Paregoribib: Tom Elliott's Recent Bookmarks and Citations

http://planet.atlantides.org/paregoribib

Tom Elliott (tom.elliott@nyu.edu)

This feed aggregator is part of the Planet Atlantides constellation. Its current content is available in multiple webfeed formats, including Atom, RSS/RDF and RSS 1.0. The subscription list is also available in OPML and as a FOAF Roll. All content is assumed to be the intellectual property of the originators unless they indicate otherwise.

March 24, 2017

Daily citations at Zotero

Saxon Running XSLT from the Command Line

Type Attachment
URL http://www.saxonica.com/documentation/index.html#!using-xsl/commandline
Accessed 2017-03-24 14:21:54
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Saxon Running XSLT from the Command Line

Type Web Page
URL http://www.saxonica.com/documentation/index.html#!using-xsl/commandline
Accessed 2017-03-24 14:21:52

March 08, 2017

Daily citations at Zotero

Textual Scholarship and Text Encoding

Type Book Section
Author Elena Pierazzo
Editor Susan Schreibman
Editor Ray Siemens
Editor John Unsworth
URL http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9781118680605.ch21
Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Ltd
Pages 307-321
ISBN 978-1-118-68060-5
Date 2016
Extra DOI: 10.1002/9781118680605.ch21
Abstract For the past 25 years the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) has assumed a central role in digital editing and textual scholarship, both as a modeling and analytical tool and as ontology for the phenomenology of the text and the page. In the same period, and most probably connected to this, a crucial shift has occurred in textual scholarship, with the role of the material support of texts – the document – taking central stage in theoretical reflection and practice. The impact of digital methodologies on textual scholarship is huge, multiform, and still waits to be fully assessed. The chapter therefore investigates the role of text encoding within the most recent development in theory of digital editing, as well as assessing its impact on the work and workflow of the editor. The role of technology in editorial work is analyzed by comparing two potentially opposite approaches: the evolution of the editor as encoder (and as programmer, and as web designer, and as publisher, and so on) and the demand for out-of-the-box editorial tools. The use of electronic tools in the editorial workflow (such as image manipulation software, collation tools, enhanced desks, and bibliography management) is changing not only the practice of editorial work, but also its theoretical bases, questioning editorial models and traditional roles. Connected to the use of TEI for editorial work, the last few years have seen a furious debate developing around the respective pros and cons of embedded and standoff markup; the chapter approaches this inevitable debate from an empirical, rather than a philosophical, point of view.
Book Title A New Companion to Digital Humanities

Epigraphers and Encoders: Strategies for Teaching and Learning Digital Epigraphy

Type Book Section
Editor Matteo Romanello
Editor Gabriel Bodard
Author Gabriel Bodard
Author Simona Stoyanova
URL http://www.ubiquitypress.com/site/books/10.5334/bat/read/#epubcfi(/6/24[id012]!4/2/4/1:0)
Place London
Publisher Ubiquity Press
ISBN 978-1-909188-46-4 978-1-909188-48-8
Date 2016
Extra OCLC: 956558304
Library Catalog Open WorldCat
Language English
Abstract This chapter will discuss the EpiDoc (TEI markup for epigraphy and papyrology) training workshops that have been run by colleagues from King’s College London and elsewhere for the past decade. We shall explore some of the evolving approaches used and strategies taken in the teaching of digital encoding to an audience largely of classicists and historians. Prominent among the assertions of EpiDoc training is that ‘encoding’ is not alien to, in fact is directly analogous to, what philologists do when creating a formal, structured, arbitrarily expressed edition. We shall share some of the open teaching materials that have been made available, and consider pedagogical lessons learned in the light of EpiDoc practitioners who have progressed from training to running their own projects, as opposed to those who have learned EpiDoc directly from the published Guidelines or via the TEI (cf. Dee, q.v.). We shall also compare the teaching of EpiDoc to the teaching of epigraphy to students, and ask what the pedagogical approaches of both practices (which overlap, since many epigraphic modules now include a digital component, and very rarely teachers of epigraphy are treating EpiDoc as the native format for editing inscriptions) can offer to teachers and learners of both traditional and digital epigraphy.
Book Title Digital classics outside the echo-chamber: teaching, knowledge exchange and public engagement
Short Title Dee 2016

Learning by Doing: Learning to Implement the TEI Guidelines Through Digital Classics Publication

