Electra Atlantis: Digital Approaches to Antiquity

http://planet.atlantides.org/electra

Tom Elliott (tom.elliott@nyu.edu)

This feed aggregator is part of the Planet Atlantides constellation. Its current content is available in multiple webfeed formats, including Atom, RSS/RDF and RSS 1.0. The subscription list is also available in OPML and as a FOAF Roll. All content is assumed to be the intellectual property of the originators unless they indicate otherwise.

May 19, 2019

Bill Caraher (The New Archaeology of the Mediterranean World)

Cyborgs and Octavia Butler

This weekend I read Colleen Morgan’s newest piece on cyborgs archaeology in the European Journal of Archaeology. At just about the same time, I finished the first two novels of Octavia Butler’s Xenogenesis series (Dawn and Adulthood Rites). 

There’s a kind of unintentional symmetry between these two pieces. Morgan’s article explores the relationship between archaeologists, their methods, their tools, and their knowledge of the past. The seamlessness of these relationships creates new spaces where the divisions between humans and non-humans, individuals and their avatars, and the past and the present cease to be meaningful.

Butler’s complex world likewise focuses on blurring the distinction between the human and non-human, the living and non-living, male and female, and many of the other dichotomies that defined how we saw the world in so much of the 20th century. It is hardly surprising that Butler’s works appeared within years of Donna Haraway’s “Cyborg Manifesto.”  And Haraway recognizes the significance of Butler in her later work, Simians, Cyborgs, and Women: The Reinvention of Nature (1991), but because I’m pretty clueless, I didn’t realize how powerful the overlap between these ideas would be. Butler’s worlds provides a rich backdrop for narratives and characters that flow between genders, sexualities, time, and space. These moves are not, however, made simple, but are complicated without being unnatural or transgressive. 

As my summer moves from reading and thinking to spending time with artifacts, architecture, and landscapes, Colleen and Octavia Butler offer me thoughtful and provocative way of thinking about how our work, tool, mind, and lives produce one another. 

Scott Moore (Ancient History Ramblings)

Sunday – Lazy and Productive

Yesterday Brandon came by to pick up some items we stored at the Polis apotheke that he needs to start excavating at Vigla. It gave us a chance to visit the apotheke, and see how much cleaning we will need to do on Monday. It was a nice relaxing day, which was good because my jet lag is always worse a couple of days after my flight east. After Brandon headed back to Larnaka, Bill and I went out to eat at the Irish Pub we like to eat at because they have pretty good pizza. The view is also ok (see picture below).

So we spent today getting things ready for starting work at the apotheke tomorrow. So this was a lot of computer work and looking for files, etc. It was too bad, because it is a really nice day out there today with a lot of sunshine and a little breeze that kept it from being too hot. I did have the chance to try out a bag of potato chips. For the first bag of the season, I chose Lay’s Taste of Mediterranean 3 Peppers. The bag shows potato chips that appear to be flavored with three different peppercorns (black, red, and white), next to a small jar of olive oil. The bag mentions the chips are flavored by 100% olive oil. The taste was interesting. It was a layered taste with the black peppercorns hitting with a strong sharp taste as soon as you bit into the chip. This was then followed up by the sweeter taste of the green and white peppercorns. Not bad at all. I found them to be a nice change of pace from traditional peppered chips. I give them a – *******(7).

We went back to Yialos for dinner and I had a pretty good meal of sheftalia, salad, olives, and fries. Now the remaining question is whether I am going to get up early to watch the Games of Thrones series finale.

RSM

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Open Access Journal: Parekbolai. An Electronic Journal for Byzantine Literature

[First posted in AWOL 1 August 2011. Updated 19 May  2019]

Parekbolai. An Electronic Journal for Byzantine Literature
ISSN: 2241-0228 

Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

Bando per ricercatore a tempo determinato in Chimica dell'Ambiente e dei Beni Culturali

Tra i 17 posti di ricercatore a tempo determinato RTDA finanziato con risorse del PON AIM LINEA1 ’Università degli Studi di Salerno pone a concorso un posto per per il S.S.D CHIM/12 - CHIMICA DELL'AMBIENTE E DEI BENI CULTURALI

May 18, 2019

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Open Access Journal: Studia Antiqua et Archaeologica

[First posted in AWOL 8 March 2011. Updated 18 May 2019]

Studia Antiqua et Archaeologica
ISSN (print): 1224-2284
ISSN (online): 2392-6031
The journal Studia Antiqua et Archaeologica was established in 1983, at that moment as a volume dedicated to the memory of the reputed scholar from Iași, Nicolae Gostar. Though at the onset the journal was envisioned as a periodical, because of the financial and political difficulties of the era, its publishing only recommenced in 1995, having appeared regularly since then. 
Studia Antiqua et Archaeologica is edited by the Chair of Ancient History and Archaeology from the Faculty of History within the “Alexandru Ioan Cuza” University of Iași, and publishes studies on the prehistory, ancient history and archaeology of, primarily, the South-eastern European area, but also of Europe and of the extra-European regions. After the first issue (1983), the journal underwent, as stated above, a steady evolution, to become one of the few Romanian publications with an up-to-date release schedule. The themes are varied, encompassing eras from prehistory to the Middle Ages and domains such as archaeology, prehistory, numismatics, epigraphy, anthropology, paleobotany, and paleofaunistics. 

Interdisciplinary studies enjoyed appreciable consideration during the last years, on account of the facilities available in the laboratories of the Chair of Ancient History and Archaeology.

Starting with 1990 the journal established international collaborations, out of which special mention should be made of those with scholars from Bari (Rodolfo Striccoli, Marcello Marin, Luigi Piacente, Domenico Lassandro). These collaborations were later intensified by the contributions of the researchers from the University of Foggia (Renzo Infante, Gilda Sansone, Maria Veronese, etc.) and from other foreign universities and institutes (Konstanz, Trier, Innsbruck, Paris, Besançon, Udine, Haifa, etc.).

In conclusion, the journal focuses on ancient history and archaeology and benefitted from the contributions of prestigious authors from Romania or abroad. Worthy of attention is that internationally-recognised scholars have accepted to be members of the editorial committee (Svend Hansen, Christoph Schaefer, Wolfgang Schuller, Martin Hose, etc.).

Open Access Journal: Panta Re: Revista digital de ciencia y didáctica de la Historia

[First posted in AWOL 25 December 2016, updated 18 May 2019]

 Panta Re: Revista digital de ciencia y didáctica de la Historia 
ISSN (electrónico): 2386-8864
ISSN (en papel): 1136-2464.
http://www.um.es/cepoat/pantarei/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/LOGO1-300x241.jpg

La revista Panta Rei ha vuelto a entrar en movimiento. Y lo ha hecho completamente renovada, pero con una filosofía en lo esencial exactamente igual a la que la vio nacer allá por el año 1993. El río en el que nos sumergimos ahora es distinto, más amplio y ambicioso, esperando que llegue al mayor número de público posible.

Con este fin, os hacemos partícipes de nuestro proyecto. Queda abierta la convocatoria para la recepción de trabajos susceptibles de ser publicados en lo que será el segundo volumen de la nueva época de la revista PANTA REI (2015). Dicha recepción se realizará en el período comprendido desde la publicación de la presente convocatoria hasta el 31 de mayo de 2015. Los trabajos recibidos con posterioridad a esa fecha serán susceptibles de publicarse en el siguiente número.

La fórmula de envío, así como los requisitos y condiciones que deben cumplir los trabajos, están recogidos en el apartado “Normas de publicación” de esta misma página.
2018
El estilo decorativo en las primeras producciones cerámicas en el valle del río vinalopó (Alicante). Decorative Style in Early Pottery Production of the Valley of Vinalopó river (Alicante)
Silvia Martínez Amorós
DOI: 10.6018/pantarei/2018/1
Límites históricos del Ateísmo: increencia en la Grecia Antigua. Historical limits of Atheism: Disbelief in the Ancient Greece
Ramón Soneira Martínez
DOI: 10.6018/pantarei/2018/2
Dynamics of Power: an Architectural Reading of the Concentration of Power (Ullastret, 4th-3rd Century BC). – Dinámica de poder: una lectura sobre la concentración de poder a partir de la arquitectura (Ullastret, siglos IV-III a. C.)
David Jesús Cebrián Martínez
DOI: 10.6018/pantarei/2018/3
La mujer como exemplum. Subversión, desafío y resistencia en Valerio Máximo. – Woman as Exemplum. Subversion, Defiance and Resistance in Valerius Maximus
Lidia González Estrada
DOI: 10.6018/pantarei/2018/4
The narrative framing of violence in teaching resources about the Spanish Conquest of America.Marcos narrativos de la violencia en recursos educativos sobre la Conquista de América
Ángela Bermúdez Vélez y Diego Argumero Martínez
DOI: 10.6018/pantarei/2018/5
Modelos de conciencia histórica en el alumnado de Educación Secundaria: tradición, simbología y contextualización en torno a los restos del franquismo. – Historical Consciousness Models in Secondary Education Students: Tradition, Symbology and Contextualization of the Remains of Franco’s Regime
Diego Miguel-Revilla y María Sánchez Agustí
DOI: 10.6018/pantarei/2018/6
La importancia de la contextualización curricular en la enseñanza de la Historia en México. –The Importance of the Curricular Contextualization in History Teaching in Mexico
Enrique Bautista Rojas
DOI: 10.6018/pantarei/2018/7
Experiencia didáctica para la enseñanza de la historia contemporánea a través de las fuentes en Educación Superior.Teaching Experience to Teach Late Modern History through Historical
Sources in Higher Education

Nayra Llonch-Molina y Verónica Parisi-Moreno
DOI: 10.6018/pantarei/2018/8

Reseñas
Prados, F., Jiménez, H., Martínez, J.J. (Eds.) (2017). Menorca entre fenicis i púnics / Menorca entre fenicios y púnicos. Murcia: Centro de Estudios del Próximo Oriente y la Antigüedad Tardía de la Universidad de Murcia. 320 págs.
Pete Missingham
DOI: 10.6018/pantarei/2018/9
Bravo Bosch, M.ª J. (2017). Mujeres y símbolos en la Roma Republicana. Análisis jurídico-histórico de Lucrecia y Cornelia. Madrid: Dykinson. 333 págs.
Borja Méndez Santiago
DOI: 10.6018/pantarei/2018/10
Karp, M. (2016). This Vast Southern Empire: Slaveholders at the Helm of American Foreign Policy. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. 360 pages.
Kevin Caprice
DOI: 10.6018/pantarei/2018/11
Livi-Bacci, Massimo (2012). A Short History of Migration. Cambridge: Polity Press. 157 pages.
Alejandro Salamanca Rodríguez
DOI: 10.6018/pantarei/2018/12

Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

Nuovo LiBackPack DG50, con doppio sensore LIDAR

Il 6 Maggio a Genova abbiamo presentato ufficialmente LIDAR Italia, nata dalla partnership tra Gter, JP Droni e GreenValleyInternational (GVI), in cui Gter stesso ricopre il ruolo di rivenditore unico per l'Italia degli strumenti SW. E' stata l'occasione importante per vedere all'opera il nuovo LiBackPack DG50, con doppio sensore LIDAR, nelle vie del centro di Genova.

Leica 3D Experience: nuove opportunità di business

Leica Geosystems organizza Leica 3D Experience, un evento della durata di due giorni, composto da corsi di formazione e conferenza utenti, per tutti coloro che desiderano avvicinarsi al mondo 3D in genere.

Indagine sulla digitalizzazione dei musei italiani e innovazione digitale

Vieni a scoprire i risultati della prima indagine sulla digitalizzazione dei musei italiani ed i progetti di innovazione affrontati in quest’anno di ricerca con la Community dell’Osservatorio Innovazione Digitale nei Beni e Attività Culturali.

Scott Moore (Ancient History Ramblings)

And the research begins.

I have received thousands of emails from people wondering how my potato research is coming along. So, let’s recap: So far I have tested and evaluated 51 different flavors of potato chips (see ratings below). They are rated on a simple 1-10 scale. I picked up 3 new flavors last night at the grocery store and will start tesing them tomorrow.

The Potato Chips of Cyprus: An Exhaustive Study:

  • Argentinean Steak — ***** (5)
  • Baked Lays with Mediterranean Herbs — *****(5)
  • Barbecue — ******** (8)
  • Brazilian Mango and Chile — **** (4)
  • Caramelized Onion and Balsamic Vinegar — ******* (7)
  • Cheese and Onion — *** (3)
  • English Cheese on Toast — ***** (6)
  •  Frit Ravich Onduladas Jamon Chips (Ham Flavoured) – ** (2)
  • Frit Ravich Mediterraneo Chips – **(2)
  • Goldies Bacon Extreme. Bacon – *(1)
  • Goldies Extreme – *****(5)
  • Greek Salsa — **** (4)
  • Handy Snacks Cyprus Potato Chips Vinegar and Oregano – *** (3)
  • Lay’s Baked Barbecue potato chips – ***** (5)
  • Lay’s Cream Cheese and Bacon – ******(6)
  • Lays Greek Salad Flavor – ****(4)
  • Lay’s Heinz Ketchup flavored – **(2)
  • Lay’s Pesto and Mozzarella with Cool Effect – ******(6)
  • Lay’s Scoops Chili Flavoured – ***(3)
  • Lays Cider Vinegar – **** (4)
  • Lays Lasagna Flavored chips – ****** (6)
  • Lays Maxx Deep Ridged Chicken Wing Flavour – ** (2)
  • Lays Maxx Deep Ridged Salt & Vinegar Flavour chips – ******* (7)
  • Lays Mozzarella and Pesto flavored — ******** (8)
  • Lays Mushrooms in Cream – ***(3)
  • Lays Sensations – Japanese Teriyaki – *****(5)
  • Lays Smokey Bacon – ****(4)
  • Lays Sour Cream and Black Pepper – ****(4)
  • Mama’s sundried tomato and basil chips -***(3)
  • Mediterranean Herb — ****** (6)
  • Mexican Peppers and Cream — ******** (8)
  • Oregano — ******** (8)
  • Oven Roasted Chicken with Lemon and Thyme — **** (4)
  • Prawn Cocktail — ********** (10)
  • Pringles Texas BBQ Sauce – ******(6)
  • Quavers with Cheese — ******* (7)
  • Replay’s Cheese flavored chips – ********(8)
  • Replay’s Ketchup Flavored Potato Chips – *(1)
  • Replay’s Terra Bites – **(2)
  • Salt and Vinegar — ******* (7)
  • Thai Sweet Chile — ** (2)
  • Tsakiris Bacon and Cheese Flavoured Chips – * (1)
  • Tsakiris Chips with Florina Peppers Flavor – ** (2)
  • Tsakiris Chips with Graviera Cheese Flavour – ******* (7)
  • Tsakiris Chips with Ketchup and Mustard – ** (2)
  • Tsakiris Chips with Mytilene Sea Salt Flavour – ******* (7)
  • Tsakiris Chips with Oregano – ****** (6)
  • Tsakiris Chips with Vinegar Flavour – ****** (6)
  • Tsakiris Chips with Santorini Tomato Flavor – ******** (8)
  • Tsakiris Chips Sweet Barbeque – **** (4).
  • Tzatziki — * (1)

RSM

May 17, 2019

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Open Access Monograph Series: Collections electroniques de l'INHA

