideas and the dynamic role of civic patronage in the Eastern provinces in the first two centuries under Rome.
    This study will concentrate on the convergence of ideas behind these great avenues, examining over fifty sites in an attempt to work out the sequence in which ideas developed across a variety of regions-from North Africa around to Asia Minor. It will look at the phenomenon in the context of the consolidation of Roman rule.

    Lire la suite...

    Noel Tan (The Southeast Asian Archaeology Newsblog)

    150-year-old royal puppet tradition revived for late King’s cremation

    via The Nation, 07 October 2017: The late Thai king’s cremation next week will also see a number of revived cultural crafts which haven’t been seen in generations. THE CENTURY-OLD royal puppet has been revived to perform at the Royal Cremation of His Majesty the late King Bhumibol Adulyadej on October 26. Source: Royal puppet … Continue reading "150-year-old royal puppet tradition revived for late King’s cremation"

    AIA Fieldnotes

    Archaeological Day in West Bohemia Museum in Pilsen

    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    Name: 
    Denisa Brejchova
    Call for Papers: 
    no

    Noel Tan (The Southeast Asian Archaeology Newsblog)

    Thai initiative to bring museums to the digital world

    via The Nation, 02 October 2017: The Culture Ministry is embracing the Thailand 4.0 initiative with its new hi-tech “smart museum” and “virtual museum” projects that aim to attract 10-11 million visitors next year. Source: Virtual museums’ aim to attract 11 million visitors

    George Town may lose UNESCO World Heritage Site status

    via Astro Awani, 06 October 2017: George Town, one of the most prominent trading ports linking the East and West for the last 200 years, is at risk of losing the UNESCO World Heritage Site status. Source: George Town may lose UNESCO World Heritage Site status | Astro Awani

    Khmer art in Sa Kaeo

    The Sdok Kok Thom Temple in Thailand’s Sa Kaeo province will be Thailand’s next official historical park. Inscriptions from the 11th century temple are the primary source for the founding of Angkor in 802. Almost 1,000 years ago, this grand Khmer architecture was dedicated to the Hindu god Shiva and called Pattharatekla, according to an … Continue reading "Khmer art in Sa Kaeo"

    Lecture: Ancient Medical Industries in Cambodia and the 2017 NSC Archaeological Field School

    Readers in Singapore may be interested in the talk by Dr Kyle Latinis at the Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre later this week. Date: 19 October 2017 Time: 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm Venue:Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, Singapore The 2017 Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre (NSC) Archaeological Field School recently assisted APSARA Authority with rather incredible discoveries at the late … Continue reading "Lecture: Ancient Medical Industries in Cambodia and the 2017 NSC Archaeological Field School"

    Evolutionary dynamics of language systems

    A new paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science studies the rates of change between grammar and vocabulary in 81 Austronesian languages and finds that grammatical changes in language differ much quicker. The paper suggests a more nuanced reading of language evolution is needed in order to trace their movement in time. … Continue reading "Evolutionary dynamics of language systems"

    October 15, 2017

    AIA Fieldnotes

    International Archaeology Day with Museum of Blanik Region

    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Museum of Blanik Region
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    lecture
    education
    other
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 21, 2017 - 11:00am

    We invite you for the guided trekking up to the legendary mountan Great Blaník. To prepare enough handouts please register via e-mail muzeum.archeolog@gmail.com. We will meet at 11:00 AM by the Blaník Nature House in Krasovice 19. We will start with a lecture and then will climbe the mountain. IN case of bad weather we have prepared indoor programme.

    Location

    Name: 
    Soňa Hendrychová
    Call for Papers: 
    no

    Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

    Augustine Scholarship Open Access courtesy of Classics Wikispaces

    Augustine Scholarship Open Access courtesy of Classics Wikispaces
    Editions [note also Migne, Patrologia Latina ; html version of Augustine's works from Migne at augustinus.it ]

    CSEL
    • Confessiones , ed. P. Knöll, CSEL 33 [= Augustine 1.1] (Vienna, 1896) [ link ] [ archive.org ]
    • Retractationes , ed. P. Knöll, CSEL 36 [= Augustine 1.2] (Vienna, 1902) [ link ] [ archive.org ]
    • Contra Academicos , etc., ed. P. Knöll, CSEL 63 [= Augustine 1.3] (Vienna, 1922) [ archive.org ]
    • Epistulae , ed. A. Goldbacher, CSEL 34 [= Augustine 2] (Vienna, 1895-1898) [ archive.org ]: part 1 [ link ]; part 2 [ link ]; CSEL 44 (Vienna, 1904): part 3 [ link ] [ archive.org ]; CSEL 57 (Vienna, 1911): part 4 [ archive.org ]; CSEL 58 (Vienna, 1923): part 5: Praefatio editoris et indices [ archive.org ]
    • Speculum , etc., ed. F. Weihrich, CSEL 12 [= Augustine 3.1] (Vienna, 1887) [ link ] [ archive.org ]
    • De Genesi ad litteram , etc., ed. J. Zycha, CSEL 28.1 [= Augustine 3.2] (Vienna, 1894) [ link ] [ archive.org ]
    • Quaestiones in Heptateuchum; Adnotationes in Iob , ed. J. Zycha, CSEL 28 [= Augustine 3.3] (Vienna, 1895) [ link ] [ link ] [ archive.org ]
    • De consensu evangelistarum , CSEL 43 [= Augustine 3.4] (Vienna, 1904) [ link ] [ archive.org ]
    • De civitate dei CSEL 40, part 1 [= Augustine 5.1] (Vienna, 1899) [ link ] [ archive.org ]: part 2 [= Augustine 5.2] (Vienna, 1900) [ archive.org ]
    • De fide et symbolo , etc., ed. J. Zycha, CSEL 41 [= Augustine 5.3] (Vienna, 1900) [ link ] [ archive.org ]
    • De utilitate credendi , etc., ed. J. Zycha, CSEL 25.1 [= Augustine 6.1] (Vienna, 1891) [ link ] [ archive.org ]
    • Contra Felicem , etc., ed. J. Zycha, CSEL 25.1 [= Augustine 6.2] (Vienna, 1892) [ link ] [ archive.org ]
    • Scripta contra Donatistas pt. 1 [ Psalmus contra partem Donati, etc.], ed. M. Petschenig, CSEL 51.1 [= Augustine 7.1] (Vienna, 1908) [ archive.org ]
    • Scripta contra Donatistas pt. 2 [ Contra epistulam Petiliani , etc.], ed. M. Petschenig, CSEL 52 [= Augustine 7.2] (Vienna, 1909) [ archive.org ]
    • Scripta contra Donatistas pt. 3 [ De unico baptismo , etc.], ed. M. Petschenig, CSEL 53 [= Augustine 7.3] (Vienna, 1910) [ archive.org ]
    • De peccatorum meritis et remissione et de baptismate parvulorum ad Marcellum , etc., ed. C. F. Vrba and J. Zycha, CSEL 60 [= Augustine 8.1] (Vienna, 1913) [ archive.org ]
    • De perfectione iustitiae hominis etc., ed. C. F. Vrba and J. Zycha, CSEL 42 [= Augustine 8.2] (Vienna, 1902) [ link ] [ archive.org ]

    • Eugippius, Excerpta ex operibus S. Augustini , CSEL 9 (Vienna, 1885) [ link ] [ archive.org ]