Type Book Section
Editor Matteo Romanello
Editor Gabriel Bodard
Author Stella Dee
Author Maryam Foradi
Author Filip Šarić
URL http://www.ubiquitypress.com/site/books/10.5334/bat/read/#epubcfi(/6/20[id010]!4/14/1:0)
Place London
Publisher Ubiquity Press
ISBN 978-1-909188-46-4 978-1-909188-48-8
Date 2016
Extra OCLC: 956558304
Library Catalog Open WorldCat
Language English
Abstract This chapter reviews the current online resources available to learn the TEI Guidelines for structured data in the humanities, as well as the theory that drives their construction and continued improvement. It focuses on the EpiDoc community as a positive example of a specialist community of practitioners who take a flexible approach to TEI instruction that meets both the shared and individual needs of scholars (cf. Bodard and Stoyanova, q.v.). We also address some of the barriers to multilingual contribution to the online digital Classics, and report on a case study in which we discuss the experience of Masters-level students trained in non-digital Classics methods with the translation and transcription of texts via the Perseids platform (cf. Almas and Beaulieu, q.v.). We consider how templates revealing the TEI markup allow students to gain comfort and familiarity with the XML, as well as to enable their own work to serve as a model for future contributors. However, we also note the pedagogical limitations of contribution without direct instruction as seen in this case study, and posit that a mixed model of experiential education combined with interpersonal guidance might better serve students hoping to contribute machine-actionable data in the digital Classics.
Book Title Digital classics outside the echo-chamber: teaching, knowledge exchange and public engagement
Short Title Dee 2016

Participatory Design with Underrepresented Populations: A Model for Disciplined Empathy

Type Presentation
Presenter Scott W.H. Young
Presenter Celina Brownotter
URL http://scottwhyoung.com/talks/participatory-design-code4lib-2017/
Place Los Angeles
Date 2017-03-08
Accessed 2017-03-08 20:28:05
Meeting Name Code4Lib 2017
Abstract A talk about participatory user experience design with underrepresented populations, given at Code4Lib 2017 in Los Angeles.

Snapshot

Type Attachment
URL http://scottwhyoung.com/talks/participatory-design-code4lib-2017/
Accessed 2017-03-08 20:28:08
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February 02, 2017

Daily citations at Zotero

Snapshot

Type Attachment
URL https://www.kennethreitz.org/essays/sublime-text-3-heaven
Accessed 2017-02-02 22:52:16
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Sublime Text 3 Heaven