Collections electroniques de l'INHA
ISSN électronique: 2108-6419
Les publications de l’Institut national d’histoire de l’art (www.inha.fr) sont destinées à valoriser les manifestations – expositions, colloques, travaux de recherche en histoire de l’art et archéologie occidentale depuis l’Antiquité jusqu’à nos jours – conçues et organisées en partenariat avec d’autres institutions – université et musées. Elles complètent les ressources élaborées par l’Institut et mises à la disposition des chercheurs, professionnels de l’art ou amateurs éclairés (bases de données, catalogue de la Bibliothèque de l’INHA…), qu’ils soient conservateurs de musée, universitaires, antiquaires ou étudiants en histoire de l’art.
Cet espace de publication centralise aussi les documents ou informations intéressant les mutations qui affectent l'édition en histoire de l'art du fait du numérique: ainsi par exemple des questions de droit (voir ici) ou de nouvelles formes d'éditorialisation (voir ).
Volumes dealing with antiquity include:
« Bronzes grecs et romains, recherches récentes » — Hommage à Claude Rolley 
Dialogues artistiques avec les passés de l'Égypte : une perspective transnationale et transmédiale
Petits musées en vers. Épigramme et discours sur les collections antiques
L'iconographie du Caire dans les collections patrimoniales françaises
L’Orientalisme architectural entre imaginaires et savoirs
Concours pour le musée des Antiquités égyptiennes du Caire 1895
Le Caire dessiné et photographié au XIXe siècle
De l'Orient à la mathématique de l'ornement. Jules Bourgoin (1838-1908)
Ô dieux de Crotone ! Lieux et témoignages du sacré à l’intérieur d’une ville antique de Calabre
Histoires d'archéologie. De l'objet à l'étude
L'architecte Marcel Dourgnon et l'Égypte
Le Caire sur le vif. Beniamino Facchinelli photographe (1875-1895)

See AWOL's Alphabetical List of Open Access Monograph Series in Ancient Studies

Open Access Journal: NEARCO - Revista Eletrônica de Antiguidade e Medievo

NEARCO - Revista Eletrônica de Antiguidade e Medievo
ISSN 1982-8713
Publica artigos, resenhas, entrevistas, dossiês, textos, documentos históricos e análises historiográficas de interesse para os campos da História Antiga e Medieval (oriental e ocidental), centrados nas sociedades grega, romana, judaica, africana, outras comunidades culturais mediterrâneas. Tem por missões democratizar o saber acadêmico, socializar os resultados de pesquisas, trazer para o primeiro plano o conhecimento em História Antiga e Medieval, promover o intercâmbio de ideias e resultados de pesquisas com pesquisadores estrangeiros.
A missão acadêmica da revista conduz ao diálogo interdisciplinar com produtores do saber nas áreas de História, Filosofia, Arqueologia, Antropologia, Geografia, Sociologia, Linguística, Letras e Ciência Política. A revista pertence ao NEA - Núcleo de Estudos da Antiguidade e integra o PPGH - Programa de Pós-Graduação de História da UERJ - Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro.
A revista foi fundada em 2008 e é hoje um periódico de referência para os especialistas das áreas de História Antiga e Medieval no mundo de língua portuguesa e espanhola. Temos periodicidade semestral e recebemos em fluxo contínuo.

2018

Capa da Edição 2018.2 Teatro no Mundo Antigo

v. 10, n. 2 (2018): Teatro no Mundo Antigo

Imagem: Winged Victory of Samothrace (Reconstructed) by James J. Choi

2008

Capa da revista

v. 1, n. 2 (2008): NEARCO

Open Access Journal: Les Mélanges de l’École française de Rome – Antiquité (MEFRA)

[First listed in AWOL 19 December 2012. Updated 17 May 2019]

Les Mélanges de l’École française de Rome – Antiquité (MEFRA)
ISSN électronique: 1724-2134 
Les Mélanges de l’École française de Rome – Antiquité (MEFRA) publient des articles portant sur l’histoire, la culture et l’archéologie des mondes anciens en Méditerranée, en particulier en Italie, en Afrique du Nord et dans les Balkans, mais portant également sur les interactions entre cet espace et le reste du monde antique. Ils publient aussi des dossiers thématiques en lien avec les fouilles et les programmes scientifiques de l’EFR, et plus généralement des études relevant de diverses disciplines (histoire, archéologie, archéométrie, épigraphie, philologie, droit etc.), de la Préhistoire à la fin de l’Antiquité.

Numéros en texte intégral


Varia

ISBN 978-2-7283-1347-1

Mélanges de l'école française de Rome [back list at Persée]
thumbnail
Ranging from the Mélanges d'archéologie et d'histoire to the Mélanges de l'École française de Rome, this journal, started in 1881, publishes studies in history and archeology, centered on Italy and the western basin of the Mediterranean, from ancient times to the present.  (1881 -2000), 224 Issues, 4202 Articles

Available periods  :


1881 - 1977 - Mélanges d'archéologie et d'histoire


1971 - 1988 - Mélanges de l'Ecole française de Rome. Moyen-Age, Temps modernes


1971 - 2009 - Mélanges de l'Ecole française de Rome. Antiquité


1989 - 2009 - Mélanges de l'Ecole française de Rome. Moyen-Age



1989 - 2009 - Mélanges de l'Ecole française de Rome. Italie et Méditerranée

Juan Garcés (Digitised Manuscripts Blog)

Ink in the clink

While he was imprisoned in the Tower of London from 1603 to 1616, the famous courtier, explorer and author, Sir Walter Raleigh (1554–1618), turned to writing. One manuscript is an impressive witness to the years he spent in prison. Add MS 57555 contains Raleigh’s own handwritten notes, a shelf-list of...

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Free Articles from Culture and History of the Ancient Near East

Free Articles from Culture and History of the Ancient Near East
With the publication of Keeping Watch in Babylon, Brill is happy to have published the 100th volume of the series Culture and History of the Ancient Near East.

To celebrate, we are offering a selection of free articles from some of the most successful volumes in the series.
Access to these articles will remain free until July 31st, 2019


Overturning Certainties in Near Eastern Archaeology (Volume: 90)

The Religious Aspects of War in the Ancient Near East, Greece, and Rome (Volume: 84)


Historical and Archaeological Aspects of Egyptian Funerary Culture (Volume: 73)


The Dawn of the Bronze Age (Volume: 72)


Sennacherib at the Gates of Jerusalem (Volume 71)


The Decoration on the Cult Chapel Walls of the Old Kingdom Tombs at Giza (Volume: 70)


The Double Kingdom Under Taharqo (Volume: 69)


Pottery and Economy in Old Kingdom Egypt (Volume: 65)


Luwian Identities (Volume: 64)

  • Introduction
    By: Alice MoutonIan Rutherford and Ilya Yakubovich
    Pages: 1–21

Archaeology, Artifacts and Antiquities of the Ancient Near East (Volume: 62)




Scott Moore (Ancient History Ramblings)

Back in Cyprus

flowersSo, another field season has arrived. Bill and I arrived in Cyprus yesterday afternoon. It was an interesting trip over. I upgraded my ticket to include priority boarding since I always seem to be in the last group to board. I have to admit that in Pittsburgh I did not feel it was worth it since when they called for priority (group 4) boarding, about 80% of the people got in line. It was a bit better in Philadelphia where fewer people were in the priority boarding group. This was balanced by the elderly Greek couple sitting next to me since it turned out that they could only speak to each other by shouting at each other, or so it felt like while I was trying to sleep.

I was stunned by the difference in the Athens Airport. It had a brand new passport control area and they moved everyone through it very efficiently. I was impressed. When I have time to kill in the Athens Airport I usually go upstairs and sit in the McDonalds and watch the planes come and go. When I headed that way, I was stunned to notice that the McDonalds had become a Burger King. I have to admit that I did not find it as good as the McDonalds.

Anyway, I met up with Bill in Athens. Despite the fact that his plane left New York City an hour after my plane left Philadelphia, he beat me to baggage claim. We arrived in Cyprus about 3:00 PM and picked up my rental car. The woman who always rents me my car (I have been renting from them for 14 years), asked me if this was my first time in Cyprus. It is actually my 22nd field season in Cyprus if my math is right. After a little confusion over finding my car reservation we headed out to Polis. When we arrived at our hotel, we had a little more confusion over finding our reservation. While we were waiting for it to be sorted out, the gentleman checking us in asked if this was out first trip to Cyprus. This is our 10th year of staying in the same hotel and the guy checking us in has talked to us during our last two seasons. Weird. Anyway, we checked in, went to the grocery store, and then went out to dinner at Yiolos’ which has a nice view of the sunset.

sunset

RSM

May 16, 2019

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Open Access Journal: CIPEG E-News (Comité international pour l’Égyptologie)

[First posted in AWOL 8 July 2016, updated 16 May 2019]

CIPEG E-News
http://cipeg.icom.museum/sources/interface/cipeg_head.jpg
The “Comité international pour l’Égyptologie” (CIPEG) is one of 30 International Committees of the International Council of Museums (ICOM). The scope of CIPEG deals with the international representation of Egyptian collections and museums in a worldwide community. CIPEG provides a unique panel for museum professionals and scholars who deal with Ancient Egyptian heritage.

The Mission of CIPEG is to promote collaboration among colleagues for the study, preservation, and presentation of Egyptian collections, monuments and sites. In addition, it supports collections of Egyptian art and archaeology, including the heritage of the Ancient Sudan, with a special focus on smaller collections, within the framework of ICOM and in close co-operation with the International Association of Egyptologists (IAE).

CIPEG also seeks to promote collaboration among museums, universities and research institutes as well as supplying partnership opportunities, sharing resources, knowledge and experience for an international forum, and holding an annual conference. CIPEG frames resolutions and policies to promote actions and, if requested, advises museum staff, scholars or institutions.

Open Access Monograph Series: Berlin Studies of the Ancient World / Berliner Studien der Alten Welt

Berlin Studies of the Ancient World / Berliner Studien der Alten Welt
ISSN: 2366-665X

The book series “Berlin Studies of the Ancient World”, issued by the Excellence Cluster Topoi, brings together contributions from all fields of classical studies, from pre- and early history and classical archeology to ancient philosophy, theory of science and theology. Monographs and volumes which present the research results of the Excellence Cluster Topoi form a major focus of the series. 
All publications are issued in high-quality print editions and simultaneously in electronic form. Since 2014 Topoi has made this series available at the research plattform Edition Topoi on an open access basis – thus facilitating rapid exchange of research worldwide.
More information on the book series and the publication strategies of the Excellence Cluster Topoi are available on www.edition-topoi.org/publishing_with_us



Vol. 66
BookDaniel A. Werning, Das Höhlenbuch im Grab des Petamenophis (TT33): Szenen, Texte, Wandtafeln, Berlin: Edition Topoi, [inpress]

Vol. 64
CollectionMichael Meyer (Ed.), Approaching Economic Spaces. Methods and Interpretation in Archaeometric Ceramic Analysis, Berlin: Edition Topoi, [inpress]

Vol. 63
BookBernhard Fritsch, Die Dekonstruktion antiker Räume und die Spolienverwertung beim Neubau von St. Peter in Rom, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2018

Vol. 60
CollectionChiara Ferella and Cilliers Breytenbach (Eds.), Paths of Knowledge. Interconnection(s) between Knowledge and Journey in the Greco-Roman World, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2018

Vol. 59
CollectionMarkus Hilgert, Henrike Simon and Kerstin P. Hofmann (Eds.), Objektepistemologien. Zur Vermessung eines transdisziplinären Forschungsraums, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2018

Vol. 58
ProceedingsUlrich Mania and Monika Trümper (Eds.), Development of Gymnasia and Graeco-Roman Cityscapes, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2018

Vol. 57
CollectionVerena Olejniczak Lobsien, Bernd Roling, Lutz Bergemann and Bettina Bohle (Eds.), Vom Seelengefährt zum Glorienleib. Formen aitherischer Leiblichkeit, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2018

Vol. 55
CollectionSusanne Grunwald, Kerstin P. Hofmann, Daniel A. Werning and Felix Wiedemann (Eds.), Mapping Ancient Identities. Methodisch-kritische Reflexionen zu Kartierungspraktiken, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2018

Vol. 54
BookPetra Wodtke, Dies ist kein römisches Objekt. Ein archäologisch-semiotischer Zugang zur materiellen Kultur der römischen Provinz Epirus, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2018

Vol. 53
CollectionJonas Berking (Ed.), Water Management in Ancient Civilizations, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2018

Vol. 52
BookStefan Schreiber, Wandernde Dinge als Assemblagen. Neo-Materialistische Perspektiven zum ‚römischen Import‘ im ‚mitteldeutschen Barbaricum‘, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2018

Vol. 51
BookOlivier Defaux, The Iberian Peninsula in Ptolemy’s Geography. Origins of the Coordinates and Textual History, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2017

Vol. 50
CollectionMichael Meyer, Piotr Łuczkiewicz and Björn Rauchfuß (Eds.), Eisenzeitliche Siedlungskeramik der Przeworsk-Kultur / Ceramika osadowa kulturyprzeworskiej z młodszego okresuprzedrzymskiego, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2017

Vol. 49
CollectionUte Luig (Ed.), Approaching the Sacred. Pilgrimage in historical and intercultural perspective, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2018

Vol. 48
BookSebastian Fischer, Raumrelationen. Die Lokalkasus im Hurritischen, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2018

Vol. 47
CollectionInes Beilke-Voigt and Oliver Nakoinz (Eds.), Enge Nachbarn. Das Problem von Doppelburgen und Mehrfachburgen in der Bronzezeit und im Mittelalter, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2017

Vol. 46
BookStefanie Kühn, Neue Untersuchungen zur Pythaïs-Prozession von Athen nach Delphi, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2018

Vol. 45
CollectionReinhard Bernbeck, Kerstin P. Hofmann and Ulrike Sommer (Eds.), Between Memory Sites and Memory Networks. New Archaeological and Historical Perspectives, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2017

Vol. 44
CollectionJohn Steele and Mathieu Ossendrijver (Eds.), Studies on the Ancient Exact Sciences in Honour of Lis Brack-Bernsen, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2017

Vol. 43
CollectionStefan Burmeister and Reinhard Bernbeck (Eds.), The Interplay of People and Technologies. Archaeological Case Studies on Innovation, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2017

Vol. 42
BookSven Greinke, Landschaft und Stadt als literarisierte Räume in den Panegyrici Latini der Tetrarchie, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2017

Vol. 41
CollectionFelix Wiedemann, Kerstin P. Hofmann and Hans-Joachim Gehrke (Eds.), Vom Wandern der Völker. Migrationserzählungen in den Altertumswissenschaften, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2017

Vol. 40
CollectionStefan Altekamp, Carmen Marcks-Jacobs and Peter Seiler (Eds.), Perspektiven der Spolienforschung 2. Zentren und Konjunkturen der Spoliierung, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2017

Vol. 39
ProceedingsFabian Horn and Cilliers Breytenbach (Eds.), Spatial Metaphors. Ancient Texts and Transformations, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2016

Vol. 38
ProceedingsSvend Hansen, Daniel Neumann and Tilmann Vachta (Eds.), Raum, Gabe und Erinnerung. Weihgaben und Heiligtümer in prähistorischen und antiken Gesellschaften, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2016

Vol. 36
BookAxel Schäfer, Die Spur des Heiligen. Raum, Ritual und die Feier des Santiago in den südlichen zentralen Anden, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2016

Vol. 35
ProceedingsBarbara Armbruster, Heidemarie Eilbracht, Oliver Hahn and Orsolya Heinrich-Tamáska (Eds.), Verborgenes Wissen. Innovation und Transformation feinschmiedetechnischer Entwicklungen im diachronen Vergleich, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2016

