Electra Atlantis: Digital Approaches to Antiquity

http://planet.atlantides.org/electra

Tom Elliott (tom.elliott@nyu.edu)

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January 05, 2015

Digital Classicist Berlin

Towards a population database for the Roman Empire.

Talk: Rada Varga (Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca), “Towards a population database for the Roman Empire. Why, how, and where to start from?”

Permalink:

Date: Tuesday, 6 January 2015

Time: starting at 17:00 c.t. (i.e. 17:15)

Venue: DAI, Wiegandhaus, Podbielskiallee 69-71, D-14195 Berlin (map)


Abstract

The current abstract sums up an ample project aiming at establishing the most viable best practices set of rules and the optimal metadata for an ancient population database.

Why is an ancient population database essential? Because a digital resource focused on individuals would reveal linkage possibilities that otherwise elude us, it would finally give us the complete and accurate image of the Roman attested population and, through codifications, it would offer the most needed overview on all relevant aspects imagined (epigraphic patterns, religiosity, migrations, onomastics, occupations, family data, etc.). A complete, aggregate database will allow a longitudinal (diachronic) view on the attested Roman population from a certain area and ideally from the whole Empire, but also a transversal (a section in time) image.

Unlike the population databases for the modern and contemporary periods, our database will also comprise anonymous individuals: the ones revealed by various archaeological contexts, mainly funerary ones. Thus, the database will have three tables: epigraphic, literary and archaeological, each of them requiring different expertise and a different standard for the individual recording form. In the end, of course, all three types of individual records will have to be integrated in the standardized database, but its final structure will depend upon the structure of each individual table; its configuration has to be made only after beta-versions of the three tables exist and have been tested for responses to different queries. One individual present in two or three (more than ideally) types of sources will appear in the central database with one singly entry, facilitating biographic and prosopographical researches; this entity resolution will only be exceptionally possible, but extremely valuable from an informational point of view.

Once the metadata is aggregated, the construction of the database will follow a series of steps imposed by good practices: creating a repository of sources; introducing, integrating, standardizing, coding and storing the information; enriching and disseminating the information. The database in itself will have three components: the sources database (with “facsimile” transcription of the sources’ text), the central database (the complete, correct, standardize form of the sources database; the codification operations are made in this database) and the dissemination database (with a friendly interface, destined for on-line usage).

The codifications hold an essential part, not only in the individual linkage procedure, but as well in the analyzing process. At the point when the database will comprise a few thousands individuals, properly recording and with all codifications undertaken, we will be able to use a sociological software for more complex and sophisticated analyses (STATA seems ideal at the moment, but SPSS might also be suited).

We strongly believe that presenting this work in progress at the Digital Classicist Seminar, while in its early stages, will provide essential feedback and hopefully broaden its future development possibilities.

December 17, 2014

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Open Access Journal: Eugesta [Journal on Gender Studies in Antiquity]

[First posted in AWOL 18 December 2011. Updated 17 December 2014]

Eugesta [Journal on Gender Studies in Antiquity]
http://eugesta.recherche.univ-lille3.fr/revue/eng/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/eugesta-bandeau-1000x288-en-v3.png 
Le recours aux concepts de sexe et de genre développés dans les Gender Studies a considérablement transformé les recherches dans le domaine de l’Antiquité en ouvrant un nouveau champ extrêmement fructueux sur le plan culturel et social. Dans la mesure où elle est à l’origine de conceptions et valeurs auxquelles se réfèrent les constructions d’identités dans les cultures occidentales, l’Antiquité est un lieu d’application de ces théories tout à fait particulier. Les travaux menés sur les relations entre hommes, entre hommes et femmes, entre femmes, et sur les façons de construire le féminin et le masculin, ont jeté sur le fonctionnement des sociétés et cultures antiques, un éclairage nouveau, qui est aussi d’un intérêt capital pour l’étude de la réception de l’Antiquité dans les cultures occidentales.
Lire la suite…
The increased attention accorded to concepts of sex and gender developed by work in gender studies has powerfully transformed research in to the ancient Mediterranean past, opening up a new extremely fruitful field of cultural and social analysis. Inasmuch as many ideas and values responsible for shaping the construction of identities in later western societies originate in antiquity, applying gendered theoretical perspectives to the texts and artifacts surviving from the ancient world antiquity offers particular benefits. Inquiries conducted into the relations among men, between men and women, among women, and on modes of constructing what qualifies as “feminine” and “masculine” have brought a new illumination to the distinctive ways that ancient societies and cultures functioned, an illumination also of major relevance for research on the reception of antiquity in western cultures.
More

Numéro 4 | 2014

Davide SusanettiCollera, crisi politica e soggetti queer. Da Antigone a Dioniso [Résumé][Texte intégral]
Anne-Sophie NoelFemmes au vase sur la scène tragique: enjeux dramatiques et symboliques [Résumé][Texte intégral]
Allison GlazebrookThe Erotics of Manumussion: Prostitutes and the πρᾶσις ἐπ’ ἑλευθερία [Résumé][Texte intégral]
Anna FokaMaterial Girls: Humor and Female Professional Seduction in Greek Literature and Culture [Résumé][Texte intégral]
George KazantzidisCallimachus and Hippocratic Gynecology. Absent desire and the female body in ‘Acontius and Cydippe’ (Aetia FR.75.10-19 Harder) [Résumé][Texte intégral]
Brooke HolmesThe poetics of anthropogony: men, women, and children in Lucretius,
book five
[Résumé][Texte intégral]

Sanjaya ThakurFemina Princeps: Livia in Ovid’s Poetry [Résumé][Texte intégral]
Rebecca LanglandsPliny’s “Role Models of Both Sexes”: Gender and Exemplarity in the Letters [Résumé][Texte intégral]
Anise K. StrongA Christian Concubine in Commodus’ Court? [Résumé][Texte intégral]

British School at Athens YouTube Channel

British School at Athens YouTube Channel
https://yt3.ggpht.com/-Q4JUitpDiQI/VEyx75CL2JI/AAAAAAAAAD0/lRQJKK__yH0/w2120-fcrop64=1,00005a57ffffa5a8-nd/1936%2BExhibition_017large.jpg
The British School at Athens organises a number of events each year to illustrate the work of its members past and present. These are presented at Conferences and Workshops, Public lectures, Upper House Seminars, BSA Seminars in collaboration with other Institutions, Fitch-Wiener Seminars in Archaeological Science, BSA Friends Lectures. They are held in Greece or the UK. Since 2011 a select number of these have been made available to a wider audience through video or audio recordings archived on the School’s website. There are also links to a number of Video tours and montages highlighting aspects of the School’s work.

Ethan Gruber (Numishare)

Near term progress in digital numismatics

Looking Back

As we close out 2014, we can reflect on a tremendous amount of progress we have made with respect to Nomisma.org and other digital numismatic projects at the American Numismatic Society. Numishare's front end has been migrated from Cocoon to Orbeon, which will enable a wider variety of current and future web standards, and the user interface was migrated into Bootstrap 3 last spring. The new version of Mantis was launched a few months ago, immediately following the release of a new project, The Art of Devastation, which is a type corpus of World War I medals. The first of the Edward T. Newell Greek numismatic research notebooks have gone online, annotated to link to other resources (monographs, coins in the ANS collection, and other researchers) by means of LOD technologies. The new version of the ANS archives, Archer, has gone online, employing SPARQL to link to another new project, the ANS Biographies (a production installation of EAC-CPF software, xEAC). In OCRE, we have completed volume IV of RIC, from Septimius Severus to Uranius Antoninus. More than 12,000 coins from the British Museum have been ingested into the Nomisma triplestore to be made available in OCRE (with many thanks to Eleanor Ghey from the BM for providing data dumps in spreadsheets that have allowed me to create a concordance between their coins in OCRE URIs). The new Bootstrap 3 version of OCRE launched into production last February, the first of the Numishare projects migrated into that stylistic framework (therefore, enabling out-of-the-box scaling for mobile devices), and in late March of 2014, we received $300,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities to complete the project over the next three years. Finally, much progress has been made in the development of a formal RDF ontology for numismatics, in conjunction with an architectural re-write of Nomisma.org, which has been in development for much of the year.

Looking Forward

We are going to be making at least as much progress in 2015 as 2014, especially in the first few months of the year. The new Nomisma.org framework will be released by the end of January. It will be fully compliant to the latest standards and protocols for a linked data publication framework. The data model for IDs will be revised significantly. SKOS will play a much larger role in linking instances together (via skos:broader), and the instances will conform to formal classes from the Nomisma ontology. The editing interface for concepts will be opened up to a wider editing team, and I foresee many more URIs minted this year, especially outside the realm of ancient numismatics. There is a large demand for greater representation of Medieval and Islamic URIs. The editing interface includes improved lookup mechanisms for linking Nomisma concepts to matching terms in other vocabulary systems, like VIAF and the Getty thesauri.

The main bottleneck for the release of the new version of Nomisma lies in the creation of URIs for Roman Republican moneyers. RRC and IGCH URIs are going to be spun off into separate projects, maintained by specialists are are focused on the curation of those datasets. As a result, the existing RRC URIs in Nomisma must redirect to URIs in a new domain name. Additionally, RRC URIs are used in production in several different projects, so those projects must transition to the new RRC Online URIs before the URIs are deprecated in the http://nomisma.org/id/ namespace. Before RRC Online can launch, the Republican moneyers must have URIs in Nomisma. I expect to have the list verified by the end of the week so that we can move forward with publishing the moneyers in Nomisma either by this Friday or the first week of January. RRC Online (which will function exactly like OCRE, but focused on Roman Republican coinage) will launch soon after. We already have more than 10,000 coins from  the ANS and British Museum ready to be linked into RRC Online, in addition to several hundred coins from The University of Virginia Art Museum, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, and University College Dublin. After the launch of RRC Online, we will move the new version of Nomisma into production by the end of January. By the time we meet in April in Berlin to discuss the Online Greek Corpus and Poland to discuss the European Coin Find Network, we should have transitioned all projects to use the new Nomisma ontology, which Karsten Tolle has been working on over the last one to two years. A draft of the Nomisma documentation should be available in time for these meetings.

We have a number of longer term Greek numismatic projects coming down the pike. As part of the Online Greek Corpus, we are going to work on standardizing Seleucid and Alexandrian types within the ANS database, as well as work on improving IGCH, which will function as a standalone Greek coin hoard research tool, much like Coin Hoards of the Roman Republic. The digital IGCH will serve as an important bridge between Greek coins in the ANS collection and associated bibliographic references. We hope to show serious progress with respect to Greek projects in time for the INC meeting in Taormina in late September.

Finally, over the course of 2015 and extending a few years into the future, we are going to work on systematically cleaning up the ANS collection database, linking denominations, materials, people, etc. to URIs in Nomisma, the Getty thesauri, VIAF, etc. whenever applicable. This will dramatically improve the usefulness of Mantis, which is often limited due to inconsistency in data entry and utter lack of controlled vocabulary. Furthermore, we are going to work on improving the bibliographic references, making it easier to traverse from Mantis to Donum (the ANS library catalog), Worldcat, JSTOR, etc. to access further information. Mantis will grow into a more useful numismatic research portal over time.

Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

Prima datazione del ferro fornisce dati sulla costruzione delle cattedrali gotiche

acier-archeologiqueUna équipe interdisciplinare ha dimostrato per la prima volta che il ferro veniva introdotto in rinforzo alla pietra già nelle fasi della costruzione. Questo studio, frutto di una collaborazione tra il Laboratorio Archeometalli e previsione dell'alterazione del CNR francese (CNRS/CEA), il Laboratorio di misura del carbonio 14 (CNRS/CEA/IRD/IRSN/Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication) et l'équipe Storia dei poteri, saperi e società dell'Università Paris 8, apre un nuovo capitolo merito alle maestranze tecniche e alle intenzioni dei costruttori delle cattedrali.

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Open Access Journal: Archivo Español de Arqueología

[First posted in AWOL 31 October 2009. Updated 17 December 2014]

Archivo Español de Arqueología
eISSN: 1988-3110
ISSN: 0066-6742
http://aespa.revistas.csic.es/public/journals/1/barra_arqueologia.jpg
Archivo Español de Arqueología, fundada en 1940 por Antonio García y Bellido como rama especializada de Archivo Español de Arte y Arqueología (1925), es una revista científica de periodicidad anual que publica trabajos de Arqueología, con atención a sus fuentes materiales, literarias, epigráficas o numismáticas. Tiene como campo de interés las culturas del ámbito mediterráneo y europeo desde la Protohistoria a la Alta Edad Media, flexiblemente abierto a realidades culturales próximas y tiempos fronterizos. Se divide en dos secciones: Artículos, dentro de los que tendrán cabida tanto reflexiones de carácter general sobre temas concretos como contribuciones más breves sobre novedades en la investigación arqueológica; y Recensiones. Además, edita la serie Anejos de Archivo Español de Arqueología, que publica de forma monográfica libros concernientes a las materias mencionadas (ver índice de volúmenes publicados y títulos en formato eBook).

Founded by Antonio García y Bellido in 1940 as a specialized branch of Archivo Español de Arte y Arqueología (1925), Archivo Español de Arqueología is a scientific journal that annually publishes articles on Archaeology that focus on their material, literary, epigraphic and numismatic sources. Its field of interest includes Mediterranean and European cultures from Protohistoric times to the Early Middle Ages and is flexibly open to upcoming cultural realities and border times. The journal is divided into two sections: articles - which include both reflections of a general nature on specific topics and shorter contributions on developments in archaeological research - and reviews. In addition, the journal publishes monographs concerning the aforementioned subjects in the series Anejos de Archivo Español de Arqueología (see the Index of published volumes and titles in eBook format).

2014

Vol 87


2013

Vol 86


2012

Vol 85


2011

Vol 84


2010

Vol 83


2009

Vol 82


2008

Vol 81


2007

Vol 80


2006

Vol 79


2005

Vol 78

191-192

2004

Vol 77

189-190

2003

Vol 76

187-188

2002

Vol 75

185-186

2001

Vol 74

183-184

2000

Vol 73

181-182

1999

Vol 72

179-180

1998

Vol 71

177-178

1997

Vol 70

175-176

1996

Vol 69

173-174

Bill Caraher (The New Archaeology of the Mediterranean World)

Rural Roman Landscapes of Greece

Now that I’m back working in Greece, I’ll have to start paying closer attention to the annually published Archaeological Reports, and a number of my colleagues helped me out by tipping me off to some of the nice contributions to this year’s edition. Generally speaking, Archaeological Reports summarize recent research in particular chronological period, and mostly they have focused on newly discovered and published sites.  

I was especially glad to read Daniel Stewart’s summary treatment of rural Greece during the Roman period. He does a nice job surveying (pun, pun) the work of intensive pedestrian survey projects in Greece, and this is no easy task as many of these projects have not published traditional archaeological volumes, but in scattered articles in edited volumes and journals. Better still, he goes a step further and considers the general direction of intensive survey in Greece with special reference to the challenges of the Roman period. This attention transforms what could have been a parochial survey of newly discovered Roman rural sites into a must read for anyone interested in intensive pedestrian survey.