Type Web Page
URL https://www.kennethreitz.org/essays/sublime-text-3-heaven
Accessed 2017-02-02 22:52:14
Abstract I decided to revisit my editor configuration the other night, and experimented with every possible editor I could think of / imagine. I heavily configured vim (neovim), PyCharm, Eclipse, Emacs (Spacemacs), VSCode, Atom, Textual, and more. I knew I was going to stay put with my choice of Sublime Text 3 (which I have been using for 5+ years), but it's nice to have validation. So, I decided to rebuild that configuration from scratch as well. I ended up with a very happy setup that I wanted to share with you. Here's a screencast of myself writing a little bit of code and pushing it to GitHub with this setup.    Sublime UI Theme: Material Sublime Text Extensions: * Anaconda — fantastic Python "IDE" support for Sublime Text. Just works, does everything you'd want it to do, including code completion and PEP8 checking.  * Color Highlighter — highlights colors present in code as the value provided (great for css). * Emmet — fantastic HTML shortcut utility.  * Package Control — (obviously) * SideBarEnhancements — enhances the sidebar context menu options. Easily create new files and folders, etc.  * Themr — easily switch between themes.  Version Control: * GitGutter — display git diff information in the gutter of Sublime Text — extremely useful! Keeps track of added/removed lines.  * GitSavvy — very useful tool for committing/pushing with Git right from Sublime!  * GitStatusBar — shows git repo status in the bottom bar of Sublime Text.      Syntax Packages: * Tomorrow Night Italics Color Scheme — italics for code comments, for Operator Mono.  * fish-shell — syntax highlighting for fish scripts.  * Jinja2 — syntax hilighting and snippets for jinjia2 templates. * RestructuredText Improved —syntax highlighting for RST files.  * requirementstxt — syntax highlighting for requirements.txt files.  * TOML — syntax highlighting for TOML.  * VimL — syntax highlighting for VimL.  Fun Toys: * ASCII Decorator — right click on text, and turn it into ASCII art.  * Glue — terminal instance within Sublime.  * GitAutoCommit — a nifty little plugin that lets you set certian repos to automatically commit on save (useful for notes, etc).  * SublimeXiki — get the power of Xiki (shown in the screencast above, at the end) in Sublime! User Key Bindings [ { "keys": ["super+2"], "command": "next_bookmark" }, { "keys": ["super+1"], "command": "prev_bookmark" }, { "keys": ["super+3"], "command": "toggle_bookmark" }, { "keys": ["super+shift+3"], "command": "clear_bookmarks" }, {"keys": ["super+g"], "command": "git_status"}, { "keys": ["super+d"], "command": "set_layout", "args": { "cols": [0.0, 0.5, 1.0], "rows": [0.0, 1.0], "cells": [[0, 0, 1, 1], [1, 0, 2, 1]] } }, ] User Settings { "auto_complete": false, "close_windows_when_empty": true, "color_scheme": "Packages/User/SublimeLinter/Tomorrow-Night-Italics (SL).tmTheme", "draw_white_space": "all", "find_selected_text": true, "fold_buttons": false, "folder_exclude_patterns": [ ".svn", ".git", ".hg", "CVS", "_build", "dist", "build", "site" ], "font_face": "Operator Mono SSm Light", "font_options": [ "subpixel_antialias" ], "font_size": 12.0, "highlight_line": true, "hot_exit": false, "ignored_packages": [ "Git", "GitSavvy", "RestructuredText", "SublimeLinter-flake8", "Vintage" ], "material_theme_accent_orange": true, "material_theme_accent_scrollbars": true, "material_theme_appbar_orange": true, "material_theme_arrow_folders": true, "material_theme_bullet_tree_indicator": true, "material_theme_compact_sidebar": true, "material_theme_contrast_mode": true, "material_theme_small_statusbar": true, "material_theme_small_tab": true, "material_theme_tree_headings": false, "remember_open_files": false, "rulers": [ 72, 79, 100 ], "theme": "Material-Theme-Darker.sublime-theme", "translate_tabs_to_spaces": true, "trim_trailing_white_space_on_save": true } That's it! Enjoy :)
Website Title Kenneth Reitz

January 27, 2017

Daily citations at Zotero

Dear Scholars, Delete Your Account At Academia.Edu

Type Magazine Article
Author Sarah Bond
URL http://www.forbes.com/sites/drsarahbond/2017/01/23/dear-scholars-delete-your-account-at-academia-edu/
Publication Forbes
Date 2017-01-23
Accessed 2017-01-27 16:49:06
Abstract As for-profit platforms like Academia.edu look to monetize the dissemination of scholarly writing even further, academics across the globe must now consider alternatives to proprietary companies which profit from our writing. Here are a few suggestions.
Short Title Bond 2017-01-23

Snapshot

Type Attachment
URL http://www.forbes.com/sites/drsarahbond/2017/01/23/dear-scholars-delete-your-account-at-academia-edu/#5db49cc22ee0
Accessed 2017-01-27 16:49:08
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Digital Preservation

Type Blog Post
Author Michael Satlow
URL http://mlsatlow.com/2017/01/26/digital-preservation/
Date 2017-01-26T13:35:55+00:00
Accessed 2017-01-27 16:48:02
Abstract Over the past few years, institutional digital repositories and more broad-based digital “commons” have proliferated.  Many are found at universities (Brown now has one) and sites such as Zenodo an…
Blog Title Michael L. Satlow
Short Title Satlow 2017-01-27

Snapshot

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URL http://mlsatlow.com/2017/01/26/digital-preservation/
Accessed 2017-01-27 16:48:06
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January 19, 2017

Daily citations at Zotero

Snapshot

Type Attachment
URL https://brendancleary.com/2013/03/08/including-a-github-wiki-in-a-repository-as-a-submodule/
Accessed 2017-01-19 22:41:35
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Including a GitHub Wiki in a Repository as a Submodule

Type Blog Post
Author bcleary
URL https://brendancleary.com/2013/03/08/including-a-github-wiki-in-a-repository-as-a-submodule/
Date 2013-03-08T03:27:07+00:00
Accessed 2017-01-19 22:41:31
Abstract Problem You are using GitHub to host your project and your using the GitHub Wiki to maintain your documentation. Now you want to create a release of your project including a current snapshot of the…
Blog Title brendancleary.com