Vol. 34
ProceedingsUndine Lieberwirth and Irmela Herzog (Eds.), 3D-Anwendungen in der Archäologie. Computeranwendungen und quantitative Methoden in der Archäologie. Workshop der AG CAA und des Exzellenzclusters Topoi 2013, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2016

Vol. 33
BookTilmann Vachta, Bronzezeitliche Hortfunde und ihre Fundorte in Böhmen, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2016

Vol. 32
ProceedingsGisela Eberhardt and Fabian Link (Eds.), Historiographical Approaches to Past Archaeological Research, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2015

Vol. 31
ProceedingsErnst Baltrusch and Julia Wilker (Eds.), Amici - socii - clientes? Abhängige Herrschaft im Imperium Romanum, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2015

Vol. 30
ProceedingsSusan Pollock (Ed.), Between Feasts and Daily Meals. Towards an Archaeology of Commensal Spaces, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2015

Vol. 29
CollectionAlmut-Barbara Renger and Isabel Toral-Niehoff (Eds.), Genealogie und Migrationsmythen im antiken Mittelmeerraum und auf der arabischen Halbinsel, Berlin: Edition Topoi, 2014

Vol. 28
BookAnton Gass, Das Siebenstromland zwischen Bronze- und Früheisenzeit. Eine Regionalstudie, 2016

Vol. 27
ProceedingsUte Kelp and Olivier Henry (Eds.), Tumulus as Sema. Space, Politics, Culture and Religion in the First Millenium BC, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2016

Vol. 26
BookDaniel Neumann, Landschaften der Ritualisierung. Die Fundplätze kupfer- und bronzezeitlicher Metalldeponierungen zwischen Donau und Po, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2015

Vol. 25
BookClaudia Gerling, Prehistoric Mobility and Diet in the West Eurasian Steppes 3500 to 300 BC. An isotopic Approach, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2015

Vol. 24
BookManfred Woidich, Die westliche Kugelamphorenkultur. Untersuchungen zu ihrer raumzeitlichen Differenzierung, kulturellen und anthropologischen Identität, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2014

Vol. 23
ProceedingsSilvia Polla and Philip Verhagen (Eds.), Computational Approaches to the Study of Movement in Archaeology. Theory, Practice and Interpretation of Factors and Effects of Long Term Landscape Formation and Transformation, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2014

Vol. 22
ProceedingsKlaus Corcilius and Dominik Perler (Eds.), Partitioning the Soul. Debates from Plato to Leibniz, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2014

Vol. 21
BookJan Moje, Herrschaftsräume und Herrschaftswissen ägyptischer Lokalregenten. Soziokulturelle Interaktionen zur Machtkonsolidierung vom 8. bis zum 4. Jahrhundert v. Chr, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2013

Vol. 20
BookCyril Brosch, Untersuchungen zur hethitischen Raumgrammatik, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2014

Vol. 19
CollectionSilvia Kutscher and Daniel A. Werning (Eds.), On Ancient Grammars of Space. Linguistic Research on the Expression of Spatial Relations and Motion in Ancient Languages, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2014

Vol. 18
CollectionEleftheria Paliou, Undine Lieberwirth and Silvia Polla (Eds.), Spatial analysis and social spaces. Interdisciplinary approaches to the interpretation of prehistoric and historic built environments, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2014

Vol. 17
CollectionEva Cancik-Kirschbaum, Nicole Brisch and Jesper Eidem (Eds.), Constituent, Confederate, and Conquered Space in Upper Mesopotamia. The Emergence of the Mittani State, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2014

Vol. 16
ProceedingsSvend Hansen and Michael Meyer (Eds.), Parallele Raumkonzepte, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2013

Vol. 15
ProceedingsStefan Altekamp, Carmen Marcks-Jacobs and Peter Seiler (Eds.), Perspektiven der Spolienforschung 1. Spoliierung und Transposition, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2013

Vol. 14
ProceedingsKlaus Geus and Michael Rathmann (Eds.), Vermessung der Oikumene, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2013

Vol. 13
CollectionCosima Möller and Eberhard Knobloch (Eds.), In den Gefilden der römischen Feldmesser. Juristische, wissenschaftsgeschichtliche, historische und sprachliche Aspekte, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2013

Vol. 12
ProceedingsDominik Bonatz (Ed.), The Archaeology of Political Spaces. The Upper Mesopotamian Piedmont in the Second Millennium BC, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2014

Vol. 11
ProceedingsOrtwin Dally, Susanne Moraw and Hauke Ziemssen (Eds.), Bild – Raum – Handlung. Perspektiven der Archäologie, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2012

Vol. 10
ProceedingsSvend Hansen, Daniel Neumann and Tilmann Vachta (Eds.), Hort und Raum. Aktuelle Forschungen zu bronzezeitlichen Deponierungen in Mitteleuropa, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2012

Vol. 9
ProceedingsElke Kaiser and Wolfram Schier (Eds.), Mobilität und Wissenstransfer in diachroner und interdisziplinärer Perspektive, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2013

Vol. 8
BookSalvatore De Vincenzo, Tra Cartagine e Roma, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2012

Vol. 7
CollectionErnst Baltrusch, Morten Hegewisch, Michael Meyer, Uwe Puschner and Christian Wendt (Eds.), 2000 Jahre Varusschlacht. Geschichte-Archäologie-Legenden, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2012

Vol. 6
ProceedingsFelix Mundt (Ed.), Kommunikationsräume im kaiserzeitlichen Rom, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2012

Vol. 5
ProceedingsElke Kaiser, Joachim Burger and Wolfram Schier (Eds.), Population Dynamics in Prehistory and Early History. New Approaches by Using Stable Isotopes and Genetics, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2012

Vol. 4
ProceedingsTherese Fuhrer (Ed.), Rom und Mailand in der Spätantike. Repräsentationen städtischer Räume in Literatur, Architektur und Kunst, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2011

Vol. 3
CollectionFrank Daubner (Ed.), Militärsiedlungen und Territorialherrschaft in der Antike, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2010

Vol. 2
BookAlessandra Gilibert, Syro-Hittite Monumental Art and the Archaeology of Performance, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2011

Vol. 1
ProceedingsEva Cancik-Kirschbaum, Margarete van Ess and Joachim Marzahn (Eds.), Babylon. Wissenskultur in Orient und Okzident/ Science Culture Between Orient and Occident, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2011

Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

Advanced VR, iMmersive serious games and Augmented REality as tools to raise awareness and access to European underwater CULTURal heritagE - Baia Italy

imareculture

Project’s i-MareCulture scope is to raise public awareness of European identity by focusing in maritime cultural heritage, which by default bridges different civilizations. In particular, i-MareCulture aims in bringing inherently unreachable underwater cultural heritage within digital reach of the wide public by implementing virtual visits, serious games with immersive technologies and underwater augmented reality.

La nuova visione della Cooperazione Italiana con il mondo dell'Impresa per uno sviluppo condiviso

EXCO2019

Archeomatica sta partecipando all’Exco2019 che si svolge in questi giorni alla Fiera di Roma con successo di partecipazione ed interesse da parte di molteplici differenziati attori. Un nuovo modello e nuove opportunità che cercano di recuperare lo sbilanciamento del rapporto per arrivare ad un nuovo equilibrio che veda il superamento del rapporto del paese donatore e paese beneficiario, nato decenni fa, a seguito dell'opera di decolonizzazione.

May 15, 2019

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Los acueductos de Hispania: construcción y abandono. Colección Juanelo Turriano de Historia de la Ingeniería.

Los acueductos de Hispania: construcción y abandono. Colección Juanelo Turriano de Historia de la Ingeniería.
By Elena Sánchez López, Javier Martínez Jiménez
Madrid:  Fundación Juanelo Turriano, 2016.  Pp. 295.  ISBN 9788494269578.

ÍNDICE
NOTA PRELIMINAR Y AGRADECIMIENTOS PRÓLOGO
I INTRODUCCIÓN
LOS ACUEDUCTOS EN HISPANIA
LOS ACUEDUCTOS ROMANOS EN HISPANIA: ESTADO DE LA CUESTIÓN METODOLOGÍA DE ESTUDIO DE LOS ACUEDUCTOS
ARQUEOLOGÍA
INGENIERÍA APLICADA A LOS ACUEDUCTOS
LOS MÉTODOS DE DATACIÓN APLICADOS A LOS ACUEDUCTOS FUENTES ESCRITAS

TEXTOS LITERARIOS DOCUMENTACIÓN JURÍDICA EPIGRAFÍA
INGENIERÍA Y FUNCIONAMIENTO DE LOS ACUEDUCTOS INGENIERÍA Y PLANIFICACIÓN
PARTES DE UN ACUEDUCTO

CAPUT AQUAE
LA CANALIZACIÓN
CASTELLUM AQUAE
FUNCIONALIDAD SUMINISTRO A FUENTES
SUMINISTRO A TERMAS Y ESPECTÁCULOS ACUEDUCTOS Y DESAGÜES
USOS INDUSTRIALES
SUMINISTRO EXTRAURBANO FUNCIONALIDAD SIMBÓLICA

II LOS ACUEDUCTOS EN CONTEXTO
LOS ACUEDUCTOS EN EL URBANISMO ROMANO LA CONSTRUCCIÓN DE LOS ACUEDUCTOS REPARACIONES Y AMPLIACIONES
LOS CONTEXTOS DE ABANDONO

III LOS ACUEDUCTOS DE HISPANIA. CATÁLOGO RAZONADO CONSIDERACIONES PREELIMINARES
CATALOGACIÓN
TARRACONENSE
BALEARICA:
1. MUNICIPIUM FLAVIUM EBUSSITANUM (IBIZA)

TARRACONENSE. CONVENTUS CAESARAUGUSTANUS:
2. CAESARAUGUSTA (ZARAGOZA)
3. CALAGURRIS NASSICA IULIA (CALAHORRA, LA RIOJA) 4. LOS BAÑALES (UNCASTILLO, ZARAGOZA)
5. RECCOPOLIS (ZORITA DE LOS CANES, GUADALAJARA)

TARRACONENSE. CONVENTUS CARTHAGINENSIS:
6. BEGASTRI (CEHEGÍN, MURCIA) - ACEQUIA DE LA POLLERA
7. COLONIA URBS IULIA NOVA CARTHAGO, CARTHAGO SPARTARIA (CARTAGENA, MURCIA) 8. CONSABURUM (CONSUEGRA, TOLEDO)
9. ILUGO (SANTISTEBAN DEL PUERTO, JAÉN)
10. CASTULO (LINARES, JAÉN)
11. SEGÓBRIGA (SAELICES, CUENCA)
12. TOLETUM (TOLEDO) - ACUEDUCTO DE LA POZUELA
13. TOLETUM (TOLEDO) - ACUEDUCTO DE ALCANTARILLA/LA ROSA
14. ¿VERGILIA? (HUELMA, JAÉN)

TARRACONENSE. CONVENTUS CLUNIACENSIS:
15. ANDELOS (DESPOBLADO DE ANDIÓN, MENDIGORRÍA, NAVARRA) - PUENTE DEL DIABLO DE

MENDIGORRÍA
16. SEGISAMO (SASAMÓN, BURGOS) - ACUEDUCTO DE LOS ANILLOS 17. SEGISAMO (SASAMÓN, BURGOS) - ACUEDUCTO DEL ARCA
18. MUNICIPIUM FLAVIUM SEGOVIENSIUM (SEGOVIA)
19. TERMES (TIERMES, SORIA)
20. UXAMA ARGAELA (OSMA, SORIA) - ACUEDUCTO NORTE
21. UXAMA ARGAELA (OSMA, SORIA) - ACUEDUCTO ORIENTAL

TARRACONENSE. CONVENTUS TARRACONENSIS:
22. COLONIA FAVENTIA IULIA AUGUSTA PIA BARCINO (BARCELONA)
23. CELLA (TERUEL)
24. SAGUNTUM; ARSE (SAGUNTO) - ACUEDUCTO DE DIANA O ACEQUIA DE GAUSA
25. COLONIA IULIA URBS TRIUMPHALIS TARRACO (TARRAGONA) - ACUEDUCTO DEL GAYÁ
26. COLONIA IULIA URBS TRIUMPHALIS TARRACO (TARRAGONA) - ACUEDUCTO DEL FRANCOLÍ 27. COLONIA IULIA URBS TRIUMPHALIS TARRACO (TARRAGONA) - ACUEDUCTO DEL SUBURBIO 28. VALENTIA EDETANORUM (VALENCIA)

BAETICA
BAETICA. CONVENTUS ASTIGITANUS:
29. FLORENTIA ILIBERRITANA (GRANADA)
30. SINGILIA BARBA (ANTEQUERA, MÁLAGA) 31. UCUBI CLARITAS IULIA (ESPEJO, CÓRDOBA)

BAETICA. CONVENTUS CORDUBENSIS:
32. AURGI (JAÉN)
33. COLONIA PATRICIA CORDUBA (CÓRDOBA) - ACUEDUCTO DE VALDEPUENTES, AQUA AGUSTA, AQUA VETUS 34. COLONIA PATRICIA CORDUBA (CÓRDOBA) - AQUA NOVA DOMITIANA, ACUEDUCTO DEL

ARROYO PEDROCHE
35. COLONIA PATRICIA CORDUBA (CÓRDOBA) - ACUEDUCTO OCCIDENTAL/ACUEDUCTO DE LA ESTACIÓN

DE AUTOBUSES/AGUAS DE LA CATEDRAL/QANAT DE AL-HAKAM/FONTIS AUREAE AQUAEDUCTUS
8
LOS ACUEDUCTOS DE HISPANIA. CONSTRUCCIÓN Y ABANDONO
36. COLONIA PATRICIA CORDUBA (CÓRDOBA) - ACUEDUCTO DE CERCADILLA/AQUA MAXIMIANA/ ACUEDUCTO DE LA HUERTA DE SANTA ISABEL
37. EGABRUM/IGABRUM (CABRA)
38. MELLARIA (FUENTE OBEJUNA, CÓRDOBA) - AQUA AUGUSTA

BAETICA. CONVENTUS GADITANUS:
39. BAELO CLAUDIA (TARIFA, CÁDIZ) - ACUEDUCTO DEL MOLINO O ACUEDUCTO NOROESTE 40. BAELO CLAUDIA (TARIFA, CÁDIZ) - ACUEDUCTO DE PUNTA PALOMA
41. BAELO CLAUDIA (TARIFA, CÁDIZ) - ACUEDUCTO DEL REALILLO O ACUEDUCTO NORTE 42. AUGUSTA URBS IULIA GADITANA (CÁDIZ)
43. LACIPO (CASARES, MÁLAGA)
44. SEXI FIRMUM IULIUM (ALMUÑÉCAR, GRANADA)
45. OCURI (UBRIQUE, CÁDIZ)

BAETICA. CONVENTUS HISPALENSIS:
46. ARUCCI (AROCHE, HUELVA)
47. CELTI (PEÑAFLOR, SEVILLA)
48. COLONIA IULIA ROMULA HISPALIS (SEVILLA) 49. ILIPLA (NIEBLA, HUELVA)

50. COLONIA AELIA AUGUSTA ITALICA (SANTIPONCE, SEVILLA)
51. ONUBA AESTUARIA (HUELVA)
52. ARUNDA (RONDA, MÁLAGA) - ACUEDUCTO DE FUENTE DE LA ARENA

