Electra Atlantis: Digital Approaches to Antiquity

http://planet.atlantides.org/electra

Tom Elliott (tom.elliott@nyu.edu)

This feed aggregator is part of the Planet Atlantides constellation. Its current content is available in multiple webfeed formats, including Atom, RSS/RDF and RSS 1.0. The subscription list is also available in OPML and as a FOAF Roll. All content is assumed to be the intellectual property of the originators unless they indicate otherwise.

March 22, 2020

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

The Biblical Toolkit: Collecting Resources for Biblical, Classical, and Near Eastern Studies

The Biblical Toolkit is a simple site for collecting useful digital resources relevant to Biblical and Jewish Studies, Ancient Near Eastern, and Eastern Mediterranean studies, all broadly speaking, aimed at most academic and research levels. It developed out of my own bookmarks, which I wanted to offload from my browser. Hence I do not really provide advice, review, or commentary, and try to just collate. I have put it on the web for use by others in the hopes that it might declutter digital lives and expand existing interests.

Online teaching help kit for Classics colleagues from the Department of Classical Studies at The Open University

Online teaching help kit for Classics colleagues from the Department of Classical Studies at The Open University
In the current health crisis, Classics colleagues all over the world are being asked to rapidly switch to online teaching. There is already a great deal of help out there, and we don’t want to replicate that, but the following is a list of resources that the Open University and FutureLearn has that might be useful to you. NB: some of the Classical material is pretty old – we’re hoping it still has paedagogical value nonetheless; this list was put together in a hurry so please excuse any formatting errors.

General guidance and help with distance learning:

OU advice page on taking your teaching online
Free course: Take Your Teaching Online
Advice on how to be an online student

Online Classical resources you can use in your teaching:

LANGUAGE LEARNING:

Introducing Greek and Latin: short course with various materials
Introducing Ancient Greekshort unit on the alphabet, pronunciation, using letters to form words and using words to form simple sentences.
Greek Vocabulary Tester: OU/Eton collaboration based on Reading Greek 
Reading Classical Greekinteractive quizzes based on Reading Greek
Introducing Classical Latin: short unit on basic vocabulary, basic principles of Latin word order and sentence structure
Interactive Latinquiz on Latin noun, verb and adjective endings
Getting started on Classical Latin: free online course with beginners’ materials
The development of the Latin language: discussion of how Latin developed into modern Romance languages
Continuing Classical Latin: short online course

GREECE:

Plato on Tradition and Belief: free online course with usable structured content
Iliad and Odyssey: animated videos
Aeschylus’ Persians: short animated summary
Aristophanes’ Lysistrata: short animated summary
Oedipus: The message in the myth: online text
Encountering a Greek Vase: video
Introduction to Antigone: video
Greek Theatre: podcast
Greek Comedy: podcasts and videos
Acropolis and Parthenon: podcast
Herodotus: various materials
Greek Myth and Dr Who: article
Icarus Myth: free online course with various materials
Introduction to the Iliad: short online course with various materials

ROME:

Myth at the heart of the Roman Empire: podcast
Introduction to Virgil’s Aeneid: free online course with various materials
Buildings of ancient Rome: podcast
Mosaics at Brading Villa: videos
Hadrian: The Roamin’ Emperor: online game
Learning from human remains: an Etruscan skeleton: podcast
Power and People in Ancient Rome (a study of the arena, baths etc.): podcast
Roman funerary monuments: podcast
Hadrian’s Rome: free course with lots of materials
Ovid and Holkham Hall: podcast
Graffiti in Pompeii: video
Thugga: Romano-African City: free course with various materials

BOTH/OTHER:

Introducing the Classical World: free course with lots of material on sourcework
Exploring the classical world through the texts of Homer, Catullus, Horace, and Juvenal: podcast
Health and Wellbeing in the Ancient World: short course
The Graeco-Roman city of Paestum: podcast
Myth in the Greek and Roman Worlds: the Temple of Diana at Nemi: podcast
The Library of Alexandria: short online course with usable material
The Body in Antiquity: short online course with usable material
Reception: Pygmalion meets Buffy the Vampire Slayer: podcast

CLASSICS CONFIDENTIAL: 150 free videos of interviews with leading scholars on a variety of Classics topics

(including Greek drama, ancient food, medicine and dress, reception of ancient myth and literature, Roman Egypt, Greek democracy, ancient philosophy, Winckelmann, Greek vases, Sparta, Pompeii, gardens and lots more!)

Audio discussions on Ancient Religion on the Baron Thyssen Centre webpage

March 21, 2020

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Open Access Publications of the Centre Jean Bérard

[First posted in AWOL  26 September 2017, updates 21 March 2020]

Publications du Centre Jean Bérard Open Access
Publications du Centre Jean Bérard
Depuis plus de quarante ans, Les Publications du Centre Jean Bérard ont pour vocation de faire paraître des ouvrages scientifiques d’archéologie de l’Italie du Sud. Dans ses différentes collections, elles proposent essais, thèses, comptes rendus de fouilles, actes de colloques et de séminaires, bibliographie topographique. Les Publications se sont également dotées d'une collection de récits de voyageurs français du « Grand Tour » et d’études sur des peintres de cette époque.
72 volumes

And see See AWOL's Alphabetical List of Open Access Monograph Series in Ancient Studies 

Of marks and meaning : a palaeographic, semiotic-cognitive, and comparative analysis of the identity marks from Deir el-Medina.

Of marks and meaning : a palaeographic, semiotic-cognitive, and comparative analysis of the identity marks from Deir el-Medina.
Type:Doctoral Thesis
Title:Of marks and meaning : a palaeographic, semiotic-cognitive, and comparative analysis of the identity marks from Deir el-Medina.
Author:Moezel, K.V.J. van der
Issue Date:2016-09-07
Keywords:Egypt
Deir el-Medina
Workmen's marks
Marking systems
Semiotics
Cognition
Linguistics
Abstract:De dissertatie analyseert de aard en structuur van een oud-Egyptisch merktekensysteem en onderzoekt de relatie van deze niet-linguïstische vorm van visuele communicatie tot het linguïstische systeem van schrift. Ook worden merktekensystemen als universeel fenomeen, waar in onze eigen maatschappij nog volop gebruik van wordt gemaakt, geanalyseerd.
Promotor:Supervisor: O.E. Kaper Co-Supervisor: B.J.J. Haring
Faculty:Humanities
University:Leiden
Handle:http://hdl.handle.net/1887/42753
 

Files in this item

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application/pdfFull text21.95MbView/Open
application/pdfTitle page_Contents608.0KbView/Open
application/pdfIntroduction788.6KbView/Open
application/pdfPart I Palaeographic analysis120.4KbView/Open
application/pdfChapter 12.125MbView/Open
application/pdfChapter 24.838MbView/Open
application/pdfChapter 3349.4KbView/Open
application/pdfPart II Semiotic and cognitive analysis290.1KbView/Open
application/pdfChapter 1344.6KbView/Open
application/pdfChapter 23.357MbView/Open
application/pdfChapter 32.262MbView/Open
application/pdfPart III Comparative analysis425.1KbView/Open
application/pdfChapter 11.821MbView/Open
application/pdfChapter 21.165MbView/Open
application/pdfConclusion359.5KbView/Open
application/pdfBibliography966.2KbView/Open
application/pdfIndexes243.0KbView/Open
application/pdfTables 13_1 Classification and metadata3.047MbView/Open
application/pdfTable 13: 2 Specimina21.27MbView/Open
application/pdfPropositions1.144MbView/Open

Ostraka in Amsterdam Collections (O.Amst.)

Ostraka in Amsterdam Collections (O.Amst.)
Type:Book (monograph)
Title:Ostraka in Amsterdam Collections (O.Amst.)
Author:Worp, K.A.Bagnall, R.S.Sijpesteijn, P.J.
Issue:9
Publisher:Terra Publishing
Issue Date:1976
Handle:http://hdl.handle.net/1887/11126
 

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Eric Sowell (ericsowell.com)

Fabulae Syrae Study Group

I have read some of Fabulae Syrae, but would really like to work through it with other people. Sometimes studying is easier with others. If you would like to practice your Latin with someone else, join the google group that I setup. We will work out the details of meeting times in the group, but I am shooting to start sometime Wednesday through Friday (March 25 through March 27). In our first meeting, we will see how much of the first chapter (which is chapter 26) we can get through. We will use Zoom for the meetings.

We will try to conduct as much of this in conversational Latin as possible. I am not that great at conversational Latin, but I will try my best. If you aren’t good at conversational Latin either, then please come practice with me. We will get better together. When our Latin fails us, we will use some other language. If you are good at conversational Latin, you are obviously welcome too!

Since Fabulae Syrae is a companion volume for Familia Romana capitulum XXVI and on, it is best if you have worked through Familia Romana up to that point. If you haven’t but want to give it a try anyway, feel free to join. If you have any questions, feel free to send me an email at eric.sowell@gmail.com or hit me up on Twitter.

March 20, 2020

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

THE IRANIAN PLATEAU DURING THE BRONZE AGE: Development of urbanisation, production and trade.

THE IRANIAN PLATEAU DURING THE BRONZE AGE: Development of urbanisation, production and trade.
The Iranian Plateau during the Bronze Age
L’ouvrage rassemble une partie des contributions présentées lors du colloque «Urbanisation, commerce, subsistance et production au iiie millénaire avant J.-C. sur le Plateau iranien» qui s’est tenu à la Maison de l’Orient et de la Méditerranée à Lyon les 29 et 30 avril 2014. Les vingt articles réunis livrent un état récent de la recherche archéologique dans cette région du Moyen‑Orient pour l’âge du Bronze. Le développement socio-économique entre le mode de vie rural et la formation des vi...

 Lire la suite

Note de l’éditeur

Cover art: © Nasir Eskandari.
  • Éditeur : MOM Éditions
  •  
  • Collection : Archéologie(s) | 1
  •  
  • Lieu d’édition : Lyon
  •  
  • Année d’édition : 2019
  •  
  • Publication sur OpenEdition Books : 19 mars 2020
  •  
  • Nombre de pages : 356 p.
mmanuelle Vila, Marjan Mashkour, Michèle Casanova et al.
Preface

The global context of the Bronze Age on the Iranian Plateau

Jan-Waalke Meyer
Early urbanisation in Iran

A view from the west – some considerations about the theory of urbanisation

Urbanisation in Eastern Iran

Julie Bessenay-Prolonge et Régis Vallet
Tureng Tepe and its high terrace, a reassessment
Ali A. Vahdati, Raffaele Biscione, Riccardo La Farina et al.
Preliminary report on the first season of excavations at Tepe Chalow

New GKC (BMAC) finds in the plain of Jajarm, NE Iran

Nasir Eskandari
Regional patterns of Early Bronze Age urbanization in the southeastern Iran

New discoveries on the western fringe of Dasht‑e Lut

Production and trade

Henri-Paul Francfort
Iran and Central Asia

The Grand’Route of Khorasan (Great Khorasan Road) during the third millennium BC and the “dark stone” artefacts

Holly Pittman
Bronze Age interaction on the Iranian Plateau

From Kerman to the Oxus through seals

Babak Rafiei-Alavi
The biography of a dagger type

The diachronic transformation of the daggers with the crescent-shaped guard

The transition to Iron Age

Hamid Fahimi
The Bronze Age and the Iron Age on the Central Iranian Plateau

Two successive cultures or the appearance of a new culture?

Conclusion

Jan‑Waalke Meyer, Emmanuelle Vila, Régis Vallet et al.
The urbanisation of the Iranian Plateau and adjacent areas during the Bronze Age

Concluding thoughts



Roger Pearse (Thoughts on Antiquity, Patristics, putting things online, and more)

Further thoughts on translating St Cuthman’s “Life”

While translating the Latin text of the Life of the anglo-saxon Saint Cuthman, I have taken to googling for fragments of the Latin, or even whole sentences.  The results are often interesting, and not infrequently important.

One reason that I do this is to identify biblical references.  Often a tortured phrase turns out to be an allusion.  Indeed I came across a reference to Tobit 10:4 half an hour ago.

Strangely Google does not prioritise the Latin bible in a search for Latin text, although it is hard to see why not.  What you DO get back is endless 16th and 17th century texts, most of which I have never heard of.  I don’t know why this should be so.  Occasionally these are useful; usually they are not.

One such search produced a snippet result in a journal called Sussex Archaeological Collections.  Looking at the handful of words, I gained the impression that whatever paper this was might be a modern edition of the Latin text.  So far I have been working with the Bollandist text of 1658.  I have, indeed, found some suspect text in the Latin text.  At one point there is reference to trabale unicum where I wonder whether it should be trabale iugum.  There is, otherwise, no noun in the sentence.  The reference would be to a ridge-beam.

Of course I was unable to see what the paper was, but it proved to  be John Blair, “Saint Cuthman, Steyning and Bosham” in SAC 135 (1997), 173-92.  I was unable to access this; but an offprint was for sale on Amazon, at a high price, but rather less than the cost of the petrol to get a copy; and this arrived today.

The Blair paper does indeed contain an edition of the text – indeed a critical edition, with apparatus of the two extant manuscripts, plus the Bollandist edition.  It also contains what the author describes as a “paraphrase” translation.  This is nearly full length, and, had I known that it existed, I might not have troubled to make a translation myself.

Why paraphrase?  Well, it’s considerably easier to get the sense of the text than it is to identify each and every Latin construction and pin down precisely what that last word means.  It also avoids the risk of some snooty person critiquing your translation!   Since the precise wording is generally less important than the idea, these kinds of things are quite serviceable and they seem very common in modern versions of hagiographical literature.  But all the same, they are an abomination.  The reader should be given a proper translation.

I’ve been learning a great deal about Latin syntax from struggling with Cuthman.  I’ve been processing much of it into context-sensitive help-materials in QuickLatin 2, which is a double benefit: I learn the stuff, and there are reminders for the future.