    Caillau


    Other
    • De Civ. Dei , ed. B. Dombart, 3rd ed., vol. 1 [Books 1-13] (Leipzig: Teubner, 1908) [ link ]; vol. 2 [Books 14-22] (Leipzig: Teubner, 1905) [ link ]; 2nd ed., vol. 1 [Books 1-13] (Leipzig: Teubner, 1877) [ link ]
    • Nisard's collection: Tertullian and Augustine - selected works [Tert. Apol. ; Aug. De Civ. Dei ] (Paris, 1877) [ link ]

    • Confessiones , ed. Von Rauner (Gutersloh, 1876) [ archive.org ]
    • De catechizandis rudibus, de fide rerum quae non videntur, de utilitate credendi , ed. C. Mariott [ in usum iuniorum ], 2nd ed. (Oxford, 1869) [ link ]; 4th ed. [adds Enchiridion/de fide, spe et charitate (Oxford, 1885) [ link ]
    • Enchiridion/de fide, spe et charitate , ed. J. G. Krabinger (Tübingen, 1861) [ link ]
    • Ars Grammatica breviata , ed. C. F. Weber (Marburg, 1861) [ link ]
    • De doctrina Christiana; Enchiridion , ed. C. H. Bruder (Leipzig, 1838) [ archive.org ]

    • G. A. Hench (ed.), The Monsee Fragments...with Notes and a Grammatical Treatise (Strasburg, 1890) [ link ] [Augustine sermon begins p. 60]
    • L. Delisle et al., Etudes paléographiques et historiques sur des papyrus du VIme siècle (Geneva, 1866) [ link ] - [on p. 107, H. Bordier: Restitution d'un manuscrit du sixième siècle contenant des lettres et des sermons de Saint Augustin]

    • J. Skinner (ed.), Coelestia, the Manual of St Augustine: The Latin Text Side by Side with an English Interpretation (London, 1881) [ link ]

    Studies
    • S. Angus, The Sources of the First Ten Books of Augustine's De Civitate Dei (Princeton, 1906) [ link ]
    • J. S. McIntosh, A Study of Augustine's Versions of Genesis (Chicago, 1912) [ link ]

    AIA Fieldnotes

    Excavation in Plavy Open Day

    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by South Bohemian Museum in České Budějovice
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    education
    other
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 21, 2017 - 1:45pm

    South Bohemian Museum in České Budějovice is organizing guided site tour at the aarchaeological excavation of the prehistorical mound burials in Plav. We will meet at 01:45 PM at the bus stop in Plav. We are looking forward to meet you!

    Location

    Name: 
    Zuzana Thomová
    Call for Papers: 
    no

    International Archaeology Day in Česká Lípa

    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Museum of Česká Lípa
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    fair
    exhibition
    education
    other
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 21, 2017

    The Museum and Gallery in Česká Lípa invite you for "Small archaeological walk around Česká Lípa", a guided tour of Archaeological museum Šatlava with 3D screening about Middle Ages and to the museum expositions in the Cloiste building (Prehistory of the region, Archaeology of the Medddle Ages in the region, Archaeological monetary depots, Ancient Egyot and our Region).

    We are ready for adult and kids. Free entry.

    Location

    Name: 
    Petr Jenč
    Call for Papers: 
    no

    The Heroic Age


    Please consider submitting an abstract to the following session at the NeMLA's 49th Convention that will take place April 12-15, 2018, in Pittsburgh, PA:

    Ancient Myth and National Spaces in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

    In this current age of resurgent nationalism, questions of national origin and legitimation take on a new importance. This panel, which welcomes submissions from scholars working within or across different national literary traditions, will explore the use of ancient myth in justifications of territorial conquests and the defense and legitimation of national spaces.

    Issues that papers may address include (but are not limited to):

    Ancient and pseudo-ancient foundation myths

    Dynastic myths and claims of descent from classical figures

    Medieval and early modern evocations of mythical conflicts

    The Latin/vernacular divide and questions of elite/popular readerships

    Word and image in the transmission of national myths

    Session chairs:
    Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski (University of Pittsburgh)
    James Coleman (University of Pittsburgh)

    Please submit abstracts (of up to 300 words) through the NeMLA site (https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/16736) by September 30.

    Any questions about this session can be emailed to james.coleman@pitt.edu.

    --
    James K. Coleman
    Assistant Professor of Italian
    Department of French and Italian
    University of Pittsburgh

    AIA Fieldnotes

    Why is the Castle Švihov Pavement Collapsing?

    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by National Heritage Institute in Pilsen
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    education
    other
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 21, 2017
    Sunday, October 22, 2017
    Saturday, October 28, 2017
    Sunday, October 29, 2017

    When you visit the Švihov Castle you walk on the late gothic pavement revealed during the archaeological excavation. Do you want to see it? Come to visit the Castle and you will learn much more!

    Last two weekends of October the guided tours will be focused on archaeology especially. This interesting view of the Castle is prepared by the archaeological department of the National Heritage Institute in Pilsen for th celebration of the International Archaeology Day.

    Location

    Name: 
    Linda Foster
    Call for Papers: 
    no

    Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

    Coming Soon: World-Historical Gazetteer

    Over a three-year period (2017-2020), the World-Historical Gazetteer (WHG) project will produce a data store and associated software and services supporting collaborative digital and data-driven historical scholarship at the global scale. This Linked Open Data (LOD) system will focus significantly but not exclusively on the centuries since 1500, and have these closely related components:
    The gazetteer. A spatially and temporally comprehensive database of significant world historical place names. This broad but shallow resource (an estimated 30,000 entries, subject to change) will draw on a few core sources, including print historical atlas indexes, linguistic atlases, and modern physical geography datasets. Those core records will be aligned with existing gazetteers where possible, including GeoNames and the Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names (TGN), and be enriched with some data from DBpedia
    A “union index.” Records from the WHG core gazetteer will be merged with those of specialized gazetteers from our project partners and elsewhere in a rich, high-performance index
    Interfaces to the gazetteer. We will build (a) a web-based interface for searching, browsing, and editing the data, and (b) an application programming interface service (API) providing faceted programmatic access to the data [GitHub Repository]
    Demonstration pilot projects. Data from two groups of historical research projects will be linked via the gazetteer, demonstrating the value of linked data in historical scholarship. One group is concerned with Maritime Asia, the other with the Atlantic World

    AIA Fieldnotes

    Shipwrecks from Malta’s recent past and what these tell us

    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by The Archaeological Society Malta
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    lecture
    other
    Start Date: 
    Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - 6:00pm
    Saturday, October 21, 2017 - 2:00pm

    Lecture by Dr Timmy Gambin, senior lecturer, Department of Classics and Archaeology, University of Malta

    21 October at 2 pm Site visit to the multi-period sanctuary site of Tas-Silġ, Marsaxlokk, led by Mr David Cardona, acting senior curator Phoenician, Roman and medieval sites, Heritage Malta, and Professor Nicholas Vella, Associate Professor of Mediterranean Archaeology and Head of the Department of Classics and Archaeology, University of Malta.

    Location

    Name: 
    Ann Gingell Littlejohn
    Telephone: 
    00356 99848764
    Call for Papers: 
    no

    Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

    #TFA2017 GIS opensource: le novità di QGIS 3

    tfa2017-gis-opensource-le-novita-di-qgis-3

    Valerio Noti di Terrelogiche presenterà il workshop "Le novità di QGIS 3, cosa cambierà nel più utilizzato software GIS Open Source".