LUSITANIA
LUSITANIA. CONVENTUS SCALLABITANUS:
53. CONIMBRIGA (CONDEIXA-A-VELHA, PORTUGAL)
54. FELICITAS IULIA OLISIPO (LISBOA, PORTUGAL)
55. CIVITAS IGAEDITANORUM, EGITANIA (IDANHA-A-VELHA, PORTUGAL)

LUSITANIA. CONVENTUS PACENSIS:
56. AMMAIA (MARVÃO, PORTUGAL)
57. URBS IMPERATORIA SALACIA (ALCÁCER DO SAL, PORTUGAL)

LUSITANIA. CONVENTUS EMERITENSIS:
58. COLONIA AUGUSTA EMERITA (MÉRIDA, BADAJOZ) - ACUEDUCTO DE LAS ABADÍAS
59. COLONIA AUGUSTA EMERITA (MÉRIDA, BADAJOZ) - AQUA AUGUSTA, ACUEDUCTO DE CORNALVO 60. COLONIA AUGUSTA EMERITA (MÉRIDA, BADAJOZ) - ACUEDUCTO DE LOS MILAGROS/PROSERPINA 61. COLONIA AUGUSTA EMERITA (MÉRIDA, BADAJOZ) - ACUEDUCTO DE SAN LÁZARO/LAS TOMAS/

RABO DE BUEY
62. CAPERA (CÁPARRA, CÁCERES)

GALLAECIA
GALLAECIA. CONVENTUS ASTURIACENSIS: 63. LEGIO VII GEMINA (LEÓN)
GALLAECIA. CONVENTUS BRACARENSIS:
64. AQUAE FLAVIAE (CHAVES, PORTUGAL) 65. BRACARA AUGUSTA (BRAGA, PORTUGAL)

GALLAECIA. CONVENTUS LUCENSIS: 66. LUCUS AUGUSTI (LUGO)
IV APÉNDICES
BIBLIOGRAFÍA GENERAL PUBLICACIONES

The Index Thomisticus Treebank Project

The Index Thomisticus Treebank Project
dependency tree structure
Started in 2006, the Index Thomisticus Treebank project is hosted at CIRCSE research centre of the Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore (Milan, Italy). The project includes a number of language resources for Latin, namely: the Index Thomisticus Treebank (Medieval Latin), a semantically annotated portion of the Latin Dependency Treebank (Classical Latin) and two valency lexica (IT-VaLex and Latin VALLEX). The project is partly funded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research (MIUR), FIR-2013 "Developing and Integrating Advanced Language Resources for Latin" (ID: RBFR13EWQN).

Non-scribal communication media in the Bronze Age Aegean and surrounding areas : the semantics of a-literate and proto-literate media (seals, potmarks, mason's marks, seal-impressed pottery, ideograms and logograms, and related systems)

Non-scribal communication media in the Bronze Age Aegean and surrounding areas : the semantics of a-literate and proto-literate media (seals, potmarks, mason's marks, seal-impressed pottery, ideograms and logograms, and related systems)

2017 - Firenze University Press
ID: 4284492
Permalink: http://digital.casalini.it/9788864536378
ISBN: 9788864536378
 
Table of contents
VII PREFACE
Anna Margherita Jasink, Judith Weingarten, Silvia Ferrara
AREAS
AEGEAN
3
A MEASURED WORLD? MEASURES IN MINOAN DAILY LIFE
Maria Emanuela Alberti
41 TO HAVE AND TO HOLD: HIEROGLYPHIC SEALS AS PERSONAL MARKERS AND OBJECTS OF DISPLAY
Silvia Ferrara, Anna Margherita Jasink
55 MANAGEMENT, POWER AND NON-LITERATE COMMUNICATION IN PREPALATIAL AND PALATIAL MESARA
Pietro Militello
73 ADMINISTRATIVE DOCUMENTS WITHOUT WRITING: THE CASE OF SEALINGS AND FLAT-BASED NODULES
Massimo Perna
81 THE ROLE OF NON-WRITTEN COMMUNICATION IN MINOAN ADMINISTRATIVE PRACTICES
Ilse Schoep
99 WHEN ONE EQUALS ONE: THE MINOAN ROUNDEL Judith Weingarten
ANATOLIA AND CYPRUS
111 HOW TO READ THE SIGNS: THE USE OF SYMBOLS, MARKING AND PICTOGRAPHS IN BRONZE AGE ANATOLIA
Willemijn Waal
131 CYPRO-MINOAN IN MARKING SYSTEMS OF THE EASTERN AND CENTRAL MEDITERRANEAN: NEW METHODS OF INVESTIGATING OLD QUESTIONS Miguel Valério, Brent Davis
VI NON-SCRIBAL COMMUNICATION MEDIA IN THE BRONZE AGE AEGEAN AND SURROUNDING AREAS
153 WRITING «SYSTEMS»: LITERACY AND THE TRANSMISSION OF WRITING IN NON-ADMINISTRATIVE CONTEXTS
Philippa Steele
NEAR EAST AND EGYPT
175
MAKING TOKENS TALK
Denise Schmandt-Besserat, Niloufar Moghimi
185 SEAL IMPRESSIONS ON JARS: IMAGES, STORAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Stefania Mazzoni
207 NON-SCRIBAL COMMUNICATION IN THE SOUTHERN LEVANT DURING THE MIDDLE AND LATE BRONZE AGES
Assaf Yasur-Landau
221 PREDYNASTIC EGYPTIAN ICONOGRAPHY: CONTRIBUTIONS AND RELATIONS WITH THE HIEROGLYPHIC SYSTEM'S ORIGIN
Gwenola Graff
233 IDENTITY MARKS IN ANCIENT EGYPT: SCRIBAL AND NON-SCRIBAL MODES OF VISUAL COMMUNICATION
Ben Haring
247 FINAL REFLECTIONS John Bennet
255 LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS
 



The Signal: Digital Preservation

Digital Strategy v1.1.2 Now Available

In October 2018, the Library published a new digital strategy describing the Library’s objectives for digital transformation over the next five years. The strategy describes goals such as growing online collections, creating opportunities for deeper engagement, and investing in an innovation culture that supports a changing information landscape.

In an effort to reflect some of these very goals, the strategy was published as a versioned, living document, open to rolling public comment and revision. We are pleased to announce the first updated version of the strategy, which we are calling Digital Strategy v1.1.2, is now available online at https://www.loc.gov/digital-strategy?loclr=blogsig! and as a downloadable PDF. For transparency, we will continue to make earlier versions of the strategy available for download from the digital strategy page.

Working with Senior Leadership and the Digital Strategy Working Group, which represents stakeholders from across our institution, the Digital Strategy Directorate evaluated all comments received since the strategy’s original publication and incorporated several constructive suggestions.

Substantive edits to the document are as follows:

  • We updated numbers throughout the strategy to be consistent with our 2018 annual report
  • In the “Maximize the use of content” section, we added language reaffirming our commitment to engage with stakeholders in our effort to continually improvement public access to legislative data
  • In the “Cultivate an innovation culture” section, we updated language to increase the specificity of professional development goals.

Going forward, we plan to continue to take comments through LC-Labs@loc.gov and revise as necessary so the strategy stays relevant. We would like to thank everyone who contributed to this process!

Ethan Gruber (Numishare)

Extending distribution and metrical analyses across corporate entities

I recently pushed some significant changes to the distribution and metrical analysis visualization features both in the Numishare platform and Nomisma.org itself to differentiate personal from corporate authories when querying typological data.

Previously, the authority could be selected as a query parameter for generating a visualization, but the underlying SPARQL query merely extracted the values associated explicitly with the nmo:hasAuthority property for coin types. This means it was impossible to compare one kingdom to another since the relationship between a type and an overarching corporate entity is nearly always made between the ruler designated as the nmo:hasAuthority and the ruler's Nomisma RDF that links the ruler concept to the corporate entity using the W3C organization ontology. For example, Ptolemy I is linked to the Ptolemaic Empire with the following model:


nm:ptolemy_i org:hasMembership ?membership .
?membership a org:Membership ;
    org:organization nm:seleucid_empire;
    org:role nm:authority.


Using this model, we are able to use the Nomisma SPARQL endpoint to extract the distinct corporate entities that minted tetradrachms with the following query:


SELECT DISTINCT ?kingdom ?label WHERE {
  ?coinType a nmo:TypeSeriesItem;
              nmo:hasDenomination nm:tetradrachm .
  {?coinType nmo:hasAuthority ?kingdom}
  UNION {?coinType nmo:hasAuthority ?auth .
        ?auth org:hasMembership/org:organization ?kingdom }
  ?kingdom a foaf:Organization ;
             skos:prefLabel ?label FILTER (langMatches(lang(?label), "en"))
}


Bear in mind that we have to use a UNION query to join coin types that may have the corporate authority explicitly expressed in the nmo:hasAuthority. This is the case for later Seleucid coinage issued under the authority of the Roman Republic.

Now that we are able to exploit the relationships between people and corporate entities in the Nomisma data, we can begin to construct new queries and visualizations across broader periods of time, for example to compare the average weights of tetradrachms issued broadly by the Seleucid vs. Ptolemaic Empires over nearly three centuries. Or to compare the distribution of deities that appear on Seleucid vs. Ptolemaic coinage (for example, http://numismatics.org/hrc/visualize/distribution?dist=deity&type=percentage&compare=authCorp+nm%3Aptolemaic_empire&compare=authCorp+nm%3Aseleucid_empire).

Distribution of deities as appearing on Seleucid and Ptolemaic coinage

Here we can see the Ptolemaic affinity toward Athena compared to the prevalence of Apollo on Seleucid coinage, at least according to the the incomplete typological data we have published from the Ptolemaic Empire (Ptolemaic Coins Online only coins the gold and silver coinage through Ptolemy IV so far). This is one of a number of recent improvements to the query mechanisms in Numishare and Nomisma, and more should be expected in the coming months, especially to include the querying of legends and monograms.

The Stoa Consortium

Digital Classicist Wiki editing sprints

The regular Digital Classicist Wiki editing sprints that we used to run have stalled in the last year or so, but we will be restarting them as of next month.

For now, sprints will run on the first Tuesday of every month, at 16:00–18:00 UK time.

  • June 4, 2019
  • July 2, 2019
  • August 6, 2019

Information on what we get up to and what we would like to achieve can be found at the Wiki Editing page.

If you want to chat with other sprinters in real time, you may join the DigiClass IRC Channel.

If you don’t yet have an account on the Digital Classicist Wiki and would like one, please contact any of the administrators named at the Members page and we will create an account for you.

We would be happy to receive suggestions of themed sprints in the future. (In the past we have run sprints on geography, papyrology, language technologies, and other topics.) Maybe suggest them here on the Digiclass list, and see who else might be interested.

Other suggestions and ideas welcome!

AMIR: Access to Mideast and Islamic Resources

Alphabetical list of Open Access Islamic Manuscripts Collections

62 collections as of May 15, 2019
[First posted 12/10/2010, updated 5/15/2019]

    Hill Museum & Manuscript Library


    "vHMML offers resources and tools for the study of manuscripts and currently features manuscript cultures from Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia. The site houses high-resolution images of manuscripts, many of them digitized as part of HMML’s global mission to preserve and share important, endangered, and inaccessible manuscript collections through digital photography, archiving, and cataloging. It also contains descriptions of manuscripts from HMML's legacy microfilm collection, with scans of some of these films...

    Virtual HMML [vHMML] Reading Room, the digital library of the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library, has thousands of Islamic manuscript records, with 400,000 West African Islamic manuscript images and metadata coming from Timbuktu, Mali in the coming years.

    The vHMML platform also includes a component called School, a resource for teaching Arabic paleography from the 9th to 20th centuries, using Christian Arabic manuscripts from Sinai and HMML’s collections.

    See also: Alphabetical list of Open Access Islamic Manuscripts Collections

    Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

    RI-TRATTI D’ARTISTA. Giovambattista Cuocolo.

    Vedere una mostra in galleria oggi è più che un evento: non richiede solo partecipazione, carica emozionale, senso critico e voglia di esporsi, di esserci, ma anche la forza di sondare quella che una volta, in bocca ai critici, era la tua realtà.

    Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

    Word Formation Latin

    Word Formation Latin
    This is the work-in-progress web application site for the EU funded Word Formation Latin project. Please click on 'Explore' to browse the data. 

    WFL has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No 658332-WFL. The project is based at the Centro Interdisciplinare di Ricerche per la Computerizzazione dei Segni dell'Espressione (CIRCSE), at the Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milan, Italy.
    For more information, please visit the project website.

    May 14, 2019

    Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

    Open Access Journal: Open Journal of Archaeometry

    [First posted in AWOL 1 August 2016, updated 14 May 2019]

    Open Journal of Archaeometry
    eISSN: 2038-1956
    http://www.pagepress.org/journals/public/arc_mini.jpg
    The Open Journal of Archaeometry is a new, peer-reviewed, Open Access, international scientific journal published by PAGEPress Publications. It is devoted to the publication of research articles, short communications and review papers on every aspect of archaeometry.
    Archaeometry – also known as archaeological science – applies scientific techniques to the analysis of archaeological materials. Research topics mainly comprise the following disciplines and analyzing techniques:
    • chemical and physical analyses of artifacts, concerning provenance, technology types of use and authenticity;
    • dating methods providing archaeologists with numerical and relative chronologies;
    • environmental approaches providing information on past changes in landscape, climate, flora, and fauna;
    • anthropological studies dealing with diet, nutrition, health and pathology;
    • mathematical methods for data treatment with the purpose of handling, analyzing, and modeling large data sources;
    • remote-sensing and geophysical-survey applications assisting underground and underwater archaeology;
    • conservation sciences involving the study of decay processes and the development of appropriate methods of conservation and restoration.
    The Open Journal of Archaeometry may also host contextually relevant announcements, book reviews and abstracts from scientific meetings. Every article published in the Journal will be peer-reviewed by experts in the field and decided upon by members of the Editorial Board.