I’ve worked harder on Cuthman than any Latin text that I have ever translated.  I’ve been proceeding as follows:

  1. Create an electronic text.
  2. Split it into chapters, each in a separate file.
  3. Split each chapter into sentences, translate this in Google Translate and interleave the two in the document.  The Google translation is generally useless, but it can sometimes highlight that the words are a set phrase of some sort, which you can therefore search for.  This is most obvious when the Google output drops into Jacobean English!
  4. Now skim-read the text in PDF, to get a sense of what the chapter says.  Ignore any difficult bits.  Speed is all.  At the head of the chapter, write down this skim-read synopsis.  This acts as a kind of guide when doing the detailed translation.
  5. First pass.  Now translate each sentence in the chapter, one by one, looking out for correlatives like vel… vel, etc.  Leave difficult bits.  Highlight in bold and red stuff of which you are uncertain.  Add a note of any Latin constructions that you recognise, and say why you chose those words.  Wherever the text feels “stiff”, then you need to document what you did.  Pay lots of attention to the verb tenses, etc.
  6. Go through the whole text until you have done the first pass.  Then copy this to a folder for later.
  7. Second pass.  Now go through the chapters again, making sure that you understand the Latin construction in every single case.  Google for them!  There’s a huge amount of information out there on syntax.  Fix whatever you can.  By the end of this, you should have satisfactory translations of the lot, with a huge amount of notes, quotes, links to external websites, and changes of mind marked with strike-out.  At this stage I tend to make most the notes grey, if I have finished with them, but want to be able to refer to them.  Then copy all these files to a new folder.

This is where I am at the moment.  The next stage will be:

  1. Third pass.  Go through the files again, removing the grey stuff, writing real footnotes; but also rechecking.  Harmonise common words.  Then save copies of this lot.
  2. Fourth pass.  Combine the sentences into groups, then into paragraphs.  Read the lot and see if it makes sense.  Sometimes you will realise that two sentences together each mean something rather different to what you thought.
  3. Create a single file with the whole translation in it.

It’s a lot of work; but it’s like solving a jigsaw puzzle.  It’s quite rewarding really!

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Egyptian textiles and their production: ‘word’ and ‘object’

Egyptian textiles and their production: ‘word’ and ‘object’
Egyptian textiles and their production: ‘word’ and ‘object’
These essays present the results of a workshop that took place on 24 November 2017 at the Centre for Textile Research (CTR), University of Copenhagen. The event was organised within the framework of the MONTEX project—a Marie Skłodowska-Curie individual fellowship conducted by Maria Mossakowska-Gaubert in collaboration with the Contextes et Mobiliers programme of the French Institute for Oriental Archaeology in Cairo (IFAO), and with support from the Institut français du Danemark and the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. Twelve essays are arranged in 4 sections: I. Weaving looms: texts, images, remains; II. Technology of weaving: study cases; III. Dyeing: terminology and technology; IV. Textile production in written sources: organisation and economy.

Contributors include: Maria Mossakowska-Gaubert, Johanna Sigl, Fleur Letellier-Willemin, Lise Bender Jørgensen, Anne Kwaspen, Barbara Köstner, Peder Flemestad, Ines Bogensperger & Helga Rösel-Mautendorfer, Isabelle Marthot-Santaniello, Aikaterini Koroli, Kerstin Dross-Krüpe, Jennifer Cromwell, and Dominique Cardon. Essays include 66 full-colour illustrations. 
Volume published by Zea Books, Lincoln, Nebraska

2020

Frontmatter for Egyptian textiles and their production: ‘word’ and ‘object’. (Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods), Maria Mossakowska-Gaubert
A new kind of loom in early Roman Egypt? How iconography could explain (or not) papyrological evidence, Maria Mossakowska-Gaubert
Egyptian pit-looms from the late first millennium AD — attempts in reconstruction from the archaeological evidence, Johanna Sigl
Tackling the technical history of the textiles of El-Deir, Kharga Oasis, the Western Desert of Egypt, Fleur Letellier-Willemin
Textiles from a Late Roman/Byzantine ecclesiastical centre at Abu Sha’ar, Egypt, Lise Bender Jørgensen
Reconstruction of a deconstructed tunic, Anne Kwaspen
What flaws can tell: a case study on weaving faults in Late Roman and Early Medieval weft-faced compound fabrics from Egypt, Barbara Köstner
Ancient Greek dyeing: a terminological approach, Peder Flemestad
Dyeing in texts and textiles: words expressing ancient technology, Ines Bogensperger and Helgo Rösel-Mautendorfer
Flax growing in late antique Egypt: evidence from the Aphrodito papyri, Isabelle Marthot-Santaniello
Textile production in the papyri: the case of private request letters, Aikaterini Koroli
How (not) to organise Roman textile production. Some considerations on merchant-entrepreneurs in Roman Egypt and the ἱστωνάρχης, Kerstin Droß-Krüpe
Domestic Textile Production in Dakhleh Oasis in the Fourth Century AD, Jennifer Cromwell
Conclusion: Egyptian Textiles and Their Production, Dominique Cardon
 

The Polychrome Hieroglyph Research Project

The Polychrome Hieroglyph Research Project

Welcome to the polychrome hieroglyph research project!

This website displays the preliminary results of ongoing research currently carried out at the Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium, into the use and meaning of colour in Egyptian hieroglyphic inscriptions.
It is powered by a database of polychrome hieroglyphs which at present contains over 3500 occurrences of individual signs.
Uniquely amongst the earliest writing systems, the Egyptian hieroglyphic script was sometimes enhanced by colouring the signs. This was not done in an arbitrary fashion, but was conventional, with each colour used in a conscious attempt either at materialism, naturalism, semi-naturalism or as a metaphor. This study aims to shed some light on the processes involved in writing in colour. The project clearly shows that a polychrome canon was in use, in a remarkably coherent and stable fashion, during some two thousand five hundred years, from the Old Kingdom right through to the Ptolemaic period.
 

The University of California Press is making all of its journal available online without charge through June 2020

The University of California Press is making all of its journal available online without charge through June 2020. The announcement is here.

Their Classics journals are:

Classical Antiquity
 Classical Antiquity

Journal of Medieval Worlds
Journal of Medieval Worlds

Rhetorica
Rhetorica: A Journal of the History of Rhetoric
 

Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

Come ti rivoluziono il survey archeologico intensivo: immagini da drone ad alta risoluzione e machine learning su Google Cloud

Due studiosi spagnoli hanno sperimentato con risultati molto promettenti la possibilità di poter individuare in modo automatico la dispersione sul terreno di frammenti fittili archeologici, il rinvenimento più comune nelle operazioni di prospezione archeologica intensiva, utilizzando immagini ad alta risoluzione da drone, fotogrammetria e una combinazione di apprendimento automatico (machine learning, branca dell’Intelligenza Artificiale) e analisi geospaziale eseguite nella piattaforma di open cloud computing geospaziale di Google Earth Engine. Si tratta di H.A. Orengo, ricercatore dell’Istituto Catalano di Archeologia Classica, e A. Garcia-Molsosa, Curie Fellow all’Università di Cambridge,e il loro studio innovativo compare sul Journal of Archaeological Science 112 di dicembre 2019.

I termini per l'analisi autoptica del territorio a fini archeologici sono numerosi: survey, prospezione archeologica, ricognizione, perlustrazione, fieldwalking. Tutti per indicare, con differenze semantiche tra loro a volte veramente sottili, una delle tecniche più note e diffuse insieme a telerilevamento e geofisica per pervenire a una conoscenza quanto più organica ed integrale possibile del territorio, del suo assetto antico e alla ricostruzione dei suoi paesaggi passati con l’individuazione di siti, insediamenti, infrastrutture e altri segni lasciati dall’attività umana nello spazio geografico nel corso del tempo. Momento imprescindibile della ricerca storico territoriale costituisce una delle modalità operative per l’elaborazione della Carta Archeologica che ricompone tutte le informazioni acquisite da fonti e metodi diversi in quadro organico e stratificato. A sua volta la Carta Archeologica è lo strumento fondamentale per ogni attività di tutela, di conservazione, fruizione e di valorizzazione del patrimonio culturale.

Sicuramente il survey archeologico è un protagonista di primo piano della ricerca archeologica.

Nel survey i “ricognitori” percorrono il territorio seguendo linee parallele o una griglia, intervallati tra loro secondo distanze prestabilite costanti, a seconda dell’intensità che si vuole dare all'indagine. Individuano e localizzano su una base cartografica, oggi tramite i dispositivi GNSSS/GPS, la persistenza e sopravvivenze di elementi antichi, monumenti, infrastrutture, tracce di attività, e dispersioni di elementi della cultura materiale del passato. Il ritrovamento prevalente è costituito dalle aree di dispersione di frammenti fittili e di materiale edilizio. A volte la prospezione viene condotta dai fieldwalker a tendenziale copertura totale, sistematica, capillare, su spettri cronologici e culturali molto ampi oppure avendo in mira periodi storici ben delimitati. Altre volte i camminatori procedono indagando aree campione secondo transetti anch'essi distanziati tra loro ma per centinaia di metri. A volte determinate aree ristrette vengono quadrettate e analizzate con estrema cura. Per pianificare le operazioni di ricognizione ma anche per analizzarle e rappresentarne i risultati del sistema informativo che grazie a esse si realizza sono impiegate abitualmente le piattaforma GIS.

Questa modalità di lavoro archeologico non va intesa in maniera totalizzante. Bisogna avere sempre coscienza dei suoi limiti. Non sempre le aree che vengono individuate in superficie corrispondono per esempio alla presenza nel sottosuolo nello stesso punto di altri oggetti o resti di edifici antichi e questo perché i processi di deposizione e di dispersione di materiale ceramico in superficie sono i più vari e complessi.
Molte poi le difficoltà che i “ricognitori” incontrano. Vanno dall'accessibilità ai fondi privati, alla copertura vegetale che ostacola o impedisce del tutto la visibilità, alla necessità di disporre per la sua effettuazione di un survey di competenze specialistiche e della capacità di vedere e di discriminare. I GIS aiutano ma l’occhio del topografo dell’antichità, la sua esperienza costituiscono un aspetto irriducibile e fondamentale per le analisi successive. Il survey va condotto poi in finestre temporali ottimali che spesso sono brevi, a volte coincidono con l’aratura ma anche insieme con le piogge che rendono i campi impraticabili per giorni, esige vegetazione ridotta al minimo, assenza di temperature elevate. E poi le difficoltà poste dai terreni compattati o dal bosco o da specificità geomorfologiche. Spesso le prospezioni si svolgono nel contesto della cosiddetta archeologia preventiva con tempi accelerati determinati dalle esigenze dei cantieri. Non da ultimo i tempi e conseguentemente i costi per sostenere le operazioni. Per ricognire un km2 sono in genere necessari non meno di 18 giornate/uomo con un orario di lavoro che non può in genere eccedere le cinque ore dopodiché cala drasticamente l’attenzione. Ancora, la necessità di conservare grandi quantità di frammenti di ceramica e la post-elaborazione e lo studio per l’analisi e la classificazione di così grandi quantità di materiale raccolto. A volte la valutazione e interpretazione dei frammenti fittili è stata legata da alcuni studiosi a metodi quantitativi controversi. In sostanza tanto tempo, tanta fatica, tante controversie metodologiche, tante difficoltà.

Il territorio italiano vanta esperienza importanti nella Carta Archeologica, e nella prospezione di superficie, che partono da Nibby a Tomassetti e che nella seconda metà del XIX secolo vedono la pionieristiche impresa in Etruria di Gamurrini, Cozza, Pasqui e Mengarelli, lucida per criteri ispiratori, ricognizione diretta dei luoghi e volontà di copertura completa e sistematica dell’intero territorio nazionale. E poi Lanciani e Ashby. Imprese proseguite con aggiornamenti metodologici e innovazioni da Lugli e da Castagnoli con la Forma Italiae e da tanti altri eminenti studiosi nel secondo dopoguerra. Numerose le ricognizioni di Quilici, Quilici Gigli, Belvedere, di molte università e scuole archeologiche straniere come la Scuola Britannica e poi con assunti metodologici, approcci e obiettivi parzialmente diversi da quelli delle scuole di topografia antica italiana gli apostoli italiani dell’archeologia dei paesaggi,swlla landscape archaeology e in generale della New Archaeology, Cambi, Terrenato, e ancora Carandini, Manacorda, Francovich e molti altri. 

Tuttavia i territori investiti in vari decenni da questo tipo di indagine non sono tantissimi, meno di cinquanta volumi per la Forma Italie ognuno dei quali corrispondenti a una tavoletta IGM scala 1 :25.000, base cartografica assunta per le ricerche, rispetto alle varie centinaia in cui è suddiviso il territorio nazionale. Ovvero siamo ben distanti dalle stime ottimistiche di studiosi come Alcock e Cherry che stimano all’inizio del XXI secolo in milioni di ettari i territori indagati nel solo bacino del Mediterraneo. 

Adesso i due studiosi Orengo e Garcia-Molsosa offrono una prima sperimentazione di un’idea che al dire il vero da tempo circola fra gli studiosi: poter individuare su grandi aree grazie al remote sensing, da piattaforme satellitari, era lo strumento che si immaginava di utilizzare, in modo automatico, poi da perfezionare manualmente,la dispersione sulla superficie dei campi di frammenti fittili. E’ quello che proprio si sono proposti di fare due studiosi utilizzando però immagini ad alta risoluzione da drone, fotogrammetria e una combinazione di apprendimento automatico e analisi geospaziale eseguita nella piattaforma di open cloud computing geospaziale di Google Earth Engine. 

La loro proposta è intrigante e si propone di incorpora nel lavoro archeologico tutta l’innovazione tecnologica del momento: il machine learning utilizzato comunemente da varie app e social media per il data mining e l'analisi. A seguire vengono integrati i droni soprattutto quelli aerei divenuti economici e con capacità tecnologiche sino a poco tempo fa impensabili, dal tempo di volo, alla sua pianificazione, alla stabilità, alla qualità e risoluzione dell'immagine adatta ora alle esigenze della ricerca archeologica, all'elusione degli ostacoli. Poi i software di fotogrammetria digitale a basso costo o open source con gli algoritmi structure from motion con le loro procedure semi-automatizzate di co-registrazione, nuvola di punti, generazione di superfici e mesh e  la diffusa distribuzione di software di fotogrammetria a basso costo e open source. Infine lo sviluppo dei servizi di cloud computing ampiamente accessibili tra cui Amazon AWS e Google Cloud Platform. Questi offrono la possibilità di utilizzare la potenza di calcolo necessaria per lo sviluppo di analisi approfondite e su larga scala.

La novità di questo studio è proprio nella definizione di un flusso di lavoro che combina una serie di recenti sviluppi tecnologici tra loro indipendenti e li integra nel lavoro archeologico.

Una scelta innovativa, coraggiosa che certamente aprirà un dibattito tra gli specialisti del settore e nuovi orizzonti per il survey archeologico.I risultati pubblicati mostrano le potenzialità sul campo di questa metodo, certamente in determinate circostanze, per produrre mappe di distribuzione accurate di frammenti ceramici sul terreno.