    #TFA2017 workshop di approfondimento sulla diagnostica non invasiva

    tfa2017-workshop-di-approfondimento-sulla-diagnostica-non-invasiva

    Marcello Melis, Profilocolore, terrà il workshop sull'evoluzione delle tecniche di diagnostica non invasiva di tipo imaging multispettrale ed integrazione con tecniche puntuali. Casi di studio dal multispettrale alle tecniche Terahertz.

    José María Ciordia (Pompilo: diario esporádico de un profesor de griego)

    Treballant el punt de vista neutral

    Darrerament he tornat a participar a Viquipèdia en català (VP:CA), després d’un temps d’inactivitat. Gairebé totes les meves intervencions tenen a veure amb la lluita pel Punt de vista neutral. Per definició, aquest és discutible i, més que per consens, em sembla que hi arribem per equilibri de forces. Per això sento —i per una mena d’imperatiu moral— que hi ha d’aportar cadascú la força que tingui. A més a més de les meves baralles per l’anomenament correcte —o sigui, en castellà— dels municipis castellanoparlants de Navarra, especialment el d’Estella (quin cansament, Déu n’hi do!), darrerament m’he batut el coure (castellanisme, ho se) per l’accent que han de portar al cognom Miguel i Prudencio Induráin. Me n’he sortit d’un i no pas de l’altre.

    Resulten menys esgotadores, però, i a la vegada molt més visibles, les contribucions a la portada de Viquipèdia, secció Notícies d’actualitat. Amb la que està caient, m’he pres la llibertat de modificar la redacció de dos titulars. Hi deia: «Catalunya celebra un referèndum…» i « Catalunya realitza una vaga general…» —així, en plan grandiloqüent, megalòman o per millor dir totalitari— i els he retitulat amb més propietat conceptual (em sembla que no pas tant d’estilística) com a «Part de Catalunya celebra…» i «Part de Catalunya realitza…». Al resum d’edició ho he justificat com «Punt de vista més neutral». Per últim hi he afegit un titular molt important, que corria el perill de no sortir publicat, i que pots ser no els hi agradarà trobar a molts dels companys, donat que tots mirem la realitat per un foradet: «Divendres 6 d’octubre. Gas Natural, CaixaBank i Banc de Sabadell lideren una fuita de seus socials d’empreses catalanes per la inestabilitat política derivada del procés d’independència». La notícia amb la qual envoltarem el peix de l’endemà. Com que s’ha d’enllaçar a una font fiable en català de la notícia, he posat un enllaç —no us ho creureu— a l’ara.cat, més que res perquè no me la treguin. Que Déu em perdoni! Au, callo!

    Captura de pantalla de Viquinotícies, a VP:CA

    NB: Puristes, ja perdonareu els obvis castellanismes. I petons per tu, J.F., guapa!

    Afegit 15/10/2017. He fet bastants aportacions a l’article de VP:CA «Fuita de seus socials de Catalunya de 2017». Pel que sembla, l’efecte d’aquesta reacció empresarial sobre el moviment per l’independència està sent demolidor, i encara està per veure el seu efecte a llarg termini sobre l’economia real. El precedent de l’efecte Mont-real no és gens tranquil·litzador: «el Quebec, al llarg de les darreres dues dè­cades, ha perdut el 30% del seu teixit ­empresarial en benefici d’altres regions canadenques». Im-presionant o, el que és el mateix, a-collonidor.

    Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

    Cuneiform Commentaries Project News

    Cuneiform Commentaries Project News 
    We wish to notify you of nine new texts that have recently been added to the online editions of the Cuneiform Commentaries Project (http://ccp.yale.edu), a list of which is provided below.

    Thanks are expressed to Shana Zaia for her editions of two texts, and to Klaus Wagensonner for reading the commentary on the Literary Prayer to Marduk 2 with us.

    You are warmly invited to contribute any editions of commentary tablets you may have made for publication on the CCP website, for which you will, of course, receive full credit.

    All the best,

    Mary Frazer
    Senior Editor of the Cuneiform Commentaries Project



    CCP 1.2 (Lugale): In its current condition, this manuscript consists of four joined fragments from the centre of what must have originally been a large tablet with three columns on each side. The preserved text represents column II, which contained the Akkadian version of the base text; of column I – which contained the base text in its original Sumerian – only traces of the final signs in some lines remain. (Read more)

    CCP 1.5 (Literary Prayer to Marduk 2): This small and badly damaged tablet contains a commentary that deals with the first sixty-eight lines of the literary prayer Lord, Sage of the Igigi, a text frequently styled, after Lambert’s pioneering edition,1 as Marduk no. 2. (Read more)

    CCP 3.1.27.B (Enūma Anu Enlil 27(28) B): In its current state of preservation, this commentary deals with twelve omens derived from the appearance of the sun and drawn from the end of the ‘Babylonian’ recension of Tablet (‘Chapter’) 27 (28) of Enūma Anu Enlil, the divination treatise on omens derived from celestial and meteorological phenomena. (Read more)

    CCP 3.4.8.C (Bārûtu 8 Kakku C): A small fragment from the top left of the obverse side of a multi-column tablet of a commentary on the eighth chapter of the divination treatise bārûtu, “extispicy.” This chapter is concerned with the “weapon,” kakku, a small piece of tissue that can protrude from anywhere in the liver. (Read more)

    CCP 6.1.2.C (Aa I/5 (?)): This previously unidentified fragment belongs to a commentary on the lexical series Aa. It comments in all likelihood on a section concerned with the readings of the sign LÁ, a section that is unfortunately not preserved in the extant manuscripts of Aa. (Read more)

    CCP 6.7.B (Weidner’s God List B): The lexical list known as Weidner’s God List (WGL) or Anum (after its incipit) was significant enough that it prompted numerous copies. Known exemplars reveal that this list was attested as early as the Ur III period and as late as the Neo-Babylonian period (Read more)

    CCP 6.7.u1 (Uncertain): W 22712/1a is a fragment from Seleucid period Uruk that was found in the third level of the House of the āšipu1 and preserves 12 lines of text. The beginnings of these lines are lost and it is unclear if the preserved lines comprise one column in a multi-column text. (Read more)

    CCP 7.2.u165 (Bird omens (?)): This fragment preserves remains of a commentary on an unidentified text. The first two lines of the reverse probably explain Jupiter’s name dapīnu, “violent,” which means that the base text might be astrological. (Read more)

    CCP 7.2.u171 (Uncertain): There is no proof that this small, nondescript fragment belongs to a commentary. Although some cola are visible (ll. 2 and 3), the fragment may well belong to an incantation (as suggested by l. 4) or a bilingual text (as suggested by l. 3). (Read more)

     

    Carole Raddato (Following Hadrian)

    15th October 117 AD – Hadrian crosses the Cilician gates and arrives in Cappadocia (#Hadrian1900)

    On this day 1,900 years ago, Hadrian crossed the Cilician Gates (Pylae Ciciliae), the most famous mountain pass through the Taurus Mountain. The new Emperor was travelling northward into Cappadocia along the Via Tauri which run across the mountain chain. We know from a fragment of an itinerary found in Rome that Hadrian left Antioch… Continue reading 15th October 117 AD – Hadrian crosses the Cilician gates and arrives in Cappadocia (#Hadrian1900)

    The Archaeology News Network

    Temple of Ramses II discovered in Giza

    Parts of a temple to Pharaoh Ramses II (1213-1279 BC), along with reliefs of solar deities, have been uncovered by an Egyptian-Czech mission during excavation work in Abusir necropolis in the the governorate of Giza. The newly uncovered temple in Abusir necropolis helps piece together the activities of Ramses II in the Memphis area [Credit: Czech Institute of Egyptology]Mohamed Megahed, deputy to the mission director, told Ahram...