    Vol 4 No 1 (2018)

    Published: 2018-06-13

    Vol 3, No 1 (2016)

    Published: 2016-04-15

    Vol 2, No 2 (2014)

    Published: 2014-09-19
    Vol 2 No 2 (2014)



    Supplement to the Akkadian Dictionaries (eSAD)

    [First  posted in AWOL 16 April 2018, updated 14 May 2019]

    Supplement to the Akkadian Dictionaries (eSAD)
    Akkadian (Babylonian-Assyrian), a Semitic language written in the cuneiform script, was the native language of Babylonia and Assyria, the two main areas of Ancient Mesopotamia. It spread all over the Ancient Near East and was used, at least in written form and during certain periods, also from Elam in southwest Iran to Anatolia Syria, Palestine and even Egypt in the west. Written from ca. 2600 BC to the 1st century AD, Akkadian is one of the best attested languages of antiquity: the size of the Akkadian text corpus approximately corresponds to the size of the corpus of ancient Latin.
    The Akkadian lexicon is actually accessible through two large dictionaries, W. von Sodens Akkadisches Handwörterbuch (1958–1981, 3 volumes) and The Assyrian Dictionary of the University of Chicago (1956–2010, 20 volumes). Both dictionaries present Akkadian words with their meaning in context and a large number of references. However, due to the many new texts published after the end of the Akkadisches Handwörterbuch and The Assyrian Dictionary of the University of Chicago, as well as new secondary literature and corrections, both dictionaries, especially in their earlier volumes, are outdated in part.
    The Supplement to the Akkadian Dictionaries is meant to update both dictionaries. Since July 1st 2013, it is funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft as a long-term project, in connection with the Etymological Dictionary of Akkadian conducted by Manfred Krebernik (Jena) and Leonid Kogan (Moscow). All results are published on this website, and in addition printed volumes will appear successively. 
    The project leader is Michael P. Streck. Collaborators are:  Nadezda Rudik (2013-2017), Elyze Zomer (2017), Janine Wende (since 2017), N. J. C. Kouwenberg (2017).
    First postes in AWOL 16 April 2018, updated How to use the Supplement to the Akkadian Dictionaries
    Content released under a CC BY-SA 3.0 license, 2007-14.
    Text Corpus
    Current State of Work
    Supplement to the Akkadian Dictionaries:
    A    B    D    E    G        I    K     L    M       P    Q    R    S        Š          U    W    Y    Z
    Printversion:
      
    Supplement to the Akkadian Dictionaries, Volume B, P., Leipziger Altorientalistische Studien Band 7,1, Harrassowitz (Wiesbaden) 2018. Divergences or additions to the print version are marked yellow in the digital version (eSAD) .
    Bibliography
    Bibliographical Abbreviations
    Other_Abbreviations

    See also:
    and

    Open Access Journal: Antaeus

    Antaeus 
    ISSN: 0238-0218
    Az "Antaeus" évente megjelenő periodika, amely angol és német nyelven közli a magyar, valamint a nemzetközi régészettudomány és társtudományainak fontos, új eredményeit.
    Az intézeti évkönyv első kötete 1970-ben jelent meg. 1970 és 1985 között a "Mitteilungen des Archäologischen Instituts der Ungarischen Akademie der Wissenschaften" című évkönyvből 14 kötet, és a konferenciák tanulmányait publikáló Beiheftből 3 látott napvilágot. 
    Az intézeti évkönyv 1986-tól "Antaeus: Communicationes ex Instituto Archaeologico Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae" címmel jelenik meg, 2002-től A4 formátumban. 



    See AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies


    Platon Digital: Tradition und Rezeption

    New in  Digital Classics Books

    Charlotte Schubert et al. (Hrsg.)

    Platon Digital
    Tradition und Rezeption

    Digital Classics Books, Band 3
    Platon ist nach Homer der antike Autor mit der reichhaltigsten Rezeption vom Altertum über das Mittelalter bis in die Neuzeit. Gleichwohl und gerade aus diesem Grund ist diese bisher allenfalls bruchstückhaft aufgearbeitet worden. Die Autoren versuchen, diesem alten Ziel geisteswissenschaftlicher Forschung auf neuen Wegen näherzukommen, indem sie eine informationswissenschaftliche Perspektive auf Platon und seine Rezeption anwenden. Dazu sind innovative Methoden der Paraphrasensuche entwickelt worden, um diese auch als Methode altertumswissenschaftlich und kulturwissenschaftlich interessierter Forschung zu etablieren.
    Inhaltsverzeichnis
    HTML
    PDF
    Titelei
    Inhaltsverzeichnis
    Charlotte Schubert, Paul Molitor, Jörg Ritter, Joachim Scharloth, Kurt Sier
    Einleitung:
    Das Projekt Platon Digital in der Förderlinie „Offen – für Außergewöhnliches“ der VolkswagenStiftung
    1. Grundlagen
    Kurt Sier, Eva Wöckener-Gade
    Paraphrase als Ähnlichkeitsbeziehung. Ein digitaler Zugang zu einem intertextuellen Phänomen
    Marcus Pöckelmann, Jörg Ritter, Paul Molitor
    Word Mover’s Distance angewendet auf die Paraphrasenextraktion im Altgriechischen
    Joachim Scharloth, Franz Keilholz, Simon Meier-Vieracker, Xiaozhou Yu, Roman Dorniak
    Datengeleitete Kategorienbildung in den Digital Humanities:
    Paraphrasen aus korpus- und computerlinguistischer Perspektive
    2. Wechselwirkungen
    Kevin Protze
    Das Verhältnis der Markiertheit und des Zitatanteils in Paraphrasen bei Aristoteles, Iamblich und Themistios
    Joachim Rautenberg
    Negation in Platons Sophistes und die Grenzen automatisierter Paraphrasensuche
    Felix Schulze
    Sophokles und die Frauen – Platonisches bei Plutarch, Clemens von Alexandria und Olympiodor
    André L. Visinoni
    „Besser als zehntausend Augen“:
    Ein Beispiel für die Wechselwirkungen zwischen Paraphrase und Markierung bei Iamblich
    3. Exemplarische Studien zu intertextuellen Bezügen
    Roxana Kath
    „Die Füchse haben ihre Höhlen und die Vögel ihre Nester …“:
    Zum Problem der Identifizierung und Kontextualisierung von Fragmenten und Paraphrasen
    Roxana Kath, Charlotte Schubert
    Platon, Anacharsis und die Medizin
    Stephan Jödicke
    Εἰ δὲ δεῖ καὶ μῦθον λέγειν – Zum literarischen Umfeld des Prometheus-Mythos bei Aelius Aristides
    Charlotte Schubert
    Δοῦναι τε καὶ δέξασθαι λόγον
    Eva Wöckener-Gade
    Mehr als nur Platons Worte – Platonisches in Lukians Charon 5–6
    4. Appendices
    Eva Wöckener-Gade, Stephan Jödicke, Henning Ohst, Erik Pulz, Kevin Protze, Joachim Rautenberg, Friederike Schellhardt, Felix Schulze, André L. Visinoni
    Appendix 1
    Ein Parallelkorpus von Paraphrasen auf Platon: Der ‚Goldstandard‘ des Projekts Platon Digital
    Eva Wöckener-Gade, Stephan Jödicke, Henning Ohst, Erik Pulz, Kevin Protze, Joachim Rautenberg, Friederike Schellhardt, Felix Schulze, André L. Visinoni
    Appendix 2
    Variantensensible und formgenaue Stoppwortliste für das Altgriechische
    Appendix 3
    Tabellen
    Abkürzungsverzeichnis
    Literaturverzeichnis
    Über die Autoren
    Online-Supplement: Tabellen (nur HTML)
    Felix Schulze
    Sophokles und die Frauen – Platonisches bei Plutarch, Clemens von Alexandria und Olympiodor
    Tabelle 1: Ergebnisse der Paraphrasensuche im gesamten Textkorpus ausgehend von Platon, De re publica 329 b6–c4
    Tabelle 2: Ergebnisse der Paraphrasensuche im Teilkorpus Olympiodor ausgehend von Platon, De re publica 329 b6–c4
    Roxana Kath
    „Die Füchse haben ihre Höhlen und die Vögel ihre Nester …“: Zum Problem der Identifizierung und Kontextualisierung von Fragmenten und Paraphrasen
    Tabelle 1: Ergebnis der Suche ausgehend von Plut. Ti. Gracch. 9,5
    Tabelle 2: Ergebnis der Suche ausgehend von Lk 9,58 bzw. Mt 8,20
    Tabelle 3: Ergebnis der Suche ausgehend von einer modifizierten Plutarch-Stelle
    Tabelle 4: Ergebnis der Suche ausgehend von ἄοικοι καὶ ἀνίδρυτοι
    Tabelle 5: Ergebnis der Suche ausgehend von ThEv86
    Tabelle 6: Ergebnis der Suche zu dem Textausschnitt αἱ ἀλώπεκες ἔχουσιν τοὺς φωλεοὺς αὐτῶν καὶ τὰ πετεινὰ ἔχει τὴν κατασκήνωσιν αὐτῶν ausgehend von ThEv86
    Tabelle 7: Ergebnis der Suche nach ἀέρος καὶ φωτὸς (Plut. Ti. Gracch. 9,5)
    Tabelle 8: Ergebnis der Suche nach τὰ θηρία καὶ τὰ πετεινὰ καταδύσεις ἔχουσι καὶ καταλύματα
    Roxana Kath, Charlotte Schubert
    Platon, Anacharsis und die Medizin
    Tabelle 1: Ergebnis der Suche ausgehend von Anacharsis Ep. 9,20–25
    Tabelle 2: Ergebnis der Suche ausgehend von Anacharsis Ep. 9,21–25
    Tabelle 3: Ergebnis der Suche mit der gekürzten Textpassage zu Anacharsis Ep. 9,21–25 im Corpus Platonicum
    Tabelle 4: Ergebnis der Suche ausgehend von Anacharsis Ep. 9,24–25
    Tabelle 5: Tabelle 5 zu Schritt 4: Ergebnis der Suche ausgehend von Anacharsis Ep. 9,21–25 im Corpus Hippocraticum
    Tabelle 6: Ergebnis der Suche ausgehend von Anacharsis Ep. 9,20–25 im Teil­korpus Diodorus Siculus
    Stephan Jödicke
    Εἰ δὲ δεῖ καὶ μῦθον λέγειν
    Tabelle 1: Paraphrasen zu Plat. Prot. 322c1–c7 Ζεὺς οὖν δείσας ... καὶ δίκην δὴ καὶ αἰδῶ
    Charlotte Schubert
    Δοῦναι τε καὶ δέξασθαι λόγον
    Table 1: Paraphrasen zu Platons δοῦναί τε καὶ δέξασθαι λόγον im Gesamt­korpus
    Tabelle 2: λόγον τε δοῦναι καὶ δέξασθαι und vergleichbare Formulierungen bei ­Platon

    Études classique in Papyrus : Institutional Repository of Université de Montréal

    Études classique in Papyrus : Institutional Repository of Université de Montréal


    AMIR: Access to Mideast and Islamic Resources

    British Library - Digital Access to Persian Manuscripts

    List of digitised Persian manuscripts

    "Below we have listed the Persian manuscripts in the British Library which have been digitised up to the present time.  Click on the manuscript number at the head of each description to go directly to the relevant entry on the British Library's digitised manuscripts site. Once there, click on the thumbnail image of the manuscript to get to the full digitised version which will open in a new window (please note that all subsequent digitised manuscripts that you view will appear in this same window). You can choose to view one page at a time or two together in book format (i.e. as if you were reading it). Make sure, however, that you select 'Right to Left' in the 'Direction' box..."

    See: Alphabetical list of Open Access Islamic Manuscripts Collections 

    Juan Garcés (Digitised Manuscripts Blog)

    Cataloguing the Harley manuscripts

    In recent months, the British Library has started to revise the online catalogue descriptions of manuscripts in the Harley collection. Sold to the nation in 1753, the Harley manuscripts form one of the Library's foundation collections. The collection comprises more than 7,000 manuscripts, 14,000 charters and 500 rolls, spanning the...

    The Signal: Digital Preservation

    Conservation photodocumentation at the Library of Congress

    Today’s guest post is from Gwenanne Edwards, Senior Paper Conservator in the Conservation Division at the Library of Congress. Gwenanne is the current head of the Conservation Division’s Image Documentation Committee, which develops protocols for staff conservation photodocumentation.

    The Digital Imaging Workflow for Treatment Documentation, an instructional manual for conservation photodocumentation used in the Conservation Division at the Library of Congress, is now available online.

    When special collections materials are selected for conservation treatment, conservation staff first record the object in its current condition through written and photographic documentation. Photodocumentation serves several purposes:

    1. As a tool for examination, where capturing the object in various lighting conditions and wavelengths can highlight certain condition issues and/or help characterize materials;
    2. As a permanent record of conservation treatment, where capturing the object before and after treatment in the same photographic conditions allows for comparison;
    3. For reference during conservation treatment.

     

    Two conservators stand over a table tophotograph an early photograph of Harriet Tubman

    Conservators Alisha Chipman and Jennifer Evers photograph the Emily Howland album, containing an early photograph of Harriet Tubman, before conservation treatment. Photo by Shawn Miller.

    Although the Digital Imaging Workflow for Treatment Documentation is specific to the setup and equipment in the Conservation Division, the procedures in the manual may be adapted for use in other conservation imaging studios. Inclusion of equipment and supplies in the manual is not an endorsement; in most cases similar materials may be substituted.

    The manual is a step-by-step guide used by approximately 40 Conservation Division conservators, preservation specialists, and technicians with a wide range of digital image documentation skill levels and experiences. Created by an internal committee within the Conservation Division, the manual is based on protocols in The AIC Guide to Digital Photography and Conservation Documentation (ed. Jeffrey Warda, 2017, 3rd edition), workshops taught by Jiuan-Jiuan Chen to the Conservation Division in 2016 and 2017, training in conservation graduate programs, and advice from outside consultants. The manual abides by the AIC Code of Ethics and Guidelines for Practice.

    The manual is divided into three parts:

    The Primary Workflow provides instructions for setting up computer and software preferences, image capture using normal illumination and a digital SLR camera, addition of metadata, post-capture image processing, and archival printing.

    The Secondary Workflow describes additional imaging modes using standard cameras, including: raking illumination, transmitted illumination, specular illumination, polarized illumination, UVA-induced visible fluorescence, and slide capture using a digital SLR camera; photomacrography using a stereomicroscope; and photomicrography using a compound polarized light microscope. Raking and specular illuminations record distortions in the surface planarity and topography of an object, while transmitted illumination emphasizes variations in the thickness of an object, revealing characteristics such as watermarks and repairs. Polarized illumination is used to reduce or eliminate surface reflections, while UV-induced visible fluorescence distinguishes and characterizes materials and markers of deterioration.

    Two side-by-side images in comparison for conservation treatment

    Mary Cassatt, Jeannette and her mother seated on a sofa, 1901, Prints and Photographs Division FP – XIX – C343, no. 177, before conservation treatment in normal illumination (left) and UVA-induced visible fluorescence (right), which captures the extent of staining in the margins of the paper support unseen to the naked eye. If left untreated, this type of staining can become visible over time.

    Finally, the Multimodality Workflow describes imaging modes using a modified camera (a standard digital SLR camera with the IR-blocking filter removed), including: visible illumination, reflected infrared, visible-induced infrared luminescence, UVA-induced visible fluorescence, and reflected UVA photography; as well as false color infrared and false color ultraviolet image processing. All of these imaging modes help to distinguish and characterize materials used in collection items, such as colorants, inks, and paper sizing. Reflected ultraviolet photography specifically emphasizes surface coatings and adhesives, while reflected infrared photography can reveal underdrawings and pale or concealed inscriptions.

    Multimodal images of a Japanese print (Utagawa Toyoharu, 1767-73, Ukie sakaicho fukiyacho kaomise yoshibai no zu, Prints and Photographs Division FP 2-JPD, no. 1967). From left: visible illumination, UVA-induced visible fluorescence, reflected UVA, visible-induced infrared luminescence, reflected infrared, false color infrared, false color ultraviolet.

     

    Multimodal images of known Japanese printing ink colorant samples. Colorants in historical Japanese prints can be characterized and/or identified by comparing their multimodal responses to those of known colorants.

    Both the combined manual and individual sections can be downloaded here.

    Roger Pearse (Thoughts on Antiquity, Patristics, putting things online, and more)

    The domes of the Church of the Holy Apostles in Constantinople

    By accident I came across an old exchange on Twitter, criticising a reconstruction of the vanished church of the holy apostles in Constantinople.  The church was demolished by the invading Ottomans.

    The church was originally constructed by Constantine, with his mausoleum at the rear, and rebuilt by Justinian.  It was in the usual square cross shape, with four aisles, each with a dome on it, and a higher central dome.

    There is a depiction of it, from around 1000 AD, in Vaticanus gr. 1613, on fol. 353 (the Vatican site seems to be offline, but the ms should be here).  Here it is:

    Note the tall domes, on a circular base pierced with windows.