Lo studio mette con molta onestà in luce i limiti e sottolinea anche i possibili auspicabili sviluppi futuri di questo metodo che, va sottolineato, gli autori ritengono debba rimanere complementare anzi, diciamo noi ausiliario, alla prospezione diretta a piedi dell’archeologo, con l’intento di passare alla gestione delle macchine gran parte del lavoro non specialistico che accompagna il survey. Nelle intenzioni esso mira a migliorare le tradizionali strategie di raccolta dei dati e fornisce nuovi modi per affrontare alcune delle carenze della registrazione delle evidenze archeologiche basata sui fieldwalker. Certamente le aree di frammenti fittili che il metodo da loro messo a punto promette di rilevare in maniera automatica non sono il survey.

Il Caso di studio è costituito dall'indagine in corso sviluppata dal Progetto Archeologico di Abdera e Xanthi (APAX) in cui gli autori sono attualmente coinvolti, diretto dall'Ephoria (Soprintendenza) di Xanthi nella Grecia nord-orientale in collaborazione con ricercatori dell'Università nazionale e Capodistriana di Atene, dell'Università di Salonicco e dell'Università della Catalogna. L’obiettivo generale del progetto è quello di studiare i cambiamenti dei modelli di occupazione della città arcaica e classica di Abdera (ca. dal VII al III a.C.). La prospezione intensiva di superficie è stata considerata come lo strumento più adeguato da impiegare allo scopo. Una ricognizione del genere, ne sono consapevoli gli autori, non potrà essere replicata per questioni di tempo e di costi in territori molto vasti.
La prospezione è però servita ai due studiosi per confrontare i dati e validare la loro soluzione automatizzata con i migliori risultati possibili ottenibili dal rilevamento tradizionale. Pertanto sono state selezionate all’interno del progetto per il loro studio pilota due aree rappresentative delle condizioni dei campi durante una tipica stagione di lavoro archeologico ad Abdera. Dopo la sperimentazione le due aree sono stati suddivise con una griglia 5 × 5 m e tutti i frammenti di ceramica in ciascuna griglia sono stati registrati in modalità ultra intensiva, ben oltre la pratica standard.
Circostanza interessante è che i ricercatori invece di una buona visibilità del terreno ideale per il rilevamento della ceramica, abbiano selezionato quelli in cui la visibilità era relativamente bassa e le condizioni di rilevamento non erano le migliori disponibili, non campi dunque arati di recente ma con un'alta presenza di vegetazione, pietre e ombre, elementi che inficiano l'efficacia del rilevamento, con sedimenti che presentassero tonalità simili a quelli della ceramica. Questa selezione intendeva valutare il successo della tecnica testandola in circostanze tutt'altro che favorevoli per garantire la sua applicazione alla più ampia gamma possibile di condizioni del terreno. Inoltre lo studio pilota mirava a esplorare le possibilità di risposta agli obiettivi di un progetto come APAX. 

Veniamo ad alcuni punti del metodo messo a punto rimandando all'articolo per i particolari della procedura spiegata in dettaglio dai due ricercatori che hanno allegato un algoritmo sviluppato per l'estrazione automatica..

Al posto del ricognitore il drone che vola a 3 m dal suolo per acquisire le immagini. E’ stato utilizzato un DJI Phantom 4 Pro v.2.0 modello economico, di qualità, un tempo di volo di 30 minuti, molto stabile grazie al suo GPS e ai sensori, capacità di evitare gli ostacoli, fotocamera con un'ottica di buona qualità, otturatore meccanico e una risoluzione di 20 MP. Software di pianificazione del volo Litchi, altezza di 3 m dal suolo come si è detto, sufficiente per identificare chiaramente i frammenti di ceramica al suolo. velocità di volo di 0,61 m /s, foto scattate automaticamente ogni 2 sec, traiettoria di volo secondo linee parallele. Per l’elaborazione fotogrammetrica delle immagini acquisite dal drone con creazione dell’ortofoto (file tiff non compresso) si è utilizzato il programma Agisoft PhotoScan Professional v. 1.2.6.

Quindi la fase complessa dell’elaborazione computazionale delle immagini. Le immagini ortometriche sono state caricate in Google Earth Engine (EE), la piattaforma dove è stato possibile combinare le analisi geospaziali con gli algoritmi di apprendimento automatico. Basata sul Web da accesso gratuito alle risorse e ai servizi di calcolo in parallelo di Google Cloud. Dopo la registrazione, EE è libera e chiunque disponendo di ortofoto può riprodurre, modificare e utilizzare l'algoritmo. EE ha alcune limitazioni tra cui la dimensione massima di 10 Gb per ogni immagine caricata. Tuttavia, molte immagini possono essere caricate fino al limite di archiviazione corrente di 250 Gb. Tra i passi importanti di questa fase la generazione delle analisi di texture e/o del gradiente e quindi la generazione di un’immagine composita. Scelto un classificatore di apprendimento automatico Random Forest (RF) e addestratolo lo si è utilizzato per classificare l'immagine composita. Ciò ha prodotto un primo risultato di classificazione dell’immagine. La classificazione è stata confrontata con l'ortomosaico per valutare la sua risposta in presenza di frammenti ceramici visibili. Sono stati generati nuovi poligoni di addestramento ed eseguita una nuova iterazione dell'algoritmo RF che ha prodotto un tasso di identificazione molto elevato. L'ultimo processo dell'algoritmo è stato la vettorializzazione dei risultati del filtro, applicato che ha generato un layer vettoriale poligonale in cui ogni elemento rappresentava un frammento di ceramica, trattabile successivamente con software GIS ai fini per esempio della generazione di più mappe a partire da quella di densità.

Quindi i due ricercatori passano a una valutazione in termine di analisi costi benefici delle due tecniche utilizzate, quella della ricognizione a piedi e quella automatica con un risultato apparentemente sbalorditivo: il metodo automatizzato è stato in grado di documentare quasi cinque volte più frammenti di ceramica 9,5 volte più velocemente rispetto al metodo standard.

Orengo e Garcia-Molsosa non nascondono alcuni aspetti come le grandi risorse computazionali necessarie per condurre l'analisi fotogrammetrica e di apprendimento automatico, le competenze necessarie in Machine Learning, l’inadeguatezza dei droni attuali in alcuni contesti, l’incidenza delle condizioni di luce e la presenza di ombre,l’esclusione dalla riconoscibilità di alcuni elementi della cultura materiale diversi alla ceramica cui non può sopperire del tutto l’analisi della texture.Tra gli sviluppi futuri i due ricercatori scorgono come assai promettente l'utilizzo di immagini multispettrali e, soprattutto, termiche comporterà anche un aumento qualitativo del rilevamento ceramico data la differenza nelle firme termiche tra ceramica, pietre, terra e vegetazione. La risoluzione delle telecamere termiche è ancora approssimativa rispetto alle telecamere ottiche e multispettrali, ma importanti miglioramenti sono in vista.

 

Promozione corsi TerreLogiche: segui ORA il corso live streaming e ritorni DOPO GRATUITAMENTE in aula. Iscrizioni aperte con posti limitati.

Nel rispetto delle misure ministeriali per il contenimento della diffusione del Covid-19, TerreLogiche ha momentaneamente sospeso le attività formative in aula previste nelle sedi di Milano, Pisa, Roma e Venezia.

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

CORE: The world’s largest collection of open access research papers

 
CORE provides access to 24,936,921 free to read full text research papers with 19,383,285 full texts hosted directly by CORE
It's the biggest collection of open access full texts, making it an unparalleled research tool. It's over 45 terabytes (TB) of textual data.

Bill Caraher (The New Archaeology of the Mediterranean World)

Friday Quick Hits and Varia

It’s still winter here in North Dakotaland, which I suppose is good because it keeps people from going out and spreading COVID-19. It also helped me stay focused on the stack of books begging to be read and the need to find effective and interesting ways to move my classes online. The entire experience so far has been a bit surreal. 

To make it more real, The Digital Press moved up the release of their latest book: DATAM: Digital Approaches to Teaching the Ancient Mediterranean edited by Sebastian Heath. While hardly a how-to guide, it provides some practical and critical reflections on cutting edge teaching on the ancient Mediterranean. As always, it’s free and open access to download.  

That being said, the internet has not stopped, so I can offer some quick hits and varia:

IMG 4819

IMG 4810

March 19, 2020

Cultural Heritage Informatics Initiative

“Out of the Mouths of Babes”: Initial Feedback on the Archaeology 101 Working Website

As Autumn and I climb closer to a completed initial version of the Archaeology 101 Project website, we wanted to get some feedback from individuals in our target audience. Luckily, we spent our Spring Break with my 10-year-old niece, who was happy to take our in-progress website for a test drive. While she was generally complimentary about our work, she provided some needed feedback and came up with some great ideas for how to improve our website.

One critical area of feedback that she provided was in regards to the content of the website. In general, she was able to read and understand the content without difficulty, which is very important. We have worked hard to make our content as accessible as possible while also keeping it informative and interesting, so it was great to see her ability to digest the content. She also enjoyed the interactive elements that we had completed at that point, and appeared to find them engaging and fun.

Something that I asked her about specifically was the amount of text on each page, as we do not want our website to be bogged down with too much text and details. While some pages of our website do have a fair amount of descriptive text, she did not think that there was too much content on our webpage and found our examples helpful. While she found the amount of content to be fine, we still plan on cutting some text in the future to streamline the content and message of each page.  

Overall, she liked what we had on the webpage so far, but she also had some recommendations for making it better. Specifically, she requested that we make the website more colorful and that we add “reveal” buttons with some of the interactive elements.

Our current website is composed primarily of black text on a white background, so my niece wished to see more color in the form of pictures and more colorful components within our interactive elements. This is great advice, as our current website looks very clean, but may not catch the eye of the younger audience that we are hoping to engage. We have taken this advice to heart and are currently working to implement her color-filled agenda.

Her second suggestion, more buttons, is also important. In a few spots on our website, we ask the audience a question that is meant to make them think deeper and apply knowledge that they just learned on that page. We had not provided answers to these questions in the content, and she was not happy about that fact. To remedy this mistake, she suggested including a button that the reader could click to find out the answer, another idea that we are currently working to implement. We also hope to include more buttons in general, such as “dig deeper” buttons that will provide interested persons with more information about specific topics throughout the website.

We would both like to say a big thank you to my niece, may your websites always be filled with color and buttons!  

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Egypt Exploration Society: New online events launched

Egypt Exploration Society: New online events launched
Following the successful trial of online webinars from the EES, we will be launching a programme of online lectures during our closure due to the COVID-19 outbreak.

These lectures will be provided for free over the next two weeks in order to ensure that our supporters around the world have a good reason to stay at home, stay motivated, and stay active. We hope that this stimulates responsible online socialising focused around topics that we are all passionate about. Each webinar has a chat facility so you can participate in the lecture and ask questions of the presenter and other attendees.
ART.212, Arab tombs near Siout by Amelia Edwards, 1877The first lectures will focus on the EES, its history, and collections
Webinars have a maximum attendance capacity of 100, so please only sign up if you’re confident that you can attend. We will repeat webinars, rather than record them, so that people can experience greater engagement with other participants. They will be repeated at different times during the day (including early morning and evening in the UK) so that supporters around the world can choose a time that suits them.
Lectures will also cover recent archive projects and fundraising appeals
Don’t forget, if you know people around you that might be interested in these webinars then feel free to share the links with them.

During this difficult time of self-isolation, we would like to thank you for your patience if any technical problems happen and want to reassure all of our supporters that we are here to help where we can.

Visit our events listings to see which webinars you can register to attend.
Events

AMIR: Access to Mideast and Islamic Resources

Free access to online content from some publishers

Due to COVID-19 emergency some publishers are now offering free access to their content. These publishers offer some content for the study of Islam and the Middle East.
AMIR will update this list as new information becomes available.

"Cambridge University Press is making higher education textbooks in HTML format free to access online during the coronavirus outbreak. Over 700 textbooks, published and currently available, on Cambridge Core are available regardless of whether textbooks were previously purchased."
https://www.cambridge.org/core/what-we-publish/textbooks
[Update 3/19/2020 : Due to unprecedented demand and reported misuse publisher temporarily removed the free access to textbooks. They are  working to address these concerns plan to reinstate free access as soon as possible.


"Project Muse: Free Resources on MUSE During COVID-19"
https://about.muse.jhu.edu/resources/freeresourcescovid19/

"Access to the digital Loeb Classical Library will be free to schools and universities impacted by COVID-19 until June 30th. From Harvard University Press International @HarvardUPLondon In these uncertain times, sometimes you need to look back at the classics. 
Access to the digital Loeb Classical Library will be free to schools and universities impacted by COVID-19 until June 30th.  Librarians: email loebclassics_sales@harvard.edu for access.

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

The gold and silver coinage of Philip II published to PELLA

The gold and silver coinage of Philip II published to PELLA
After considerable effort by ANS curator Peter van Alfen, the gold and silver coin types of Philip II of Macedon have been published to PELLA. This typology, based on Georges Le Rider's 1977 Le monnayage d’argent et d’or de Philippe II frappé en Macédoine de 359 à 294, has been numbered 1-382. Le Rider's corpus is actually a die study, and the numbering system is based on die combinations rather than types. As such, there are about 2,200 or so die combinations that correspond to the 382 types. These types were given a new numbering scheme, pella.philip_ii.1 to 382, but all of the Le Rider numbers are also URIs in order to establish a concordance between Le Rider and the new scheme so that collections that cataloged their coins with Le Rider numbers can submit their RDF with those URIs or map the Le Rider to the PELLA type number.

Le Rider numbers as subtypes or deprecated types

The correspondence between PELLA and Le Rider numbers is either 1:n or 1:1. When a typology has multiple possible die combinations, the Le Rider number is considered to be a subtype of the PELLA super type. For example, there are three die combinations for PELLA Philip II no. 1, Le Rider 1.1 to 1.3. If a museum has cataloged one of their coins to Le Rider 1.1, that coin will show up on the subtype page for that combination as well as the page for PELLA Philip II 1, which gathers all of the physical specimens linked directly to that URI or any possible subtype URI (via Nomisma.org's SPARQL endpoint).
Philip II 125 with the first specimen from a Nomisma partner.