January 06, 2017

Daily citations at Zotero

Python, Unicode and Ancient Greek

Type Web Page
Author J.K. Tauber
URL http://jktauber.com/articles/python-unicode-ancient-greek/
Accessed 2017-01-06 05:17:44
Abstract This is a work in progress. Feedback welcome.
Website Title J. K. Tauber

Snapshot

Type Attachment
URL http://jktauber.com/articles/python-unicode-ancient-greek/
Accessed 2017-01-06 05:17:46
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December 16, 2016

Daily citations at Zotero

Getting Organized Using Perspectives - Inside OmniFocus

Type Blog Post
Author Johnny Chadda
URL https://inside.omnifocus.com/perspectives/
Date n.d.
Accessed 2016-12-16 16:32:19
Abstract It’s not hard to get up and going with Perspectives.
Blog Title Inside Omnifocus

Getting Organized Using Perspectives - Inside OmniFocus

Type Attachment
URL https://inside.omnifocus.com/perspectives/
Accessed 2016-12-16 16:32:21
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December 13, 2016

Daily citations at Zotero

Making publication ready Python Notebooks

Type Blog Post
Author Julius Schultz
URL http://blog.juliusschulz.de/blog/ultimate-ipython-notebook
Date 2015-08-27
Accessed 2016-12-13 20:46:36
Blog Title Blogging is Fun

Making publication ready Python Notebooks

Type Attachment
URL http://blog.juliusschulz.de/blog/ultimate-ipython-notebook
Accessed 2016-12-13 20:46:38
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November 09, 2016

Daily citations at Zotero

Amheida I: Ostraka from Trimithis 1

Type Book
Author Roger Bagnall
Author Giovanni R. Ruffini
URL http://dlib.nyu.edu/awdl/isaw/amheida-i-otrim-1/
Place New York
Publisher NYU Press
ISBN 978-0-8147-4526-7
Date March 2012
Accessed 2016-11-09 20:21:34
Abstract Catalog and analysis of 455 inscribed ostraka from the NYU excavations at Amheida, Egypt
Short Title Amheida I
# of Pages 178

Bagnall and Ruffini. (2012). Amheida I: Ostraka from Trimithis 1.

Type Attachment
URL http://dlib.nyu.edu/awdl/isaw/amheida-i-otrim-1/
Accessed 2016-11-09 20:21:36
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October 27, 2016

Daily citations at Zotero

Snapshot

Type Attachment
URL https://developers.google.com/kml/
Accessed 2016-10-27 02:00:46
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Keyhole Markup Language

Type Web Page
URL https://developers.google.com/kml/
Accessed 2016-10-27 02:00:43
Abstract KML is a file format used to display geographic data.
Website Title Google Developers

Snapshot

Type Attachment
URL https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Shapefile&oldid=742580333
Accessed 2016-10-27 01:56:58
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Shapefile

Type Encyclopedia Article
URL https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Shapefile&oldid=742580333
Rights Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Date 2016-10-04T15:02:02Z
Extra Page Version ID: 742580333
Accessed 2016-10-27 01:56:56
Library Catalog Wikipedia
Encyclopedia Title Wikipedia
Language en
Abstract The shapefile format is a popular geospatial vector data format for geographic information system (GIS) software. It is developed and regulated by Esri as a (mostly) open specification for data interoperability among Esri and other GIS software products. The shapefile format can spatially describe vector features: points, lines, and polygons, representing, for example, water wells, rivers, and lakes. Each item usually has attributes that describe it, such as name or temperature.

October 21, 2016

Daily citations at Zotero

Designing for Colour Blindness

Type Blog Post
Author Si digital
URL https://sidigital.co/blog/designing-for-colour-blindness
Accessed 2016-10-21 13:30:30
Abstract Our projects are always created with the user experience in mind. Find out how our design team accommodate an incredibly common condition that is often overlooked.
Blog Title Si digital

Snapshot

Type Attachment
URL https://sidigital.co/blog/designing-for-colour-blindness
Accessed 2016-10-21 13:30:33
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Chatbot Fundamentals: An interactive guide to writing bots in Python

Type Blog Post
Author Liza Daly
URL https://apps.worldwritable.com/tutorials/chatbot/
Rights This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Accessed 2016-10-21 12:48:01
Abstract Part 4 of Natural Language Processing for Programmers. In this brief tutorial I’ll walk you through using a popular Python language library to construct a simple chatbot that evaluates and responds to user input. It won’t fool your friends, and for a production system you’ll want to consider one of the existing bot platforms or frameworks, but these examples should help you think through the design and engineering challenges of a conversational UI.