    The tweeter added images of churches following the same pattern: the church of San Marco in Venice:

    Domes of St Mark’s in Venice

    These may be rather higher than those of the Holy Apostles were, although it is hard to say how accurate the painted depiction is.  And the church of St Anthony in Padua likewise has domes atop circular bases:

    Basilica of St Anthony in Padua

    The tweet also referenced John Beckwith, Early Christian and Byzantine Art, 1986, p.222, to support the idea that the church was altered during the 10th century to raise the height of the domes:

    Moreover, in spite of the lack of documentary sources the structure of the church of the Holy Apostles seems to have been thoroughly altered between 944 and 985. From representations of the church in the Menologion of Basil II (Vatican, gr. 1613) executed about 985 it appears that Justinian’s cupolas, of which four had been pendentive domes and only the central fifth had windows, were considerably modified.

    In the Menologion all the domes are raised on drums pierced by windows, and the central dome is taller than the others. If the identification is correct, this form is confirmed by a miniature in two early-twelfth-century copies of the homilies of James of Kokkinobaphos (Vatican, gr. 1162, fol. 2; Paris, gr. 1208, fol. 3 verso [207]) showing a five-domed church with tall drums and windows and with the representation in one of the vaults of the Mission of the Apostles.

    Now this scene is described by Nicolaos Mesarites shortly after 1200 as being in the central dome of Holy Apostles, and from his description, which is again incomplete, we learn that this decoration, though by and large conforming to the general pattern of the Twelve Feasts, was a great deal more complex than that described by Constantine of Rhodes. There were, for example, representations of St Matthew among the Syrians, St Luke preaching at Antioch, St Simon among the Persians and the Saracens, St Bartholomew preaching to the Armenians, and St Mark at Alexandria. Some of the scenes after the Resurrection are given in greater detail, such as the attempts of the priests to bribe the soldiers on guard at the Sepulchre and to suborn Pilate.

    Whether this programme was worked out in the middle of the tenth century is difficult to confirm, but the church of the Holy Apostles was second only to Hagia Sophia in importance and more than once served as a model for other churches (in particular all three versions of S. Marco at Venice), and it continued to be the pantheon of the Byzantine Emperors until well into the eleventh century, the last Emperor to be buried there was Constantine VIII (d. 1028). The decoration of this church must always have been of prime importance. When the central dome collapsed after an earthquake in 1296, Andronicus II lost no time in rebuilding it.[10]

    The claim that the domes were raised derives from Krautheimer’s Early Christian and Byzantine Architecture (many editions).  The claim was rejected by A.W. Epstein in “The rebuilding and redecoration of the Holy Apostles in Constantinople” (GRBS 23, 79-92, 1982; online here), mainly on the grounds of lack of evidence and the unreliability of manuscript decorations.

    The original church raised by Justinian is clearly enough described by Procopius, as similar to that of Hagia Sophia but smaller, and likewise in the shape of a cross:[1]

    That portion of the roof which is above the sanctuary, … is built, in the center at least, on a plan resembling that of the Church of Sophia, except that it is inferior to it in size. The arches, four in number, rise aloft and are bound together in the same manner and the circular drum which stands upon them is pierced by the windows, and the dome which arches above this seems to float in the air and not to rest upon solid masonry, though actually it is well supported. Thus, then, was the central portion of the roof constructed. And the arms of the building, which are four, … were roofed on the same plan as the central portion, but this one feature is lacking: underneath the domes the masonry is not pierced by windows.

    There is a description written between 931-944 by Constantine of Rhodes, which I have just acquired, and need to read through.  It is full of flowery descriptions, so we’ll have to see what it actually contains!

    1. [1]Aed. 1.4.9-24, at 14-16.  See Loeb.

    Bill Caraher (The New Archaeology of the Mediterranean World)

    Chairs Telling Stories

    I read last week that Michael Wolf died. He was a photographer whose work mostly concerned cities. As part of his interest in urban street life he produced a series called “Bastard Chairs.” You can check it out here.

    There’s something strangely personal about chairs. They reflect our daily routine and our daily movements. They are our constant companions and the make their forms and limits felt in our bodies. I have a favorite chair at home that reminds my neck and back weekly of our incompatibility. At various times in my career, I’ve collected orphan chairs from around the various buildings where I worked and moved them to my office. They aren’t terrible comfortable or attractive, but they sometimes prove useful. An office or a room without a chair seems particularly abandoned or unoccupied. A chair represents human presence and is a useful metonym for the human who occupies it: e.g. department chair. 

    One of my favorite books is Jonathan Olivares, A Taxonomy of Office Chairs. (2011), and it was a helpful guide to the abandoned office furnishings in the Wesley College buildings that were destroyed last summer.

    Here are some of the chairs left behind. I love how they’re rarely at the center of the photo and often out of focus. At the same time, they represent the absent presence of the individuals and groups who dwelled in these spaces.

    IMG 0673

    IMG 0479

    IMG 0469

    IMG 0541

    IMG 0503

    P1000904

    P1000914

    P1000954

    P1000966

    P1000984

    IMG 0621

    IMG 0607

    P1000862

    P1000852

    IMG 0342

    P1150862

    P1000781

    IMG 0399

    IMG 0206

    IMG 0356

    DSCN4327

    P1000728

    P1150920

    P1000835

    P1000755

    May 13, 2019

    Dan Cohen's Digital Humanities Blog

    What’s New Season 2 Wrap-up

    With the end of the academic year at Northeastern University, the library wraps up our What’s New podcast, an interview series with researchers who help us understand, in plainspoken ways, some of the latest discoveries and ideas about our world. This year’s slate of podcasts, like last year’s, was extraordinarily diverse, ranging from the threat of autonomous killer robots to the wonders of tactile writing systems like Braille, and from the impact of streaming music on the recording industry to the disruption and meaning of Brexit. I’ve enjoyed producing and being the interviewer on these podcasts, and since I like to do my homework in addition to conversing with the guests live, I’ve learned an enormous amount from What’s New.

    I hope you have too if you’re a subscriber to the podcast or just the occasional listener, and would love your feedback about what we can do better, and topics you would like to hear us cover in the future. One surprising and rewarding thing we’ve noticed about the podcast is how new subscribers are going back and listening to the show from Episode 1. Podcasts do seem to encourage binging, and the fact that we keep our podcasts to roughly 30 minutes means that you can easily go through both Seasons 1 and 2 during a relatively short timespan while commuting, walking your dog, or relaxing this summer.

    The overall audience for What’s New has also gone up considerably over the last year. In the last 12 months we’ve had about 150,000 streams, and each episode now receives 5-10,000 listeners. These are not chart-topping numbers, but for a fairly serious educational podcast (with, I hope, intermittent humor) it’s good to find a decent-sized niche that continues to grow.

    If you haven’t had a chance to listen yet, you can subscribe to What’s New on Apple PodcastsGoogle PlayStitcherOvercast, or wherever you get your podcasts, or simply stream episodes from the What’s New website. Word of mouth has been the primary way new listeners have heard about the podcast, so if you like what we’re doing, please tell others or leave a review on iTunes, as that remains the starting point for most podcast listeners.

    And as a jumping off point for new listeners or those who may have missed a few shows during the school year, here’s a summary of this year’s episodes:

    Episode 17: Remaking the News – how consolidation in the news industry and the rise of the internet has changed professional journalism, with Dan Kennedy

    Episode 18: Making Artificial Intelligence Fairer – exploring the biases endemic to AI, which come from its creators, with Tina Eliassi-Rad

    Episode 19: The Shifting Landscape of Music – how the music industry moved from vinyl records to cassettes, CDs, downloads, and now streaming, and what this evolution has meant for musicians, with David Herlihy

    Episode 20: A New Way to Scan the Human Body – pioneering the use of nanosensors within the body and its potential applications, with Heather Clark

    Episode 21: Election Day Special: Michael Dukakis – on 2018’s Election Day, the three-term governor and presidential candidate spoke candidly about the state of politics

    Episode 22: Bridging the Academic-Public Divide Through Podcasts – a recording of yours truly giving a keynote at the Sound Education conference at Harvard, which brought together hundreds of educational and academic podcasters and podcast listeners

    Episode 23: The Regeneration of Body Parts – new research and techniques for stimulating the growth of limbs, eyes, and organs, with Anastasiya Yandulskaya, Brian Ruliffson, and Alex Lovely

    Episode 24: The Urban Commons – how 311 systems, which allow citizens to provide feedback to municipalities, have changed our knowledge of cities and they ways residents and governments interact, with Dan O’Brien

    Episode 25: Touch This Page – the history and future of tactile writing systems, and what they tell us about the act of reading, with Sari Altschuler

    Episode 26: Seeking Justice for Hidden Deaths – between 1930 and 1970 there were thousands of racially motivated homicides in the U.S., and one project is attempting to document them all, with Margaret Burnham

    Episode 27: Tracing the Spread of Fake News – looking carefully at the impact of untrustworthy online sources in the election of 2016, with David Lazer

    Episode 28: How College Students Get the News – the surprising results of a large study of the news consumption habits of college students, with Alison Head and John Wihbey

    Episode 29: The Web at 30 – celebrating the 30th anniversary of the founding of the World Wide Web with a discussion of how it has reshaped our world for better and worse, with Kyle Courtney

    Episode 30: Controlling Killer Robots – how major advances in robotics and artificial intelligence have led to the dawn of deadly, independent machines, and how an international coalition is trying to prevent them from taking over warfare, with Denise Garcia

    Episode 31: European Disunion – how Europe has regularly escaped the fate of dissolution, and what Brexit means in this longer history, with Mai’a Cross

    Thanks for tuning in!

    Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

    Open Access Journal: ACTA Mvsei Porolissensis

    ACTA Mvsei Porolissensis
    ISSN: 1016-2801
    ACTA
    Revista Muzeului Judeţean de Istorie şi Artă Zalău, Acta Mvsei Porolissensis a fost editată începând cu anul 1977, odată cu împlinirea a 25 de ani de la înfiinţarea muzeului, având ca scop principal valorificarea şi promovarea patrimoniului cultural al  judeţului Sălaj, în particular, şi al Transilvaniei în general. În acord cu profilul multidisciplinar al instituţiei muzeale, revista a fost structurată pe câteva domenii ale cercetării ştiinţifice: arheologie, conservare-restaurare, istorie, etnografie şi artă. În decursul apariţie sale au existat volume tematice care au reunit lucrări prezentate la manifestări cu caracter naţional sau internaţional, organizate de instituţia noastră. În paginile revistei se regăsesc studii semnate de personalităţi marcante ale cercetării româneşti: Eugen Chirilă, Nicolae Chidioşan, Gheorghe Lazarovici, Nicolae Gudea, Al. V. Matei,  Istvan Ferenczi, Nicolae Edroiu, Ioan Bolovan, Cornel Grad, Constanţa Cristescu, Paul Petrescu, Marius Porumb.

    În noul context creat de imperativele  cercetării ştiinţifice, revista îşi propune să extindă sfera colaborărilor pentru a da un plus de valoare acestui demers editorial.

    Colegiul redacțional Acta Mvsei Porolissensis

    EDITOR ȘEF: Dr. Corina BEJINARIU
    Anuar 2009 - 2010
    Anuar 2011
    Anuar 2012
    Anuar 2013
    Anuar 2014
    Anuar 2015
    Anuar 2016

    Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

    Archeomatica media partner a exco2019 l'Expo della Cooperazione Internazionale

    EXCO 2019

    Archeomatica partecipa all'appuntamento internazionale, ideato e organizzato da Fiera Roma, Diplomacy Sustainaway in calendario dal 15 al 17 maggio 2019, rivolto alle aziende e alle istituzioni che operano nella ricerca scientifica, nell'innovazione tecnologica e nella formazione; in particolare, a quelle realtà già impegnate nell'offerta di servizi, prodotti e soluzioni per lo sviluppo sostenibile anche secondo i 17 SDGs e Agenda 2030. 

    Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

    Open Access Monograph Series: Universitätsmuseum Heidelberg – Kataloge

    Universitätsmuseum Heidelberg – Kataloge
    Das Universitätsmuseum ist das "Schaufenster der Universität": Neben Einblicken in aktuelle Forschungen an der Ruperto Carola - von Affen bis Zellteilung - bieten die Ausstellungen auch Ergebnisse von Lehrveranstaltungen und Beiträge bürgerschaftlicher Gruppen zu universitären Themen. Vielfach dokumentieren Begleitbände diese Studioausstellungen; sie erscheinen in der Reihe "Universitätsmuseum Heidelberg. Kataloge". Ursprünglich als "Ausstellung zum Mitnehmen" für das Ausstellungspublikum konzipiert, sind die Kataloge dank der Online-Publikation nun weiten Kreisen zugänglich. Konzentriert und übersichtlich bieten sie Fachleuten, die nach selten publizierten Objekten und Archivalien suchen, ebenso spannende Lektüre wie Laien, die sich einen schnellen Überblick über ein ungewöhnliches Thema verschaffen möchten.





    Reinhard Stupperich (Hrsg.)

    Licht! 
    Lampen von der Antike bis zur Neuzeit. Begleitheft zur Ausstellung

    Universitätsmuseum Heidelberg – Kataloge, Band 4
    Eine ungewöhnlich große Zahl von römischen Lampen ist in einem der größten bisher in Süddeutschland ergrabenen römischen Friedhöfe in Heidelberg zutage getreten und wird gerade von Andreas Hensen publiziert. Wie er feststellte, hat den Ausdruck „Lychnologie“ für die Lampenforschung vor fast zwei Jahrhunderten der Heidelberger Professor für Klassische Philologie und Archäologe Friedrich Creuzer geprägt. So ist es durchaus passend, dass die Internationale Lychnologie-Gesellschaft (ILA) ihren dritten internationalen Kongress im September 2009 in Heidelberg, der Geburtsstadt der Lychnologie, veranstaltet. Aus diesem Anlass haben wir in interdisziplinärer Zusammenarbeit von klassischer, provinzialrömischer und mittelalterlicher Archäologie in einem Seminar im Wintersemester 2008/09 diese kleine Ausstellung vorbereitet.





    Andrea Jördens et al.

    Ägyptische Magie im Wandel der Zeiten 
    Eine Ausstellung des Instituts für Papyrologie in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Institut für Ägyptologie der Universität Heidelberg

    Universitätsmuseum Heidelberg – Kataloge, Band 5
    Das Institut für Papyrologie der Universität Heidelberg kann sich rühmen, in seiner Sammlung eines der bedeutendsten Corpora magischer Papyri weltweit zu besitzen. Die kleine, aber feine Gruppe von Pergamenten in koptischer Sprache, die wohl um die Jahrtausendwende entstanden und häufig mit Zeichnungen ausgestattet sind, wurde zusammen mit der in einem Papiercodex erhaltenen Kyprianlegende bereits 1934 in dem von Adolf Grohmann und Friedrich Bilabel herausgegebenen Band “Griechische, koptische und arabische Texte zur Religion und religiösen Literatur in Ägyptens Spätzeit” vorgelegt. Darin wurde auch der “soeben geglückte Erwerb” zweier einzigartiger Zauberbücher vermeldet, von denen das eine seit 1945 jedoch als verschollen galt. Einer der renommiertesten Forscher auf diesem Gebiet, P. Angelicus Kropp, konnte den Text aufgrund einer früheren Abschrift immerhin noch im Jahr 1966 publizieren, doch schien P. Heid. Kopt. inv. 686 (zuvor P. Heid. inv. 1686) für immer verloren.