The other category in which a PELLA and Le Rider number might correlate is 1:1. In these cases, the Le Rider URI still exists, but is not a subtype (linked in the RDF as skos:broader). Instead, the Le Rider Linked Open Data is dcterms:isReplacedBy the PELLA URI, which forces an automatic semantic HTTP 303 redirect in the browser (e.g., Le Rider 5.120). The underlying RDF for the Le Rider URI is still accessible through content negotiation or appending .ttl, .jsonld, or .rdf onto the URI. These two URIs are still linked together by skos:exactMatch, which facilitates the display of coins linked to Le Rider URIs on the PELLA page.

Uploading spreadsheets in Numishare

The publication of this typology represents a breakthrough in another way. Last summer, I spent several weeks developing a spreadsheet import mechanism in the Numishare back-end. I detailed it here (along with recommendations for structuring numismatic data in Google Sheets). After some further tweaking this week, the Philip II typology is the first spreadsheet data imported into Numishare in production. Out of all of the typology projects we have published online in the last 8 years (since the OCRE prototype developed in 2012), this is the first one that did not require me to write an intermediate PHP script. I cannot overemphasize how important this is. Curators can now formulate their own data, according to the specifications above, and publish new projects without technical intervention. After the conclusion of the Hellenistic Royal Coinages project in May, I will turn my attention to refactoring older spreadsheets from OCRE into this new format, and major updates in OCRE can be made directly by curators. I have essentially coded myself out of a repetitive task, saving myself a lot of time and the ANS a lot of money in the long term.

What's next for PELLA?

Now that the URIs for Philip II are activated, I imagine that our colleagues in Berlin and Paris will begin cataloging with them. Peter has updated our curatorial database with these new IDs, but the data have not been pushed from our [terrible] FileMaker database to Mantis, but you should expect to see the ANS's coins of Philip II online in the coming days. In the mean time, a single tetradrachm from the Fralin Museum at the University of Virginia is the first contributor to the new corpus, for Philip II 125.

Juan Garcés (Digitised Manuscripts Blog)

Surveying Lord Burghley’s Atlas

Map-making, according to the 16th-century cosmographer William Cunningham, is ‘a treasure worthy to be had in estimation’. In the early modern period, maps and atlases were central to the business of government, as cartographers and surveyors devised new ways of charting Britain’s land, as well as the rest of the...

Bill Caraher (The New Archaeology of the Mediterranean World)

Three Thing Thursday: Greeks, Roads, and Oil

For whatever reason, I’m having trouble getting myself into gear over spring break and have been jumping from one thing to the next all week. It’s predictable, then, that today blog post will be a dreaded “three things” rather than a more sustained consideration of one issue, topic, question, or publication. What’s the biggest bummer is that I wanted to write more about each of these three things. Maybe I can next week, but for now, here’s a sampling of what I’ve been up to.

Thing The First

If I had all the time and energy into the world, I’d publish a little volume featuring the work of Byzantine and Late Antique archaeologist outside of the Mediterranean basin. David Pettegrew and Kostis Kourelis would appear in it, of course. This week, I was really happy to receive a copy of Pennsylvania History 87.1 (2020) which is co-edited by Pettegrew and includes an article by Kourelis and Pettegrew on the Greek communities of Harrisburg and Lancaster, Pennsylvania in the early 20th century. 

The article draws primarily from census data to paint a picture of the changing Greek communities in those towns and their divergent trajectories. The broader argument is that the tendency to emphasize Greek communities in major urban areas (Chicago, New York, et c.) obscures the fact that most Greek communities were small. More than that, these small Greek communities developed according the vagaries of these locales. The city of Harrisburg with its higher rents and involvement in the City Beautiful movement saw a very different kind of Greek community than the city of Lancaster. The Greek community in Harrisburg was more male-dominated and slower to include families although perhaps slightly more affluent, and these features most likely delayed the organization of a Greek church in the city which further slowed the development of this community.

Pettegrew and Kourelis construct their images of these two communities from the scrappy evidence provided by the census and their broad understanding of trends in these two cities. Their ability to paint vivid pictures from fragmentary evidence almost certainly derives from their years of patient work with the fragments of the Late Roman and Byzantine periods in Greece. 

(I couldn’t find the article online yet, but a few of the articles from the special issue are available here for free!).

Thing the Second

A good bit of our work on the Western Argolid Regional Project has focused on roads through our region. As a result, I’ve been trying to digest anything that drifts across my desk about roads in the Eastern Mediterranean. A couple of weeks ago, I spied Peri Johnson and Ömür Harmanşah’s “The Political Ecology of Roads And Movement: The Yalburt Yaylası Archaeological Landscape Research Project 2018 Season” from The Archaeology of Anatolia, Volume III (2019). Ömür Harmanşah has quietly established himself as one of the most insightful readers of the Mediterranean landscape and this article with Peri Johnson reflects his careful sophistication.

Johnson and Harmanşah consider the roads through their survey area in Central Anatolia from both a diachronic and decentralized perspective. In other words, they were not as concerned with the well-known roads through their area in particularly well documented periods and more interested in the ways in which local communities in their area interacted with one another and the wide region. By decentering their research and engaging with local communities, they were not only able to discover neglected roads and routes, but also associated sites. 

Their work and the situation in their survey area has close parallels with ours in the Western Argolid where in the Inachos valley formed the major route through our area throughout the ancient and into the modern period. At the same time, it has become clear that a number of significant routes linked sites in our survey area in ways that did not follow the dominant interregional road along the valley bottom. 

Thing the Third

I read John Sayles’ new book Yellow Earth this weekend. I really want to write a more substantive review of it, in part, because I really wanted to like it more than I did. Here are a few quick observations.

First, a colleague of mine mentioned once that most novels these days are really just short stories cobbled together. This book is that with plots and characters that come and go, intersect obliquely, and sometimes just fade away.

Second, Sayles does some interesting things with time. The book begins in the early days of the Bakken boom and ends just as the bust begins. For the characters, however, time passes at different rates. For two of the characters, their final year in high school traces the trajectory of the boom. For another, it occurs over the course of her pregnancy. For another still, it follow the construction of a house, the life span of a strip club, or the travels of a Mexican migrant from the border to North Dakota. The varying times at play during a boom is fascinating.

Third, the book navigates a difficult space in that one of the main characters is modeled after Tex Hall, the well-known and controversial former chairman of the Three Affiliated Tribes. This means Sayles spends much of the novel writing a number of Native American characters. While I don’t necessarily want to imply that his depiction of these characters was somehow inappropriate, instead, I’d like to acknowledge the ethical complications associated with this move and with depicting and understanding the complex attitudes among the Native American community to the oil boom.

Fourth and finally, for now, I still rankle at the depiction of the Bakken as the Wild West. I understand and appreciate the drama and the moral ambiguity latent in the concept of the Wild West, but I worry that this depiction somehow naturalizes the situation in the Bakken and undermines a reading that recognizes a series of very deliberate choices that allowed corrupt practices to prevail. 

Ethan Gruber (Numishare)

The gold and silver coinage of Philip II published to PELLA

After considerable effort by ANS curator Peter van Alfen, the gold and silver coin types of Philip II of Macedon have been published to PELLA. This typology, based on Georges Le Rider's 1977 Le monnayage d’argent et d’or de Philippe II frappé en Macédoine de 359 à 294, has been numbered 1-382. Le Rider's corpus is actually a die study, and the numbering system is based on die combinations rather than types. As such, there are about 2,200 or so die combinations that correspond to the 382 types. These types were given a new numbering scheme, pella.philip_ii.1 to 382, but all of the Le Rider numbers are also URIs in order to establish a concordance between Le Rider and the new scheme so that collections that cataloged their coins with Le Rider numbers can submit their RDF with those URIs or map the Le Rider to the PELLA type number.

Le Rider numbers as subtypes or deprecated types

The correspondence between PELLA and Le Rider numbers is either 1:n or 1:1. When a typology has multiple possible die combinations, the Le Rider number is considered to be a subtype of the PELLA super type. For example, there are three die combinations for PELLA Philip II no. 1, Le Rider 1.1 to 1.3. If a museum has cataloged one of their coins to Le Rider 1.1, that coin will show up on the subtype page for that combination as well as the page for PELLA Philip II 1, which gathers all of the physical specimens linked directly to that URI or any possible subtype URI (via Nomisma.org's SPARQL endpoint).

Philip II 125 with the first specimen from a Nomisma partner.


The other category in which a PELLA and Le Rider number might correlate is 1:1. In these cases, the Le Rider URI still exists, but is not a subtype (linked in the RDF as skos:broader). Instead, the Le Rider Linked Open Data is dcterms:isReplacedBy the PELLA URI, which forces an automatic semantic HTTP 303 redirect in the browser (e.g., Le Rider 5.120). The underlying RDF for the Le Rider URI is still accessible through content negotiation or appending .ttl, .jsonld, or .rdf onto the URI. These two URIs are still linked together by skos:exactMatch, which facilitates the display of coins linked to Le Rider URIs on the PELLA page.

Uploading spreadsheets in Numishare

The publication of this typology represents a breakthrough in another way. Last summer, I spent several weeks developing a spreadsheet import mechanism in the Numishare back-end. I detailed it here (along with recommendations for structuring numismatic data in Google Sheets). After some further tweaking this week, the Philip II typology is the first spreadsheet data imported into Numishare in production. Out of all of the typology projects we have published online in the last 8 years (since the OCRE prototype developed in 2012), this is the first one that did not require me to write an intermediate PHP script. I cannot overemphasize how important this is. Curators can now formulate their own data, according to the specifications above, and publish new projects without technical intervention. After the conclusion of the Hellenistic Royal Coinages project in May, I will turn my attention to refactoring older spreadsheets from OCRE into this new format, and major updates in OCRE can be made directly by curators. I have essentially coded myself out of a repetitive task, saving myself a lot of time and the ANS a lot of money in the long term.

What's next for PELLA?

Now that the URIs for Philip II are activated, I imagine that our colleagues in Berlin and Paris will begin cataloging with them. Peter has updated our curatorial database with these new IDs, but the data have not been pushed from our [terrible] FileMaker database to Mantis, but you should expect to see the ANS's coins of Philip II online in the coming days. In the mean time, a single tetradrachm from the Fralin Museum at the University of Virginia is the first contributor to the new corpus, for Philip II 125.

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Two new epigraphic volumes announced

Two new epigraphic volumes announced
Dear Members of the AIEGL Community,
we are happy to announce that two new epigraphic volumes have just been published. The volumes stem from the papers presented in Venice in October 2018 in the course of two conferences sponsored by our Association, to which several other contributions have been added. We attach the front page and the Table of Contents of both volumes. Their full digital content is available online in Gold Open Access format at the following links, from which you can also download the pdf versions of the whole volumes, as well as of each single article:
Altera pars laboris. Studi sulla tradizione manoscritta delle iscrizioni antiche, a cura di L. Calvelli, G. Cresci, A. Buonopane, Venice, Edizioni Ca' Foscari, 2019
https://edizionicafoscari.unive.it/en/edizioni4/libri/978-88-6969-375-5/chaptersList
La falsificazione epigrafica. Questioni di metodo e casi di studio, a cura di L. Calvelli, Venice, Edizioni Ca' Foscari, 2019
https://edizionicafoscari.unive.it/en/edizioni4/libri/978-88-6969-387-8/chaptersList
Buona lettura!

March 18, 2020

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

LOPODVNVM VI: Die 3D-Rekonstruktion des römischen Forums von Ladenburg Beschreibung und Begründung der Nachbildung

LOPODVNVM VI: Die 3D-Rekonstruktion des römischen Forums von Ladenburg Beschreibung und Begründung der Nachbildung
Jürgen Süß und Brigitte Gräf 
 LOPODVNVM VI
Forschungen und Berichte zur Archäologie in Baden-Württemberg
 
Das Zentrum der römischen Stadt Lopodunum beherrschte ein Baukomplex aus Forum und Basilika, der sich durch eine enorme Fläche und ein großes Volumen auszeichnete. Von den Gebäuden blieb allerdings bis auf Reste der Fundamente nur wenig im mittelalterlich geprägten Kern der heutigen Stadt Ladenburg erhalten. Die vorliegende Abhandlung erläutert die Überlegungen, die zur virtuellen 3D-Rekonstruktion des antiken Forums geführt haben, wie sie heute im Lobdengau-Museum in Ladenburg präsentiert wird. Neben der Darlegung der Rekonstruktionsansätze werden dabei auch Perspektiven für die weitere wissenschaftliche Beschäftigung mit dem historisch so bedeutsamen römischen Baukomplex aufgezeigt.

Inhaltsverzeichnis
PDF
Titelei
Vorwort
Inhalt
Vorwort der Autoren
1 Einführung
2 Basilika
3 Apsis
4 Nebenbauten im Rückbereich der Basilika
5 Hof
6 Innere Portiken
7 Tabernen
8 Eingangshalle
9 Äussere Portiken
10 Ausstattung
11 Umgebung
12 Schluss
13 Literaturverzeichnis / 14 Abbildungsnachweis

Resources for Online Teaching (from the SBL)

Resources for Online Teaching (from the SBL)

General Considerations

Your university will likely have resources and staff expertise to help you transition to a virtual classroom. Be sure to take advantage of them.

Pivoting to Online Instruction
Jessica Tinklenberg

Tips for Teaching Online
Amy Hale and the AAR Teaching and Learning Committee

Bringing Your Course Online
Modern Language Association

Teaching in the Context of COVID-19
Jacqueline Wernimont and Cathy N. Davidson

How to Be Present Online amid COVID-19
J. David Star

Moving Online Now: How to Keep Teaching during Coronavirus (downloadable guide)
The Chronicle of Higher Education

Some Resources for Online Learning from the Wabash Center Resource Collection
The Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion


Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)
These are some online courses brought to our attention by members. Staff have not reviewed the courses in their entirety. Viewer discretion is advised. If you offer an online course that might benefit other members, please email us at sblpress@sbl-site.org.

The Bible in Light of the Ancient Near East
Nili Samet

Introduction to New Testament
Christine Hayes


Virtual Tours

The Ultimate Guide to Virtual Museum Resources

Virtual World Project


Ancient Near East and Biblical Studies Online Resources
SBL Online Teaching Weekly Newsletters

16 March Newsletter
*Recognizing the increased need for online resources, SBL staff has chosen these external resources because we feel they may be useful for those who teach the Bible. The Society is committed to providing as many resources as we are able, and staff make every effort to vet external resources, but please be aware that the nature and availability of these resources change on a daily basis. Inclusion on the SBL site does not constitute or imply an endorsement, recommendation, warranty, or favoring of products or services by the Society or constitute or imply an exclusive arrangement with the Society. The views and opinions of external resources do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of the Society. The Society neither controls nor endorses the content of external sites or the product promoted therein.