    [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

    Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

    The Sun Temple of King Niussere (Rathoris)


    The Sun Temple of King Niussere (Rathoris)
    published by Friedrich Wilhelm Freiherr von Bissing Professor at the University of Utrecht
    Volume II: The Small Festival Description
    by Friedrich Wilhelm Freiherr von Bissing and Hermann Kees 

    Leipzig
    J.C. Hinrichs' Bookstore 1923

    Original Title: DAS RE-HEILIGTUM DES KÖNIGS NE-WOSER-RE (RATHÜRES) BAND II: DIE KLEINE FESTDARSTELLUNG 

    Translated from German by: Stardust Doherty (with assistance from Bernhard Ruchti, Jean Daniel DEGREEF, and Christoph Hemmer). Translation comments appear in {curly brackets}. Translation uses Manuel de codage transliterations. 

    Note from Jean Daniel DEGREEF: The order of the rituals is the opposite of that adopted by Kees (the procession marks the beginning of the festival, not its end; the foundation occurs on the last day, see DEGREEF, 2009, on Academia.edu). This can be seen thanks to the great similarities with the New Year Festival on pBrooklyn 47.218.50 and by the numbering of the registers in the scenes at the temple of Soleb. None of these had been published when Kees wrote this book.

    Amphorae ex Hispania: Catálogo de ánforas hispanas

    [First posted in AWOL 10 January 2016, updated 15 October 2017]

    Amphorae ex Hispania
    Logo Amphorae ex Hispania
    Hace ya 30 años que Miguel Beltrán publicó su libro “Ánforas romanas en España”, que se convertía en un verdadero hito para el estudio de estos envases comerciales romanos no tan sólo en nuestro país, sino en la mayoría de países europeos.
    Su trabajo pionero definió los grandes temas de investigación futura y sentó cátedra dentro de la joven investigación española en arqueología e historia de Roma. En estos 30 años las ánforas hispanas han cobrado un especial protagonismo con el estudio de las zonas de producción de los envases (p.e. costas andaluzas y valencianas, valle del Guadalquivir, litoral catalán), de su distribución en las provincias del Imperio romano (p.e. Germania, Britannia), su clasificación formal y, ya más recientemente, su arqueometría. Como resultado de todo ello, podemos afirmar que en la actualidad existen numerosos especialistas españoles y portugueses sobre esta materia, reconocidos en el extranjero por sus sólidos trabajos de investigación.

    The Egyptiana Emporium

    NEWS: Czech archaeologists discover Ramses II temple remains south of Cairo

    (Source: Luxor Times).

    “The Egyptian-Czech Archaeological Mission uncovered remains of King Ramses II Temple during the excavation works carried out at Abusir.

    Dr. Mostafa Waziry, Secretary-General of the Supreme Council of
 Antiquities announced the discovery.
    Dr. Waziry explains that the discovery comes after the mission had found in 2012
archaeological evidences that shows the existence of a temple in this area,
a fact that encourages the mission to resume its excavations in this area and the neighborhood along the last four years.

    Dr. Mohammed Megahed, Deputy director of the mission, said that the temple is 32 x 51 meters wide and consists of mud brick foundations of one of its pylons, a large forecourt that leads to the pillars hall whkch parts of its halls are painted in blue.
At the rear end of the court, the mission found a staircase or a ramp
leading to a sanctuary whose back part is divided into three parallel chambers. The remains of this building were covered with by huge deposits of sand and chips of stones of which may bore fragments of polychrome
reliefs.
 

    (Source: Luxor Times).

    Dr. Miroslav Barta, The head of the Czech mission explains that the different titles of King Ramses II were found engraved on a relief fragments which is connected to the cult of the solar deities.

    In addition, relief fragments depicting scenes of the solar gods ”Amun”, “Ra and Nekhbet”
    He continues that this temple is the only evidence of the King Ramses II presence in Memphis necropolis and confirms at the same time the continuation of the worshipping of the sun god “Ra” in the region of Abusir, which began since the 5th dynasty and continued until the era of the New Kingdom” – via Luxor Times.


    Turkish Archaeological News

    Antalya

    Antalya is a city that is difficult not to fall in love with. Its beauty enchanted ancient authors, explorers and travellers that visited the Ottoman Empire were stunned by its charms, and even the father of modern Turkey and the first president of the Turkish Republic, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, expressed his fascination in Antalya in superlatives only. On the one hand, Antalya is currently a metropolis with the population of over a million inhabitants, but on the other hand - it is also increasingly popular tourist resort with beautiful beaches and luxury hotels. What's more, in the heart of the city there is a charming historical district, and the collections gathered in the local Archaeological Museum are among the most attractive in the whole of Turkey. What will Antalya be for you? Certainly, it is a city worth a visit and checking if it actually is "the most beautiful place on earth."

    Antalya

    Byzantine News

    New Book: Reading in the Byzantine Empire and Beyond


    Editors: T. Shawcross & I. Toth

    From Cambridge University Press:

    Offering a comprehensive introduction to the history of books, readers and reading in the Byzantine Empire and its sphere of influence, this volume addresses a paradox. Advanced literacy was rare among imperial citizens, being restricted by gender and class. Yet the state's economic, religious and political institutions insisted on the fundamental importance of the written record. Starting from the materiality of codices, documents and inscriptions, the volume's contributors draw attention to the evidence for a range of interactions with texts. They examine the role of authors, compilers and scribes. They look at practices such the close perusal of texts in order to produce excerpts, notes, commentaries and editions. But they also analyse the social implications of the constant intersection of writing with both image and speech. Showcasing current methodological approaches, this collection of essays aims to place a discussion of Byzantium within the mainstream of medieval textual studies.Read more
    Contents:
    INTRODUCTION TO BOOKS, READERS, AND READING
    I. Byzantium: a bookish world Teresa Shawcross
    II. Modern encounters with Byzantine texts and their reading publics Ida Toth
    PART I. Love for the Written Word
    The emotions of reading
    1. John Mauropous and the benefits of reading Marina Bazzani
    2. The autobiographies of the Patriarch Gennadios II Scholarios Michael Angold
    Centre and margins
    3. The role of the speeches of John the Oxite in Komnenian court politics Judith R. Ryder
    4. The liturgical poetics of an elite religious confraternity Paul Magdalino
    5. Manuscript notes and the Black Death in rural Cyprus Tassos Papacostas
    PART II. Contact with a Living Culture
    The power of rhetoric
    6. Ancient Greek rhetorical theory and Byzantine discursive politics: John Sikeliotes on Hermogenes Panagiotis Roilos
    7. Memoirs as manifesto: the rhetoric of Katakalon Kekaumenos Jonathan Shepard
    8. Performative reading in the late Byzantine theatron Niels Gaul
    Religious texts
    9. The religious world of John Malalas David M. Gwynn
    10. Oikonomia in the hymns of Romanos the Melode Johannes Koder
    11. Quotation and allusion in Symeon the New Theologian Manolis S. Patedakis
    12. Scriptural citation in Andronikos Kamateros Alessandra Bucossi
    Secular texts
    13. Aristocratic family narratives in twelfth-century Byzantium Peter Frankopan
    14. Historiography, epic and the textual transmission of imperial values: Liudprand's Antapodosis and Digenes Akrites Günter Prinzing
    15. Intertextuality in the Late Byzantine romance Tale of Troy Ulrich Moennig
    PART III. Communication and Influence
    Educational practices
    16. Late Byzantine school teaching through the iambic canons and their paraphrase Dimitrios Skrekas
    Text and image
    17. Eros, literature and the Veroli Casket Liz James
    18. Object, text and performance in four Komnenian poems Margaret Mullett
    19. Textual and visual representations of the Antipodes from Byzantium and the Latin West Maja Kominko
    Interlingual circulation and transmission
    20. Basil I, Constantine VII and Armenian literary tradition in Byzantium Tim Greenwood
    21. Bilingual reading, the Alexiad and the Gesta Roberti Wiscardi James Howard-Johnston
    22. Transplanting culture: from Greek novel to medieval romance Roderick Beaton
    PART IV. Modern Reading as Textual Archaeology
    Traces of authorship
    23. Anonymous textual survivals from Late Antiquity Fiona K. Haarer
    24. Authorship and the Letters of Theodore Daphnopates John Duffy
    25. Authorship revisited: language and metre in the Ptochoprodromika Marjolijne C. Janssen and Marc D. Lauxtermann
    Recovered languages
    26. The lexicon of horses' colours in learned and vernacular texts Erich Trapp
    27. Multilingualism and translation in the edition of vernacular texts Manolis Papathomopoulos
    Afterword: Reading and hearing in Byzantium Elizabeth Jeffreys and Michael Jeffreys