Stewart identifies four major areas of development in intensive survey: challenges to ceramic typologies, refined collections strategies, studies across landscape zones, and interdisciplinarity. He does a nice job communicating the problems associated with ceramic chronologies for the Roman period and the vexing, but somehow inescapable dependence on the Early, Middle, and Late Roman chronological division. (I blame prehistorians for passing this chronological structure onto us.) David Pettegrew’s landmark Hesperia article on the “busy countryside” of Late Roman Greece was cited with approval (pdf here). 

At the same time, I think any close observer of survey archaeology would agree with these developments broadly speaking, although one could also say that these recent development have characterized the general trajectory of intensive survey since the 1980s. For example, survey archaeologists have always been working to refine their collection strategies to sample more effectively the material on the surface, and Stewart’s attention to re-survey is less a product of recent methodological refinement and more of a particular opportunistic, expression of longstanding interest in how best to sample and document kaleidoscopic surface assemblages. Stewart is right in recognizing that site classification remains a challenge for intensive survey projects and this is tied directly to the intensity of sampling. More rigorous sampling techniques produce a greater range of sites both in terms of size and, in many cases, in terms of functional assemblage. In some conditions, as few as a handful of fine ware sherds can represent activity in the landscape, but they intensity, type, and duration of activities at that particular place must remain undefined. 

The same could be said for recent attention to interdisciplinarity. The earliest efforts at intensive survey in Greece incorporated ethnographic and scientific components to their work embracing the twin influences of processual archaeology and the unstructured perambulations of early modern travelers. By the late 20th century, it was unthinkable to conduct a survey without geologists, a plan for sectioning pottery, biologists to help understanding flora and fauna, and ethnographers to interpret local knowledge. It was odd that Stewart did not mention the influence of geologists as being particularly important to recent trends in intensive survey. 

Finally, efforts to survey different landscape zones has been part of the survey archaeologist’s tool kit from at least the dawn of the Second Wave of survey projects. This is hardly a new trend or one deserving particular mention. In fact, one could argue that recent (21st century) permit limits that impose a 30 sq km maximum study area for intensive survey project have led to a shift from more extensive approaches to the Greek landscape to a more intensive focus on collection and sampling strategies. Intensive survey is committed to saying more with less.  

I also think that Stewart’s emphasis on the fragility of the surface assemblage in light of more intensive agriculture and development in Greece is misplaced or, at least, poorly defined. It seems hard to image even the most intensive collection regimes putting much of a dent in the abundant material present in a surface assemblage. In fact, our work on Cyprus in conditions in every way compatible with those in Greece suggested that typical sampling methods for intensive survey (20% of the surface) collect less than 10% of the material visible and that assemblage of material is only a tiny fraction of the material present. While deep ploughing/plowing does present a risk to archaeological remains (not to mention soil health), from the perspective of intensive survey, the danger is more closely related to movement of artifacts in the landscape than to any significant destruction of the archaeological record. 

I would have liked Stewart to focus more (any?) attention on the reluctance of the significant second wave survey projects (i.e. Pylos Regional Archaeology Project, Nemea Valley Archaeological Project, Eastern Korinthia Archaeological Survey, Kythera Island Project, et c.) to make their raw digital data freely accessible. This has had a substantial impact on our ability to comparing and synthesizing the landscapes produced by these projects.

I might have also liked to see some critique of the tendency toward parochialism in Greek archaeology of the Roman period. Of course, this is a generalization that some might see as unfair, but it nevertheless would have been useful to understand how our understanding of rural Greece in the Roman period contributes or responds to similar interest elsewhere in the Mediterranean. For example, scholars invested in intensive survey methods have focused on rural Roman landscape across the Mediterranean basin. The work of these scholars have produced significant data both in terms of material and methodology for any understanding of Roman Greece.  

Despite my critiques (which are mostly saying that I’d write a different article!), Stewart’s article provides a nice summary of recent work and a great point of departure for anyone interested in staying abreast of recent research in the rural world of Roman Greece. 


Corinthian Matters

A New Book on Rural Villas in Roman Greece

David Smith’s recent article in Archaeological Reports notes the publication of a new book titled Villae Rusticae: Family and market-oriented farms in Greece under Roman rule. Proceedings of an International Congress held at Patras, 23-24 April 2010. Edited by A.D. Rizakis and I.P. Touratsoglou, the publishers (Institute of Historical Research/National Hellenic Research Foundation) describe the content of the volume in this way:

“As that of other provinces of the Empire, the rural economy of Greece underwent many changes as well, with important implications for the strategies and organization of the production, as well as for the distribution and consumption of goods. Thanks to the extraordinary mass of archaeological data collected in Greece in the last decades, and to the possibility of applying both more sophisticated research instruments and more profitable methods of approach and analysis of these data, a re-examination of a regional case study such as Roman Greece is now more feasible. The publication in this volume of material remains – remarkable both for number and quality, from various in size productive complexes– and the synthetic studies on the other hand will provide students of the ancient world with an invaluable material which will greatly contribute to a better understanding of the economic organization of this part of the Roman Empire. It will also represent a point of reference for the study of both the rural world and more specific the economy of the cities of a small but not insignificant Roman administrative unit.”

Running 800 pages long, Smith may be right that Villae Rusticae will become “a standard text for the study of the rural economy of Roman Greece.”At the moment, however, there seem to be few libraries in the world that actually own a copy. I couldn’t find a loaning library in the U.S. via Interlibrary Loan, and the price is a hefty 120 €, plus shipping. An article or two are available for free on the National Hellenic Research Foundation website, and I found one or two more via Academia. It would be wonderful if the publisher would release a PDF version of the entire volume as they did with their Roman Peloponnese series.

The table of contents, available here, lists chapters mainly in Greek, with a few English, Italian, and French contributions.


Mia Ridge (Open Objects)

The rise of interpolated content?

One thing that might stand out when we look back at 2014 is the rise of interpolated content. We've become used to translating around auto-correct errors in texts and emails but we seem to be at a tipping point where software is going ahead and rewriting content rather than prompting you to notice and edit things yourself.

iOS doesn't just highlight or fix typos, it changes the words you've typed. To take one example, iOS users might use 'ill' more than they use 'ilk', but if I typed 'ilk' I'm not happy when it's replaced by an algorithmically-determined 'ill'. As a side note, understanding the effect of auto-correct on written messages will be a challenge for future historians (much as it is for us sometimes now).

And it's not only text. In 2014, Adobe previewed GapStop, 'a new video technology that eases transitions and removes pauses from video automatically'. It's not just editing out pauses, it's creating filler images from existing images to bridge the gaps so the image doesn't jump between cuts. It makes it a lot harder to tell when someone's words have been edited to say something different to what they actually said - again, editing audio and video isn't new, but making it so easy to remove the artefacts that previously provided clues to the edits is.

Photoshop has long let you edit the contrast and tone in images, but now their Content-Aware Move, Fill and Patch tools can seamlessly add, move or remove content from images, making it easy to create 'new' historical moments. The images on extrapolated-art.com, which uses '[n]ew techniques in machine learning and image processing [...] to extrapolate the scene of a painting to see what the full scenery might have looked like' show the same techniques applied to classic paintings.

But photos have been manipulable since they were first used, so what's new? As one Google user reported in It’s Official: AIs are now re-writing history, 'Google’s algorithms took the two similar photos and created a moment in history that never existed, one where my wife and I smiled our best (or what the algorithm determined was our best) at the exact same microsecond, in a restaurant in Normandy.' The important difference here is that he did not create this new image himself: Google did, without asking or specifically notifying him. In twenty years time, this fake image may become part of his 'memory' of the day. Automatically generated content like this also takes the question of intent entirely out of the process of determining 'real' from interpolated content. And if software starts retrospectively 'correcting' images, what does that mean for our personal digital archives, for collecting institutions and for future historians?

Interventions between the act of taking a photo and posting it on social media might be one of the trends of 2015. Facebook are about to start 'auto-enhancing' your photos, and apparently, Facebook Wants To Stop You From Uploading Drunk Pictures Of Yourself. Apparently this is to save your mum and boss seeing them; the alternative path of building a social network that don't show everything you do to your mum and boss was lost long ago. Would the world be a better place if Facebook or Twitter had a 'this looks like an ill-formed rant, are you sure you want to post it?' function?

So 2014 seems to have brought the removal of human agency from the process of enhancing, and even creating, text and images. Where do we go from here? How will we deal with the increase of interpolated content when looking back at this time? I'd love to hear your thoughts.

Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

Call for Internship presso CNR ITABC

interactive-exhibition-logoV-Must, rete di eccellenza dei musei virtuali ha aperto una Call for internship per un tirocinio formativo presso il CNR-ITABC di Monterotondo dedicato ad "affrontare in maniera completa il tema delle tecnologie applicate ai Beni Culturali e, nel dettaglio, capire quali sono le strategie vincenti per realizzare una mostra interattiva che prenda in considerazione luoghi unici, innovazione tecnologica e le esigenze del pubblico più eterogeneo".

Archeologia subacquea in 3D, un ROV per la fotogrammetria in ambienti sommersi

ROV3DIl laboratorio LSIS (Laboratorio di Scienze dell’Informazione e dei Sistemi) del CNRS di Marsiglia nella persona di Pierre Drap, in collaborazione con la società COMEX, specializzata nelle operazioni sottomarine di alta tecnologia, e SETP, società di studi e lavori fotogrammetrici, ha sviluppato un sistema di acquisizione fotogrammetrica in alta definizione ed in tempo reale, mettendolo a bordo di un sistema ROV (drone o robot) sottomarino.

Laureate dell'Unical premiate al Convegno Diagnosis of Cultural Heritage

studentesse-unical-convegnoNei giorni 11 e 12 Dicembre 2014 si è tenuto a Napoli il V° Quinto Convegno Internazionale dal titolo “Diagnosi Conservazione e Valorizzazione del Patrimonio Culturale” promosso dall’associazione AIES (Associazione Italiana Esperti Scientifici) e dall’Università La Sapienza di Roma con l’Adesione del Presidente della Repubblica e il Patrocinio del Ministero per i Beni e le Attività Culturali, oltre che di molteplici Dipartimenti Universitari e di Istituzioni operanti nel settore dei Beni Culturali.

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Bibliography of Mesopotamian Astral Science

Bibliography of Mesopotamian Astral Science

December 16, 2014

Cooper-Hewitt Labs

Our new ticketing website

Screenshot 2014-12-16 16.25.03

This past week we launched https://tickets.cooperhewitt.org — a new online ticketing system which leverages our Consitutent Relationship Management application, Tessitura, as its “source of truth.”

It’s a simple application, really. It lets you pick the day you want to come visit us, select the kind of tickets you want to buy, and then you fill out your basic info, plug in your credit card digits and off you go. Moments later you receive an email with PDF versions of your tickets attached.

On the user-facing side of things, it is designed to be as simple as possible. You don’t need to log in, there is no “shopping cart”, and above all, you can do all of this from your phone if you want to skip ahead of the lines this Winter on your first visit back since we closed nearly three years ago.

A little background

The idea to pre-book tickets online came at us from a number of directions. Some time last year we decided to invest in Tessitura to handle all of our CRM needs. Tessitura, if you have never heard of it before, is an enterprise class, battleship that grew out of the Met Opera House and has made its way around the performing arts sector. It’s a great tool if you are looking to centralize everything there is to know about a Constituent. As a museum, it is also appealing in that it does many of the things that non-profit type cultural institutions need to do out of the box.

So, Tessitura. It is now a thing at our museum. Everyone on our staff started ramping up on the software and getting settled into the idea of using Tessitura for one thing or another. Our department began to get requests.

Obviously our membership department would like to use Tessitura to sell and manage memberships. Development would like to use it to manage and collect donations and gifts. Education would like to centralize all public programs, book tours, manage special events, and all of the other crazy things they do. And did I mention we have a museum that sells tickets?

This is how it always starts. The avalanche of ideas, whiteboard sessions, product demos and gentle emails that say things like “When will Tessitura be ready?” begin to pour in. You have to soak it all in and then wring it all out.

The Simplest, Dumbest Thing

Aaron says that quite often. “Just do the simplest, dumbest thing…” and he’s right. Often times you have to boil things down a bit to get to the real core issues at hand. It was clear from the start that this would be an essential part of the “design process” on this project.

So, I started out by asking myself this question:  “What is the most basic thing we want to do with Tessitura?”

I wound up with two clear answers.

  1. We wanted to be able to sell tickets online. Just basic, general admission tickets. Nothing fancy yet.
  2. We eventually want to use Tessitura as our identity provider, and as a way to pair your ticket with the Pen. More on that towards the end…

Tackling Tickets

So to get started, I thought about the challenge of selling a ticket online. I looked at other sites I liked such as StubHub, EventBrite, and other venue websites that I knew used Tessitura like BAM, Jazz at Lincoln Center, and the 92Y. I did some research, I bought some tickets, and I asked all my friends who used these sites what they liked and disliked. Eventually I started to find my way gravitating towards the Eventbrite way of doing things. We have been using Eventbrite for a couple of years here at Cooper Hewitt, for the most part as a way to sell tickets to education programs and events.

To tell you the truth, Eventbrite has been a dream come true for us and our sales for these events, both paid and free, have been very good. So, what is Eventbrite doing right? Simply put they’ve made the process of purchasing a ticket to an event online stupidly simple.

I wanted to know more. So, I spent some time and slowly walked myself through the process of booking all kinds of things on Eventbrite. I tried to step through each page in the process, I tried to notice what kind of user feedback I got, and what sort of emails and notifications I got. I tried the same on mobile devices and through their iPhone app. Here are a few takeaways.

  1. You don’t need to register in order to purchase a ticket on Eventbrite.
  2. If you don’t register when making an initial purchase, you can register later and see your purchase history.
  3. As soon as you book your tickets, you get them in an email.
  4. The Thank You page is just as useful when you are logged out as when you are logged in.
  5. Most importantly, you can only buy one thing at a time. In other words, there is no idea of a Shopping Cart.

That last one was pretty huge. Most eCommerce sites are built around the idea that users put items in a cart and then “Checkout.” Eventbrite doesn’t do it this way. Instead, you simply pick the thing you are wanting to attend, select the kinds of tickets you want ( student, senior, etc ) and then put in your credit card info. Once you hit submit, you’ve paid for your tickets and your transaction is complete.

I felt this flow was incredibly powerful and probably one of the reasons Eventbrite was working so well for our education programs. There are simply less chances to change your mind, less confusion over what you are buying, and the end-to-end process of picking something out and paying for it is just so much smaller than the more traditional shopping cart experience.

I began to think of it kind of like the difference between getting your weekly groceries and just picking up a six pack. The behaviors are totally different because you are trying to accomplish two totally different tasks. One is very routine, requires a little creativity and some patience, and a willingness to wander around and “pick.” The other is a strategic strike, designed to get in and get out so you can get home and relax with a nice cold one.

The Eventbrite concept seemed like what we wanted. I had my simplest dumbest thing, and something to model it on.