“He Inscribed Upon a Stone”: Celebrating the Work of Jim Eisenbraun

Eisenbrauns is a veritable household name for scholars of the Bible, archaeology, and Near Eastern studies. The retirement of Jim and Merna Eisenbraun (the reason for the plural Eisenbrauns) and the transition of the imprint to Pennsylvania State University Press is an opportunity to celebrate and pay tribute. When SBL asked authors, editors, and staff associated with Eisenbrauns if they would contribute to a volume celebrating Jim’s legacy, over one hundred responses resulted in this tribute.
[Text from  the  announcement, which you can read here]

Internet Archaeology

Issue 52. Developing the ArchAIDE Application: A digital workflow for identifying, organising and sharing archaeological pottery using automated image recognition

Pottery is of fundamental importance for understanding archaeological contexts, facilitating the understanding of production, trade flows, and social interactions. Pottery characterisation and the classification of ceramics is still a manual process, reliant on analogue catalogues created by specialists, held in archives and libraries. The ArchAIDE project worked to streamline, optimise and economise the mundane aspects of these processes, using the latest automatic image recognition technology, while retaining key decision points necessary to create trusted results. Specifically, ArchAIDE worked to support classification and interpretation work (during both fieldwork and post-excavation analysis) with an innovative app for tablets and smartphones. This article summarises the work of this three-year project, funded by the European Union's Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme under grant agreement N.693548, with a consortium of partners representing both the academic and industry-led ICT (Information and Communications Technology) domains, and the academic and development-led archaeology domains. The collaborative work of the archaeological and technical partners created a pipeline where potsherds are photographed, their characteristics compared against a trained neural network, and the results returned with suggested matches from a comparative collection with typical pottery types and characteristics. Once the correct type is identified, all relevant information for that type is linked to the new sherd and stored within a database that can be shared online. ArchAIDE integrated a variety of novel and best-practice approaches, both in the creation of the app, and the communication of the project to a range of stakeholders. Contains video, 3D models and links to related digital archive and software repository.

Juan Garcés (Digitised Manuscripts Blog)

Your plain friend without flattery

Have you ever told someone off for their own good? Would you like some inspiration from the early modern era? One of our manuscripts (Add MS 15891) began as a letterbook compiled by Samuel Cox, secretary to the Elizabethan courtier Sir Christopher Hatton (c. 1540–1591), but it continued to accrue...

Bill Caraher (The New Archaeology of the Mediterranean World)

Things and Assemblage: Codex in Retrospect

Because my trip to the UK was cancelled, I’m back to working on my book on archaeology of contemporary American culture. When last I left it, I was wrestling with a chapter on things, agency, and materiality. This chapter, in turn, was part of the first part of the book which sought to unpack and generalize some of the lessons that I learned from the Alamogordo Atari Excavation. This section involved three chapters: (1) garbology, (2) things, materiality, and agency, and (3) media archaeology as archaeology.

Right now, I’m wrapping up chapter two with a section on assemblages and a concluding case study drawn from Micah Bloom’s Codex project (and the resulting book that The Digital Press at the University of North Dakota published in 2017).

Here’s what I say.

The final part of this chapter will reflect on a recent multimedia project developed by the artist Micah Bloom in Minot, North Dakota. His work, which was not archaeological in a proper sense, documented the aftermath of the Souris River flooding which devastated the small city of Minot in 2011. The floods caused the evacuation of over 4000 homes, the construction of almost 2000 shelters by FEMA, and a final cost of over $1 billon. Bloom’s work captured the tremendous impact of these floods by photographing the books left behind by the receding waters over the course of 2011. He also collected some of the books and created an instalation that traveled to several venues across the U.S. In this exhibit, he arranged some of the waterlogged and disintegrating books on shelves annotated with a series of inventory numbers. He also displayed the Tyvek suits, masks, and plastic gloves and scientific paraphernalia that his team used when collecting and examining the recovered books. Finally, his installation featured a graveyard where Bloom arranged books in neat rows on a carpet of earth awaiting burial. On the walls surrounding this cemetery hang photographs showing the find spots of books with forensic clarity. The published book associated with this project includes essays from a range of scholars who respond to his work. These essays make explicit many of the

Bloom is hardly the only artist approaching books with archaeological sensibilities. In fact, a number of municipal waste disposal centers developed artist residency programs (San Francisco, Philadelphia) as a way to capitalize on the long standing recognition that everyday objects take on new meanings when discarded as waste and repurposed as art. Bloom’s photographs of books abandoned by the retreating Souris River and disintegrating emphasizes the materiality of paper slowly returns to pulp when exposed to water. Their unnatural entanglement with the wooded banks of the river further suggests that the flood reversed the process of book manufacturing by returning the books to pulp and then to vegetation. The status of books as treasured objects (Prugh 2017; Sorensen 2017), carefully curated in libraries, in homes, and in institutions, made these images of regression even more haunting. By playing on books as personal things, always in the process of construction and decomposition (Liming 2017; Haeselin 2017; Kibler 2017), the disembodied state of the decaying books makes the absence of humans all the more visible. The absence of clear human intervention in the fate of these books offers a salient reminder that agency is not limited to individuals. The interplay between the books, the flood, and their post-deluge deposition reveal evidence for the work of insect, animals, microbes and the inherent fragility of any single material state.

Finally, Thora Brylowe’s contribution to the book dedicated to the Codex project recognized in this assemblage of books the interplay of forces on the global scale. The weather patterns, for example, that produce the 2011 Souris flood occurred as part of the larger El Niño-Southern Oscillation when the cooling waters of the equatorial Pacific produced a La Niña weather pattern which caused wetter than normal winter and spring in the Northern Plains as well as the East Asian drought. Climate change will likely make El Niño and La Niña events more intense, and the 2011 La Niña was the warmest on record. Brylowe notes that industrial practices, including paper production which both removed old growth trees from the landscape at a massive scale and relied upon fossil fuels not only allowed for the emergence of books as an affordable, personal commodity, but also spurred global climate change. The entanglement of books, climate, humans, microbes, weather, and history demonstrate the dispersed character of agency across assemblages. These assemblage not only spanned continents, but also centuries emphasizing the immediacy of Bloom’s photographs and installation as interventions which, like archaeology, seeks to provide some limits on how we see the interplay between objects.

Cultural Heritage Informatics Initiative

Archaeology 101: Stratigraphy Game update

If you’re not familiar with this project, Archaeology 101 is a collaborative CHI project between myself and Jeffrey Painter. At the launch, this project will be an interactive website that can be used to introduce elementary and middle school students (and other interested parties) to archaeology! A main component of the Archaeology 101 project will be interactive games created through different JavaScript libraries to teach visitors about different archaeological concepts.

I’ve been focusing on creating an interactive element to teach visitors about stratigraphy. Currently, the draft of text on the website introducing the concept of stratigraphy is:

Another way that archaeologists tell time is through the principle of stratigraphy. The main idea behind stratigraphy is that older things will be buried below more recent things, making it possible for archaeologists to say generally that some types of objects or sites came before or after others.

Think about your dirty clothes basket at home. On Monday night, you put your dirty clothes into the hamper. Then on Tuesday, you again throw your dirty clothes into the basket. By Friday, you have a basket full of clothes piled on top of each other. If you dug through this basket to find something, your clothes from Monday would be on the very bottom, Tuesday’s clothes would be on top of those, and Friday’s clothes would be on top. Stratigraphy works in the same way. If you build a new house on top of the ruins of another, then you know that the ruins on bottom are older than the new house being built.

Image of soil stratigraphy from a site on Michigan State University's campus. Image courtesy of the MSU Campus Archaeology Program.Image of stratigraphic profile. Image courtesy of the Michigan State University Campus Archaeology Program.

For the interactive element to allow visitors to test their understanding of this concept, we have created a stratigraphic profile, like the above image, it shows the wall of a square hole in the ground, aka the flat surface where you can see different layers of buried soil and artifacts.

Instructions for the game will ask the visitors to drag and sort images of the artifacts seen in the overall stratigraphy drawing in order from youngest at the top, to oldest at the bottom. This interactive element is being built using the sortable function of JqueryUI.

Based on feedback from Jeff’s niece (stay tuned for a blog about her other feedback tomorrow), there are a few changes I want to make to this exercise. First, she requested that the different layers and artifact be in color instead of black and white, that way it looks similar to the example image we use. We have also decided on how to show the correct answer to the game, we are now going to build a pop-up modal that you can click on to reveal the answer. Keep a look out for our launch post in May to see the final version!

Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

Come Internet of Things diventa Internet of Tutankhamon.

Un gruppo di geologi sta sperimentando con successo la tecnologia Internet of things (IoT) per monitorare e garantire la stabilità strutturale delle formazioni rocciose che sovrastano le Tombe dei Faraoni nella Valle dei Re in Egitto.

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

ASOR MEMBER RESOURCES: Online Resources for Teaching Ancient Near Eastern Studies and Cognate Fields

ASOR MEMBER RESOURCES: Online Resources for Teaching Ancient Near Eastern Studies and Cognate Fields

[Please be patient, the page load slowly]

Page under construction. Main page. Information on online teaching resources and other resources here. Links to sub-pages.

Online Resources

During this initial phase, we are asking our members to share online resources, websites, teaching aids, guidelines, or advice that they feel could be useful. We recognize that many have been forced into a position of teaching online, and ASOR wants to provide a portal where we can share ideas and help each other. Please email Marta Ostovich at programs@asor.org with any resources you would like to share with your colleagues. We also welcome your suggestions and offers to volunteer in helping us set up these resources.
Stay tuned for more to come!
Much of the content for these online resources came from H.Dixon, “What’s Already Out There? Online Resources for Teaching Ancient Near Eastern Studies and Cognate Fields,” Creative Pedagogies for Teaching the Ancient Near East and Egypt session (M. Ameri and H. Dixon, chairs), 2019 ASOR Annual Meeting, San Diego.”

Tom Brughmans (Archaeological Network Analysis)

CFP Réseaux & Histoire, Aix-en-Provence, 21-22 octobre 2020

Via Res-Hist and HNR: the call for papers for the next Res-Hist event. Cfp: La sixième rencontre du groupe Res-Hist (Réseaux & Histoire) “Réseaux bipartis en histoire” + training at Aix-en-Provence, 21-22 octobre 2020 Workshop Créé en 2013, le groupe Res-Hist est un collectif destiné à favoriser les échanges scientifiques autour des réseaux en histoire.... Continue Reading →

March 17, 2020

dh+lib: where the digital humanities and librarianship meet

ANNOUNCEMENT: We’re Going On Hiatus

Dear friends,

In light of library closures and disruptions brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, we are suspending publication of dh+lib Review for the next couple of weeks. This will allow our community of editors-at-large and editorial staff to free up some mental bandwidth as we refocus and transition professionally and personally.

We will be in touch with our editors-at-large as things progress, and this post will be updated on March 31 with any additional changes to our publication schedule.

Be well,
dh+lib Review editors

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

FREE ONLINE ACCESS to all textbooks that constitute the "Cambridge Core"

Cambridge University Press is offering FREE ONLINE ACCESS to all textbooks that constitute the "Cambridge Core" https://cambridge.org/core/what-we-publish/textbooks  
 This includes 61 books in Classical Studies, 71 in History and many others

#DigitalANE

FINAL REPORT | NOVEMBER 2019: Museum of the Bible Dead Sea Scroll Collection Scientific Research and Analysis

FINAL REPORT | NOVEMBER 2019: Museum of the Bible Dead Sea Scroll Collection Scientific Research and Analysis

The Results


“After an exhaustive review of all the imaging and scientific analysis results, it is evident that none of the textual fragments in Museum of the Bible’s Dead Sea Scroll collection are authentic,” concluded Colette Loll, founder and director of Art Fraud Insights, in a detailed report about the findings. “Moreover, each exhibits characteristics that suggest they are deliberate forgeries created in the twentieth century with the intent to mimic authentic Dead Sea Scroll fragments.”
In 2016,13 of the museum’s fragments were published by a team of scholars in Dead Sea Scrolls Fragments in the Museum Collection. Since publication, scholars have expressed growing concern about the authenticity of some of these fragments — especially since all were purchased after 2002 when suspected forgeries entered the market. Extensive appraisals of the scribal features revealed inconsistencies with authentic DSS. Pending further analysis, Museum of the Bible displayed, upon opening in November 2017, five of its DSS fragments with exhibit labels indicating that authenticity had not yet been verified.
“Notwithstanding the less than favorable results, we have done what no other institution with post-2002 DSS fragments has done,” Museum of the Bible Chief Curatorial Officer Dr. Jeffrey Kloha said. “The sophisticated and costly methods employed to discover the truth about our collection could be used to shed light on other suspicious fragments and perhaps even be effective in uncovering who is responsible for these forgeries.”

Access to the digital Loeb Classical Library will be free to schools and universities impacted by COVID-19 until June 30th.

From Harvard University Press International @HarvardUPLondon
In these uncertain times, sometimes you need to look back at the classics. Access to the digital Loeb Classical Library will be free to schools and universities impacted by COVID-19 until June 30th.  
Librarians: email loebclassics_sales@harvard.edu for access.

Roger Pearse (Thoughts on Antiquity, Patristics, putting things online, and more)

How papyrus rolls lost their tops and bottoms – from Oxyrhynchus

A truly fascinating post at Papyrus Stories tells us what happened when an archive of papyrus rolls was neglected in the early 2nd century.

“The documents shown to me by the clerk Leonides (…) were in some cases deprived of their beginning, or damaged, or moth-eaten (…). Since the books have been hastily moved from one place to another repeatedly, lying on top of each other and unattached (…). Some were eaten away at the top because of the dry heat (…) and since they are being handled daily, and their material is brittle, it happened that some were destroyed in parts, others were without beginnings, and some had even fallen apart.”

This was only part of the story.  There was a position, Keeper of the Fayum archives, but by 107 AD Leonides was the man responsible for day to day care.  The rolls were already in a mess.  Over the next 50 years all those concerned were involved in endless bureaucratic argument and appeals to the prefect over whose fault this was and what should be done, and who should pay for it.

I recommend reading the whole article.  It is an interesting insight into the disfunction of the administration at that period, from the Prefect down.  But more, it explains how it is that we get so many texts which are missing the beginning.