    Jim Davila (Paleojudaica.com)

    Langlois on those 9 dubious DSS fragments

    <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/xUtDmLmsb-U" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

    Paul Barford (Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues)

    Tallying Knowledge Theft by UK Artefact Hunters


    How can this be in any way considered as acceptable? Today the Heritage Action Artefact Erosion Counter indicates that in the twenty years since the PAS was created to deal with the information loss through the lack of mandatory reporting of finds made in the course of activities such as artefact hunting there have been
    six million artefacts pocketed by metal detectorists alone.

    Meanwhile, the Portable Antiquities Scheme Database rather pathetically celebrates:


    According to these figures only one out of every six recordable items found during Collection-Driven Exploitation of the Archaeological Resource is ever seen by archaeologists.

    Five out of six are disappearing without trace.  



    Why can’t we ID these people?


    Heritage Action, with what seems a perfectly valid question: 'Why can’t we ID these people?'15/10/2017. Here's one metal detectorist pictured at Great Chesterford:




    And, as HA point out, this is just one percent of the 24000 active detectorists postulated by Dr Sam Hardy's  latest calculations*:



    In other words the serried ranks would look a bit like this in overview:

    One, a hundred, twenty-four thousand. How much information is being lost weekly, monthly, annually as artefacts by the million disappear into their pockets? Why is there so little discussion of this?

    *The Heritage Action Artefact Erosion Counter has at the basis of its algorithm a figure well below half of that, the PAS suggest its 'around 9,600 metal detector users across England and Wales', while until I saw Dr Hardy's figures I was using my own more recent revised value of 16k. What's yours?
     

    Jim Davila (Paleojudaica.com)

    Jenkins on historical amnesia

    <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/lWTv6dlbRGM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

    Paul Barford (Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues)

    US Anti-Israel Bias, too.


    The US is pulling out of UN cultural organisation UNESCO, accusing it of "anti-Israel" bias. Yet Israel is one of the nations with which the US does not have a cultural property MOU under the CCPIA.


    Jim Davila (Paleojudaica.com)

    Frey and Jost (eds.), Gottesdienst und Engel im antiken Judentum und frühen Christentum

    <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/YcSMuYmBYbQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

    Documentary on the Ritman Library

    <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/x1bu-nb9FlQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

    James F. McGrath (Exploring Our Matrix)

    Scholars Using Social Media

    Larry Hurtado, Deane Galbraith, Scot McKnight, and Bob Cornwall are among those who’ve already mentioned a new book that many more contributed to, including myself: Thomas Jay Oord’s edited volume, Theologians and Philosophers Using Social Media: Advice, Tips, and Testimonials. I haven’t had the time to really explore the other contributions to the volume yet, and so I […]

    Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

    I punti di forza della piattaforma ArcGIS 10.5, formazione di Esri Italia al #TFA2017 Roma 19 Ottobre

    i-punti-di-forza-della-piattaforma-arcgis-10-5-formazione-di-esri-italia-al-tfa2017-roma-19-ottobre

    Con il recente rilascio della versione 10.5 della piattaforma ArcGIS, Esri segna un’altra pietra miliare nell'evoluzione delle proprie tecnologie Web GIS. Con la piattaforma ArcGIS 10.5 anche integrata nei sistemi esistenti, le aziende e le organizzazioni sono in grado di rendere ancora più veloci ed efficaci i processi decisionali, di ottenere sensibili riduzione dei costi, attraverso il miglioramento di tutti i processi in cui sono un valore la geolocalizzazione e l’analisi delle informazioni nel contesto geografico.

    #TFA2017 Sessione speciale Pompei, sicurezza ed integrazione di tecnologie per il primo Smart Archeological Site

    tfa2017-sessione-speciale-pompei-sicurezza-ed-integrazione-di-tecnologie-per-il-primo-smart-archeological-site

    Il 18 Ottobre, a seguire la sessione inaugurale, la presentazione a cura dei Responsabili della Cabina di Regia di "Smart@POMPEI".  Questo progetto pilota per la creazione del primo Smart Archaeological Park in Italia e al mondo, presso il Parco Archeologico di Pompei, rappresenta un modello tecnologico integrato, da seguire, per gestire e controllare la sicurezza delle persone e dei monumenti in condizioni normali e in condizioni di emergenza.

    ArcheoNet BE

    14de Spraakwater-lezingenreeks in Tongeren van start

    Op donderdag 19 oktober geeft het Gallo-Romeins Museum in Tongeren het startschot van de 14de editie van de lezingenreeks ‘Spraakwater’. Zoals elk jaar bieden de lezingen weer een boeiende mix van thema’s uit de internationale archeologie en de klassieke geschiedenis. Wil je meer weten over het ontstaan, de verspreiding en de impact van de huiskat? Benieuwd naar de nieuwe inzichten in het leven van de Egyptische koningin Nefertiti? Of wil je horen wat kunstenaar Koen Vanmechelen te vertellen heeft over de kaakresten van een dromedaris in Romeins Tongeren? Je vindt het volledige programma op galloromeinsmuseum.be.

    Lawrence H. Schiffman

    Shma: Listen Speaker Series

    Early Christians Tabgha

    Tabgha, courtesy of Grauesel, Wikimedia Commons

    Judaism, Christianity and the Dead Sea Scrolls
    Thursday, October 19 | 7:00 pm
    Pere Marquette Gallery, 2nd Floor DuBourg Hall, Saint Louis University
    1 N. Grand Blvd., 63103

    Free and open to the public. For more information, email Theology@SLU.edu.