Technical Challenges

With every new project comes some kind of technical challenge(s). Tessitura is a “new to us” application and our staff at Cooper Hewitt were clearly at the bottom left of a steep learning curve when we started the project. We also had many challenges we knew we were going to have to face because we are a “Governmental Institution.” So things like PCI compliance, complex network configurations, and security scans were all things I was going to need to learn about.

Tessitura comes with two APIs. One is a somewhat older ( as in the first thing they built ) SOAP API, and the other is a newer ( as in still under development ) REST API. Both allow data to get in and out of Tessitura in a variety of forms.

In addition to the standard SOAP and REST APIs, Tessitura has the facility to expose just about anything you can build into an MS SQL Stored Procedure through its API. This is an incredibly powerful feature, which can also be quite dangerous if you think about it.

When I attended the Tessitura Learning Conference & Convention this past summer, it became clear to me that many institutions that use Tessitura are building some kind of API wrapper, or some type of middleware that helps them make sense of it all. We chose to do the same. To accomplish this, I chose to model the API wrapper off our own Collections API, which is a REST-ish API based on Flamework, and uses oAuth2 for authentication. Having this API wrapper allows us to all speak the same language and use the same interface. It is also very, very similar to the Collections API, so among our own staff, it is pretty easy to navigate. The API wrapper, wraps methods from both the Tessitura SOAP and the REST APIs and presents a unified interface to both of them. It doesn’t implement every single API method, and it exposes “new” methods that we have custom built via those Stored Procedures I mentioned.

The Tickets website is a separate project that talks directly to the API. It is also a Flamework project, written primarily in PHP. It uses a MySQL database to store a small amount of local data, but for the most part it is making calls to the API wrapper, which in turn is making calls to either the SOAP or REST Tessitura APIs. Tessitura is the source of truth for most of the things the Ticketing website does.

The Front End

Screenshot 2014-12-16 16.25.44

The Tickets site from the user’s perspective is designed to be extremely simple. I worked with Sam ( our in house front end guru ) to build a responsive, and simple web application that does basically one thing, but the devil is always in the details.

At first glance, all the site does is allow you to select the day you want to come visit us, pick out what kinds of tickets you want, and then fill out your billing info and receive your tickets. It’s basically a calendar and a form and not much more. But like I said, the devil is in the details.

First, Sam built a beautiful calendar like one I’d never seen before. We talked at length about how dumb most website calendars were, and we tried to push things in a new direction. Our calendar starts out by showing you what you most likely are looking for–Today. It displays the next bunch of days up to two weeks worth by default, and if you are looking for a special date, it lets you drop down and navigate around until you find it. On mobile its slightly different in that it doesn’t show you any past dates ( why would you want to book the past? ) and it limits things a little so you’re not as overwhelmed by the interface. We call this “designing for context” and we thought that users might be using their mobile phones to buy a ticket online and jump up to the front of the queue.

Once you’ve selected the date you want, the app loads up the available tickets right below the calendar. You can easily change your mind and pick a different date. From here you just select the type and quantity of each ticket you want. Sam’s code does a bunch of front-end validations to make sure everything you are trying to do makes sense ( you can only purchase a youth ticket with another paid ticket for example ). Between the two of us, we try to do as much validation to what you are selecting as possible, both in Javascript on the front-end and in PHP on the back.

Once you hit Order Now, an order form is generated and displayed. I think its important to note here that nothing has really happened yet in Tessitura-land. We asked Tessitura for some details about the tickets you are interested in, but we haven’t “added them to your cart” or anything like that as of yet.

Screenshot 2014-12-16 16.28.34

You can then fill out your vitals. We ask you to give us your name, email, credit card details and billing address. We store all of this, with the exception of your credit card, in Tessitura. We make you an account, and at this point we send you an activation email which allows you to set up your password at your leisure. If all goes well with your credit card, we build your tickets ( I chose to do all this with FPDF rather than try and use Tessitura’s built in Print at Home server thing ) send them in an email, and then take you to a Thank You Page. You never had to register, or log in, and you technically never do. Your PDF tickets arrive in your inbox and that is technically all you need.

Screenshot 2014-12-16 16.27.35

As a little bonus, we just stick the barcode and some basic metadata about each ticket you bought on the Thank You Page so you can just present your phone at the door. This part is still a little rough and I chose to leave it that way for the time being so we can do some user research in the galleries. It’s a nice feature, but only time will tell if people actually use it or if it needs some finesse.

Screenshot 2014-12-16 16.26.50

Now that you are in the system, you can buy more tickets using the same email address and they will be connected to your same account, even if you still have never logged in. If you do choose to activate your account and login, you can look at your order history, and reprint your tickets if you’ve lost your email copy.

Screenshot 2014-12-16 16.27.10

Tessitura & The Pen

A while back in this blog post, I mentioned that we also wanted to use Tessitura as our identity provider and as a way to pair the ticket you’ve purchased with the pen we’ve handed you. This work is nearly done, but not yet in production. It will go live when our pen is available sometime in early 2015. But, the short story is, when you buy a ticket, either online or in person, we generate a special coded version of your ticket. This code gets paired up with the internal ID of the pen we gave you and that pairing gets stored in a database. What this all amounts to is that when you get home, and you want to see all the cool things you’ve done with your pen, you simply enter the code ( or go to a custom short URL ) on our website. We look up your pairing and are able to connect your Identity ( Tessitura ) with your Visit ( on the Collections site ). But that is all the topic of a future series of blog posts.

Next

Now that the Tickets site is up and running, and we are watching the sales roll in, it’s easy to start thinking of more features and new ways to expand what the site can do. I’ve already started building simple admin tools and have been thinking about building a basic check-in app for off-site events. It’s too early to talk about all of the things we aim to do and how we plan to expand our online sales, but I’m hopeful that we will stay focused and narrow in our approach, offering our users the most elegant visitor experience possible. Or at the very least, the simplest, dumbest thing.

Kristina Killgrove (Powered by Osteons)

A very bioarchaeology Christmas tree!

Grades are in!  Department holiday party is over!  Sure, I'll be working the rest of the week on syllabi for my spring courses, but I decided to spend an hour today putting my own bioarchaeological spin on this book-Xmas-tree meme that's been going around... 


Merry (very early) Christmas from Powered by Osteons!  (Yes, I know it's actually the first day of Hanukkah today, but if I could figure out how to make a skeleton-book-themed menorah, I would...)

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

ASOR Syrian Heritage Initiative

ASOR Syrian Heritage Initiative
http://www.asor-syrianheritage.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/SHI-logo-8.jpg
The ASOR Syrian Heritage Initiative is a cooperative agreement between ASOR and the U.S. Department of State that is designed to document, protect, and preserve the cultural heritage of war-torn Syria. Hundreds of significant heritage sites have been damaged since fighting began in 2011. Although the destruction of cultural property represents only part of the humanitarian crisis, these harmful actions threaten our common world heritage and the cultural diversity of the Syrian people. We have an ethical obligation to respond, and our project is part of an international effort to empower Syrians to protect their heritage and cultural identity.
The ASOR Syrian Heritage Initiative implements cultural property protection by:
1. Promoting global awareness
2. Documenting and mapping heritage damage
3. Planning emergency responses and post-war initiatives

Promoting Global Awareness
  • Monitor a wide range of media to document the impact of the conflict on cultural heritage
  • Communicate with Syrian heritage specialists, networks of volunteers, and NGOs to help monitor, document, and verify the condition of heritage collections and sites
  • Provide Syrians with training in and tools for heritage documentation
  • Coordinate efforts with other organizations that are working to safeguard Syrian heritage
Documenting and Mapping Heritage Damage
  • Utilize satellite imagery to monitor, document, and verify damage and preservation needs
  • Develop a comprehensive digital map and inventory of cultural heritage sites
  • Create a bibliography and repository of sources on cultural heritage collections and sites in Syria
  • Engage and share information with other groups that are creating inventories and maps of cultural heritage
Planning Emergency Responses and Post-war Initiatives
  • Produce written and imagery-based condition documentation for sites in the heritage inventory and assess the major preservation issues affecting cultural heritage
  • Develop multiple small and large-scale documentation and preservation projects for heritage sites in Syria that can be implemented in the future
  • Provide resources for short-term, high impact mitigation projects to prevent and decrease the risk of further damage to collections and sites
  • Identify human resource priorities and training needed to strengthen future cultural heritage management capacity for Syria
Related Articles
Prescott, Kurt. 6 Things You Need to Know About ASOR’s Syrian Heritage Initiative. ASOR, 2014.

Syrian Heritage Initiative Bibliographies

In order to understand fully the damage that has occurred to Syrian cultural heritage sites, it is important to obtain a comprehensive understanding of these sites prior to the civil conflict that began in 2011. Academic publications, excavation reports, archaeological surveys, and damage assessments are just some of the many sources that can paint a broad picture of pre-conflict cultural heritage in Syria, which in turn proves instrumental to our documentation efforts and preservation planning. Below you will find a series of bibliographies that contain both published and unpublished works in a variety of languages, including English, Arabic, French, German, and Italian, among others. We encourage you to seek out these sources and to learn more about the cultural heritage that is currently at risk.
BIBLIOGRAPHIES BY TOPIC:

CDLI News: Digital capture of the Louvre cuneiform collection

Digital capture of the Louvre cuneiform collection

We are delighted to announce an ongoing collaboration between the Louvre Museum and the Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative (CDLI - Los Angeles/Berlin/Oxford). Signed in March of 2013, an Agreement of Scientific Cooperation between the Louvre and UCLA formalized the long-term efforts by both the Museum and CDLI to effect the digital capture, persistent archiving and free Internet dissemination of one of the most significant collections of cuneiform texts on earth, with its rich history of archaeological discovery in the ancient Middle East. The Louvre's Department of Near Eastern Antiquities combines epigraphic finds from famous French excavations in ancient Iranian Susa, in southern Mesopotamian Girsu and Larsa, among many other sites of cultural-historical significance.

In furtherance of this cooperation between members of the CDLI, primarily coordinated by Principal Investigator Jacob Dahl at Oxford, and of the Louvre Museum, led by Béatrice André-Salvini, Director of the Department of Oriental Antiquities, with her academic and technical staff, Dahl was able to commence scanning of the collection in 2011, and has since, together with Oxford research associate Klaus Wagensonner, undertaken several missions to Paris to continue this work. Assisted by staff at the Louvre Museum, the CDLI team have in this effort combined standard and highly efficient flatbed scanning (<http://cdli.ox.ac.uk/wiki/doku.php?id=submission_guidelines>) with high-resolution RTI imaging (see, for instance, <http://culturalheritageimaging.org/Technologies/RTI/>), utilizing domes created in the course of imaging collaborations between the CDLI members at the University of Oxford and members of the team of Kirk Martinez at the Department of Electronics and Computer Science at the University of Southampton, to produce full photographic documentation of Louvre artifacts. Following cataloguing, and fatcross-processing and cleaning of raw files at Oxford, initial images were posted to the CDLI website in 2012, and more are going up incrementally; these can now be viewed at <http://cdli.ucla.edu/collections/louvre/louvre_en.html> or by searching the CDLI database at <http://cdli.ucla.edu/search/>. We are currently processing to browsable content our raw RTI files, and, using an online viewer developed at CNR-ISTI (<http://vcg.isti.cnr.it>), have posted to <http://cdli.ucla.edu/?q=rti-images> a selection of such  images of Louvre artifacts, as well as a few examples of our work on artifacts in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, and the Oriental Institute Museum, Chicago, the latter done at our behest by Bruce Zuckerman’s WSRP team (<http://www.usc.edu/dept/LAS/wsrp/>). We are grateful to the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for making our Louvre initiative possible, as well as to the Humanities Divisions of the University of Oxford and UCLA for their continuing support of the CDLI.

From the beginning, the Louvre viewed this effort as an opportunity to make available its cuneiform collection to the world-wide community of online researchers and informal learners. The agreement between the Museum and UCLA laying out the Louvre/CDLI collaboration is designed to assist cuneiform specialists in the collation of existing text publications, while at the same time providing general access to catalogue data, annotated transliterations, and artifact images to lay the broadest possible foundation for networked collaboration by the scholarly community. We are confident that our adherence in this initiative to the principles of free and open access best serves all in the Humanities, but particularly in the fields of dead language research that are dependent on the availability of primary source materials for their work. In opening to world-wide inspection cuneiform collections such as that located at the Louvre, we believe, further, that humanists fulfill their curatorial responsibilities to digitally archive, and to make available to the public all such artifacts of shared world cultural heritage that are in their immediate or indirect care.


For the Louvre Museum:
Béatrice André-Salvini, Director, Department of Near Eastern Antiquities

For the Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative and UCLA:
Robert K. Englund, Professor of Assyriology & Director, CDLI

For the Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative and the University of Oxford:
Jacob L. Dahl, Associate Professor of Assyriology & co-PI, CDLI

Source: Journalism Code, Context & Community

Tag Soup: Using Custom Elements to Cover Elections and Beyond

By Thomas Wilburn

Tag Soup: Using Custom Elements to Cover Elections and Beyond

From the Seattle Times election results page, the project on which we honed our approach to custom elements

An election results board is in many ways the purest test for a news app: it combines a high-traffic, high-pressure breaking news page with the challenge of scraping data feeds from a range of sources (some well-organized, many much less so). Nobody in the Seattle Times newsroom was happier, or more relieved, when our results page performed almost flawlessly on election night. A brand-new Node-based application built on our news app template, it pulled results from the Washington Secretary of State and King County, parsed and merged them, then uploaded the results as static pages to Amazon S3.

I was relieved because there was always a worry that something would go wrong with the feeds or the build process, but also because our election page served as a testbed for custom elements in a news app. Part of an upcoming platform feature called Web Components, custom elements let developers define their own HTML tags, with complex behavior and lifecycle. I’d used them before as a part of an embedded web UI framework , but not on a general-public site. Based on our experience, I’m extremely excited about their potential. To see why, let’s take a quick tour of the Web Component concept, then look at how we leveraged them for the Seattle Times election results page, before seeing how they make it easy to create reusable and sharable newsroom tools.

A Brief Primer on Web Components

Although the idea no doubt germinated from many seeds, one of the founding arguments for Web Components can be found in this blog post by Chrome engineer Alex Russell. There he complains that there’s too much “magic” in browsers: everything is either high-level elements or low-level hackery (WebGL), largely ignoring the power of JavaScript in the middle. Russell called for browsers to provide APIs that would let coders implement and explain new behavior at all layers using only HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, without any magic.

The Web Components spec attempts to achieve this by providing four new “building blocks:”

  • document.registerElement(), which creates new tags and extends existing tags with new features,
  • Shadow DOM, which hides the internal structure of those elements from external styles and scripts,
  • <template> for stamping out fresh copies of HTML in each component, and
  • HTML Imports, which provide a better mechanism for loading all the required resources.

Using the Web Component platform APIs, it’s possible to bundle up a complicated unit of functionality into a single declarative element, just like any other HTML tag. In many cases, browser developers have already been using these same tools, and they’re just exposing them to users: the date input in Chrome and the color input in Firefox are already built entirely with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript behind the scenes.