    Sally Apeikis, Lea Bauer, Christoph Beringer, Boch Cathrin

    Himjar 
    Das vergessene Reich in Südarabien

    Universitätsmuseum Heidelberg – Kataloge, Band 7
    Vor gut drei Jahrzehnten präsentierte eine kleine Ausstellung des Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums in Mainz die Ergebnisse mehrjähriger Restaurierungsarbeit an den Überresten von zwei – wie sich dabei herausstellte – fast zweieinhalb Meter hohen Königsfiguren, die im klassischen Kontrapost wie Heroenstatuen dargestellt waren, signiert von einem griechischen Künstler Phokas. Schlagartig stellte sich damit ein bis dahin den meisten Archäologen und Historikern noch völlig unbekanntes altsüdarabisches Königreich im heutigen Jemen vor – und versank danach wieder weitgehend in Vergessenheit.




    Charlotte Lagemann, Tina Schöbel, Christian Vater (Hrsg.)

    Leben Dinge Texte 
    Begleitheft zur Ausstellung des Sonderforschungsbereichs 933 „Materiale Textkulturen“

    Universitätsmuseum Heidelberg – Kataloge, Band 10
    Die Ausstellung „LEBEN DINGE TEXTE“ stellt Dinge vor, auf denen etwas geschrieben steht. Die Exponate stammen aus Gesellschaften vor der Erfindung des Buchdrucks: Keilschrifttafeln aus Mesopotamien, antike Graffiti, magische Papyrus-Amulette, gestempelte Dachziegeln, eine Hundeleine mit Edelstein-Inschrift - an solchen 'schrifttragenden Artefakten' kann untersucht werden, wie sich Beschreibstoffe auf die Bedeutung der Texte auswirken und umgekehrt. Außerdem zeigt sich, wie Schrift nicht nur gelesen wird, sondern vielfältig mit Handlungen verbunden und in Rituale eingebettet war.
    Der Sonderforschungsbereich 933 „Materiale Textkulturen“ zeigt in dieser Ausstellung Zwischenergebnisse seiner Arbeit. Der SFB 933 wird von der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft gefördert und vereint über 50 Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler der Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg und der Hochschule für Jüdische Studien Heidelberg.






    Lajos Berkes, Laura Willer (Hrsg.)

    Christen und Muslime am Nil 
    Zusammenleben im früharabischen Ägypten. Begleitheft zur Ausstellung im Universitätsmuseum Heidelberg vom 28. April bis 16. Juli 2017

    Universitätsmuseum Heidelberg – Kataloge, Band 13
    Mit der arabischen Eroberung Ägyptens änderte sich zunächst wenig für die einheimische Bevölkerung.
    Die Ausstellung "Christen und Muslime am Nil" (28. April - 16. Juli 2017) im Universitätsmuseum Heidelberg zeigte anhand griechischer, koptischer und arabischer Papyri und archäologischer Objekte Veränderungen und Kontinuitäten innerhalb der früharabischen Zeit Ägyptens im Vergleich zur ausgehenden byzantinischen Epoche. Untersucht wurden unter anderem Gemeinsamkeiten und Unterschiede bei Glaube und Jenseitsvorstellungen, das Alltagsleben mit seinen Aspekten Ernährung und Kleidung sowie Veränderungen in den Verwaltungsstrukturen.


    Juan Garcés (Digitised Manuscripts Blog)

    Homer in London

    Currently on display in the Treasures Gallery at the British Library are these two images of Hercules, one of the greatest heroes in Greek mythology. They are found in manuscripts of the Histoire Universelle, a medieval history in French of the ancient world from Genesis to the Romans. The Histoire...

    Bill Caraher (The New Archaeology of the Mediterranean World)

    Summer Reading List

    It’s almost summer and my stack of books and stalled projects has grown to the point of being embarrassing. But each summer brings a bit of hope with, maybe, a bit more time and a bit more clarity of purpose, or at very least some long flights and hazy jet-lagged nights where reading can happen.

    To add a bit to the difficulty level this summer, I managed to break my glasses yesterday and leave for the Mediterranean on Wednesday armed with a pair of “store boughten” reading glasses that makes everything a bit more consistently blurry.

    It’s an exciting time to consider my annual summer reading list.  

    You can check out my past reading lists here:  2018, 20172016201520142013, and 2011. I try to go back and re-read them each year to keep from feeling a sense of accomplishment at the end of a long semester. Reinforcing inferiority and failure is a key element to scholarly productivity.

    This summer, my top priority is writing and databasing. Reading is secondary, but I do have a paper in the fall that deals with Cyprus and insularity. I need to think more about what it means to work on an island. This has pushed me read Anna Kouremenos recent edited volume: Insularity and Identity in the Roman Mediterranean  (2018). I also need to check out Constantakopoulou’s Dance of the Islands: Insularity, Networks, the Athenian Empire, and the Aegean world (2007), Paul Rainbird, The Archaeology of Islands (2007), James Conolly and Matthew Campbell, Comparative Island Archaeologies (2008), Thansis Vionis, A Crusader, Ottoman, and Early Modern Aegean Archaeology (2012),  Helen Dawson’s Mediterranean Voyages: The Archaeology of Island Colonization and Abandonment (2013), Jane Francis and Anna Kouremenos’ Roman Crete: New Perspectives (2016). I’m sure there is more.

    Dimitri Nakassis has nudged me to think about landscapes in a different way in the run up to our field season on WARP and on his recommendation I’ve grabbed a copy of David Hinton’s Hunger Mountain: A Field Guide to Mind and Landscape (2012). It’s also got me thinking a bit about drones and dronoscopy and seeing the landscape from above (with a hat tip to conversations that I had at the EAA’s with Becky Sefried!).  I’ll try to read Caren Kaplan’s Aerial Aftermaths: Wartime from Above (2018) and the book that she co-edited with Lisa Parks, Life in the Age of Drone Warfare (2017). 

    [As an aside, Duke University Press and the University of Minnesota Press are just killing it right now!] 

    I also know that I need to keep thinking a bit about what I do as editor of North Dakota Quarterly and at The Digital Press. Last year I started but didn’t finish Peter Ginna’s What Editors Do: The Art, Craft, and Business of Book Editing (2017) and this year,  a copy of Benjamin Dreyer’s Dreyer’s English: An Utterly Correct Guide to Clarity and Style (2019). I still need to finish Joy Williams’ The Changeling (1978), and since she appears in the next issue of NDQ, it seems like a good time to try to do that. I also got a copies of Kiese Laymon’s Heavy: An American Memoire (2018) and Long Division: A Novel (2013) because I was really struck by him at the 2019 UND Writers Conference

    Along similar lines (with another hat tip to the UND Writers Conference), this spring, I read Marlon James’ Black Leopard, Red Wolf (2019) while listening to Sun-Ra and some more recent Afrofuturist space jazz (The Comet is Coming’s latest, for example) convinced me to get some Octavia Butler, particularly the Xenogenesis trilogy, collected as Lilith’s Brood, and her Patternist series collected as Seeds to Harvest.

    There are some other odds and ends that I’ll work through this summer, I’m sure. Some of it will invariably chasing this or that footnote; some of it will be what passes for fun these days; some of it will be a flailing effort to think more critically about what I do as a teacher and a scholar. 

    In the end, if I read 25% of these books, I’ll have done something. I probably won’t manage to do even that (as a gaggle of J.G. Ballard and Ursula K. LeGuin novels stare at me from lists of reading past). Maybe making the list public will keep me humble, though, and remind me that for every book I intend to read there are three or four more than I really should read instead.  

     

     

    Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

    Christen und Muslime am Nil: Zusammenleben im früharabischen Ägypten. Begleitheft zur Ausstellung im Universitätsmuseum Heidelberg vom 28. April bis 16. Juli 2017

    Christen und Muslime am Nil: Zusammenleben im früharabischen Ägypten. Begleitheft zur Ausstellung im Universitätsmuseum Heidelberg vom 28. April bis 16. Juli 2017
    Lajos Berkes, Laura Willer (Hrsg.)
    Universitätsmuseum Heidelberg – Kataloge
    Mit der arabischen Eroberung Ägyptens änderte sich zunächst wenig für die einheimische Bevölkerung.
    Die Ausstellung "Christen und Muslime am Nil" (28. April - 16. Juli 2017) im Universitätsmuseum Heidelberg zeigte anhand griechischer, koptischer und arabischer Papyri und archäologischer Objekte Veränderungen und Kontinuitäten innerhalb der früharabischen Zeit Ägyptens im Vergleich zur ausgehenden byzantinischen Epoche. Untersucht wurden unter anderem Gemeinsamkeiten und Unterschiede bei Glaube und Jenseitsvorstellungen, das Alltagsleben mit seinen Aspekten Ernährung und Kleidung sowie Veränderungen in den Verwaltungsstrukturen.
    Inhaltsverzeichnis
    PDF
    Titelei
    Inhaltsverzeichnis
    Einleitung und Danksagung
    Papyrologie und Restaurierung
    Ägypten nach den Pharaonen
    Koptentum und Islam
    Klöster in Ägypten
    Die Sprachen im früharabischen Ägypten
    Die Verwaltung im Wandel der Zeit
    Arabisation und Islamisation
    Schule und Bildung
    Alltagsleben I: Ernährung
    Alltagsleben II: Kleidung
    Bestattungssitten
    Frauenleben
    Magische Praktiken
    Kunst(handwerk) und Musik
    Die Welt der Namen
    Weiterführende Literatur

    Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

    Archeologia, Geografia e Geomatica: strumenti e metodi per la divulgazione e condivisione

    Il 23 Maggio 2019 dalle 9.30 sino alle 16.30, presso l'Università di Bologna - Aula Prodi Dipartimento Storia Culture Civiltà - si svolgerà il convegno "Archeologia, Geografia e Geomatica: strumenti e metodi per la divulgazione e condivisione".

    May 12, 2019

    Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

    For it Stands in Scripture: Essays in Honor of W. Edward Glenny

    • Publication Date: 2019
      • Edited By:
      • Ardel B. Caneday
      • Anna Rask
      • Greg Rosauer
      • Cover for the book 'For it Stands in Scripture'
      • Summary

        For It Stands in Scripture is a collection of essays in honor of Septuagintal scholar W. Edward Glenny on the occasion of his 70th birthday. The essay contributors are former students and research assistants of Ed Glenny who taught at Central Baptist Theological Seminary in the 1990s and has since 1999 taught at the University of Northwestern – St. Paul. The essays cover various topics in Old Testament and New Testament studies
         

        Contents

        Foreword
        Appreciations
        The Life and Career of W.Edward Glenny 
        - Ardel B. Caneday
        1. Some Reflections on the Old Greek of Psalm Four
          - John Screnock
        2. The Sacrifice of Praise in Psalm 49 LLX
          - Lance Kramer
        3. The Nature of Israel's Rebellion in Amos 4:4-5
          - Anna Rask
        4. Articulating a Theology of Jesus
          - Jonathan R. Pratt
        5. The Divine Name in the Gospel of John
          - Robert A. Snyder
        6. Jesus, the Church, and Mental Illness
          - Joshua W. Jipp
        7. First Peter and Atonement Theology
          - Greg Rosauer
        8. Peter's Gospel to the Martyrs
          - David D. Danielson II
        9. Prayer in Apocalyptic Perspective
          - Brian J. Tabb
        Bibliography of Publications by W. Edward Glenny
        Contributors

    Open Accesss Journal: Interfaces: A Journal of Medieval European Literatures

    Interfaces: A Journal of Medieval European Literatures
    ISSN: 2421-5503
    The Journal Interfaces opens an interdisciplinary and multilingual forum for the study of medieval European literatures. These literatures are broadly conceived as the products of the interconnected textual cultures which flourished between Late Antiquity and the Renaissance in a region extending from the North Atlantic to the Eastern Mediterranean. Interfaces envisages the study of the textual culture of medieval Europe as situated at the intersection of a number of modern disciplines, including history, literature, philology, codicology, philosophy, sociolinguistics, and theology.

    Contributions are invited which cross linguistic or disciplinary boundaries in the recognition that the vitality of medieval texts in present-day scholarship and culture demands a space not confined by single philologies, national research traditions, confessions, or disciplinary canons. Interfaces strives to combine methodological questioning of hermeneutic and didactic practices with the opening up of new common themes, new connections between literatures, and new transdisciplinary conceptualisations of the modern understanding of medieval literatures, including regional and global challenges to claims of European unity.

    It is the ambition of Interfaces to publish the best new scholarship which will contribute to a redefining of how the medieval textual heritage Europe is read, researched, taught and disseminated in the 21st century. European medieval civilization – of which Greek, Hebrew, Slavonic, and Arabic textual cultures form an integral but often neglected part – will continue to be an important source of cultural identity in a globalised world and the global perspectives of the 21st century impel us to ask new questions of the medieval past. The changing forms and technologies of literature and historical writing in the present also urges us to engage with pre-modern writing in new ways. The texts transmitted to us from the Middle Ages and how we read them are a crucial site for negotiating the relationship between modernity and the past.

    Interfaces will promote new types of high quality scholarship as well as make the case for the historical, intellectual, and aesthetic value of the literatures of a broadly conceived medieval Europe.

    No 5 (2018)

    Biblical Creatures: The Animal as an Object of Interpretation in Pre-Modern Christian and Jewish Hermeneutic Traditions

    This issue of Interfaces explores the question of how Jewish and Christian authors in pre-modern Latin Europe thought and wrote about some of the animals mentioned in the Bible. To them, thinking about animals was a way of thinking about what it means to be human, to perceive the world, and to worship God and his creation. Animals' nature, animals' actions and animals' virtues or shortcomings were used as symbols and metaphors for describing human behavior, human desires, human abilities and disabilities, and positive or negative inclinations or traits of character.
    Both Christian and Jewish medieval and early modern scholars wondered about how they could possibly delve into the deeper layers of meaning they assumed any textual or extra-textual animal to convey. Not surprisingly, they often had to deal with the fact that a specific animal was of interest to members of both religious communities. A comparison between Jewish and Christian ways of reading and interpreting biblical passages featuring animals shows what the two hermeneutic traditions had in common, what separated them, and how they influenced each other, depending on the historical context in which the authors worked.
    The papers in this issue of Interfaces cover a wide range of animal species, such as the dove, the stag, the unicorn, the elephant, the crocodile, the lion, the hyena, the raven, the hare, and the dog as medieval and early modern authors and illuminators portrayed and interpreted them. Since several themes come up in more than one paper concerning different kinds of animals, this issue groups its papers in three sections. These sections deal with divine creatures (mediators between humankind and God, symbols for the human believer, agents of heaven); exotic creatures (animals in different parts of the world, encounters between humans and animals in past times, animals with extraordinary appearances and properties); and social creatures (transgressive and pious animals, animals used to demonstrate obedience or to facilitate transgression, animals as symbols for conflict or cooperation).

    Table of Contents

    Full Issue

    Astrid Lembke, Beatrice Trînca, Elke Koch, Julia Weitbrecht, David Rotman, Johannes Traulsen, Oren Roman, Andreas Kraß, Sara Offenberg, Bernd Roling, Kenneth Stow
    PDF
    193 p.