    Pharisees and Sadducees in the Dead Sea Scrolls
    Thursday, October 19 | Noon-2:00 pm
    Congregation Temple Israel
    1 Rabbi Alvan D. Rubin Dr., 63141

    A kosher lunch will be hosted by Congregation Temple Israel at no cost. RSVP required to Nancy Dubman at 314-442-3771 or NDubman@JFedSTL.org.

    For additional information, contact Cyndee Levy 314-442-3754 or CLevy@JFedSTL.org.

    Sh’ma: Listen! Advisory Committee Chair
    Rabbi Jeffrey Stiffman

    Staff
    Rabbi Tracy Nathan, Senior Educator, Center for Jewish Learning 
    Cyndee Levy, Director, Center for Jewish Learning

    Jewish Federation of St. Louis
    Gerald P. Greiman, Board Chair
    Andrew Rehfeld, President & CEO

    The post Shma: Listen Speaker Series appeared first on Prof. Lawrence H. Schiffman.

    Paul Barford (Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues)

    Artefact Hunters and Collectors Know 'How Archaeology Shuld be being Done - innit'


    PAS-partners on a metal detecting forum near you (oldartefact » Sat Oct 14, 2017 8:22 pm):
    To be honest I always thought Archies were on our side, and that is certainly the case with a great many... but there are some who are quite happy to stand up at the Treasure Conference and throw unfounded dispersions around the place [...] Sadly there is an element that want to close us down, and are more than happy to use smear tactics at a public conference to do it. Archies present themselves very well, they are learned academics after all, and there is nothing wrong with that... but when is the last time you heard an Archaeologist stand up and question the effectiveness of their own search techniques? These guys and girls get paid to do a good job out in the field, and then they insist on using archaic recovery techniques which leaves part of the story in the ground, and other parts of the story dug but not seen, thus leaving the narrative of the site only partly told. It seems that our hobby is always on the back foot, trying to defend itself, but given that we are collectively the experts in artefact recovery, maybe its about time we taught the Archaeologists a lesson or two in how they can do their job more effectively.
    Yeah:

    Lenborough grabfest

    Greg's Hole (now expunged from Internet)

    'Somewhere in Dorset'
     and many many more examples, though they are mainly commented on only on this blog, you'll not find them discussed anywhere else, really. PAS-partner archaeologists are not so keen to follow 'examples' like this.


    ISIL held Zone of Raqqa Restricted


    The situation in Raqqa 20th September 2017 (ISIL - grey)


    SDF forces have seized full control of the Nahda district in Raqqa as the battle for the city is slowly nearing it end. Meanwhile the coalition announced a deal has been reached by the region's tribal elders to evacuate civilians from the besieged districts. As the battle enters its final phase, the situation is still grim.


    Metropolitan Museum of Art Issues Statement Against U.S. Decision to Pull Out of UNESCO


    The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s president and CEO, Daniel H. Weiss, has issued a statement opposing the U.S. Decision to Pull Out of UNESCO (Alex Greenberg, 'Metropolitan Museum of Art Issues Statement Against U.S. Decision to Pull Out of UNESCO' New York Times 10/12/17):
    One of our most important responsibilities as museum leaders is to protect cultural heritage and promote international education. For more than half a century The Met and countless other museums have successfully partnered with UNESCO, an organization that has earned the respect of nations and communities worldwide for bringing together curators, conservators, and a range of other scholars to educate, preserve, protect, and support the intellectual and artistic traditions of our shared cultural heritage. President Trump’s decision to withdraw from UNESCO undermines the historic role of the United States as a leader in this effort and weakens our position as a strong advocate for cultural preservation. Although UNESCO may be an imperfect organization, it has been an important leader and steadfast partner in this crucial work. The Met remains deeply committed to productive engagement with UNESCO and our colleagues around the world who share this important objective.

    Detectorists Selling Finds not Approved


    Our Portable Past:
    English Heritage will support the general principle that archaeological material should not be sold for profit (in exceptional cases such sales might be acceptable as part of a properly formulated and agreed disposal policy);

    The Archaeological Review

    Understanding the Dead Sea Scrolls

    Hershel  Shanks
    Random House
    New York
    1992
    ISBN 0-679-41448-7

         "On the west side of the Dead Sea, but out of range of the exhalations of the coast, is the solitary tribe of the Essenes, which is remarkable beyond all the other tribes in the whole world, as it has no women and has renounced all sexual desire, has no money, and has only palm-trees for company. Day by day the throng of refugees is recruited to an equal number by numerous accessions of persons tired of life and driven thither by the way of fortune to adopt their manners. Thus through thousands of ages  (incredible to relate) a race into which no one is born lives on forever, so prolific for their advantage is other men's weariness of life!*

                                                                                                                        Pliny the Elder

    In the opening of the book, the editor gives a quick rundown of the contents of his book starting with the discovery of the scrolls in a series of eleven caves near the deserted Dead Sea community of Qumran. The scrolls represent the earliest known documents of their type and are important to the development of the early history of Rabbinical Judaism and Christianity. Since the discovery, the scrolls, which are mainly fragmentary, have become coveted by the scholars who possessed shares of the find. This has had the effect that the scrolls, for the most part, suffered from handling and incorrect preservation causing some of the material to be destroyed. It has also resulted in slowing down the publication and distribution to other scholars of the documents.

    In chapter one by Harry Thomas Frank the discovery of the scrolls unfolds. The discovery of the first scrolls was by Bedouins climbing a hill to retrieve a goat when a cave was found. The Bedouin through a rock into the cave and heard the sound of pottery breaking. Once in the cave, the Bedouin found tall clay jars with lids and inside the jars some seven scrolls in sound condition including a mostly intact Book of Isaiah, and the slightly less well preserved Manual of Discipline.

    In the second chapter Frank Moore Cross places the scrolls in the environment of the people who hid them, dating the documents paleography and historically. In the formative years of the last couple centuries of the Hellenistic world to the first century of the Roman empire differing sects of Judaism including the Essenes, Pharisees and Sadducee lived in a time of the second temple in Jerusalem.

    The lives of some of these sects involved the idea that they were living in the end times in the period leading up to and beyond 70 A.D. and the destruction of the second temple in Jerusalem by the Romans. Clearly, this book is not for the young with the reader being a complex composition suitably fascinating for anyone who loves archaeology and ancient texts. It must be noted that not all the scrolls are of religious nature, though every book of the Bible is represented except Esther.

    Part of what makes the book so fascinating is in the presentation with various scholars putting forward their arguments in dating the scrolls as well to the contents and the identification of the personalities who are identified in the texts with historical and biblical personages. Scholar Raphael Levy presents the earlier finds of documents related to the later find of the Dead Sea Scrolls in a storeroom known as a genizah in a Cairo synagogue.

    The genizah was a place to put old unwanted sacred texts and books until they could be buried in consecrated ground. In the Cairo Genizah, this had not been done in centuries leaving thousand-year-old texts to be discovered and taken to Cambridge University in the late 1890's. One of the most important documents found in the genizah is known today as the Damascus Document, the titles name referring to a flight to Damascus. Fifty years later when the Dead Sea Scrolls were found at Qumran a number of copies of the Damascus Document was found among them though a thousand years older.

    The late great archaeologist Yigael Yadin, excavator of the fortress at Masada and the important site of Hazor, writes about the Temple Scroll and his acquisition of it. At the time of Israel's victories in the Six-Day War of 1967, Mr. Yadin was working as a military adviser to the Prime Minister Levi Eshkol.