Google has a purpose-built component library called Polymer for this process, but it’s only available for IE10 and up, and our minimum-supported browser is IE9. So for creating custom elements at the Seattle Times, I set up an alternative scaffolding that only directly shims the document.registerElement() method using Andrea Giammarchi’s library. For the other parts of the spec, we provide functional alternatives: ICanHaz.JS or Dot for templating, LESS for isolating element styles, and a Grunt build process for bundling all the dependencies up into a single package.

Our Savage Elements

As a committed front-end developer, I often shrug off complaints from other developers about the vagaries of HTML and CSS, but when it comes to SVG, I suspect I know how they feel. My experiences with it have been capricious and inconsistent from browser to browser (I’m probably doing something wrong). Still, for election maps SVG images are probably still the best option, so I decided to wrap them in a custom element that would contain and control their oddities, along with a small library (named Savage) for papering over the cracks in the SVG API.

If you view the source for our results page, you’ll notice the maps embedded for statewide races and ballot measures are contained in an unfamiliar element: <svg-map>. Loading an SVG into the page is as easy as setting the src attribute on these elements, and the component takes care of requesting, caching, and injecting the SVG document. A JavaScript promise attached to the element is resolved once the image is ready, and convenience methods like eachPath() attach to this promise to perform asynchronous rendering, such as when results are added to the state map.

In the source, you’ll also notice that the innards of some of our <svg-map> elements are Handlebars templates, but these don’t appear directly in the output—what’s up with that? When an element is created for the first time, the component parses its innerHTML out as a template for the hover text on the map, then replaces that with the actual image contents. A JavaScript onhover method feeds data back to the template in response to the hover event.

Custom elements quickly proved their worth on this project. They simplified our JavaScript by bundling code up into a discrete, logical unit with a straightforward external interface. They made it easy to add maps and reposition them on the page, since they were written like any other tag. And they provided a declarative API for non-programmers like our web producers who wanted to adjust the maps or their hover text: it’s just HTML!

Introducing &lt;responsive-frame&gt;

Introducing &lt;responsive-frame&gt;

I’ve enjoyed using custom elements in this project as a developer, but I think the real value comes from the way that they package up a discrete piece of UI in a way that can be used equally well by coders and non-coders in a newsroom. As a proof of concept, we’ve developed <responsive-frame>, an alternative to the Pym.js library created by NPR. Pym is a great library, and we rely on it often (we’ve even published our own branch of it for bugfixes), but even as minimal as it is, its configuration burden is relatively high for non-coders: the parent page alone requires a placeholder div, a script import, and a configuration script that calls the Pym constructor with an ID and a URL. I think it can be made easier with web components. Using our custom element, embedding a child page is as simple as including the registration script and then writing:

<responsive-frame src="child.html"></responsive-frame>

On the other side, the child page can declare any element as the “container” for embedded content by using the <responsive-child> element, or even just adding an is attribute to extend an existing element. For example, we can target the <body> of the child page this way:

<body is="responsive-child">

That’s all the configuration needed! When the elements start up on each side of the embed, they negotiate a unique ID for each iframe, and then send messages across the boundary using a JSON-based protocol when either window is resized.

If you’d like to experiment with our responsive frame, you can take a look at the source code here, or install it from Bower as component-responsive-frame. We’ve also used these new elements in our newest investigative piece, Sell Block.

A Call for Wider Adoption

A Call for Wider Adoption

One of my favorite parts of working in newsrooms as a developer is the number of really cool, innovative browser-based tools that have come out of journalism. In the past, these libraries have been published the same way as most other front-end projects: either as jQuery plugins, or as bundles of JavaScript that a coder needs to glue together. But with custom elements, you can provide a declarative method for putting the element on the page, while still exposing its API for customization. It’s helpful to imagine packaging up something like Pro Publica’s Landline as a <landline-map>, for example, or a <boundary-input> that’s powered by Wherewolf. We’re also experimenting with a Leaflet map element that lets users quickly assemble a map with layers, markers, and GeoJSON without touching a line of JavaScript.

If you’re working on a newsroom tool that you think you might re-use, or open-source for others, I’d like to advocate for going the Web Component route. It’s not just something that we’re using at The Seattle Times: Google is pushing hard for Polymer-based components at this year’s Chrome Dev Summit, and Mozilla is using them with its Brick library in Firefox OS.

If you’re interested in getting started, feel free to build on our component template, which provides a framework for building elements and packaging them up for external use. We’d love to hear about projects that you build with it, or any bugs you might find!

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

New Open Access Monograph Series: Estudos de Egiptologia

Estudos de Egiptologia
http://www.seshat.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/cropped-topo-seshat31.png
O Laboratório de Egiptologia do Museu Nacional é o primeiro Laboratório no Brasil dedicado ao estudo da arqueologia do Egito antigo. Ligado ao Museu Nacional da UFRJ, o Laboratório tem como foco a pesquisa arqueológica da coleção egípcia do museu, a maior da América Latina, e a arqueologia do Egito antigo.

Sob coordenação do Prof. Dr. Antonio Brancaglion, o Laboratório desenvolve diferentes linhas de pesquisa que objetivam a análise dos objetos arqueológicos egípcios, bem como a compreensão da sociedade egípcia em diversos períodos.
Publicações
Semna – Estudos de Egiptologia I (2014), orgs. Antonio Brancaglion Jr., Thais Rocha da Silva, Rennan de Souza Lemos e Raizza Teixeira dos Santos, Prefácio: Dr. Chris Naunton, Seshat/Editora Klínē. ISBN 978-85-66714-01-2

Capa Estudos de Egiptologia I SEMNA
(clique na imagem para fazer download)
Sumário
Trabalhos apresentados na I SEMNA não incluídos neste volume
Equipe organizadora da I SEMNA
Lista de autores
Apresentação, os organizadores
Prefácio/Foreword, Chris Naunton (Egypt Exploration Society, Londres)
Auxiliares para o renascimento: estátuas funerárias de Osíris e Ptah-Sokar-Osíris da coleção do Museu Nacional/UFRJ, Simone Bielesch
Para falar aos deuses: estudo das estatuetas votivas da coleção egípcia do Museu Nacional, Cintia Prates Facuri (Museu Nacional, UFRJ)
Tecnologias tridimensionais aplicadas em pesquisas arqueológicas de múmias egípcias, Simonte Belmonte (INT), Jorge Lopes (PUC-Rio/INT) e Antonio Brancaglion Jr (Museu Nacional, UFRJ)
Amarna: pintando uma nova paisagem, Rennan de Souza Lemos (Museu Nacional, UFRJ)
As representações da família real amarniana e a consolidação de uma nova visão de mundo durante o reinado de Akhenaton (1353-1335 a. C.), Gisela Chapot (UFF)
Hierarquia e mobilidade social no antigo Egito do Reino Novo, Nely Feitoza Arrais (UNILASALLE-RJ)
Implicações econômicas dos templos egípcios e a constituição de poderes locais: um estudo sobre o Reino Antigo, Maria Thereza David João (USP)
Sobre a importância da teoria social na egiptologia econômica, Fábio Frizzo (UFF)
Identidade, gênero e poder no Egito Romano, Marcia Severina Vasques (UFRN)
“E me traga essa carta de volta”. As cartas aos deuses e os estudos de gênero no Egito Ptolomaico. Contribuições da antropologia, Thais Rocha da Silva (USP/Museu Nacional, UFRJ)
As estelas funerárias com o morto reclinado em uma cama funerária: etnia, identidade eemaranhamento cultural no Baixo Egito durante o Período Romano, Pedro Luiz Diniz von Seehausen (Museu Nacional, UFRJ)
Adriano e o Egito: a construção de um modelo egipcianizante para a Villa Adriana, Evelyne Azevedo (Museu Nacional, UFRJ)

Juan Garcés (Digitised Manuscripts Blog)

Tudor Scribe and Spy at No. 2 in the Official Classical Charts

A new recording of a magnificent choirbook produced for King Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon, one of the great treasures in the British Library’s music collections, reached number 2 in the Classical Charts in the first week of its release in October 2014. Detail of a historiated initial with...

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Directories of Ancient World Scholars and Organizations

First posted 2/1/10. Updated 3/2/11 with the addition of the Mesopotamian Directory 2011 and the removal of the International Directory of Hittitologists and Anatolianists (has that reappeared somewhere?  I can't find it).  Updated 5/19/11 with the addition of the Directory of Ancient Historians in the United States and Canada Updated (links checked and fixed, AMESA added, 16 October 2013. Updated 16 December 2014]

I also use the online directories of scholarly and professional societies, which I don't list here because on the whole they are restricted to access by their members.

Are there other important directories I'm missing? What do you use to find people and places in your own disciplines? Reply in the comments below if you can.

Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

Un viaggio nell'antica Valle del Tevere, nuovo spazio interattivo al Museo Etrusco di Villa Giulia

museo-virtuale-tevereE' stato presentato martedì 16 dicembre presso il Museo Nazionale Etrusco di Villa Giulia il nuovo Museo virtuale della Valle del Tevere, nuova installazione realizzata nel Museo dall'Istituto per le Tecnologie applicate ai Beni Culturali (ITABC) del CNR in collaborazione con la Direzione Regionale MiBACT per i Beni culturali e paesaggistici del Lazio, la Soprintendenza per i beni archeologici dell'Etruria Meridionale, il Museo del fiume di Nazzano e la Società Geografica Italiana.L'iniziativa è stata finanziata da Arcus Spa.

Corinthian Matters

Archaeological Reports (Journal of Hellenic Studies)

The 2014 volume of Archaeological Reports is now out and promises some interesting new studies of the northeast Peloponnese and Greece.

If you’re not familiar with Archaeological Reports, the journal is published by the British School at Athens and offers “the only account of recent archaeological work in Greece published in English.”

Table of Contents:

“Introduction & overview” (Zosia Archibald)

“2013–2014 — a view from Greece” Catherine Morgan

“Newsround” (David M. Smith and Helen Murphy-Smith)

“Method in the archaeology of Greece”(Zosia Archibald)

“The work of the British School at Athens, 2013–2014″ (Catherine Morgan)

“The city of Athens” (Robert Pitt)

“The Classical naval installations in the Piraeus” (Chryssanthi Papadopoulou)

“Central Greece and the Peloponnese (Archaic to Roman)” (David M. Smith)

“Recent epigraphic research in central Greece: Boeotia” (Fabienne Marchand)

“Crete (prehistoric to Hellenistic)” (Matthew Haysom)

“Macedonia and Thrace: Iron Age to post-Roman urban centres” (Zosia Archibald)

“Archaeobotany in Greece” (Alexandra Livarda)

“Rural sites in Roman Greece” (Daniel Stewart)

IF you visit the table of of contents online here, you can click on article titles to see an abstract or opening paragraph.

Two articles that caught my attention:

1. Smith, David M. “Central Greece and the Peloponnese (Archaic to Roman).” Archaeological Reports 60 (November 2014): 55–71. doi:10.1017/S0570608414000088.

The much shorter Archaiologikon Deltion for the single year of 2005 invariably offers far fewer reports on the work of the Archaeological Service than the four-year volume with which we were presented last year. This, in itself, is no bad thing, although the geographical and chronological balance generated by such a large dataset is notable by its absence. This unevenness is, as ever, partially offset by the publication of fieldwork, although certain areas maintain a far more visible archaeological presence than others. This is particularly true for the northeastern Peloponnese, which has, in recent years, been the recipient of an almost unparalleled focus of both research and rescue excavation; a fact reflected in the significant contribution made to this year’s report by the edited proceedings of the conference The Corinthia and the Northeast Peloponnese: Topography and History from Prehistoric Times until the End of Antiquity (Kissas and Niemeier 2013). A total of 56 individual papers provide details on sites that range in date from the Neolithic to the Byzantine period. A great strength of this collection lies in the contribution of so many current and former staff of the Archaeological Service, and, of the numerous papers that engage directly or indirectly with the archaeology of the Archaic to Roman period, several are discussed in greater depth in the course of this report. A complementary Hesperia supplement detailing the current state of prehistoric and historic research on the Corinthian Isthmus is due to appear before the end of the year (Gebhard and Gregory forthcoming), as is a study of material from Henry Robinson’s 1961–1962 excavation in the North Cemetery (Slane forthcoming). The study of religious practice during the Classical period benefits from the publication of the first volume of material from excavations conducted by the Canadian Institute in Greece between 1994 and 2001 in the Sanctuary of Athena at Stymphalos (Schaus 2014a), while the consolidation of synthetic regional studies and individual site reports within Villae Rusticae: Family and Market-oriented Farms in Greece under Roman Rule (Rizakis and Touratsoglou 2013) will no doubt ensure that it becomes a standard text for the study of the rural economy of Roman Greece (see Stewart, this volume).

2. Stewart, Daniel. “Rural Sites in Roman Greece.” Archaeological Reports 60 (November 2014): 117–32. doi:10.1017/S0570608414000131.

[W]hile pretending to throw some light upon classical authors by careful observation of the manners of the present day, romantic travellers succeeded in fact in accommodating reality to their dreams … by creating for themselves and for their readers carefully edited portraits of modern Greece that transformed the present into the living image of the past (Saïd 2005: 291).

Thirty years ago archaeological field survey promised to reshape radically our understanding of the countryside (Keller and Rupp 1983: 1–5). Traditional archaeological approaches to cities and monuments were increasingly seen to be extensions of textual research, and research on the rural landscape was envisaged as a way to access the other side of the traditional urban-rural dichotomy (though see the comments in Alcock 2007: 671–72). Some scholars estimated that, in the Classical period, the vast majority of Greek poleis had populations of less than 3,000 and territories no more than a few hours” walk from the urban core. Given that, they asked, does it make sense to divide elements of Greek life into “city” and “country”? In a sense, the study of landscapes was seen as a way to redress perceived imbalances between this urban-rural division and the picture painted by the ancient sources of Roman Greece as a pale reflection of its Classical brilliance. In the years since, landscape studies have grown to include much more than archaeological field survey, but this tension between textual and archaeological narratives remains at the heart of understandings of rural Roman Greece.


Bill Caraher (The New Archaeology of the Mediterranean World)

Mobilizing the Past for a Digital Future: A Digital Archaeology Workshop

I’m pretty excited to head back to the great Commonwealth of Massachusetts this winter to participate in another exciting workshop focusing on digital archaeology. The last workshop hosted by Eric Poehler at the University of Massachusetts – Amherts was great. This years worshop is hosted by Erin Walcek Averett (Creighton University), Derek Counts (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee), Jody Gordon (Wentworth Institute of Technology), and Michael K. Toumazou (Davidson College). 

This group all hails from the Athienou Archaeological Project (AAP) on Cyprus. They work about 10 miles inland from my site at Pyla-Koutsopetria and helped us tremendously with advice and support as our project got started. Now, the AAP folks are moving into the digital realm in a deliberate and serious way. This conference is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, Creighton University, the Wentworth Institute of Technology, Davidson College, and the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee. 

DigiArchNEH finalposter

Here’s the program.

The list of contributors is like a who’s who in digital field archaeology in the Mediterranean world these days so the conversation should be lively and productive. I think that these annual meetings which bring together the same core group of digital archaeology practitioners has the advantage of allowing ideas and conversations to develop, but runs the risk of creating an echo chambers. Right now, we’re not an echo chamber, which is good, and this workshop will bring in some new voices to the conversation which will almost certainly leaven the results. 

The Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project is represented by Sam Fee and my paper. For my paper, I’m continuing to develop the idea of Slow Archaeology as a complement and counter-weight to current trends in digital archaeology that privilege efficiency and speed in the field. My first publication developing some of these ideas will appear early next year in a special edition of a literary journal (GASP), North Dakota Quarterly. I’ll keep folks in the loop as I develop my paper.

Click through the workshop’s website and, if you’re in the area, register and come and join the fun! We’ll have a twitter hashtag – maybe #MobileArc – to open the conversation up to a global audience. 


Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

Nanotecnologie per il restauro della Fontana di Trevi

 

statua-fontana-treviSono state affidate ad alcuni ricercatori dell’Università della Calabria coordinati dal rettore, Prof. Gino Mirocle Crisci, le indagini diagnostiche e la sperimentazione di nuovi prodotti protettivi da applicare alla fontana di Trevi, durante le prossime fasi del restauro. 

La dama con l'ermellino ora fruibile in 3D

dama-ermellino-3dProrogata fino al 31 ottobre 2015, in occasione di Expo, la mostra Leonardo3 - Il Mondo di Leonardo, in Piazza della Scala a Milano, dedicata alla produzione tecnologica di Leonardo da Vinci si arricchisce ora di una nuova esperienza interattiva.

Tom Brughmans (Archaeological Network Analysis)

Hestia2 videos on Youtube

A while ago we at The Connected Past co-organised an event in Southampton called ‘Hestia2: exploring spatial networks through ancient source’. I published a review of the event on this blog before, read it here. We managed to record quite a few talks presented during this event. But this was not the only Hestia2 conference: […]

Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

A Pompei la scuola sui dati archeologici aperti STVDIVM

studivm-pompeiSi avvia alla conclusione il progetto OpenPompei nato per "promuovere la cultura della trasparenza e della partecipazione nel territorio campano, attraverso attività legate ad un luogo di alto valore simbolico, ovvero l’area archeologica di Pompei. Lo strumento più adatto al raggiungimento di questo obiettivo è stato individuato nello stimolo al rilascio in formato aperto dei dati amministrativi e archeologici.

NEH Office of Digital Humanities Update

Sustaining the Digital Humanities: Host Institution Support beyond the Start-up Phase, an Ithaka S+R Report

By Ann Sneesby-Koch

In 2012, the National Endowment for the Humanities awarded Ithaka S+R a Digital Humanities Implementation Grant to conduct a study investigating to what extent universities and colleges provide for the creation, sustainability, and maintenance of DH output on their campuses.  In June 2014, the final report, Sustaining the Digital Humanities: Host Institution Support beyond the Start-Up Phase and the Sustainability Implementation Toolkit, were published.

December 15, 2014

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Egyptian Funerary Cones Wiki

 [First posted in AWOL 27 January 2011, updated 15 December 2014]

Data on Funerary Cones

This website is one of wikis, in other words, WE can edit and update the pages like Wikipedia. 
Editing this site is easier than it: we do not have to know HTML or other special syntax. All you have to do is just type as you like, the same way you always do when you use MS WORD or other tools. 
As for the browsers, seeing and editing with Google Chrome is highly recommended since IE, Fire Fox, and other browsers collapse the appearances.

The owner hopes this site to be used as the online reference for funerary cones.

If you wish to get involved, you are kindly requested to get Google account and send email to me, the owner of this site, Kento Zenihiro and he will invite you as a coeditor (as long as he is alive!).

In fact, the best way I think is not to take this procedure but to edit directly without being "invited" by me. 
Due to today's Google sites' system however, you cannot do so. 
If you know other wiki-style sites that enable you to edit pages while you remain to be anonymous, and do not require us to use special syntax, please tell me.

Do not hesitate to send me the emails. I can always reply within 24 hours.






Swiss Mummy Project

Swiss Mummy Project
Schepenese
The Swiss Mummy Project (SMP) is a research project based at the Institute of Evolutionary Medicine (IEM), University of Zurich.
The aim of the Swiss Mummy Project is to investigate ancient human mummies of multiple cultural and geographical backgrounds with state-of-the-art scientific methods. This allows gaining insights into the evolution of disease, human variation but also socio-cultural aspects.
About
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The Signal: Digital Preservation

“Elementary!” A Sleuth Activity for Personal Digital Archiving

Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson. Published in The Adventure of Silver Blaze, which appeared in The Strand Magazine

Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson. “The Adventure of Silver Blaze,” in The Strand Magazine. Illustration by Sidney Paget (1860-1908). On Wikimedia.

As large institutions and organizations continue to implement preservation processes for their digital collections, a smattering of self-motivated information professionals are trying to reach out to the rest of the world’s digital preservation stakeholders —  individuals and small organizations — to help them manage their digital collections.

Part of that challenge is just making people aware that:
1. Their digital possessions are at risk of becoming inaccessible
2. They need to take responsibility for preserving their own stuff
3. The preservation process is easy.

The Library of Congress offers personal digital archiving resources and takes an active role in outreach. [Watch for the announcement of Personal Digital Archiving 2015 next April in New York City.] And we are always happy to discover novel approaches by our colleagues to teaching personal digital archiving. Consider the work of one group of information professionals from Georgia.

The Society of Georgia Archivists, the Atlanta Chapter of ARMA International and the Georgia Library Association have collaborated on a curriculum for a personal digital archiving workshop that addresses the basic problems and solutions. Among the steps they outline, they emphasize the need to make files “findable.”

To that end they devised an activity called “Find the Person in the Personal Digital Archive” (the activity data set and all the workshop materials are free and available for download, reuse and remixing). The premise is simple and the game is fun but it drives home an important message about organizing your files. The producers created a folder filled with files and sub-folders — messy, disorganized files; pointless sub-folders; mis-named files; highly personal files mixed with business files; encrypted files and obsolete file formats, many sourced from the Open Preservation Foundation’s Format Corpus — and they invite people to participate in a forensics activity, to look through all the files and directories and try to piece together some information about the owner of the files.

Sample of random files in a folder

Courtesy of the Society of Georgia Archivists.

As the user looks through the folder, there are questions to answer, such as “How would you describe the contents?”, “How did the creator of the archive name and arrange the files?” and “How do the features of the archive (such as file names, organization scheme, file format, etc.) make some of the records easy to understand and some of them impossible to understand?”

Though the goal is to deduce the identity and fate of the owner through various clues and “Aha!” moments, in doing the activity the users ends up making judgments about what is useful (like descriptive file and folder names) and what is not (files called “things.xml” and “untitled.txt”). Poring over a fake mess such as this drives home a point: how do you organize your own personal stuff? If someone, such as a loved one, had to go through your digital files, how easy or difficult would it be for them to find specific files and make sense of it all? Are you leaving a mess for someone else to trudge through?

Wendy Hagenmaier, the outreach manager for the Society of Georgia Archivists, is one of the workshop producers. Hagenmaier wanted to reach beyond her community to demystify digital archives stewardship and explain to the general public why digital preservation matters and how they can preserve their own stuff. She researched other like-minded organizations in Georgia to find interested parties for the workshop. “This topic really seems to be taking off in public libraries,” said Hagenmaier,”and genealogists are very much interested in personal digital archiving, though I don’t know if the topic comes up in their circles on its own.”

Woman giving a slide presentation.

Michelle Kirk, president of the Atlanta Chapter of ARMA, gives a presentation. Photo courtesy of the Society of Georgia Archivists.

Hagenmaier — and her colleagues Michelle Kirk, Cathy Miller and Oscar Gittemeier — geared the workshop toward information professionals and encouraged the workshop attendees to go out and teach the workshop to others so that the message will reach the general public in a sort of trickle-down effect. So far she has presented the curriculum at a “train the trainer” webinar, a workshop and at a Georgia State Archives genealogy event.

The Society of Georgia Archivists also offer a Personal Digital Archiving Workshop Outreach Grant to help information professionals in Georgia promote the idea that librarians, archivists and records managers are a source of expertise for assisting individuals (the public, family members, students, corporate employees, etc.) with their personal digital archiving needs. The grant will be given to individuals who apply for the grant after hosting and teaching a workshop at their institutions or in their communities, using the curriculum materials designed by SGA, GLA and Atlanta ARMA.

Hagenmaier is fervent about getting the word out to people, making them aware that they casually create and use digital stuff in their everyday lives, so digital stewardship could and should be just as casual and effortless. She feels that knowledge of digital stewardship will empower people and assure them that their digital files can be safe if they keep them safe. She said that in the course of her work she sees in people a fear of the unknown, a huge anxiety about the fate of digital files. To illustrate her point she cites a moment during her genealogy conference presentation when she asked a group of genealogists, “How many of you think you will be able to access your digital files in ten years?” No one raised a hand.

“They are hopeful but not confident,” said Hagenmaier. “Personal digital archiving is still foreign to people. It is important for us to just get the word out that they can preserve their own stuff.”

Cultural Heritage Informatics Initiative

Paper-based Productivity and Digital Research

As I dive into the world of Digital Humanities, I am exposed to an increasing variety of programs, apps, coding languages, and platforms to digitize my research and see my work in new ways. I’ve always been interested in productivity, and paper and pen or pencil have long been some of the most valuable tools in my academic life. For the last few years I have become interested in thinking about digital tools not just as the end result of research, but also how they shape my workflow and daily routines. I’ve found Zotero to be quite helpful in organizing the thousands of newspaper articles on my hard drive, I use Evernote for organizing just about everything related to my teaching and research, and Scrivener is without a doubt my favorite program for writing articles and dissertation chapters.


Yet, the more I use digital tools, the more I continue to appreciate to my analog systems of paper and pencil. While most of my research puts me in front of my laptop screen, I find being tied to screen all day far from ideal. My laptop and other gadgets often seem as efficient as they are distracting. When I teach I run my sections as a laptop-free zone and I explain to my students the flaws of assuming we are all “good at multi-tasking.” I also find it funny to be in an academic meeting of some sort and see many in attendance using their laptops to check Facebook or email, rarely even making eye contact with the presenter.


Key to designing and maintaining a productivity system is to think about what goals you want to accomplish and what are the ‘tools of the trade’ you will enjoy using on a daily basis. I’ve found one of the most challenging things about being a PhD student is keeping on top of all of the little things, while also keeping an eye on the big picture and making steady progress towards my overarching goals. This is especially true because I have to balance both my research and my work as GTA, in which I am usually assigned to a class of about 100 students. Before I was ABD, I had all of my coursework to balance as well. I have adjusted my analog system as I have worked my way through my program, and here are two major components of my current system:


    1. Daily Tasks Journal: While I keep all off my important dates and deadlines on iCal, I also have a notebook in which I have to-do lists for each day of the week. I’ve found this very helpful in managing small tasks so they don’t eat up my day and developing an manageable plan for the week.


    2. Dissertation/writing/research Journal: My advisor (and lots of grad student blogs) suggested I start a dissertation journal when I became ABD, and this was very good advice. I don’t use this journal to collect any actual research, but rather to document how the process is going, including my work on my digital project for this fellowship. I have a pretty loose format for this journal. I document what I am working on, what seems to be going well, and what challenges I am encountering. I use this journal also to explore ideas or connections I’m seeing in my sources, as well as for topics or questions I’m just starting to think about. I find it helpful to be able to look back and see the patterns of days in which I was more productive versus less productive, and days when I felt stressed while writing compared to the days when my writing came pretty easy. When I became ABD, one of my biggest challenges was getting used to a completely different kind of schedule, in which I have tons to do but it is all on my own time. Documenting my day-to-day process has been very helpful in trying to figure out what works (besides lots of great coffee) and what hasn’t been as successful.


Both journals could easily work in a digital format. I prefer using paper not just so I get a screen break, but also because I feel that break allows me to think more deeply about my work while I am visually away from it. I like being away from email, social media, and other distractions so I can thoughtfully assess my work, even if I am just writing for ten minutes. Field Notes are my favorite notebooks for paper-based productivity. Not only are they beautifully designed and made in the USA, but I’ve found the size is small enough so I can easily carry both with me but large enough so I don’t feel cramped. Clearly I’m not the only person using analog tools to think about digital research — I’m looking for an excuse to buy these awesome stencils. I am more of pencil person versus pen, and I am a huge fan of Blackwing pencils. Many scholars and students may find it easy to give up on paper, and ultimately we should all develop systems that work best for us. But I’ve found that as I become more well versed in digital tools, I find that they greatly compliment, not replace, the joys and tangible benefits of writing by hand in a notebook.

Source: Journalism Code, Context & Community

Event Roundup, Dec 15

By Erika Owens

Event Roundup, Dec 15

The Chaos Communication Congress is December 27-30 in Hamburg. Follow along online, or if you're attending in person, OpenNews staff and fellow alumni will be there--say hello and let's chat about journalism and tech. (The CCC blog)

Deadlines

Know of any upcoming fellowship or conference proposal deadlines? Have an upcoming event? Let us know: source@mozillafoundation.org.

Center for History and New Media

Digital History Fellowships available for Fall 2015

We’re pleased to announce that the Department of History & Art History at George Mason University has received another round of funding from the Provost’s PhD Award Program to admit two Digital History Fellows in each of the next three years.

Fellows enrolling in Fall 2015 will receive stipends of $20,000 for two years, during which time they will take a practicum course each semester here at RRCHNM, and then a further three years of support from the Department of History and Art History. The practicum courses provide an opportunity to be part of a digital history center and to contribute to a range of projects across all three of the Center’s divisions. Syllabi for the practicum courses can be found on the Fellows’ blog, which also includes posts by all three cohorts of fellows reflecting on their experiences at the Center.

Students interested in applying to the GMU History PhD program and being a Digital history Fellow, should consult the information on the department website or contact the department’s graduate director, Professor Cindy Kierner. Applications close January 15, 2015

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Open Access Journal: Museum Helveticum

[First posted in AWOL 6 August 2009. Updated 15 December 2014]

Museum Helveticum

Das Museum Helveticum ist die einzige Schweizer Zeitschrift, die Beiträge aus der gesamten klassischen Altertumswissenschaft veröffentlicht, einschliesslich der Papyrologie, Epigraphik und (mit Einschränkungen) Archäologie. Es will nicht nur die Schweizer Forschung fördern und repräsentativ darstellen, sondern auch die Kontakte mit der internationalen. Forschergemeinschaft pflegen und vertiefen. Entsprechend steht die Zeitschrift zum einen den in der Schweiz Lehrenden und Lernenden offen und versteht sich auch als Mittel der Nachwuchsförderung, zum anderen ist sie seit ihren Anfängen auch Publikationsorgan der internationalen Forschergemeinschaft; dementsprechend ist neben den drei Landessprachen Englisch häufige Publikationssprache. Entstanden ist das Museum Helveticum während des Zweiten Weltkrieges aus der Zusammenarbeit einiger damals führender altertumswissenschaftlicher Lehrstuhlinhaber, die, abgeschnitten von den bisherigen europäischen Publikationsorganen, der schweizerischen Altertumswissenschaft ein Diskussionsforum schaffen und gleichzeitig die Zusammengehörigkeit betonen wollten; die erste Nummer erschien 1944. Nach Kriegsende wurde die Zeitschrift zum Organ der schweizerischen altertumswissenschaftlichen Forschung.
All issues are published online 20 months after print publication.