    Individual Articles

    Astrid Lembke
    PDF
    1-15
    Beatrice Trînca
    PDF
    16-30
    Elke Koch
    PDF
    31-48
    Julia Weitbrecht
    PDF
    49-64
    David Rotman
    PDF
    65-77
    Johannes Traulsen
    PDF
    78-89
    Oren Roman
    PDF
    90-110
    Andreas Kraß
    PDF
    111-128
    Sara Offenberg
    PDF
    129-153
    Bernd Roling
    PDF
    154-174
    Kenneth Stow
    PDF
    175-193

    2015

    No 1 (2015): Histories of Medieval European Literatures: New Patterns of Representation and Explanation

    Lucio Fontana, Concetto Spaziale, 1968: idropittura su tela, 73 x 92 cm
    cat. gen. 68 B 16
    © Fondazione Lucio Fontana, Milano

    2016

    No 2 (2016): The Theory and Phenomenology of Love

    Mark Rothko, Untitled (Violet, Black, Orange, Yellow on White and Red), 1949: oil on canvas, 81 ½ x 66 inches (207 x 167.6 cm)
    Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York: Gift, Elaine and Werner Dannheisser and The Dannheisser Foundation, 1978: 78.2461

    No 3 (2016): Rediscovery and Canonization: The Roman Classics in the Middle Ages

    Alberto Burri, Sacco L.A., 1953: burlap and acrylic on canvas, 39 5/16 x 33 7/8 inches (101 x 87 cm), inv. 5337
    © Fondazione Palazzo Albizzini Collezione Burri, Città di Castello – by SIAE 2016

    2017

    No 4 (2017): Open Issue

    Max Ernst, Fleur Bleue, non datée, vers 1964: huile sur bois, 21,2 x 27 cm
    Inv. Fondation des Treilles 990.110 - Photographie par Jacqueline Hyde (1922-2013) – by SIAE 2017



    May 11, 2019

    Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

    The British Institute for the Study of Iraq Lectures Online

     [First posted in AWOL on 24 April 2017, updated 11 May 2019]

    The British Institute for the Study of Iraq Lectures Online


    Wed, 03 Apr 2019
    The British Academy...
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    19:07
    Memorial for Dr Lamia Al Gailani Werr
    Wed, 27 Feb 2019
    The British Academy...
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    06:39
    Dr Robert Killick on "From Alexander to al-Tabari: Recent Investigations at Charax Spasinou"
    Wed, 14 Nov 2018
    The British Academy...
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    00:00
    23:13
    Rashad Salim - The Ark Re-imagined: Navigating Iraqi Cultural Heritage on the Edge of Extinction
    Wed, 13 Jun 2018
    The British Academy...
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    02:10
    Professor Eleanor Robson on 'Connecting People and the Past in Post-Conflict Iraq and its Neighbours: Introducing the Nahrein Network
    Mon, 05 Mar 2018
    The British Academy...
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    50:26
    Iraq's last Jews tell the story of their country
    Wed, 14 Feb 2018
    The British Academy...
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    17:28
    Dr Franco D'Agostino on the Italian Archaeological Mission at Abu Tbeirah in Southern Iraq
    Wed, 22 Nov 2017
    The British Academy...
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    09:16
    Dr Lamia al-Gailani Werr on the Museum in Baghdad: The Story of the Iraq Museum in the First Half of the Twentieth Century
    Wed, 14 Jun 2017
    The British Academy...
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    18:24
    Dr. Caecilia Pieri on Rethinking Baghdad's Built Identity and Strategies (1915-2015)
    Wed, 22 Feb 2017
    The British Academy

    Wed, 16 Nov 2016
    The British Academy
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    30:44
    The archaeologist Professor Wathiq Ismail al-Salihi explores the site of Hatra: an Arab Kingdom in Roman Times

    Wed, 15 Jun 2016
    The British Academy
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    13:14
    Ethnomusicologist Rolf Killius examines the traditional music of Iraq from the Rifi singers to the masters of the oud

    Wed, 24 Feb 2016
    The British Academy
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    10:13
    The Ur Project - digitising Sir Leonard Woolley's excavations (1922-1934) at the ancient city of Ur

    Wed, 16 Dec 2015
    The British Academy
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    08:31
    Dr Géraldine Chatelard on the Marshlands and the archaeological sites of Eridu, Ur and Uruk

    Wed, 18 Nov 2015
    The British Academy
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    03:15
    Professor Helen Berry explores the paradoxes and contradictions of Gertrude Bell’s life from the perspective of women’s history

    Thu, 11 Jun 2015
    The British Academy
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    15:45
    Professor Emilie Savage-Smith looks at the surgeons and physicians of medieval Iraq

    Thu, 26 Feb 2015
    The British Academy
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    14:31
    Ikon Director Jonathan Watkins gave an illustrated talk for BISI about his experiences as curator of the Iraqi Pavilion for the 2013

    Aerial view of excavation and archaeologists
    Thu, 20 Nov 2014
    The British Academy
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    58:49
    Dr Jane Moon talks about the excavations at the old Babylonian settlement at Tell Khaiber



    Thu, 19 Jun 2014
    The British Academy
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    22:17
    Dr Nelida Fuccaro discusses oil lives and cultures in Iraq before the 1958 Revolution
    Thu, 27 Feb 2014
    The British Academy
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    12:09
    Dr Mariam Rosser-Owen & Dr Rosalind Wade Haddon on the small finds from the Herzfeld excavations at Samarra
    Thu, 10 Oct 2013
    The British Academy
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    54:06
    A lecture by the Directors of the Iraq and Basrah Museums
    Fri, 13 Sep 2013
    The British Academy
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    57:05
    Gertrude Bell and Iraq – A Life and Legacy Conference - Gertrude Bell & Iraqi Heritage
    Fri, 13 Sep 2013
    The British Academy
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    00:12
    Gertrude Bell and Iraq - A Life and Legacy Conference - Gertrude Bell & Archaeology
    Fri, 13 Sep 2013
    The British Academy
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    11:33
    Gertrude Bell and Iraq - A Life and Legacy Conference - Gertrude Bell - A Woman in a Man's World
    Thu, 12 Sep 2013
    The British Academy
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    37:48
    Gertrude Bell and Iraq - A Life and Legacy Conference - Gertrude Bell & the Making of Iraq
    Thu, 12 Sep 2013
    The British Academy
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    41:56
    Gertrude Bell and Iraq - A Life and Legacy Conference - Gertrude Bell & the Making of Iraq
    Thu, 12 Sep 2013
    The British Academy
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    10:40
    Gertrude Bell and Iraq - A Life and Legacy Conference - Gertrude Bell & the Ottoman Empire


    Wed, 11 Sep 2013
    The Royal Society...
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    34:29
    A panel discussion on British-Iraqi relations as part of the Gertrude Bell Conference
    Thu, 20 Jun 2013
    The British Academy
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    16:23
    The film-maker and travel-writer Mike Laird on the mudhifs of southern Iraq
    Thu, 30 May 2013
    The British Academy
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    19:20
    Thu, 28 Feb 2013
    The British Academy
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    03:15
    The archaeologist Dr Joan Oates on excavating in Northern Iraq with the Mallowans
    Thu, 22 Nov 2012
    The British Academy
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    34:15
    Dr Ali A. Allawi on the evolution of Iraq's identity as a modern state and the role of archaeology in this process
    Thu, 25 Oct 2012
    The British Academy
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    56:22
    David Michelmore on research, conservation and interpretation of Erbil Citadel
    Thu, 27 Sep 2012
    The British Academy
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    05:18
    Robert Irwin on the literary and scientific life of Mediaeval Basra

    Open Access Journal: Forum Classicum: Zeitschrift für die Fächer Latein und Griechisch an Schulen und Universitäten

    [First posted in AWOL 3 November 2009. Updated 11 May 2019 (recent volumes added)]

    Forum Classicum: Zeitschrift für die Fächer Latein und Griechisch an Schulen und Universitäten
    ISSN-Print: 1432-7511
    ISSN-Internet: 2510-4705
    Forum Classicum ist die Zeitschrift für die Fächer Latein und Griechisch an Schulen und Universitäten. Die Zeitschrift wird von Deutschen Altphilologenverband herausgegeben und erscheint jährlich mit vier Heften.

    Die Zeitschrift Forum Classicum setzt das von 1958 bis 1996 in 39 Jahrgängen erschienene „Mitteilungsblatt des Deutschen Altphilologenverbandes“ fort.

    Jahrgang 2018:

    Jahrgang 2017:

    Jahrgang 2016:

    Jahrgang 2015:

    Jahrgang 2014:

    Jahrgang 2013:

    Jahrgang 2012:

    Jahrgang 2011:

    Jahrgang 2010:

    Jahrgang 2009:


    Jahrgang 2008:


    Jahrgang 2007:


    Jahrgang 2006:


    Jahrgang 2005:


    Jahrgang 2004:


    Jahrgang 2003:


    Jahrgang 2002:


    Jahrgang 2001:


    Jahrgang 2000:


    Jahrgang 1999:


    Jahrgang 1998:


    Jahrgang 1997:


    Jahrgang 1996 (MDAV):


    Jahrgang 1995 (MDAV):


    Jahrgang 1994 (MDAV):

    Jahrgang 1987 (MDAV):

     

    Roger Pearse (Thoughts on Antiquity, Patristics, putting things online, and more)

    Eusebius of Caesarea, Six extracts from the Commentary on the Psalms, in English

    Last year I gave a list of passages from Eusebius’ massive Commentary on the Psalms which deserved to be read in English.  Thankfully Fr. Alban Justinus stepped up and translated six of these for us, before other events drew him away.  I’d like to make that material accessible now.  Here they are:

    The files can also be found at Archive.org here.

    As usual, these are public domain.  Do with them whatever you like, personal, educational or commercial.

    Our thanks to Fr. Alban Justinus for translating all this material!

    Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

    PhD Research in Assyriology: Showcasing the next generation of scholars in the history, archaeology, and languages of the ancient Near East

    PhD Research in Assyriology: Showcasing the next generation of scholars in the history, archaeology, and languages of the ancient Near East
    Welcome to PhD Research in Assyriology! This site exists to promote the research being carried out by PhD students in the field of Assyriology. What’s that? It’s a broad term that covers all scholarly fields related to the study of the ancient Near East in the time of the cuneiform cultures. That means the time between the fourth millennium BCE and the first century AD, in the historical regions of Mesopotamia, Syria and the Levant, Iran, and Anatolia. Assyriology includes the history, archaeology, and art history of the ancient Near East, as well as its languages: Sumerian, Akkadian (Babylonian and Assyrian), Hittite, Elamite, Hurrian, and others.

    PhD Research in Assyriology is an initiative of the International Association for Assyriology (IAA). To find out more about “Assyriology”, the IAA, our annual conference (the “Rencontre” or “RAI”), or to hear the latest news, please visit the IAA website. If you like what we do, please consider joining the IAA. Your support helps us offer a range of prizes and awards to make life a little less difficult for students and early career scholars, and to celebrate their successes.

    May 10, 2019

    Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

    3D Interactive Tour of the Harvard Semitic Museum

    3D Interactive Tour of the Harvard Semitic Museum
    Harvard Semitic Museum
    By housing ancient Near Eastern exhibitions, The Harvard Semitic Museum explores the rich history of cultures connected by the family of Semitic languages. Exhibitions include a full-scale replica of an ancient Israelite home, life sized casts of famous Mesopotamian monuments, authentic mummy coffins, and tablets containing the earliest forms of writing. Like the artifacts it displays, the museum itself has a rich and nuanced history.
    The Harvard Semitic Museum was founded in 1889, and moved into its present location in 1903. From the beginning, it was the home of the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, a departmental library, a repository for research collections, a public educational institute, and a center for archaeological exploration. Among the Museum's early achievements were the first scientific excavations in the Holy Land (at Samaria in 1908-1910) and excavations at Nuzi and Serabit el-Khadim in the Sinai, where the earliest alphabet was found. During World War II, the Museum housed Naval offices and was closed to the public. In the 1970's, academic activities resumed in the Semitic Museum, which is again home to the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, and to the University's collections of Near Eastern archaeological artifacts. These artifacts comprise over 40,000 items, including pottery, cylinder seals, sculpture, coins and cuneiform tablets. Many are from museum-sponsored excavations in Israel, Jordan, Iraq, Egypt, Cyprus, and Tunisia. The Museum remains dedicated to the use of these collections for the teaching, research, and publication of Near Eastern archaeology, history, and culture.

    Monumenta rariora: La Fortuna dela Stattuaria Antica nei Repertori a Stampa - The Reception of Antique Statuary in Collections of Engravings

    [First posted in AWOL: 20 December 2012, updated 10 May 20129]

    Monumenta rariora: La Fortuna dela Stattuaria Antica nei Repertori a Stampa - The Reception of Antique Statuary in Collectionsof Engravings
    Il progetto prevede la realizzazione di un corpus di repertori di incisioni a stampa sulla statuaria antica la cui gestione informatizzata permetta una fruizione ottimale e contestualizzata dei testi che lo costituiscono, in genere di difficile reperimento.

    Il lavoro è stato strutturato su due fronti differenti ma correlati: da una parte la considerazione dell'oggetto rappresentato da un punto di vista archeologico e della sua storia collezionistica, dall'altra lo studio dell'incisione finalizzato alla determinazione di vari rapporti intercorrenti all'interno delle tradizioni culturali che afferiscono all'opera medesima.

    La creazione di una base di dati scientificamente sostenibile, rigorosa e continuamente aggiornabile, si accompagna ad un sistema di utilizzo che permette agevolmente l'intera fruizione e che fornisce all'utente la possibilità di seguire dei personali "itinerari" di ricerca.

    L'analisi e' partita approfondendo due raccolte:


    - François Perrier, Segmenta nobilium signorum et statuarum que temporis dentem invidium evasere, Roma-Parigi, 1638
       
    - Paolo Alessandro Maffei, Raccolta di statue antiche e moderne data in luce da Domenico de Rossi, Roma, 1704 (successive edizioni Roma, 1742; Roma 1825).
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    Network for the Study of Esotericism in Antiquity (NSEA)

     [First posted in AWOL 15 January 2013, updated 10 May 2019]

    Network for the Study of Esotericism in Antiquity (NSEA)
    Ancient Esotericism.org is the website for the Network for the Study of Ancient Esotericism (NSEA), a thematic network associated with the European Society for the Study of Western Esotericism (ESSWE). NSEA specializes in the study of esoteric phenomena of the ancient period and provides contact for specialists of ancient esoteric thought, history, and literature.
    This website is intended as a resource for scholars and students. While the ancient sources (Gnostic, theurgic, Neoplatonic, Hermetic, etc.) of Western Esotericism possess enormous importance for the development of esoteric currents from the fourteenth century onwards, there remains only a minimum of interaction between the antiquity experts and their (proto)-modern colleagues. The Network therefore is intended to 1) introduce scholarship on ancient esotericism to students of Western Esotericism, 2) serve as a forum in which to exchange ideas, notes and references, etc. outside of other professional bodies which are not concerned with esotericism per se, 3) to coordinate study and workshops with other working groups on the subject, such as the Society of Biblical Literature’s Section on Mysticism, Esotericism, and Gnosticism in Antiquity, and 4) (and most importantly) to provide a junction of the many resources online that can serve as aids in the study of this fascinating and difficult material (dictionaries, textual corpora, blogs, etc.).
    NSEA Directors:
    Dylan M. Burns, Freie Universität Berlin
    Sarah L. Veale, York University
    For more information, please contact Dylan M. Burns.
    The website was designed by Sarah L. Veale. For questions about the website, including corrections and additions, please contact Sarah L Veale.
    To join ESSWE, click here.