    In the war, the Israeli military captured Jerusalem's Old City and Bethlehem allowing Mr. Yadin to visit the seller of the scroll and acquired the document for a little over $100 000. The chapter contains a number of nice black and white photos of the scroll including a view looking out of Cave 11 where the Temple Scroll was found. The Temple Scroll is the longest of the Dead Sea Scrolls with much of it concerning the temple's layout.

         "You shall make a dry moat around the temple,... which will separate the holy temple from the city so that they may not come suddenly into my temple and desecrate it. They shall consecrate my temple and fear my people, for I dwell among them"    
                                                                                            Temple Scroll, (Column XLVI)

    The staggering size of the temple would have been almost as large as Jerusalem's old city. The temple being surrounded by three courtyards and an outer moat one hundred and sixty-five feet wide ensuring the sanctity of the temple precincts. When Herod rebuilt the temple it was completed in just under a year and a half but it took some eighty years to complete the temple's precincts, at which time eighteen thousand workers were laid off.

    The reader is presented with the various elements of Rabbinical books that have come to form the Hebrew Bible. These books have also acquired scribal errors through translation into different languages as well as shortening of some books and the removal of other texts that individual sects found undesirable. Scholar Frank Moore Cross also points out the many ancient documents found at a number of different sites south of the eleven caves that make up the find spot for the Dead Sea Scrolls.

    In the books fifth section, the scrolls are evaluated for the connections they make to Christianity. These connections include the identification of the characters found in the scrolls with early Christian leaders. A fragment of text found in Qumran cave 4 and known as 4Q246 has a parallel in the Gospel of Luke, with the fragment using the term "Son of God". This being the only time outside the bible that the phrase has been found.

         "[X] shall be great upon the earth. [O king, all (people) shall] make [peace], and all shall serve [him. He shall be called the son of] the [G]reat [God], and by his name shall he be hailed (as) the Son of God, and they shall call him Son of the Most High."
                                                                                                                           4Q246

    Scholar Otto Betz puts forward the idea that John the Baptist was an Essene prophet who at one time lived among the Qumran community. At some point, the Baptist left the monastic life at Qumran to preach the salvation to the people including baptizing Jesus and denouncing Antipas' marriage to Herodias. There are a number of similarities between John and the Teacher of Righteousness found in the Dead Sea Scrolls which some may conclude that they are one and the same.

    Among the scrolls found in cave 3 was one completely different from all the others in content, linguistics, and even the material, the scroll is written on a sheet of copper. Unlike the other books, the Copper Scroll contains a list of 64 locations where masses of treasure had been hidden. The masses of gold and silver are hidden in these locations if put together, would weigh in at between 58 and 174 tons. Many of the items included in the deposits belong to temple services and as a result of the treasure likely belonged to the Second Temple. The treasure being deposited in the run-up of the Roman invasion and destruction of Jerusalem and its temple in 70 A.D.

    Scroll scholar Hartmut Stegemann addresses the issue of the reconstruction of the scrolls from the tens of thousands of fragments into readable documents. To reconstruct the fragments a number of observations can be used from the handwriting of the individual scribes as well as the material the scroll was created from, and the varying thickness and shades of that particular medium. Even the type of damage can help identifying which pieces belong together whether insect, rodent or decomposition.

    The Dead Sea Scrolls have stirred up much controversy mostly due to the slow rate of publication and the fact that the material was possessed by a few scholars who coveted their portions. More controversy was raised by others who believed that the Catholic church was suppressing the publication of some of the scrolls that may run contrary to Christian teachings.

    Certainly, the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls was one of the most important archaeological events of the Twentieth Century, with the job of publication of the hundreds of scrolls found among the Qumran library a daunting task that took many years of some of the finest scholars work to put together and interpret. Hershel Shanks has here put together a volume that can only touch the surface of the knowledge to be gleaned but in this, the reader will find an excellent starting point for anyone wishing to gain the knowledge of "Understanding the Dead Sea Scrolls."

         "I am the light of the world; he who follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life." 

                                                                                                                       John 8:12

    Notes:

    * James Vanderkam

    Further Information on the Scrolls:
    The Dorot Foundation Dead Sea Scrolls Information and Study Center 

    The Leon Levy Dead Sea Scrolls Digital Library

    October 14, 2017

    Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

    One Off Open Access Journal Issues: Speculum 92:1, The Digital Middle Ages

    Speculum: A Journal of Medieval Studies

    Free AccessFront Cover
    First Page | PDF (144 KB) | Permissions 

    Free AccessInside Front Cover
    First Page | PDF (53 KB) | Permissions 

    Free AccessMasthead
    p. ii
    First Page | PDF (45 KB) | Permissions 

    Free AccessThe Digital Middle Ages: An Introduction
    David J. Birnbaum, Sheila Bonde, Mike Kestemont
    pp. S1–S38
    First Page | Full Text | PDF (1386 KB) | Permissions 

    Manuscripts and Images


    Free AccessThe History and Provenance of Manuscripts in the Collection of Sir Thomas Phillipps: New Approaches to Digital Representation
    Toby Burrows
    pp. S39–S64
    First Page | Full Text | PDF (1234 KB) | Permissions 

    Free AccessScribal Attribution across Multiple Scripts: A Digitally Aided Approach
    Peter A. Stokes
    pp. S65–S85
    First Page | Full Text | PDF (950 KB) | Supplemental Material | Permissions 

    Free AccessArtificial Paleography: Computational Approaches to Identifying Script Types in Medieval Manuscripts
    Mike Kestemont, Vincent Christlein, Dominique Stutzmann
    pp. S86–S109
    First Page | Full Text | PDF (1475 KB) | Permissions 

    Free AccessNew Light on the Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Manuscript: Multispectral Imaging and the Cotton Nero A.x. Illustrations
    Murray McGillivray, Christina Duffy
    pp. S110–S144
    First Page | Full Text | PDF (4816 KB) | Permissions 

    Mapping


    Free AccessLocating Medieval French, or Why We Collect and Visualize the Geographic Information of Texts
    David Joseph Wrisley
    pp. S145–S169
    First Page | Full Text | PDF (1362 KB) | Permissions 

    Free AccessMapping Illuminated Manuscripts: Applying GIS concepts to Lancelot-Grail Manuscripts
    M. Alison Stones
    pp. S170–S189
    First Page | Full Text | PDF (2689 KB) | Permissions 

    Texts and Editions


    Free AccessBernard of Clairvaux and Nicholas of Montiéramey: Tracing the Secretarial Trail with Computational Stylistics
    Jeroen De Gussem
    pp. S190–S225
    First Page | Full Text | PDF (1073 KB) | Permissions 

    Free AccessAlgorithmic Analysis of Medieval Arabic Biographical Collections
    Maxim Romanov
    pp. S226–S246
    First Page | Full Text | PDF (823 KB) | Permissions 

    Free AccessA Quantitative Analysis of Toponyms in a Manuscript of Marco Polo’s Devisement du monde (London, British Library, MS Royal 19 D 1)
    Mark Cruse
    pp. S247–S264
    First Page | Full Text | PDF (238 KB) | Permissions 

    Free AccessDigital Corpora and Scholarly Editions of Latin Texts: Features and Requirements of Textual Criticism
    Franz Fischer
    pp. S265–S287
    First Page | Full Text | PDF (1418 KB) | Permissions 