Chatbot Fundamentals: An interactive guide to writing bots in Python

Type Attachment
URL https://apps.worldwritable.com/tutorials/chatbot/
Accessed 2016-10-21 12:48:03
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October 13, 2016

Daily citations at Zotero

Software Citation Workflows

Type Blog Post
Author Martin Fenner
URL https://blog.datacite.org/software-citation-workflows/
Rights CC-BY
Date 2015-10-19T00:00:00+00:00
Accessed 2016-10-13 17:37:14
Website Type website
Language en
Abstract This blog post provides more detail for a short presentation I will give today at the Software Credit Workshop in London. The aim is to look at the infrastructure pieces needed for software discove...
Blog Title DataCite Blog

Preserving Digital Scholarship in Perseids: An Exploration

Type Journal Article
Author Fernando Rios
Author Bridget Almas
URL https://sites.tufts.edu/perseids/2016/10/10/preserving-digital-scholarship-in-perseids-an-exploration/
Publication Perseids
DOI 10.5281/zenodo.159569
Accessed 2016-10-13 17:35:27

Perseids | Preserving Digital Scholarship in Perseids: An Exploration

Type Attachment
URL https://sites.tufts.edu/perseids/2016/10/10/preserving-digital-scholarship-in-perseids-an-exploration/
Accessed 2016-10-13 17:35:29
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September 29, 2016

Daily citations at Zotero

TEI: P5 Guidelines

Type Attachment
URL http://www.tei-c.org/Guidelines/P5/index.xml
Accessed 2016-09-29 10:28:06
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TEI: P5 Guidelines

Type Web Page
URL http://www.tei-c.org/Guidelines/P5/index.xml
Accessed 2016-09-29 10:28:04

Snapshot

Type Attachment
URL https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=XML&oldid=738419312
Accessed 2016-09-29 10:27:27
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XML

Type Encyclopedia Article
URL https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=XML&oldid=738419312
Rights Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Date 2016-09-08T21:07:23Z
Extra Page Version ID: 738419312
Accessed 2016-09-29 10:27:25
Library Catalog Wikipedia
Encyclopedia Title Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Language en
Abstract In computing, Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a markup language that defines a set of rules for encoding documents in a format that is both human-readable and machine-readable. The W3C's XML 1.0 Specification and several other related specifications,—all of them free open standards—define XML. The design goals of XML emphasize simplicity, generality, and usability across the Internet. It is a textual data format with strong support via Unicode for different human languages. Although the design of XML focuses on documents, the language is widely used for the representation of arbitrary data structures such as those used in web services. Several schema systems exist to aid in the definition of XML-based languages, while programmers have developed many application programming interfaces (APIs) to aid the processing of XML data.

JSON-LD - JSON for Linking Data

Type Web Page
URL http://json-ld.org/
Rights Creative Commons CC0 Public Domain Dedication
Accessed 2016-09-29 10:25:22

JSON-LD - JSON for Linking Data

Type Attachment
URL http://json-ld.org/
Accessed 2016-09-29 10:25:24
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Common Format and MIME Type for Comma-Separated Values (CSV) Files

Type Report
Author Y. Shafranovich
URL https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4180
Date October 2005
Accessed 2016-09-29 10:21:55
Series Title Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) Request for Comments
Institution Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF)
Report Type Category: Informational
Abstract This RFC documents the format used for Comma-Separated Values (CSV) files and registers the associated MIME type "text/csv".
Report Number RFC 4180
Short Title RFC 4180

RFC 4180 - Common Format and MIME Type for Comma-Separated Values (CSV) Files

Type Attachment
URL https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4180
Accessed 2016-09-29 10:21:57
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The JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) Data Interchange Format