Volumes
Period of publication
Title
Volume 1
1944
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 2
1945
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 3
1946
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 4
1947
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 5
1948
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 6
1949
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 7
1950
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 8
1951
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 9
1952
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 10
1953
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 11
1954
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 12
1955
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 13
1956
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 14
1957
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 15
1958
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 16
1959
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 17
1960
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 18
1961
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 19
1962
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 20
1963
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 21
1964
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 22
1965
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 23
1966
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 24
1967
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 25
1968
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 26
1969
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 27
1970
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 28
1971
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 29
1972
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 30
1973
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 31
1974
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 32
1975
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 33
1976
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 34
1977
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 35
1978
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 36
1979
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 37
1980
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 38
1981
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 39
1982
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 40
1983
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 41
1984
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 42
1985
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 43
1986
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 44
1987
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 45
1988
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 46
1989
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 47
1990
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 48
1991
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 49
1992
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 50
1993
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 51
1994
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 52
1995
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 53
1996
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 54
1997
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 55
1998
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 56
1999
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 57
2000
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 58
2001
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 59
2002
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 60
2003
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 61
2004
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 62
2005
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 63
2006
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 64
2007
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 65
2008
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 66
2009
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 67
2010
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 68
2011
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Volume 69
2012
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

Must be obtained from the publisher Volume 70
2013
Museum Helveticum : schweizerische Zeitschrift für klassische Altertumswissenschaft = Revue suisse pour l'étude de l'antiquité classique = Rivista svizzera di filologia classica

transparent gif layout purposes

Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

Prosegue il progetto CyArk500 per la digitalizzazione di monumenti di tutto il mondo

cyark-torre-londraLo scorso ottobre si è tenuto il Summit annuale del Progetto CyArk presso i National Archives di Washington DC riunendo leader da più di venticinque paesi da tutto il mondo in uno spettacolo stellare di supporto per la documentazione rapida, la condivisione e l'archiviazione di 500 siti del patrimonio in via di estinzione in cinque anni di tempo. Il crescente conflitto globale, le catastrofi naturali, e la crescita della popolazione rende la necessità di questo tipo di conservazione del patrimonio più importante che mai. CyArk, una fondazione non-profit che utilizza laser scanner per creare copie digitali di siti storici per la conservazione, l'uso didattico e l'accesso virtuale, ha presentato i nuovi siti del progetto CyArk 500 ad un pubblico di oltre 200 funzionari di governo, ambasciatori, rappresentanti di imprese e fondazioni, partner istituzionali, giornalisti.

dh+lib: where the digital humanities and librarianship meet

We’re Looking for dh+lib Review Editors-at-Large for Spring 2015

The dh+lib Review, a volunteer-driven service for highlighting and sharing the best of digital humanities and libraries, is looking for editors-at-large for the Spring 2015 semester. We’ve had a steadily increasing number of editors-at-large for each of the six semesters the Review has been in operation, and we’re hoping to continue the trend. Sign up for a shift today!

The snippets, which appear on the dh+lib homepage, in a weekly newsletter sent to the ACRL Digital Humanities Interest Group listserv, and in our Twitter stream, are selected from an aggregated stream of content that is produced and shared by the dh+lib community. This stream – in the form of RSS feeds – casts a wide net and includes content produced by librarians, archivists, museum workers, faculty, information professionals, and technologists, just to name a few.

The post-publication filtering process relies heavily on the work of our editors-at-large, who volunteer for one-week shifts to survey the stream of content and select what should be highlighted on the dh+lib homepage. Once the editors-at-large have made their nominations, the editors (currently, Zach Coble, Caro Pinto, and Roxanne Shirazi), make a final selection decision, write a brief snippet providing context for each resource, and then publish the week’s batch each Tuesday.

Are you interested in volunteering for the dh+lib Review? It’s an easy way to get involved in the dh+lib community and great for staying current with conversations in DH. Editors-at-large commit to a one-week shift that involves approximately 20 minutes a day. We currently need editors-at-large for the Spring 2015 semester – sign up today!

Bill Caraher (The New Archaeology of the Mediterranean World)

Agency, Formality, and Keeping Warm in Bakken Workforce Housing

After three lovely days in the Bakken, my mind is awash in ideas for research and I feel like I can start revising our submission to Historical Archaeology right away. We were once again overwhelmed by the generosity of both new and old North Dakotans. People’s patience with our sometimes intrusive requests to take photos and have conversation, their willingness to sign IRB paperwork, and their general good will makes doing research in workforce housing in the Bakken truly remarkable.  

P1090439

Our goals for this trip were to focus on architectural innovation in the Bakken as a way to get at issues of agency in the context of workforce housing. The reviewers of our article suggested that our famous typology (Type 1, Type 2, Type 3) was more confusing than elucidating and, to be honest, we had spent more time talking about whether a camp was Type 1 or Type 2 (or whatever) was necessary over the past few visits. So, from the start of this trip we accepted that our typology was a heuristic that was useful when we started describing workforce housing, but has become less helpful as we have come to understand it better.

In the place of our typology, we discussed how camps seem to function on a continuum from the less formal to the more formal. Less formal camps tend to have less institutional control over behavior of residents, less regular appearances, and the greater fluidity of rules and policies and their enforcement than more formal camps. The most formal camps, for example, would by those set-up and run by large companies that cater to large companies in the oil patch by strictly enforcing rules of behavior and the appearance of the camp. The least formal camps are occupied by squatters with no institutional oversight and the only limits on the structure of the camp relate to their existence outside legally sanctioned settlement.

This continuum then, from formal to informal, allowed us to describe both greater variation within the workforce housing sites in the Bakken and to understand the mechanisms that have led to this variation.

In the specific context of revising our article, shifting our focus to the “formality” of camps links our descriptions of workforce housing sites much more tightly to issues of individual agency in the physical structure of the units in the camps. Less formal camps, have greater scope for individual agency and greater variation, but nevertheless still have certain limits that dictate their organization and practices. For example, the arrangement of water, sewage, and electrical hook-ups limits the arrangement of units in the camp. Moreover, the location of the camp and its visibility to local authorities also influenced how much freedom camp residents have to innovate architecturally.

For example, we focused some of our conversations with camp residents on the practice of insulating their RVs for winter. We learned that residents of RV parks tend to learn how to insulate their RVs from their neighbors with folks who had more experience weathering the long, cold North Dakota winters, providing informal advice to those from more mild southern climes. The photograph below shows stacks of extruded polystyrene insulation prepared to be mounted around the base of a new Sandpiper RV. The unit to the right has both polystyrene and plywood insulation affixed to the base of the unit and its mudroom.

P1090528

In some cases, camp managers would inspect the insulation particularly around sewage and water attachments. Some camp managers explained that if one or two units let their water or sewage freeze, they pipes throughout the camp might be compromised. As a result, they inspect sewage and water pipes regularly.

P1090476

P1090358

P1090352

The construction of mudrooms or other forms of enclosure attached to the RV is another indication of the formality of a workforce housing site. Our favorite camp in the Bakken is Williston Foxrun which has worked hard to manage the range of architectural innovation present at the site. In its earliest days, the camp showed a remarkable variation in mudroom styles including some that exceed the size of the RV or enclosed it completely. Recently, they have worked to limit the size of mudrooms to 8 x 10, but grandfather older mudrooms built in more permissive days provided that they’re not a fire hazard or encroach on their neighbors lot. The first two photos below show relatively large mudrooms probably grandfathered through at Williston Foxrun. Both rooms have air conditioning units suggesting that they’re used for more than just taking off dirty clothes and storage. The room in the top photo also has a propane tank with lines running into the unit for either a heater or a cooktop. The last of the following three photos shows a recently built mudroom which is a good bit smaller than the 8 x 10 size limit and lacks any amenities. 

P1090502

P1090516

P1090527

Finally, we had a chance to look more carefully at discard practices at workforce housing in the Bakken. As the activity in the Bakken has shifted south and has slowed down because of the dip in oil prices, there are more and more signs of RV parks being abandoned or filled with empty lots. While some of the lots were tidy after the departure of a resident – as one of our informants noted: if he left stuff behind someone else would use it, so he might as well take it with him – other lots show signs of hasty departure or no particular concern about recycling insulation or scrap wood. 

P1090529

P1090408

P1090339

In conversation with site managers, we learned the folks left cars, personal items, mudrooms, and other scraps behind when they pulled out. Abandonment sometimes followed a period of neglect when the RV would break down, its sewage system would fail, or the occupant had come into hard times and no longer maintained his or her living space. In some cases, the resident would leave abruptly or be evicted leaving behind a mess for the camp manager but a rich assemblage for archaeological investigation. The unit pictured below showed evidence for an infant living there at least for a short period of time (a single diaper, infant sunscreen, baby lotion), but the camp manager thought the lot was just occupied by a “couple of North Dakota boys.”

P1090399

So, it was a productive trip out west thanks, especially to my colleagues Bret Weber and Richard Rathaus who helped me see differently. 

P1090565


Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

Geotecnologie per l'Archeologia, ultimi giorni per iscriversi al Master di II livello

 

geotecnologie-archeologia-14-15Mancano pochi giorni alla scadenza per le iscrizioni al Master GTARC in geotecnologie per l'Archeologia, dedicata a conoscere le applicazioni di tecnologie innovative nell'archeologia: GIS, telerilevamento, fotogrammetria, modellazione 3D e geofisica. Non solo teoria, ma software innovativi ed esercitazioni pratiche.

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

News from the Freer|Sackler: Entire collection in a digital asset management system

Open F|S: Digital Zero
Composite of 700 images from the Freer Ramayana.
Composite of 700 images from the Freer Ramayana.
Courtney O’Callaghan is chief digital officer at the Freer|Sackler.

We’ve reached an important milestone at the Freer|Sackler, an effort we’re calling Digital Zero. As of this writing, we’ve become the first Smithsonian museums to digitize their collections. This is a great opportunity for scholars and researchers as well as our everyday virtual visitors to have 24/7 access to our works of art.

What exactly is Digital Zero? For the Freer|Sackler, it means that we’ve photographed and uploaded our entire collection into a digital asset management system—more than 40,000 objects and almost twice as many images, from Whistler’s Peacock Room to the tiniest unnamed ceramic sherd. We have examined the rights information on every object and marked them appropriately. We have reviewed records, both complete and incomplete, and deemed them acceptable to make public.
On January 1, 2015, we will finally share all of our objects and accompanying data with the public. We will make available 40,000+ works as high-resolution images with (often) detailed metadata, available for non-commercial use by anyone.

Digital Zero gives us the freedom to begin the rapid prototyping of digital offerings. It allows us to focus on how our visitors want to interact with our collection. And it enables our creative allies to peruse our objects and form their own endlessly variable takes on the Freer|Sackler legacy.
But this is simply the base from which we begin our digital journey. As our curators and their collaborators discover new insights, new connections, and new interpretations of our storied holdings, we must acknowledge the fact that our work is on shifting sands. Our understanding of our own collection continually evolves and changes.

We hope that by releasing this information, we will encourage others to join our journey of discovery and help us fill in the gaps, share stories, and think of new ways to envision and enliven these objects. As we move from the idea of museums as spaces for the static delivery of a monolithic point of view into ones where our objects inspire communal storytelling, and where we share diverse perspectives that are alive and changing, we will be able to engage our visitors in ways that we cannot yet imagine.

This is only the first phase. If you are interested in being part of our adventure, email us at openfs@si.edu and we will include you in our plans.

Corinthian Matters

Corinthiaka at the AIA Meeting: New Orleans, January 2015

One of the small benefits of not attending the annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America next month is that I will not have to spend Christmas break frantically working on a paper that I was unable to complete during a busy semester. On the other hand, New Orleans in January should be fantastic, with pleasant weather that contrasts with the nightmare AIA in the Snow of Chicago 2014.

The conference website notes 150 archaeology sessions and 800 speakers—which doesn’t include papers of the parallel meeting of the Society for Classical Studies (formerly APA). As in years past, I’ll post the smattering of paper titles on Corinthiaka subjects, but first, I couldn’t resist another word cloud image of the AIA 2015 after playing around with SBL titles last month. This Wordle image is based on all the AIA paper titles stripped (or mostly stripped) of presenter titles, affiliations, institutions, and meaningless keywords. 

AIAWordle

The hit subjects this year are Mediterranean, the Roman period, and the State (I should probably have stripped Ancient and Age which are too generic to be useful). Conference attendees will hear much about – gasp – the traditional places of classical archaeology: Italy, Greece, Crete, Athens, Rome, and the Etruscans (Cyprus, Sicily, Turkey, Spain, and Israel remain secondary). The Roman period is most frequent, but Bronze Age and Classical topics follow close behind (note the smaller Hellenistic period – remarkable given its vast geographic scope – and the tiny Byzantine period that must appear in only a handful of papers). I am glad to see that the “public” makes a modest show and that “evidence” and “analysis” are so important, but the tiny “digital” is surprising given its prominence in the humanities disciplines.

The Corinthiaka papers from the Program include:

  • “Tombs, Burials, and Commemoration in Corinth’s Northern Cemetery”
    (Kathleen Warner Slane, University of Missouri)
  • “Isotopic Investigation of Late Antique Human Population Movement in
    Cemeteries from Corinth, Greece” (Larkin Kennedy, Texas A&M University)
  • “Reliefs from Early Roman Corinth” (Mary C. Sturgeon, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)
  • “Corinth’s Economic Basis in the Eastern Adriatic during the Fifth – Second
    Century B.C.E.” (Jeffrey Royal, RPM Nautical Foundation/East Carolina University)
  • “The Ancient Corinth-South Stoa Roof Project: Previous Restoration and Conservation Treatments-New Approaches” (David Scahill, American School of Classical Studies at Athens, and Nicol Anastassatou, Corinth Excavations)
  • “Tegulae Mammatae in the Roman Baths at Isthmia” (Jon M. Frey, Michigan State University, and Timothy E. Gregory, Ohio State University)
  • “A Sixth Century Church in Corinth” (Paul D. Scotton, California State University, Long Beach)

See also:


ASOR Blog (American Schools of Oriental Research)

What did Jewish Priests Wear?

ANET_Dec2014_Banner

By: Joan E. Taylor

In antiquity, as today, ritual experts of various kinds were distinguished by dress that marked them … Read more

Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

Convenzione PRODOC-ICRCPAL per la conservazione del patrimonio archivistico

prodoc-conservazione-archivioNell’ottica di garantire la massima professionalità nei servizi offerti, PRODOC ha stipulato una convenzione con l’ICRCPAL (Istituto Centrale per il Restauro e la Conservazione del Patrimonio Archivistico e Librario), a cui viene affidato un incarico di consulenza per lo svolgimento dell’attività di ispezione diagnostica, biologica e microbiologica dei beni librari e documentari non appartenenti allo Stato.