For the last year I have myself been trying to obtain access to a document in an archive near me, where petty bureaucrats simply won’t solve the problems they themselves create.  I’ve had to give up, in fact.  So I have quite a bit of fellow-feeling for the poor souls caught up in this mess!

Some notes on St Alnoth

A correspondent was looking for the Life of St Alnoth in the Acta Sanctorum, and found himself confused by the series, as most of us are initially.

The Acta Sanctorum is confusing to the casual visitor, because all the lives of the saints are given on their saints’ day, the day in the Catholic Church on which they are commemorated.  For Alnoth this is February 27.  There is no overall numbering of volumes.  Instead the numbering is within each month – January vol 1, etc.

The material for St Alnoth is in February, vol 3, under the material for February 27th.  In the 1658 original edition, it’s on p.684.  I’m not sure if there is a standard way to reference this, but I might give it as something like:

Acta Sanctorum, Februarii III, Feb.27,  p.684 (1658)

This volume is online in a hard-to-read form here.  An electronic transcription is here.  (If you are on Windows, just do a ctrl-F in your browser for Alnoth)

Most people find the 19th century reprint easier to use.  There it’s on p.689, here (which is p.736 of the PDF).

There does not seem to actually be a “vita” for St Alnoth.  This item is instead a “sylloge”, which seems to be a collection of snippets from other hagiographical sources.  It was written in 1658 by the Bollandist editor: in this case, none other than Johannes Bolland (“I.B.”) himself.

Bolland quotes for St Alnoth the “Life” of St Werburgh, which is in February vol 1.  He also gives another couple of snippets from elsewhere.  I did look to see if the vita of St Werburgh had been translated, but if it has, it eluded me.

Alnoth himself was a 7th century anglo-saxon saint, who lived first as a herdsman.  He suffered from the attentions of an  unfair bailiff, and then he moved to become a hermit.  He was eventually murdered by robbers.

One day I ought to sit down and compile a “finder’s guide” for anybody wanting to work with the lives of the saints.  Maybe it already exists, I do not know.  Like most people, I wandered into the world of hagiography more or less by accident!

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

DATAM: Digital Approaches to Teaching the Ancient Mediterranean

DATAM: Digital Approaches to Teaching the Ancient Mediterranean
Edited by Sebastian Heath
 
DATAM: Digital Approaches to Teaching the Ancient Mediterranean provides a series of new critical studies that explore digital practices for teaching the Ancient Mediterranean world at a wide range of institutions and levels. These practical examples demonstrate how gaming, coding, immersive video, and 3D imaging can bridge the disciplinary and digital divide between the Ancient world and contemporary technology, information literacy, and student engagement. While the articles focus on Classics, Ancient History, and Mediterranean archaeology, the issues and approaches considered throughout this book are relevant for anyone who thinks critically and practically about the use of digital technology in the college level classroom.

 DATAM features contributions from Sebastian Heath, Lisl Walsh, David Ratzan, Patrick Burns, Sandra Blakely, Eric Poehler, William Caraher, Marie-Claire Beaulieu and Anthony Bucci as well as a critical introduction by Shawn Graham and preface by Society of Classical Studies Executive Director Helen Cullyer.
The book is a free, open access download and will be made available as a low-cost paperback by the middle of next month.

Bill Caraher (The New Archaeology of the Mediterranean World)

New Book Day and Teaching Tuesday: DATAM: Digital Approaches to Teaching the Ancient Mediterranean

As the coronavirus has continued to disrupt higher education in the US and globally, The Digital Press accelerated the release of Sebastian Heath’s edited volume, DATAM: Digital Approaches to Teaching the Ancient Mediterranean as a way to contribute to the ongoing conversation about digital and online teaching not only in Classics, Ancient History, and Mediterranean Archaeology but across the entire humanities. 

The book is a free, open access download and will be made available as a low-cost paperback by the middle of next month.

We’re calling this version, the “Digital First, Alpha Version” because it sounds cool. You can download it here.

Here’s the description of the book:

DATAM: Digital Approaches to Teaching the Ancient Mediterranean provides a series of new critical studies that explore digital practices for teaching the Ancient Mediterranean world at a wide range of institutions and levels. These practical examples demonstrate how gaming, coding, immersive video, and 3D imaging can bridge the disciplinary and digital divide between the Ancient world and contemporary technology, information literacy, and student engagement. While the articles focus on Classics, Ancient History, and Mediterranean archaeology, the issues and approaches considered throughout this book are relevant for anyone who thinks critically and practically about the use of digital technology in the college level classroom.

DATAM features contributions from Sebastian Heath, Lisl Walsh, David Ratzan, Patrick Burns, Sandra Blakely, Eric Poehler, William Caraher, Marie-Claire Beaulieu and Anthony Bucci as well as a critical introduction by Shawn Graham and preface by Society of Classical Studies Executive Director Helen Cullyer.

Here’s the cover:

DATAM Cover AlphaVersion2

For those of you working to bring your classes online, you might also find useful insights and ideas in Shawn Graham’s recent, award winning, book: Failing Gloriously and Other Essays and the journal that he edits Epoiesen (which can be found here in PDF and on the web here).

Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities

Building a Community Data Curation Practice: Digital Archiving through Partnership and Resource Sharing

In support of the Re/Member Black Philadelphia project, Garcon launched a community data curation pilot in partnership with the Free Library of Philadelphia. The goal of the community-rooted digitization project was to create access pathways to historical records from under-documented communities by producing digital surrogates and offering consultation to expand the life of materials held within the communities of color. As Philadelphia gentrifies at a faster rate than San Francisco, well-resourced institutions need to develop inclusive practices that support on-going community archival efforts. This talk discusses the experience of building an institutional practice that foregrounds partnership and resource sharing in developing digital archives.

The post Building a Community Data Curation Practice: Digital Archiving through Partnership and Resource Sharing appeared first on Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities.

March 16, 2020

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Open Access Journal: Entangled Religions: Interdisciplinary Journal for the Study of Religious Contact and Transfer

Entangled Religions: Interdisciplinary Journal for the Study of Religious Contact and Transfer
ISSN: 2363-6696
Entangled Religions is an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed academic journal. It deals with encounters between different religious traditions and concomitant processes of transfer in past and present times.
Contributions to Entangled Religions discuss occasions, themes, modes, conditions, and consequences of contacts between religious groups and the way religious thought and practice developed in and through such contact phenomena. Such phenomena, we assume, eventually brought about both the larger and smaller religious traditions of today and the religious field as a social entity distinct from other fields such as politics, economics, and art.

The journal aims at overcoming the historically established disciplinary cleavages in religious studies by providing a common point of departure. Inter- and intra-religious processes initiated by religious encounter are a focal point of research on religion, enabling researchers from various academic backgrounds to share their respective research. Presenting research on dynamics resulting from the interaction of distinct religious traditions and their manifestations in the self-imagination of these traditions, Entangled Religions creates systematic reference points which allow for the integration of diachronically and synchronically compared material into a general history of religions.
Entangled Religions focuses on case studies of original research, with each case study focusing on a particular geographical region, a particular moment in or period of time, and a particular constellation of two or more religious traditions encountering each other. Each case study extrapolates the occasions as well as the historical and social contexts of such encounters and, most importantly, sheds light on the issues, notions, themes and practices addressed in the particular contact situation.

While individual case studies and the particularities of the presented material are crucial, the broader objective of Entangled Religions is to enable larger-scale comparisons. Comparing diverse cases beyond individual particularities, time periods, and cultural contexts requires abstracting from the material at hand and making broader generalizations. We believe this is best done by using theoretical concepts that function as tertia comparationis, making every case study in Entangled Religions a case of something. For example, a case study about transformations of Jewish rituals in ancient Palestine due to contact with Christian communities is comparable with another case study about polemics on Catholic food prohibitions among contemporary Lebanese Sunnis only if both case studies refer to and draw from a common theoretical concept, such as “purity”.

Authors are thus expected to use analytical concepts to substantiate their case studies. Examples include the analytical concepts discussed on our website. Authors are strongly encouraged to engage with and present their material in light of these, or to introduce other analytical concepts as long as comparability of their case studies is ensured.

Entangled Religions is published by the Center for Religious Studies and the Käte Hamburger Kolleg "Dynamics in the History of Religions between Asia and Europe" at Ruhr-Universität Bochum. The website is hosted by the University Library of Ruhr-Universität Bochum.
  • Religion, Media, and Materiality
    Vol. 11 No. 3
    Guest Editors: Giulia Evolvi and Jessie Pons
    Religious practice necessarily involves the use of media to bridge the gap between immanence and transcendence. Scholarship has bee nincreasingly interested in the relationship between religion and media and how material and immaterial objects become entangled in religious belief-systems and practices. In this respect, the issue of authority emerges as paramount. The special issue aims at exploring the interplay of authority, religion, and media. It includes scholars from different disciplines –religious studies, media studies, art history, philology – presenting a wide range of case
    studies from different geographical and historical contexts, focusing both on authority as discussed within specific religious communities and as negotiated between different religious groups.
  • Formative Exchanges between the Sasanid Empire and Late Antique Rome: Zoroastrianism, Manichaeism and Christianity in Contact
    Vol. 11 No. 2
    Guest Editors: Eduard Iricinschi and Kianoosh Rezania
    The special issue “Formative Exchanges between the Sasanid Empire and Late Antique Rome: Zoroastrianism, Manichaeism and Christianity in Contact”, edited by Kianoosh Rezania and Eduard Iricinschi, publishes the contributions of a two-days workshop of the Käte Hamburger Kolleg "Dynamics in the History of Religions between Asia and Europe" hold on first and second of June 2017 at the Center for Religious Studies, Ruhr University Bochum. It explores formative dynamics of contacts, interactions, and exchanges that took place in the Sasanian and Roman Empires between Zoroastrianism, Manichaeism, and Christianity at multiple levels. The contributions investigate the cognitive, ritual, and material scope of religions represented as “minorities” within larger ethnic and ideological landscapes, such as Christians and Manichaeans in the Persian Empire, or Manichaeans in the Roman Empire. Also, they enquire into how the subsequent reactions from the political, ethnic, and religious “majority” of the Persian and Roman Empires led not only to various manners of accommodation or rejection of religious minorities by the religious establishment, but also to the transformation of these majorities themselves as a result of religious contacts, influences, and borrowings.
  • Senses, Religion and Religious Encounter
    Vol. 10
    This special issue is the outcome of the conference "Religion and the Senses", held at the Käte Hamburger Kolleg in September 2016.
    After having been disregarded in favour of doctrines and dogmas for a long time, the sensory dimension of religions has recently attracted a large scholarly attention in religious studies. In tune with the surrounding academic landscape, the Käte Hamburger Kolleg "Dynamics in the History of Religions between Asia and Europe" has devoted the academic year 2015-2016 to the scrutiny of the role of the theme "senses" from the perspective of interreligious, intrareligious and intersocietal contact. The conference summarized the main results of this work.
  • The Changing Landscapes of Cross-Faith Places and Practices
    Vol. 9 (2019)
    The present special issue of Entangled Religions has emerged from a conference about “Shared Sacred Places and Multi-Religious Space” that took place at the Leibniz Institute of European History (IEG) in Mainz in September 2016. As the title of the conference indicates, a main interest was to re-think the relation between place and space and between different religions. The conference took place in the framework of the IEG focus topic “Europe from the Margins,” which also included a lecture series on processes of marginalization and exclusion with regard to social and religious minorities within and beyond Europe. This background explains the range of topics in this special issue to a certain degree, because the conference had the aim to de-centre established notions of Europe and religion and understand them in their multi-dimensionality. While cross-faith practices are a worldwide phenomenon, the main geographical focus of the following articles is on southeastern Europe and the Mediterranean with their spatial extensions to Asia. Proceeding from here, the contributions in this volume understand multi-faith practices as embedded in local arrangements as well as in larger multi-religious landscapes, thus taking account of the interconnection between the local and the global and paying attention to the micro and macro levels of analysis.
  • Between the Altar and the Pulpit: The (New?) Materiality of the Spiritual
    Vol. 7 (2018)
    The special issue is based on papers presented at the international conference “Zwischen Kanzel und Altar. Die (neue) Materialität des Spirituellen” held at the Johannes a Lasco Bibliothek, Emden in April 2016. Continuity and change in church interiors were key concepts addressed at the conference. The studies presented here analyse the impact of confessional change on church interiors and intentionally move away from the cathedrals and parish churches in the political and religious centres of early modern Europe.
  • Historical Engagements and Interreligious Encounters - Jews and Christians in Premodern and Early Modern Asia and Africa
    Vol. 6 (2018)
    The essays in this special issue are based on the proceedings of the workshop Eastern Jews and Christians in Interaction and Exchange in the Islamic World and Beyond: A Comparative View held in Jerusalem and Raʿanana in June 2016. Accordingly, the essays address interreligious encounters in the Islamic world and beyond, examining social and religious attitudes towards religious Others in a wide range of disciplinary approaches. What binds these essays together is an attempt to shed light on a little-known history of Jewish-Christian relations in premodern Asia and Africa, a subject that stands at the heart of the research project Jews and Christians in the East: Strategies and Interactions between the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean.

Open Access Journal: Cartagine. Studi e Ricerche

 [First posted in AWOL 27 July 1017, updated 16 March 2020]

Cartagine. Studi e Ricerche
ISSN: 2532-1110 [Online]
ISSN: 2532-3563 [Print]
Testata della pagina 
Cartagine. Studi e Ricerche (CaSteR) è la rivista internazionale, accademica, peer-reviewed e Open Access, della Società Scientifica Scuola Archeologica Italiana di Cartagine (SAIC).

Ambito e orizzonte culturale

L'ambito culturale della rivista è quello delle scienze storiche, archeologiche e dell’antichità, della storia dell’arte, della conservazione, della valorizzazione e del restauro dei beni culturali. L'ambito cronologico di riferimento va dalla preistoria fino al periodo fatimide (XII sec.) mentre dal punto di vista geografico l'area di elezione è quella dell'Africa del Nord (in particolare Tunisia e paesi del Maghreb) intesa sia come spazio geografico fisico che come termine culturale di raffronto per studi che trattino di aspetti comuni ad altre aree e di rapporti di interscambio culturale e materiale. Particolare attenzione verrà inoltre riservata agli studi che tratteranno di aspetti collegati alla musealizzazione, al restauro dei monumenti, alle tematiche collegate alla valorizzazione dei giacimenti culturali materiali e immateriali.