Type Report
Author T. Bray
URL https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc7159
Date March 2014
Extra Category: Standards Track
Accessed 2016-09-29 10:18:18
Series Title Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) Request for Comments
Institution Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF)
Abstract JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) is a lightweight, text-based, language-independent data interchange format. It was derived from the ECMAScript Programming Language Standard. JSON defines a small set of formatting rules for the portable representation of structured data. This document removes inconsistencies with other specifications of JSON, repairs specification errors, and offers experience-based interoperability guidance.
Report Number RFC 7159
Short Title RFC 7159

RFC 7159 - The JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) Data Interchange Format

Type Attachment
URL https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc7159
Accessed 2016-09-29 10:18:20
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The GeoJSON Format

Type Report
Author H. Butler
Author M. Daly
Author A. Doyle
Author S. Gillies
Author S. Hagen
Author T. Schaub
URL https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc7946
Date August 2016
Extra Category: Standards Track
Accessed 2016-09-29 10:12:10
Series Title Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) Request for Comments
Institution Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF)
Abstract GeoJSON is a geospatial data interchange format based on JavaScript Object Notation (JSON). It defines several types of JSON objects and the manner in which they are combined to represent data about geographic features, their properties, and their spatial extents. GeoJSON uses a geographic coordinate reference system, World Geodetic System 1984, and units of decimal degrees.
Report Number RFC 7946

Snapshot

Type Attachment
URL https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Comma-separated_values&oldid=740670978
Accessed 2016-09-29 10:13:03
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Comma-separated values

Type Encyclopedia Article
URL https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Comma-separated_values&oldid=740670978
Rights Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Date 2016-09-22T14:47:09Z
Extra Page Version ID: 740670978
Accessed 2016-09-29 10:13:01
Library Catalog Wikipedia
Encyclopedia Title Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Language en
Abstract In computing, a comma-separated values (CSV) file stores tabular data (numbers and text) in plain text. Each line of the file is a data record. Each record consists of one or more fields, separated by commas. The use of the comma as a field separator is the source of the name for this file format. The CSV file format is not standardized. The basic idea of separating fields with a comma is clear, but that idea gets complicated when the field data may also contain commas or even embedded line-breaks. CSV implementations may not handle such field data, or they may use quotation marks to surround the field. Quotation does not solve everything: some fields may need embedded quotation marks, so a CSV implementation may include escape characters or escape sequences. In addition, the term "CSV" also denotes some closely related delimiter-separated formats that use different field delimiters. These include tab-separated values and space-separated values. A delimiter that is not present in the field data (such as tab) keeps the format parsing simple. These alternate delimiter-separated files are often even given a .csv extension, despite the use of a non-comma field separator. This loose terminology can cause problems in data exchange. Many applications that accept CSV files have options to select the delimiter character and the quotation character.

RFC 7946 - The GeoJSON Format

Type Attachment
URL https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc7946
Accessed 2016-09-29 10:12:12
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The JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) Data Interchange Format

Type Report
Author T. Bray
URL https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7159
Date 03/2014
Accessed 2016-09-29 10:11:36
Institution RFC Editor
Library Catalog CrossRef
Language en
Report Number RFC7159

Regular Expression Tutorial - Learn How to Use Regular Expressions

Type Attachment
URL http://www.regular-expressions.info/tutorial.html
Accessed 2016-09-29 10:09:39
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Regular Expression Tutorial - Learn How to Use Regular Expressions

Type Web Page
URL http://www.regular-expressions.info/tutorial.html
Accessed 2016-09-29 10:09:37

Snapshot

Type Attachment
URL https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Data_structure&oldid=740892231
Accessed 2016-09-29 10:04:49
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Data structure

Type Encyclopedia Article
URL https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Data_structure&oldid=740892231
Rights Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Date 2016-09-24T00:43:32Z
Extra Page Version ID: 740892231
Accessed 2016-09-29 10:04:47
Library Catalog Wikipedia
Encyclopedia Title Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Language en
Abstract In computer science, a data structure is a particular way of organizing data in a computer so that it can be used efficiently. Data structures can implement one or more particular abstract data types (ADT), which specify the operations that can be performed on a data structure and the computional complexity of those operations. In comparison, a data structure is a concrete implementation of the specification provided by an ADT. Different kinds of data structures are suited to different kinds of applications, and some are highly specialized to specific tasks. For example, relational databases commonly use B-tree indexes for data retrieval, while compiler implementations usually use hash tables to look up identifiers. Data structures provide a means to manage large amounts of data efficiently for uses such as large databases and internet indexing services. Usually, efficient data structures are key to designing efficient algorithms. Some formal design methods and programming languages emphasize data structures, rather than algorithms, as the key organizing factor in software design. Data structures can be used to organize the storage and retrieval of information stored in both main memory and secondary memory.