    Multimediality: Space and Sound


    Free AccessConstruction–Deconstruction–Reconstruction: The Digital Representation of Architectural Process at the Abbey of Notre-Dame d’Ourscamp
    Sheila Bonde, Alexis Coir, Clark Maines
    pp. S288–S320
    First Page | Full Text | PDF (3228 KB) | Supplemental Material | Permissions 

    Free AccessSoundscapes of Byzantium
    Spyridon Antonopoulos, Sharon E. J. Gerstel, Chris Kyriakakis, Konstantinos T. Raptis, James Donahue
    pp. S321–S335
    First Page | Full Text | PDF (1072 KB) | Supplemental Material | Permissions 

    Free AccessIcons of Sound: Auralizing the Lost Voice of Hagia Sophia
    Bissera V. Pentcheva, Jonathan S. Abel
    pp. S336–S360
    First Page | Full Text | PDF (1781 KB) | Supplemental Material | Permissions 

    ἐν ἐφέσῳ: Thoughts and Meditations

    The voice morphology of εἰμί and γίνομαι: Questions from Facebook

    It is also no accident that the types of meanings expressed by γίνομαι and εἰμί, one with middle morphology and the other with active morphology correspond effectively one-to-one with the general preferences for other non-linking and low frequency verbs.

    Kristina Killgrove (Forbes)

    These Six Celebrities Have One Thing In Common: Anthropologist Parents

    These six famous people all have parents who share the same unusual occupation.

    AIA Fieldnotes

    Family Day: Excavating Archaeology!

    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Kelsey Museum of Archaeology
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    fair
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 21, 2017 - 12:30pm

    Family Day: Excavating Archaeology @ U-M: 1817-2017

    Explore . . .
    the Egyptian practice of mummification by mummifying Barbie™

    Discover . . .
    how archaeologists excavate the past in our practice dig pits

    Create . . .
    your own Roman lamp with clay

    The Museum and Family Day are free and open to the public. Engaging hands-on activities take place in Newberry Hall. Kid-friendly tours of the exhibition will take place at 1:00, 2:00, and 3:00 PM.

    Location

    Name: 
    Sarah Mullersman
    Call for Papers: 
    no

    Anthropology.net

    Tianyuan Man Genome Reveals The Nuances of Asian Prehistory

    A new study in Current Biology analyzed the entire genome of the Tianyuan man who was found near Beijing, China and lived around 40,000 years ago. The Tianyuan man’s genome marks the earliest ancient DNA from East Asia, but this is not the first time we have studied Tianyuan’s genes.

    The Tianyuan skeleton was unearthed near the Zhoukoudian site, about 50 km southwest of Beijing.

    The Tianyuan skeleton was unearthed near the Zhoukoudian site, about 50 km southwest of Beijing.

    In 2013 paper in PNAS, the same group that published the Current Biology paper showed there is a closer relationship of Tianyuan to present-day Asians, based off his genes, than to present-day Europeans. At that time it was suggested that present-day Asian history has a deep lineage as far back as 40,000 years ago.

    In the last 4 years, we have had more data showing that modern Europeans derive from more prehistoric populations which separated early from other early non-African populations soon after the migration out of Africa. This hasn’t changed our understanding of East Asian ancestry however, showing that Tianyuan’s genetic similarity to Asians remained in comparisons including ancient Europeans without mixed ancestry…

    But, most interestingly it was surprising that when they compared Tianyuan to the 35,000-year-old individual from Belgium, GoyetQ116-1, who in other ways reflected an ancient European, he shared some genetic similarity to the Tianyuan individual that no other ancient Europeans shared. This suggests that the two populations represented by the Tianyuan and GoyetQ116-1 individuals derived some of their ancestry from a sub-population prior to the European-Asian separation. The genetic relationship observed between these two ancient individuals is direct evidence that European and Asian populations have a complex history.

    Another unexpected result sheds light on the Peopling of the America’s theory. In 2015, a study comparing present-day populations in Asia to those in the Pacific and the Americas, showed that some Native American populations from South America had an unusual connection to some populations south of mainland Asia, most notably the Melanesian Papuan and the Andamanese Onge. They proposed that they could not have come from a single unit, but rather more than one group crossed and had additional ties to an Asian population that also contributed to the present-day Papuan and Onge.

    f3(Tianyuan, X; Mbuti) for All Sites Where X Is a Present-Day Human Population or an Ancient Individual  The f3 statistic ranges from 0.04 to 0.25. A higher value (red) indicates higher shared genetic drift between the Tianyuan individual and the (A) present-day population or (B) ancient individual. The intersection of the dotted lines indicates where the Tianyuan Cave is located. See also Table S2A.

    f3(Tianyuan, X; Mbuti) for All Sites Where X Is a Present-Day Human Population or an Ancient Individual The f3 statistic ranges from 0.04 to 0.25. A higher value (red) indicates higher shared genetic drift between the Tianyuan individual and the (A) present-day population or (B) ancient individual. The intersection of the dotted lines indicates where the Tianyuan Cave is located. See also Table S2A.

    There are no trace of this connection in present-day East Asians and Siberians, but the Tianyuan man possesses genetic similarities to the same South Americans, in a pattern similar to that found for the Pacific groups. So this new study confirms that the multiple ancestries represented in Native Americans were all from populations in mainland Asia… What is intriguing, however, is that the migration to the Americas occurred approximately 20,000 years ago, but the Tianyuan individual is twice that age. Thus, the population diversity represented in the Americas must have persisted in mainland Asia in two or more distinct populations since 40,000 years ago.


    Filed under: Blog, Physical Anthropology Tagged: ancient dna, asia, china, population genetics, tianyuan

    AIA Fieldnotes

    Projekt Navis - zaključna plovba z rimskodobnim deblakom (Project Navis - final sail with a roman logboat)

    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by ZaPA (Institute for underwater archaeology) and Skupina Stik (Private institution for promotion of cultural heritage)
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    other
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 21, 2017

    Event will take place in Vrhnika and in Ljubljana, Slovenia. The whole summer we were building roman replica of a logboat, discovered three years ago in river Ljubljanica. Around the building a lot of events took place. Final event will happen on Saturday, 21st October - we will go on a sail with a logboat. Start will be in Vrhnika, where original logboat was discovered and finish line in Ljubljana, where the building of new logboat took place. Also another event will happen on the same day at the same time.

    Location

    Name: 
    Mojca Fras
    Telephone: 
    0038640217
    Call for Papers: 
    no

    Archaeological News on Tumblr

    Genome-wide data from a 40,000-year-old man in China reveals complicated genetic history of Asia

    CHINESE ACADEMY OF SCIENCES HEADQUARTERS—The biological makeup of humans in East Asia is shaping up...

    Rwanda: Archaeologists Discover Ancient King's Artifact

    A team of archaeologists are excavating a place believed to have been palace for former Rwandan...

    French-Swiss archaeological mission unearth mini-pyramid in Saqqara

    The French-Swiss archaeological mission unearthed a mini-pyramid, made of pink granite, in South...

    AIA Fieldnotes

    Múzeum mesta Bratislavy/Gerulata

    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    lecture
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 21, 2017

    Location

    Name: 
    Jaroslava Schmidtova
    Telephone: 
    +42159100812
    Call for Papers: 
    no

    Archaeological News on Tumblr

    800-year-old city walls excavated in southwest China

    Archaeologists recently excavated 800-year-old city walls and gates at site in southwest...