Scopo

La rivista si propone di incoraggiare, negli ambiti sopra identificati, la ricerca interdisciplinare sull'area nord Africana ed in particolare in Tunisia proponendosi come un contenitore di scambio e confronto non solo tra i componenti della comunità accademica degli specialisti di settore ma, superando i confini nazionali, tra le diverse comunità accademiche e la società civile.

Tipo di documenti editi

I contenuti della rivista saranno principalmente testi a stampa corredati da immagini fotografiche, disegni in vari formati (raster e vettoriali), filmati video e file contenenti dati testuali. Potranno essere inoltre sottoposti alla valutazione di CaSteR per l'edizione anche lavori multimediali purché rigorosamente a carattere scientifico e di ambito cronologico, geografico e culturale assolutamente coerente con le linee editoriali sopra esposte.

2016

Copertina

V. 1 (2016)

Althiburos, Tunisia. Teatro romano (foto Gilberto Montali).


2017

Copertina

V. 2 (2017)

Ellès, Tunisia (foto Anna Depalmas).


2018

Copertina

V. 3 (2018)

Thignica, Ain Tounga, Tunisia (foto Simone Ligas).


2019

Copertina

V. 4 (2019)

Leptis Magna. Il mercato e la cosiddetta tholos (foto di Attilio Mastino, 2008).




Sommario

Editoriale

Antonio M. Corda

Saggi e studi

Souad Miniaoui
Salvatore Fadda
Lavinia Del Basso
Alessandro Teatini
Claudio Farre
Ciro Parodo
Giuseppina Battaglia, Babette Bechtold, Rossana De Simone, Stefano Vassallo, Giuseppe Montana, Luciana Randazzo
Mustafa Khanoussi, Fatma Naït -Yghil
Paola Cavaliere, Danila Piacentini
José Ortiz Córdoba
Habib Baklouti
Giorgio Crimi, Silvia Orlandi
Tiziana Carboni

Schede e materiali

Piero Bartoloni
Piero Bartoloni
Mariette de Vos Raaijmakers, Enrico Zuddas

Notizie e resoconti

Sergio Ribichini
Sergio Ribichini
Attilio Mastino
Maria Antonietta Rizzo
Cinzia Vismara
Mustafa Turjman
Maria Antonietta Rizzo, Patrizio Pensabene, Antonio Ibba
Maria Bastiana Cocco
Alberto Gavini

Recensioni

Mohamed-Arbi Nsiri

Redazionali

 


2020

Copertina

V. 5 (2020)

Il porto di Cartagine, Tunisia
Foto: Salvatore Ganga

Pubblicazione in corso
Il numero 5 (2020) è ancora aperto.

Sommario

Recensioni

Antonio Ibba

Open Access Journal: Archaeological Textiles Newsletter - Archaeological Textiles Review

 [First posted in AWOL 7 March 2017, updated 16 March 2020]

Archaeological Textiles Newsletter - Archaeological Textiles Review
ISSN: 0169-7331
In the beginning of January 2020 ATR61 was sent out to the subscribers.
Back issues ATN 1-53 and ATR 54-60 are now available on this homepage or as print-on-demand from the University of Copenhagen webshop. The webshop has both an English and Dansk interface.

We hope the readers will appreciate the comprehensive and varied issues in print or as downloads on this homepage.

Please use ATR as a medium for distributing the growing amount of information on textile archaeology, and keep sending us articles and reviews. We encourage the contributors to submit their articles throughout the year to spread the editing workload.

The deadline for contributions to this year’s ATR is the 1st of May.

We have many followers, so please spread the word, and send us your news and announcements.

 

GreekandLatinUCL (on YouTube)

 [First posted in AWOL 28 October 2018, updated 16 March 2020]

GreekandLatinUCL (on YouTube)
The Department of Greek and Latin at UCL is one of the premier Classics departments in the UK. It offers study programmes at the BA, MA and PhD level, produces high-quality research and is keen to share its expertise with the general public. UCL Greek & Latin has more than ten permanent members of staff as well as part-time staff and postgraduate researchers with diverse backgrounds and a variety of research interests. We are a vibrant community that covers all the main areas of ancient Greek and Latin language and literature as well as aspects such as philosophy, palaeography, linguistics and the reception of the ancient world in the modern period. For more information on the Department visit: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/classics/

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Bill Caraher (The New Archaeology of the Mediterranean World)

Brokenness and Repair

Over the last week or so, I’ve been carrying around Francisco Martínez’s and Patrick Laviolette’s book Repair, Brokenness, Breakthrough: Ethnographic Responses (Berghahn 2019) in part to keep my fingers in the book that I’m trying to write on the archaeology of contemporary America and, in part, because I thought it might speak to me about the headlines these days that emphasize the brokenness of, say, the US health systems. (That there are case studies involving the Pantheon clock and Swiss watches is just a happy bonus!). 

The essays largely focus on the materiality of brokenness and repair. The case studies from Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Republics in Central Asia offered particularly compelling case studies. In these contexts, brokenness largely represented the transition from state-controlled and centrally administered regimes of maintenance to a system grounded in the market economics. Tamta Khalvashi’s ethnography of brokenness and maintenance in the elevators of Georgia, for example, provided insights into the strategies used to ensure that the elevators in Soviet era apartment buildings continued to function once the centralized maintenance systems became privatized. From coin boxes to the contributions of residents (and the various efforts from folks to game the system or to avoid paying their share of elevator maintenance costs), Khalvashi maps the adaptive strategies of various communities in their effort to preserve the material manifestations of an earlier regime. Similar ethnographies of roads, holes, and buildings in other former communist block countries demonstrated similar trajectories where brokenness represents discontinuities within the history of these places and repairs present efforts both at preserving experiences and utility of objects and places as well as marking the passage of time.

As someone who has spent most of my adult life on university campuses and some recent time exploring and documenting soon-to-be-demolished buildings, I found the exploration of brokenness and repair a useful way of understanding the fabric of these buildings. More than that, it helped me appreciate the materiality of their history and how their fragmented and discontinuous pasts challenge the kinds of cohesive narratives that institutions cultivate. If the two tensions of traditional and progress define university campuses, then the visibility of repairs complicates a present constructed as an uninterrupted expression of past values. It also suggests that progress does not follow a continuous and rational trajectory from the flawed and imperfect to the improved and perfected. Repairs indicate recursive and imperfect encounters with tradition and the halting and discontinuous working of progress.

On our campus, then, the buildings most scarred with repairs the first buildings that ambitious administrators seek to erase with new constructions. These new buildings embody progress by overwriting the past and suggest tradition by creating a purified version of the architectural styles present across campus which then stand is as pure examples of an uninterrupted past.

In short, brokenness and repair create problematic ruptures in the way in which communities understand their past. At the same time, preserving evidence for repair, in turn, preserves the ruptures in the past that reveal agency in ways that the rather disembodied or heroic narratives of progress and tradition attempt to overwrite. 

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Scaife Viewer Update

Two years ago, we launched the Scaife Viewer. The primary goal at the time was to provide a reading environment for the Perseus Digital Library and the Open Greek and Latin First One-Thousand Years of Greek Project.
But even before we launched, we knew it was only the beginning and that there were a lot of rich annotations we wanted to support, including:
  • translation alignment
  • treebanks
  • critical apparatus
  • manuscript images
and more.
We also knew that Scaife wouldn’t just stay as one site (scaife.perseus.org) but become an ecosystem of software used for building all sorts of rich reading environments.
Over the last year, we’ve worked on a handful of new projects built on Scaife (although we’re always looking for more!) and, as funding permitted, have been laying the foundation for the capabilities we want the Scaife software to have in the future.
In the last update, I talked about our new architecture, essentially made up of a front-end skeleton hosting widgets talking via GraphQL to a backend server we dubbed ATLAS (for Aligned Text and Linguistic Annotation Server—an acronym I’m still proud of).
Today, on the second anniversary of the launch of the original site built on Scaife, we’re opening up our efforts on this new architecture.
We’re launching two actively developed prototypes of the new architecture: “Explore Homer” which will bring together various levels of analysis of Homer, and “SV Mini” which goes broader with a variety of texts with some analysis but not as deep as Explore Homer (nor as broad as the entire Perseus Digital Library.)
It’s still early days, but you can see the work in progress at:
with new features being released every few weeks. I will endeavour to provide updates on these releases along with video screencasts on a roughly monthly basis.
The GitHub repositories are all open (the code is open source under an MIT license) and the Trello boards tracking development have all been made public today.
The best way to get involved is to join Slack and get familiar with the key repositories and Trello boards.
Links have also been added to the project website https://scaife-viewer.org.
I am almost always available on Slack to answer any questions.
James Tauber

March 15, 2020

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Public Statement of Library Copyright Specialists: Fair Use & Emergency Remote Teaching & Research


March 13, 2020

This Statement is meant to provide clarity for U.S. colleges and universities about how copyright law applies to the many facets of remote teaching and research in the wake of the COVID-19 outbreak. We write this as copyright specialists at colleges, universities, and other organizations supporting higher education in the U.S. and Canada who work every day with faculty, staff, and librarians to enable them to make ethical and legal choices about copyright issues in online teaching.   

The United States is in a time of crisis. As of this writing, more than 200 universities and colleges have moved to remote teaching. These moves aim to promote public health by slowing the spread of the disease, while maintaining at least some of the important functions higher education plays in teaching, learning, and research. We have heard concerns that copyright may pose impediments to a rapid shift to remote instruction, or conversely, that copyright is not relevant. While legal obligations do not automatically dissolve in the face of a public health crisis, U.S. copyright law is, thankfully, well equipped to provide the flexibility necessary for the vast majority of remote learning needed at this time.

Fair Use

Copyright law in the United States is made to support teaching, research, and learning. This stems from its Constitutional purpose, which is “to promote the Progress of Science and the useful Arts.” One critical feature of copyright law is fair use, a flexible users’ right that allows the use of copyrighted works without permission. It accommodates a wide variety of circumstances, including new and rapidly evolving situations. In the words of one of our colleagues, April Hathcock, “fair use is made for just these kinds of contingencies.” 

To analyze whether a particular use is fair, courts balance four factors. The “heart of the fair use inquiry” lies in the first factor – the purpose and character of the use. Courts favor uses where the purpose is to benefit the public, even when that benefit is not “direct or tangible.”

Even under normal circumstances, courts favor educational uses because of their broad public benefits. While there are no fair use cases squarely addressing copying to help minimize a public health crisis, the other wide variety of public benefits cited by courts leads us to believe that this purpose would weigh extremely heavily in favor of fair use. For example, in the Authors Guild v. HathiTrust case, the court made it clear that providing access to persons with disabilities was a strong public interest that weighed heavily in the fair use assessment. Similarly, other courts have found that allowing reproduction of the Zapruder film documenting Kennedy's assassination was in the public interest, and allowing redistribution of leaked internal memos about problems with electronic voting machines also favored fair use. 

The benefit to the public in providing remote coursework is obvious when it enables teaching to continue in the face of social distancing measures or quarantine, or when access to physical library materials is impossible. The public benefit of these measures is without a doubt of at least equal importance as in these cases.

The second factor examines the nature of the work used—is it more factual or creative, published or not? In cases like this, the second factor “has rarely played a significant role in the determination of a fair use dispute.” For remote teaching in the COVID-19 situation, the analysis should be the same.

The third fair use factor examines the “amount and substantiality” of the work used. Per the Supreme Court, this is a flexible standard that is situation-specific. The third factor is not a mechanical application of a rule such as “no more than 10%” or “1 chapter.” The question is whether “the quantity and value of the materials used ... are reasonable in relation to the purpose of the copying.” For copies made to support rapid adoption of remote teaching, users should be thoughtful about this factor, but not agonize over it: a use can be fair as long as it reproduces what is reasonable to serve the purpose.

The fourth factor is “the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work.” This factor “requires a balancing of the benefit the public will derive if the use is permitted” versus “the personal gain the copyright owner will receive if the use is denied.” While in normal circumstances there may be licensing markets for some items, the spontaneity of a move to remote teaching under emergency circumstances reduces the importance of this factor. Checking for and relying on licensed alternatives bolsters the case for fair use under the fourth factor, but lack of time to check for licenses should not be a barrier to meeting the needs of our communities.

Campuses can also consider approaches to mitigate potential risk. Campuses should restrict access to course materials only to students, instructors, or teaching assistants enrolled in the course. Further, they should provide content only for the period of time needed, and excerpt materials when pedagogically appropriate. This limits the possibility of market harm. Ultimately, the purpose of copyright law, “promot[ing] the Progress of Science and useful Arts,” is served by engaging in these time-limited, purpose-specific uses.

It is evident that making materials available and accessible to students in this time of crisis will almost always be a fair use. As long as we are being thoughtful in our analysis and limiting our activities to the specific needs of our patrons during this time of crisis, copyright law supports our uses. The fair use doctrine accommodates the flexibility required by our shared public health crisis, enabling society to function and progress while protecting human life and safety. 

We also encourage campuses to begin contemplating the longer-term needs this situation presents. While fair use is absolutely appropriate to support the heightened demands presented by this emergency, if time periods extend further, campuses will need to investigate and adopt solutions tailored for the long-term.

DMCA and Video

While fair use offers a clear path for most uses in rapidly shifting to remote teaching, some uses raise other concerns. In particular, copying a full-length movie or television episode from a DVD for use in teaching may require circumvention of technical protection measures, which is prohibited under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (“DMCA”). Like fair use, the DMCA is designed with flexibility in mind—it empowers the Librarian of Congress to create exemptions allowing circumvention under certain circumstances. Unfortunately, the current exemptions extend only to copying “short portions” of motion pictures for use in certain types of teaching, not to copying entire works, even when doing so is clearly fair use. Courts disagree on whether circumvention violates the DMCA when the underlying use is non-infringing (for example, because of fair use) and on what constitutes circumvention. Individual institutions will need to make their own assessments of this issue in consultation with their legal counsel or administration.

When possible, we encourage using video through licensed services. From Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Prime to PBS and cable channels, many films are readily available, either for free or after payment of a relatively low fee for access. 

Rightsholders

Some creators and other copyright owners may find this analysis concerning. We offer this analysis from a place of deep respect for creators—and to provide a practical lens through which our colleagues working as instructors and in instructional support positions can keep copyright in mind despite the seismic changes they’re implementing in support of public health.


We encourage the use of already-licensed online content, openly licensed, and public domain alternatives, and working with content vendors to find mutually agreed-on ways to expand existing access to support social distancing for instruction and research. We commend vendors who have stepped up to provide free access to certain resources through the end of the current academic term. 