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Type Attachment
URL https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Data_manipulation_language&oldid=723127954
Accessed 2016-09-29 10:04:45
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Data manipulation language

Type Encyclopedia Article
URL https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Data_manipulation_language&oldid=723127954
Rights Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Date 2016-06-01T05:21:32Z
Extra Page Version ID: 723127954
Accessed 2016-09-29 10:04:43
Library Catalog Wikipedia
Encyclopedia Title Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Language en
Abstract A data manipulation language (DML) is a family of syntax elements similar to a computer programming language used for selecting, inserting, deleting and updating data in a database. Performing read-only queries of data is sometimes also considered a component of DML. A popular data manipulation language is that of Structured Query Language (SQL), which is used to retrieve and manipulate data in a relational database. Other forms of DML are those used by IMS/DLI, CODASYL databases, such as IDMS and others. Data manipulation language comprises the SQL data change statements, which modify stored data but not the schema or database objects. Manipulation of persistent database objects, e.g., tables or stored procedures, via the SQL schema statements, rather than the data stored within them, is considered to be part of a separate data definition language. In SQL these two categories are similar in their detailed syntax, data types, expressions etc., but distinct in their overall function. Data manipulation languages have their functional capability organized by the initial word in a statement, which is almost always a verb. In the case of SQL, these verbs are: SELECT ... FROM ... WHERE ... INSERT INTO ... VALUES ... UPDATE ... SET ... WHERE ... DELETE FROM ... WHERE ... The SELECT query statement is classed with the SQL-data statements and so is considered by the standard to be outside of DML. The SELECT ... INTO form is considered to be DML because it manipulates (i.e. modifies) data. In common practice though, this distinction is not made and SELECT is widely considered to be part of DML. Most SQL database implementations extend their SQL capabilities by providing imperative, i.e. procedural languages. Examples of these are Oracle's PL/SQL and DB2's SQL_PL. Data manipulation languages tend to have many different flavors and capabilities between database vendors. There have been a number of standards established for SQL by ANSI, but vendors still provide their own extensions to the standard while not implementing the entire standard. Data manipulation languages are divided into two types, procedural programming and declarative programming. Data manipulation languages were initially only used within computer programs, but with the advent of SQL have come to be used interactively by database administrators. For example, the command to insert a row into table employees:

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URL https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_file_formats&oldid=741522273
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List of file formats

Type Encyclopedia Article
URL https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_file_formats&oldid=741522273
Rights Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Date 2016-09-28T01:29:47Z
Extra Page Version ID: 741522273
Accessed 2016-09-29 10:04:39
Library Catalog Wikipedia
Encyclopedia Title Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Language en
Abstract This is a list of file formats used by computers, organized by type. Filename extensions are usually noted in parentheses if they differ from the format name or abbreviation. Many operating systems do not limit filenames to a single extension shorter than 4 characters, as was common with some operating systems that supported the FAT file system. Examples of operating systems that do not impose this limit include Unix-like systems. Also, Microsoft Windows NT, 95, 98, and Me do not have a three character limit on extensions for 32-bit or 64-bit applications on file systems other than pre-Windows 95/Windows NT 3.5 versions of the FAT file system. Some filenames are given extensions longer than three characters. Some file formats may be listed twice or more. An example is the .b file.

September 28, 2016

Daily citations at Zotero

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Type Attachment
URL https://developers.google.com/search/docs/guides/intro-structured-data
Accessed 2016-09-28 23:33:12
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Introduction to Structured Data | Search

Type Web Page
URL https://developers.google.com/search/docs/guides/intro-structured-data
Accessed 2016-09-28 23:33:10
Website Title Google Developers

R.I.P. to the Cartographic Priesthood | MediaCommons

Type Blog Post
Author Thomas Chapman
URL http://mediacommons.futureofthebook.org/question/how-can-we-better-use-data-andor-research-visualization-humanities/response/rip-cartographi
Date February 12, 2014
Accessed 2016-09-28 23:29:56
Abstract There was a time not long ago when the map was the purveyor of ‘truth.’ But then something strange happened...
Blog Title Media Commons