Master in Digital Audio-Video Editing e Restauro Digitale Audio-Video

restauro-video-sapienzaSono aperte le iscrizioni ai Master "Spettacolo" promossi dall'Università Sapienza di Roma. I Master sono aperti a tutti i laureati in Arti e Scienze dello Spettacolo o Laurea in Lettere (v.o.) o Laurea DAMS, e tutti colori in possesso di un titolo universitario appartenente ad una delle classi di laurea presenti sul bando e interessati a conoscere le tecnologie avanzate di editing, animazione 3D e restauro digitale, sia attraverso lo studio delle metodologie produttive nell’ambito dell’audiovisivo multimediale, sia attraverso l’applicazione delle tecnologie elettroniche digitali attraverso gli hardware e software più diffusi in ambito broadcast. 

3D ArcheoLab tra i vincitori del bando Incredibol

3d-archeolab-schemaAnche il progetto 3D Archeolab è tra i vincitori della quarta edizione del concorso Incredibol! – l’innovazione creativa di Bologna, progetto promosso dal Comune di Bologna, con il sostegno della Regione Emilia-Romagna e la collaborazione di un’ampia partnership pubblico-privata, che offre ai vincitori un accompagnamento su misura in un mix di contributi economici, spazi in comodato gratuito, consulenze, formazione e promozione. 18 i progetti selezioanti tra 116 presentati.

Nuova app in realtà aumentata per conservatori e scienziati dei beni culturali

 

app-ar-scienziatiE’ stata presentata recentemente al Scientific Symposium dell’International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) una nuova app per la diagnostica per immagini. Questa app è stata sviluppata dall’Universita’ della California in San Diego (CISA3) dall’ingengnere David Vanoni.

NEH Office of Digital Humanities Update

A Change in our Implementation Grant Guidelines

By Perry Collins

This year, we have made one substantive addition to the guidelines: a special call that asks applicants to re-envision past work in innovative and ambitious ways.

December 14, 2014

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Akkadische und sumerische Texte (AST)

Akkadische und sumerische Texte (AST) bearbeitet von Walter Sommerfeld
Ur III Transliterationen mit Hyperlinks
Quelle: Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative (CDLI)
ur3_20110805_public.atf 
Ur III Glossar Teil 1 (A–E) mit Hyperlinks
Quelle: Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative (CDLI)
ur3_20110805_public.atf
Ur III Glossar Teil 2 (G–L) mit Hyperlinks
Quelle: Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative (CDLI)
ur3_20110805_public.atf
Ur III Glossar Teil 3 (M-Š) mit Hyperlinks
Quelle: Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative (CDLI)
ur3_20110805_public.atf 

Ur III Glossar Teil 4 (T–Z, Numeralia)) mit Hyperlinks
Quelle: Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative (CDLI)
ur3_20110805_public.atf  

Ur III Zeichenkonkordanz
Quelle: Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative (CDLI)
ur3_20110805_public.atf
Der Kodex Hammurabi (KH) Transliteration [PDF]
Quellen: Rykle Borger, Babylonisch-Assyrische Lesestücke3 (Analecta Orientalia 54)
Heft I, XIII–XV, 2–50 (2006)
Dokumentation (Fotos und Kopien): Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative (CDLI) http://cdli.ucla.edu/P249253
Der Kodex Hammurabi (KH) Transliteration [text]
Quellen: Rykle Borger, Babylonisch-Assyrische Lesestücke3 (Analecta Orientalia 54)
Heft I, XIII–XV, 2–50 (2006)
Dokumentation (Fotos und Kopien): Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative (CDLI) http://cdli.ucla.edu/P249253
Der Kodex Hammurabi (KH) Glossar
Quellen: Rykle Borger, Babylonisch-Assyrische Lesestücke3 (Analecta Orientalia 54)
Heft I, XIII–XV, 2–50 (2006)
Dokumentation (Fotos und Kopien): Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative (CDLI) http://cdli.ucla.edu/P249253
Der Kodex Hammurabi (KH) Zeichenkonkordanz
Quellen: Rykle Borger, Babylonisch-Assyrische Lesestücke3 (Analecta Orientalia 54)
Heft I, XIII–XV, 2–50 (2006)
Dokumentation (Fotos und Kopien): Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative (CDLI) http://cdli.ucla.edu/P249253


Robert Consoli (Squinches)

The Hawaiian Islands. A Case Study in Kingdom Formation 2

Hereditary Inequality in the Hawaiian Islands.
A Review of How Chiefs became Kings by P.V. Kirch.

“Whatever the supporting role of factors such
as population growth, intensive agriculture,
and a beneficient environment, hereditary
inequality does not occur without active
manipulation of social logic by human agents.”
[Flannery, Marcus 2012] 191
(Emphasis is mine.)

Going from west to east in the Hawaiian Islands it becomes noticeably more difficult to produce food.  The western islands, Oahu and Kauai, are millions of years older and have large areas that are naturally irrigated and suitable for taro (Colocasia esculenta) cultivation.  On both Oahu and Kauai there are even true rivers whereas most other islands have only rain-fed streams.

Figure 1 The principal Hawaiian Islands

This map is the work of MattWright.  It is in the public domain.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawaii_(island)#mediaviewer/File:Map_of_Hawaii_highlighting_Hawaii_(island).svg


Characteristic landscape regimes on those islands are the Wailua river valley and the Hanalei valley on Kauai or the Anahulu valley on Oahu.  Moreover the islands of Kauai and Oahu have richly developed fringing reefs and abundant marine food resources.  The eastern islands, Hawaii, Maui, and Molokai, are younger.  Erosion has not had as long to work.  Hawaii and Maui have fewer areas suitable for wet-land taro agriculture (with the notable exceptions of Hana on Maui and Waipio valley on Hawaii.).  These younger islands also have less well developed fringing coral reefs.  Salt water aquatic life is not as rich; both fresh and salt water fish ponds are not so easy to construct.[1]


Small demonstration taro (Colocasia esculenta) pond in Iao Valley on Maui, Hawaiian Islands.
Copyright Robert H. Consoli, all rights reserved.

Yet, even though these eastern islands are poorer in irrigated land and demand more labor they are greater in area and, given the right agricultural methods (in this case rain-irrigated dry land farming), they will provide a living for a large population and have the potential to become a power base for some enterprising chief.  At some time during, perhaps, the sixteenth century some enterprising high chiefs did begin to exploit these rain-irrigated uplands and, by doing so, developed the basis for genuine kingdoms along with the institution of kingship itself.

These are the main points made by Patrick V. Kirch in his book of 2010, How Chiefs Became Kings; Divine Kingship and the Rise of Archaic States in Ancient Hawaii.  He intends his book to be a contribution to the literature of state-formation[2] and he comes to the task from an agronomic and soils-science perspective.[3]  Along with the eminent anthropologist Marshall Sahlins, he co-wrote two volumes on the terracing for taro cultivation of Oahu's Anahulu Valley. [4]

Coming from that background his insights are unique and valuable and he nearly succeeds in his goal of explaining the rise of the Hawaiian state.

Against much of the current literature on the Hawaiian Islands Kirch assumes that kingship and, par extenso, the institution of the State was already present when single rulers established hegemony over their respective islands.  I say 'against the current literature' because the prevailing assumption is that the first genuine King in Hawaii was Kamehameha I who was able to unite the islands through conquest and diplomacy only after the contact with the West.[5]  Kamehameha's advantage was the possession of cannons and men who could use them; something no other Hawaiian leader had.  Kamehameha, in this account, is a genuine King because he was a uniter of chiefdoms; each chiefdom now becoming no more than a province in the new Hawaiian State.

This plunges us directly into the debate over whether the several Hawaiian polities were chiefdoms or kingdoms.  Either they were realms presided over by chiefs or true states being led by kings.  Which was it?  There are several generally agreed upon criteria for identifying the State form of polity and Kirch tries to convince us that the individual polities established on the individual islands were and had been States in that sense since at least the beginning of the sixteenth century.[6]

Polities, whether foragers, chiefdoms, or states, are generally characterized by flux; the actions of individual actors over time will transition a polity forward or backward on the scale that runs from 'foragers' to 'state' and the action of labelling difficult cases like Hawaii is simply taking a snapshot of this process and to not much analytical purpose.  Careful descriptions will yield more understanding than labeling will.

What distinguishes a chiefdom  from a state?  I suggest that the most important criterion is that a chiefdom is unsophisticated and simple from the point of view of administrative complexity.  Chiefdoms have little or no administration to which the leader can delegate authority.  Indeed, delegation in a chiefdom is a dangerous action; 'delegation' comes close to delegating everything.[7]  A state, on the other hand, is administratively complex.  Delegation in a state is a nearly risk-free activity; indeed it is the only way to accomplish certain complex tasks.  This is why we associate the transition from chiefdom to state with the  undertaking of tasks larger than those heretofore attempted by the society in question.  The classic examples of such tasks are irrigation projects and things of that type.  No chiefdom is really ready to undertake such a project but, having done so, the chiefdom quickly learns to elaborate its upper administration so that the task can be accomplished.

The process of state formation can be facilitated by learning how to perform this adminitrative elaboration from a neighboring state.  It is for this reason that the literature distinguishes between primary and secondary state formation.[8]  There are very few genuine primary states - states that learned to be states all by themselves and with no example to follow.  Egypt is one such, Mesopotamia another.  It turns out that, due to its isolation, Hawaii is also a good example of primary state formation - the Hawaiians had no examples to follow.

And there can be no doubt that the Hawaiian people pioneered a state with a richly elaborated administration.  In addition to the hangers-on at court, priests and religious officials, reciters of genealogies (mo'ole'lo), the artists in tapa cloth and dancers and innovators of the hula, the wives and other women of the chief and other high ali'i there was a rich apparatus for running the chief's various farms and, most of all, collecting the onerous rents, taxes, and tributes from the ordinary farmers.  But even though it was administratively complex why is it that the ali'i nui had to perform the Makahiki himself?  Why is it that he had to spend four months of the year travelling from district to district in order to collect taxes and 'gifts'?   It must surely mean that the ali'i nui did not have the kind of administration to which the collection of taxes could be delegated.  And if that's true then the individual Hawaiian islands were simply chiefdoms without a genuinely effective administration and so not states at all.[8a]

At the initial contact with western explorers in 1778 the society of the Hawaiian islands was the most rigidly hierarchical of the known and classified Polynesian societies.[9]  In Hawaii  there were three classes, the ali'i or aristocracy, and the noa or commoners, and the kauwa or outcasts[10].  Among the ali'i marriage and mating were rigidly controlled; close track was kept of their genealogies.  Even today surviving genealogies can go back some twenty generations.[11]  Among the kamaaina, the people, keeping track of genealogies was forbidden.  Children were allowed to know the names of their grandparents but that was all.[12]

Hanalei Valley on Kauai. Wet-land taro agriculture.
Copyright Robert H. Consoli.  All rights reserved to creator.


This change to a rigidly hierarchical society is reflected in the etymology.  In proto-Polynesian the word *kainangameans a land-holding associated with a lineage group.  Such a land-holding group traces its ascent from a common individual ancestor.  In proto-eastern polynesian the word *kainanga is merged with the prefix mata to form *mata-kainanga; which designates such a group.  In Hawaiian this becomes maka'a inana which means 'commoner' or 'people'.[13]  In other words, at some point in Hawaiian history, the genealogical pedigree which connects the lineage to specific plots of cultivable land has been broken.  Now the land belongs to the ali'i and the commoners no longer have a genealogical connection to it, they merely work what once was theirs.  How was this genealogical pedigree broken?  In the language of [Flannery, Marcus 2012] what were the specific demands to be treated as superior that resulted in the dispossession of the people from their land?  How was this genealogical  dispossession accomplished?

We are not told.
Kirch comes very close to telling us what really happened in the islands when he stresses that between the fourteenth and the sixteenth centuries the easily irrigable land was all accounted for.  Kirch understands his subject thoroughly and he convinces on this score.  By putting together data from a number of archaeological surveys he presents an irrefutable case that wet-land agriculture was at its maximum extent by that time.  The only thing left was to settle the upland rain-irrigated dry lands of Maui and Kauai.  Some chiefs, apparently sensing the opportunity, did precisely that.  At what must have been great labor and expense the dry lands of Maui and Hawaii were gradually turned into areas of productive agriculture.  Having accomplished this the chiefs had created an agricultural base upon which they could now attempt larger projects such as conquest warfare.  What probably happened (although Kirch nowhere that I can find actually says this) is the following (I’m going to state this as an hypothesis) :
H0: the project of agricultural expansion into upland rain-irrigated farmlands created a productive base that was divorced from the genealogically-oriented *mata-kainanga and came under the complete control of the ali'i who pioneered this agriculture.   These ali'inow became immensely rich and powerful relative to the ali'i on Oahu and Kauai.
As I say, this is stated as an hypothesis and, given what we’re told by Kirch, it seems a safe one.  Eventually I am going to make a claim remarkably like this for the Mycenaeans of Orchomenos.
It’s too bad that Kirch leads up to H0 but never quite asserts it.  In what I take to be the books' money paragraph we read this:
“What begins as status rivalry between senior and junior siblings, or between two ranked lineages with an ancestral *mata-kainanga group, ultimately plays out in Hawai’i as the ranked differentiation of a chiefly class (itself highly graded internally) from the commoners.”[14]
So.  How do ancestral *mata-kainanga groups come into conflict in such a way that the result is a differentiation into a chiefly and a commoner class?  Well, it just ‘plays out’.[15]  This is not very satisfying since this 'playing out' is precisely the set of contingent acts by agents which he has convinced us are vital to an explanation.  As Flannery and Marcus suggest, social inequality has nothing to do with weather, soil fertility, or population growth but with specific actions by specific people to remake the social logic in order to be treated as superior.  How is this social logic remade in Hawaii?

We are not told.
It’s unfortunate that, having told us so much of value about Hawaii, Kirch does not identify the contingent acts, the ‘manipulation by human agents’ that creates the rigidly stratified society he has spent a lifetime studying.
In my next post I will try to describe the kinds of explanations regarding ‘contingent acts’ and ‘agency’ leading to social inequality which I find missing in Kirch’s book.


Endnotes



[1] For information on the salt-, brackish-, and fresh-water fish ponds in Hawaii see [Kelly 1989]

[2] For the literature on state-formation see, e.gg. [Feinman, Marcus 1998], [Flannery and Marcus, 2012], [Carneiro 1970]

[3] ‘Agronomic and soils-science perspective’ Dr. Kirch’s titles span both soils science and traditional archaeology. See the bibliography in this post for more details. The interested reader may wish to consult the bibliography in the volume under review, pp. 253-255.

[4] This work was, itself, a crucial contribution to the development of the institution of kingship in the Hawaiian islands. [Sahlins, Kirch 1994a and 1994b].

[5] [Flannery, Marcus 2012] 347 and biblio. on p 589 under '341' and '345'.

[6]  These criteria listed in [Feinman, Marcus 1998] 4-6.

[7] [Redmond, Spencer 2012] 23.

[8] [Kirch 2010] 4.

[8a] Makahiki described in [Kirch 2010] 60-65.  And Chapter 36, 'Concerning the Makahiki' in [Malo 1951] 141-159.