Signatories

(Institutional affiliations listed for identification purposes only)
Emilie Algenio, Copyright/Fair Use Librarian, Texas A&M University Libraries
Sara R. Benson, Copyright Librarian, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
Josh Bolick, Scholarly Communication Librarian, University of Kansas Libraries
Justin Lee Bonfiglio, Copyright Specialist, University of Michigan Library 
Brandon Butler, Director of Information Policy, University of Virginia Library
Will Cross, Director, Copyright & Digital Scholarship Center, North Carolina State University
Kyle K. Courtney, Copyright Advisor, Harvard Library
Kate Dickson, Copyright & Licensing Librarian, University of North Carolina, Charlotte
Amy V. Dygert, Director of Copyright Services, Cornell University
Will Edmiston, Librarian for Copyright & Reserves, The New School
Sandra Aya Enimil, Copyright Services Librarian, The Ohio State University
Ana Enriquez, Scholarly Communications Outreach Librarian, Penn State University
Maryam Fakouri, Copyright Librarian, University of Washington
Sharon E. Farb, Associate University Librarian and Chief Policy Strategist, UCLA
Donna L. Ferullo, Director, University Copyright Office, Purdue University
Katie Fortney, Copyright Policy & Education Officer, California Digital Library
Christine Fruin, Scholarly Communication and Digital Projects Manager, Atla
Agnes Gambill, Head of Scholarly Communications, Appalachian State University
Anne Gilliland, Scholarly Communications Officer, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Liz Hamilton, Copyright Librarian, Northwestern University Libraries and Northwestern University Press
Kiowa Hammons, Rights Clearance Manager, The New York Public Library
Dave Hansen, Associate University Librarian & Lead Copyright and Information Policy Officer, Duke University
April M. Hathcock, Director of Scholarly Communications & Information Policy, New York University
Brandy Karl, Head of the Office of Scholarly Communications and Copyright, Penn State University
Molly Keener, Director of Digital Initiatives & Scholarly Communication, Wake Forest University
Mary Lee Kennedy, Executive Director, Association of Research Libraries
Cindy Kristof, Head, Copyright & Scholarly Communication, Kent State University
Michael Maire Lange, Copyright & Information Policy Specialist, UC Berkeley
Yuan Li, Scholarly Communications Librarian, Princeton University Library
Carla Myers, Coordinator of Scholarly Communications, Miami University
Rina Elster Pantalony, Director, Copyright Advisory Services, Columbia University Libraries
Laura Quilter, Copyright and Information Policy, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Rachael Samberg, Scholarly Communication Officer & Program Director, UC Berkeley
LeEtta Schmidt, Copyright and Intellectual Property Librarian, University of South Florida
Nancy Sims, Copyright Program Librarian, University of Minnesota Libraries
Kevin L Smith, Dean of Libraries, University of Kansas
Stephen Spong, Law Library Director, Western University
Stephanie Towery, Copyright Officer, Texas State University
Nate Wise, Intellectual Property Office Manager, Brigham Young University - Idaho
Timothy Vollmer, Scholarly Communication & Copyright Librarian, UC Berkeley
Micah Zeller, Head of Scholarly Communication Services, Washington University in St. Louis
Katie Zimmerman, Director of Copyright Strategy, MIT Libraries

Murašu Archives online

Murašu Archives online
[From Francis Joannès via Agade]
Les 773 textes et fragments cunéiformes constituant l’ensemble publié
des archive des Murašu sont désormais accessibles en translittération
(et traduction pour certains) avec leur apparat critique sur le site
www.achemenet.com. Ils peuvent être consultés sur l’onglet Sources
Textuelles <http://www.achemenet.com/fr/tree/?/sources-textuelles>,
par les entrées «textes par langue et écriture», « textes par région »
et « textes babyloniens par publications».

 --------

The 773 published cuneiform texts and fragments constituting the
published collection of the Murašu Archive are now available in
transliteration (and translation for some of them), together with a
critical apparatus, on the site <www.achemenet.com>. They can be found
in the section Textual Sources
<http://www.achemenet.com/fr/tree/?/sources-textuelles> through the
entries "texts by languages and scripts", "texts by regions" and
"Babylonian texts by publications".

Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

Network analysis con ArcGIS per riscoprire una diramazione della via della Seta attraverso il Tibet

Un gruppo di studiosi cinesi ha ricostruito utilizzando ArcGIS e un DEM con risoluzione di 90 m il percorso dell'antica strada Tang-Tibet per l'altopiano del Qinghai-Tibet. 

L'altopiano del Tibet, ai piedi dell'Himalaya, plateau gigantesco di oltre 2.600.000 km2, panorami grandiosi, il tetto del mondo. Un ambiente naturale estremo, un'altitudine che si impenna dal suo bordo nord-est rapidamente dai 2.000 m sino a guadagnare e superare i 4.000 m (con una altidudine media di 4.400 m).

Mia Ridge (Open Objects)

Useful distractions: help cultural heritage and scientific projects from home

Today I came across the term ‘terror-scrolling’, a good phrase to describe the act of glancing from one COVID-19 update to another. While you can check out galleries, libraries, archives and museums content online or explore the ebooks, magazines and other digital items available from your local library, you might also want to help online … Continue reading Useful distractions: help cultural heritage and scientific projects from home

March 14, 2020

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

SCS Presidential Talks delivered at Annual Meetings

SCS Presidential Talks delivered at Annual Meetings
Home

      Open Access Journal: Thersites: Journal for Transcultural Presences & Diachronic Identities from Antiquity to Date

       [First posted on AWOL 21 July 2016, updated 14 March 2020]

      Thersites: Journal for Transcultural Presences & Diachronic Identities from Antiquity to Date
      ISSN: 2364-7612
      http://www.thersites.uni-mainz.de/public/journals/1/homeHeaderTitleImage_de_DE.png
      thersites is an international open access journal for innovative transdisciplinary classical studies founded in 2014 by Christine Walde, Filippo Carlà and Christian Stoffel.
      • thersites expands classical reception studies by reflecting on Greco-Roman antiquity as present phenomenon and diachronic culture that is part of today’s transcultural and highly diverse world. Antiquity, in our understanding, does not merely belong to the past, but is always experienced and engaged in the present.
         
      • thersites contributes to the critical review on methods, theories, approaches and subjects in classical scholarship, which currently seems to be awkwardly divided between traditional perspectives and cultural turns.
         
      • thersites brings together scholars, writers, essayists, artists and all kinds of agents in the culture industry to get a better understanding of how antiquity constitutes a part of today’s culture and (trans-)forms our present.
      Ancient Greek and Roman Multi-Sensory Spectacles of Grief
      Vol. 9 (2019)
      Is grief for the death of a loved one a universal, trans-historical emotion? What role does the historical, political and socio-cultural context play in how grief is understood, processed, performed, written about and represented in art? This special issue of thersites seeks to address these questions with reference to the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome. Drawing on a wide range of both textual and material culture evidence, the six papers that make up this issue investigate how the ancient Greeks and Romans reacted to the death of relatives, friends and members of their wider community, and how it affected their lives, societies and sense of identity. The first half of the issue is devoted to the portrayal of grief in the Homeric epics and Greek tragedy, while the second examines a rich variety of Roman evidence from inscriptions to art, literature and philosophy. Our work intersects with wider debates in the cross-disciplinary field of the History of Emotions, but some of the papers also reference recent scholarship on the senses in antiquity.

      Full Issue

      •    
      •  
        Vol. 6 (2017)
        While studies in the field of Classical Receptions have flourished in recent years, in particular regarding the visual and performing arts, advertising has until now been substantially neglected, owing to its (elitist) exclusion from many definitions of “art” or “culture”. But advertising – through its very aim to appeal to a broad public – is a highly relevant indicator of the presence, significance and symbolic value of Classical Antiquity in popular culture. Ancient themes and figures are in fact regularly present in modern Western advertising, constituting familiar reference points in which many of the “values” that ads attempt to communicate find a reliable symbol or pictogram that can be immediately recognized by the public – Hercules (for strength) being possibly the most obvious example. Similarly, the high prestige attributed to the Classical world and its knowledge until just a few decades ago is often used in the Western world to confer an immediate credibility to the product or element being advertised.
        Ancient forms of advertising have also been substantially neglected in scholarship, eventually studied only by scholars of ancient economy and almost only ever in reference to Rome. Nevertheless, as is the case today, adverts were part of everyday life for the inhabitants of ancient cities, who covered their walls with offers, promises and public announcements of every kind, private and official. The very term “advertising” derives from the Latin adverto or “turn towards”, hence also “draw attention to” – a word that captures the very essence of advertising. This paves the way to multiple potential approaches that link to social and cultural studies, such as the relationship between advertising and identity.
        This relationship is, once again, central to studying the presence of Antiquity in modern advertising: should the audience identify with the Ancient Greeks and Romans, recognize them as a part of their cultural heritage, or should they feel different from them? How is such a message constructed, and what pre-knowledge of the Classical world do the ad-creators expect from their targeted audience?
        As within our multimedia saturated world, ads were also acknowledged and perceived in different ways in ancient times. They could be read or seen but also heard, appearing in the form of inscriptions, paintings, and announcements read aloud by the kerykes/praecones.
        This issue therefore contains contributions that, whether they concern Antiquity or the modern world, highlight the multimedia character of advertising and interrogate its multisensorial communication and reception.

      • War of the Senses – The Senses in War Interactions and Tensions between Representations of War in Classical and Modern Culture
        Vol. 4 (2016)
        This special issue of thersites (edited by Annemarie Ambühl) addresses artistic representations of war in literature and other media, focusing especially on the role of sensory perceptions and emotions as well as on gender issues. In line with the transcultural and diachronic outlook of thersites, issues of reception are approached either by applying modern theories and methods to the interpretation of classical texts or by comparing and contrasting ancient and modern responses to war and violence and their impact on human beings and society in general. The issue features contributions that range from Homer to postmodern novels and movies, as well as reviews of thematically related recent publications. Within this wide horizon two thematic clusters emerge: One group of papers studies the narratological, aesthetic and psychological dimensions of (fictional) descriptions of battles and other forms of violence in Latin literature, especially in Caesar’s war commentaries and the epics of Lucan, Valerius Flaccus and Statius, while another group of papers looks at novels that directly or indirectly reflect on experiences from both World Wars and the recent wars in Iraq through a complex engagement with classical narratives and concepts derived from classical antiquity. 
         
      •  
         
      •  
        Vol. 2 (2015)


      See AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies

      Open Access Journal: Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies

      Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies
      ISSN: 0076-0730 (Print)
      ISSN: 2041-5370 (Online)
      Issue Cover
      The Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies promotes cutting-edge and interdisciplinary research in all areas of classical studies broadly defined, including archaeology. All issues are themed.

      Volume 62, Issue 2, December 2019




      Original Articles

      Bull Inst Class Stud, Volume 62, Issue 2, December 2019, Pages 1–9, https://doi.org/10.1111/2041-5370.12103
      Bull Inst Class Stud, Volume 62, Issue 2, December 2019, Pages 11–28, https://doi.org/10.1111/2041-5370.12104
      Bull Inst Class Stud, Volume 62, Issue 2, December 2019, Pages 29–48, https://doi.org/10.1111/2041-5370.12105
      Bull Inst Class Stud, Volume 62, Issue 2, December 2019, Pages 49–65, https://doi.org/10.1111/2041-5370.12106
      Bull Inst Class Stud, Volume 62, Issue 2, December 2019, Pages 67–79, https://doi.org/10.1111/2041-5370.12107
      Bull Inst Class Stud, Volume 62, Issue 2, December 2019, Pages 81–95, https://doi.org/10.1111/2041-5370.12108
      Bull Inst Class Stud, Volume 62, Issue 2, December 2019, Pages 97–117, https://doi.org/10.1111/2041-5370.12109
      Bull Inst Class Stud, Volume 62, Issue 2, December 2019, Page 119, https://doi.org/10.1111/2041-5370.12110
      Bull Inst Class Stud, Volume 62, Issue 2, December 2019, Pages 121–136, https://doi.org/10.1111/2041-5370.12111


      See AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies

      Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

      I Sumeri

      Un libro avvincente I Sumeri di Franco D’Agostino, che nel formato tascabile cartaceo, ancora il più amato dai lettori di tutta la Terra, spiega, non senza classificazioni da ‘fabric analysis’ delle tavolette d’argilla, come questa cultura dell’alluvio mesopotamico fosse la prima tradizione manoscritta nella preistoria dell’Asia occidentale a ridosso del bacino mediterraneo. 

      Sentiamo spesso parlare di Mosul in Iraq e della distruzione del suo Museo, una prima volta danneggiato già nel 2003 e, con video simultaneamente diffusi dai network, nel 2015 ad opera dell’Isis, che ne ha sbriciolato i reperti archeologici, tra cui un lamassu, cioé un leone con testa umana, provenienti dai siti di Nimrud e di Ninive, città di Ishtar, Venere fondatrice del regno Assiro di Assurbanipal.

      Gli arazzi di Raffaello nel cinquecentenario dalla morte

      La Cappella Sistina quest’anno ha esposto per una settimana gli arazzi con scene tratte dagli Atti degli Apostoli (Pinacoteca Vaticana, Roma), realizzati su cartoni di Raffaello (Victoria and Albert Museum, Londra). La brillante esibizione vaticana, appena trascorsa, intermittentemente si ricollega alla grande mostra Raffaello 1520-1483, sospesa subito dopo l’inaugurazione del 5 marzo scorso.

      Mia Ridge (Open Objects)

      Stuck at home? View cultural heritage collections online

      With people self-isolating to slow the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, parents and educators (as well as people looking for an art or history fix) may be looking to replace in-person trips to galleries, libraries, archives and museums* with online access to images of artefacts and information about them. GLAMs have spent decades getting some … Continue reading Stuck at home? View cultural heritage collections online

      Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

      L'arte del Gandhara

      Coraggiosa l’iniziativa dell’ICR di rilanciare uno studio tecnico sulle policromie e le dorature di arte del Gandhara, una delle espressioni culturali di intenso simbolismo che più abbiano suggestionato la tendenza all’astrazione dei movimenti artistici del Novecento, in un momento in cui il trattamento della documentazione fotografica di restauro è quanto mai soggetto alle alterazioni di software di fotoritocco, che rasentano la fotointerpretazione nella visibilità  dell’oggetto artistico, al limite della fotografia artistica e della divulgazione pseudoscientifica.