[9] Hawaii compares, in this respect, to Tonga and Tahiti but is even more rigidly stratified.  [Kirch 2010] 41.  “By the time of initial contact with Europeans, Hawaiians had taken the older Polynesian concepts of chiefship and rank, and subjected them to a form of hypertrophy, the logical extension of which was that their rulers, their kings, were now held to be divine. This was not simply a quantitative extension of the Ancestral Polynesian ranking system; it was a truly qualitative change by which Hawaiian society had entered a new realm.”

[10] Ibid., 34.

[11] Ibid., 35 and Table 3.1 on p. 83.

[12] Ibid.

[13] [Kirch 2010] A helpful chart of etymological transformations is on p. 25 with accompanying discussion on pp. 16-26.

[14] [Kirch 2010] 204.

[15] This kind of mushy academese is a blot on an otherwise fine book.



Bibliography

[Carneiro 1970] Robert L. Carneiro, “A Theory of the Origin of the State”. Science, 169:733-38

[Feinman, Marcus 1998] Gary M. Feinman, Joyce Marcus, edd., Archaic States. School of American Research Press. 1998

[Flannery, Marcus 2012] Kent Flannery, Joyce Marcus. The Creation of Inequality; How our prehistoric ancestors set the Stage for Monarchy, Slavery, and Empire. Harvard University Press. Cambridge, MA, USA. 2012.

[Kelly 1989] Kelly, Marion. “Dynamics of Production Intensification in Pre-Contact Hawai’i.” In What’s New? A Closer Look at the Process of Innovation, ed. Sander E. Van der Leeuw and Robin Torrence, 82-106. London: Unwin Hyman.  1989.  Online here.

[Kirch, Hunt 1997] Patrick V. Kirch and Terry L. Hunt. Historical Ecology in the Pacific Islands: Prehistoric Environmental and Landscape Change. Yale University Press. 1997.

[Kirch 2011] Patrick V. Kirch. Roots of Conflict: Soils, Agriculture, and Sociopolitical Complexity in Ancient Hawai'i. School for Advanced Research Press. 2011.

[Kirch 2012] Patrick V. Kirch. A Shark Going Inland Is My Chief: The Island Civilization of Ancient Hawai'i. University of California Press. 2012.

[Kirch 2002] Patrick V. Kirch. On the Road of the Winds: An Archæological History of the Pacific Islands before European Contact. University of California Press. 2002.

[Malo 1951] David Malo, Hawaiian Antiquities, Mo'olelo Hawai'i. Nathaniel B. Emerson, translator. Bishop Museum Press. 1951.

[Redmond and Spencer, 2012] Elsa M. Redmond, Charles S. Spencer. “Chiefdoms at the Threshold: The competitive origins of the primary state”.  Journal of Anthropological Archaeology. 31 (2012) 22-37. 

[Sahlins, Kirch 1994a] Marshall Sahlins, Patrick V. Kirch. Anahulu: The Anthropology of History in the Kingdom of Hawaii, Volume 1: Historical Ethnography. University of Chicago Press. 1994.

[Sahlins, Kirch 1994b] Marshall Sahlins, Patrick V. Kirch. Anahulu: The Anthropology of History in the Kingdom of Hawaii, Volume 2: The Archaeology of History. University of Chicago Press. 1994.

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Akkadische Glossare und Indizes (AGI)

Akkadische Glossare und Indizes (AGI) bearbeitet von Walter Sommerfeld
Belegsammlung
Quellen: Archiv für Orientforschung 25 (1974/1977) – 52 (2011), Beiheft 21 (1986)

Sumerische Glossare und Indizes (SGI)

Sumerische Glossare und Indizes (SGI) bearbeitet von Walter Sommerfeld
Belegsammlung
Quellen: Archiv für Orientforschung 25 (1974/1977) – 52 (2011), Beiheft 21 (1986)
Digital Corpus of Cuneiform Lexical Texts (DCCLT) (2014)
electronic Pennsylvania Sumerian Dictionary (ePSD) (2006)
The Electronic Text Corpus of Sumerian Literature (ETCSL) (2005)
Leipzig–Münchner sumerischer Zettelkasten (2006)
Sammlung Sommerfeld (Auszug Juli 2014)

Zeichenkonkordanz
Quellen: Archiv für Orientforschung 25 (1974/1977) 52 (2011), Beiheft 21 (1986)
Digital Corpus of Cuneiform Lexical Texts (DCCLT) (2014)
electronic Pennsylvania Sumerian Dictionary (ePSD) (2006)
The Electronic Text Corpus of Sumerian Literature (ETCSL) (2005)
Leipzig Münchner sumerischer Zettelkasten (2006)
Sammlung Sommerfeld (Auszug Juli 2014)

December 13, 2014

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Open Access Journal: E-Sylum: An Electronic Publication of the Numismatic Bibliomania Society

 [First posted in AWOL 27 November 2011, updated 13 December 2014]

E-Sylum: An Electronic Publication of the Numismatic Bibliomania Society
http://www.coinbooks.org/global/images/layout/esylum_masthead.gif
On the morning of Friday, September 4, 1998, the Numismatic Bibliomania Society's Internet email list was inaugurated with the following message:
This message is being sent to members and friends of the Numismatic Bibliomania Society (NBS)
In a Press Release going out soon to the numismatic press, we describe the purpose of the mailing list as follows: 
 

Numismatic Bibliomania Society Vice President Wayne Homren is collecting email addresses for NBS members,  a process which began at the national meeting at the Portland  ANA convention.

The resulting mailing list will be used to keep members and interested parties updated on NBS events and  changes to the NBS web site (http://www.money.org/club_nbs.html). 
 
A number of folks signed up at the meeting in Portland.  To that initial group we've added the addresses of other current and former members that the Board is aware of, plus a few numismatic pen pals we thought might be interested. 
This is intended to be a moderated, low-volume mailing list, with no more than one message every week or so.  Its purpose and use will evolve over time - please send us your comments and suggestions. 
In the meantime, please visit our web site, and forward this  note to any other email pen-pal you think might have an interest. Remember, the list isn't limited to only NBS members.  Don't assume they're already on the list;  we're starting small, but with your help we can grow.  
The Esylum Volume Index
Volume #YearTotal Issues by YearTotal Issues to Date
Volume 119981212
Volume 219995264
Volume 3200054118
Volume 4200153171
Volume 5200252223
Volume 6200355278
Volume 7200452330
Volume 8200554384
Volume 9200653437
Volume 10200753490
Volume 11200852542
Volume 12200952594
Volume 13201052646
Volume 14201153699
Volume 15201254753
Volume 16201353806
Volume 17201450855
Esylum Complete Table of Contents

Cultural Heritage Informatics Initiative

Double Vision

Because of my interest in Renaissance drama and visual art, I am interested in connections, relationships, and patterns between Renaissance verbal and visual media. I’m also interested in how Renaissance playwrights and visual artists might be connected culturally, artistically, and professionally. For this reason, I’ve pursued digital visualization tools to use for my CHI Fellowship project. Having just presented on Palladio (with additional references to Tableau and Voyant), I’ve become more reflective of what visualization tools are, and what they are not.

 
The first question I’ve asked myself is why I should visualize my data at all. The short answer is that visualizing data allows me to view my data in a different way and it also allows me to present it to others in a tangible, approachable manner. For example, I am interested in the way in which Shakespeare uses emerging English artistic theory in his plays. So one of the first things I look for is when, how, and to what effect Shakespeare incorporates artistic terminology in his writing. While I could complete some close readings on these key passages, relate them to relevant primary works, and then situate my argument in the field accordingly, what would happen if I added the extra step of visualization to literally view these key references in a new way? Using a different lens? Might I uncover interesting and significant connections that I could not see before?

 
Visualizing this data, I theorize, will allow me to see connections, patterns, and potential trends (I’ve already uncovered a few surprises during my preliminary research). For example, does Shakespeare make greater use of artistic terminology in comedies or drama? Does he use artistic terminology more in his later plays? Are there particular acts, scenes, or characters that use artistic terminology more often? These are the types of questions visualization might be able to address.

 
Of course digital visualization does not solve research questions for me. A graph cannot analyze itself, or the enchanting Shakespearean lines that hooked me in senior English class. But it does show me new things…it does provide me with new Ways of Seeing. From there, it is up to me; what narrative will I tell to accompany my visual? What exactly is my data story? Why does it matter that Timon of Athens includes variations of the word ‘paint’ more than a dozen times? What purpose does it serve and what is at stake by identifying the purpose of these allusions?

 
Over the next month I’ll continue to explore visualization tools in an effort to determine which platform is right for me and my project. Exciting things are to come in the next semester: solidifying my project, attending DH workshops at the SAA, and launching what I hope will be a useful tool for myself and others.

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Lexundria: A Digital Library of Antiquity

Lexundria: A Digital Library of Antiquity
http://lexundria.com/lexundria.png
Lexundria is a digital library of classical antiquity. Although most of the texts on this site can be found elsewhere on the internet, this project aims to make them accessible in a more research-friendly format. The Lexundria editions are thus distinguished by the following features:
1. Standard reference numbers. Most classical texts have a standard referencing scheme used by academics and other authors (analogous to the verse divisions of the Bible). These divisions are clearly marked in the texts on this site, even when the corresponding print edition does not contain them.
2. Pin-citation functionality. You can easily look up a passage at Lexundria using its pin citation. Rather than browse through long blocks of text in order to find the passage you’re looking for, simply enter the standard citation in the Lexundria search box. Lexundria will automatically pinpoint the passage and display it.
3. Parallel-editions mode. When Lexundria hosts more than one edition of a work, you will see a “compare” option at the bottom of the version menu. This feature allows you to compare editions side-by-side, one passage at a time. For a taste of how this works, try reading Epicurus’s Kuriai Doxai in comparison mode.
4. A comprehensive search engine. Lexundria’s full-text search engine makes it easy to search for words and phrases. To search the entire Lexundria library, simply enter your search terms in the search box and hit submit. To limit your search to a single work, add a backslash followed by the standard abbreviation for the work. (For example, “Antonius \Cic. Phil.” will search for occurrences of “Antonius” only in Cicero’s Philippics.) To limit your search to a single edition, add another backslash followed by the Lexundria abbreviation for the edition. (Edition abbreviations can be found on Lexundria’s table of contents page for the work you’re interested in.)
Please note that Lexundria will conduct a natural-language search by default. To conduct a Boolean search instead, add an equals sign to the beginning of your query.
With only a few dozen texts online at the moment, this project is still in its infancy. But even a limited version is preferable to a “coming soon” page, and in that spirit this modest start is offered to the public. I hope that this resource will make consulting these important texts more convenient than ever.

Biographies

Kristina Killgrove (Powered by Osteons)

Bones - Season 10, Episode 10 (Review)

The 200th in the 10th 

So this isn't a typical episode of Bones, of course.  It's some weird fake-40s movie-within-a-movie-within-a-TV-show, starring every single semi-regular character.  Brennan is trying to be a detective and trying to impress her father, the chief of LAPD.  Booth is a jewel thief whom she tracks to Eva Braga's house.  He breaks into Braga's safe but finds only her smoking, dead body.  Brennan doesn't think Booth did it; she partners with him to clear him if he helps her solve the case and prove her worth as a detective.  Brennan asks Hodgins, Professor Actual Factual, to use his palaeontological skills to figure out information about the skeleton in the safe.

Hodgins and Edison figure out that the person was killed by blunt trauma to the skull before she was put on fire.  They then figure out based on the small shoes and short dress in Braun's closet that the skeletal remains were not hers (they were too tall). Angela helps with a facial reconstruction, and Hodgins figures out Braga was pushed down the stairs and that she was dead a few hours before the dynamite was set.

Aubrey, another jewel thief, has information for Booth but is stabbed in the back, and Booth is framed for his murder.  Meanwhile, Miss Julian, the owner of the Foxy Club, tells Brennan that Booth only stole jewels from people who made money from taking and selling Jewish internees' goods.  Then he gave the money from the sale to his friends who had PTSD from the war.

Brennan and Booth figure out that the murderer is actually Saroyan (the maid).  She stole jewels from Braga, ran off to Rio, met Aubrey there, and came back to LA.  Aubrey figure out she wasn't really Braga, though, and so Saroyan killed Braga and put her in the safe, knowing that Booth would be there to take back the jewels. She also killed Aubrey.  Brennan and Booth confront Saroyan, who takes Brennan with her to the airport to drop her into the ocean.  Booth manages to get into the plane, there's a struggle. Saroyan tries to push Brennan off the plane; she falls out.  Booth flies the plane. Brennan gets to head the division of forensic anthropology.  We never fade back to the 1950s movie stars in the movie, which means the whole opening sequence was pointless.

Stray Comments:

  • Oh jeez, the fake accents.
  • Those dial phones looked like they're from the 60s.  When is this supposed to be set?  After 1945 and before 1969 is all I could figure.
  • Forensic science wasn't invented in the 50s. It's much older, even the bone side (although it wasn't called forensic anthropology then).
  • What is up with Edison's skin color?  Is it a problem of makeup or lighting? (Or my TV?)  Seriously, he was a weird color.

From Stone to Screen

FIREtalks: Two years in 300 seconds

Our From Stone to Screen team is constantly on the lookout for opportunities to present our research; ever-vigilant, we comb calls-for-papers and subscribe to list-serves, watching for announcements and waiting to hear back about the status of submitted abstracts. So, when UBC’s Koerner Library announced the topic of their most recent…

Continue reading

December 12, 2014

Cooper-Hewitt Labs

API methods (new and old) to reflect reality

design-eagle-cloud

A quick end-of-week blog post to mention that now that the museum has re-opened we have updated the cooperhewitt.galleries.openingHours and cooperhewitt.galleries.isOpen API methods to reflect… well, reality.

In addition to the cooperhewitt.galleries API methods we’ve also published corresponding openingHours and isOpen methods for the cafe!

For example, cooperhewitt.galleries.isOpen.

curl 'https://api.collection.cooperhewitt.org/rest/?method=cooperhewitt.galleries.isOpen&access_token=***'

{
	"open": 0,
	"holiday": 0,
	"hours": {
		"open": "10:00",
		"close": "18:00"
	},
	"time": "18:01",
	"timezone": "America/New_York",
	"stat": "ok"
}

Or, cooperhewitt.cafe.openingHours.

curl -X GET 'https://api.collection.cooperhewitt.org/rest/?method=cooperhewitt.cafe.openingHours&access_token=***'

{
	"hours": {
		"Sunday": {
			"open": "07:30",
			"close": "18:00"
		},
		"Monday": {
			"open": "07:30",
			"close": "18:00"
		},
		"Tuesday": {
			"open": "07:30",
			"close": "18:00"
		},
		"Wednesday": {
			"open": "07:30",
			"close": "18:00"
		},
		"Thursday": {
			"open": "07:30",
			"close": "18:00"
		},
		"Friday": {
			"open": "07:30",
			"close": "18:00"
		},
		"Saturday": {
			"open": "07:30",
			"close": "21:00"
		}
	},
	"timezone": "America/New_York",
	"stat": "ok"
}

Because coffee, right?