Maia Atlantis: Ancient World Blogs

http://planet.atlantides.org/maia

Tom Elliott (tom.elliott@nyu.edu)

This feed aggregator is part of the Planet Atlantides constellation. Its current content is available in multiple webfeed formats, including Atom, RSS/RDF and RSS 1.0. The subscription list is also available in OPML and as a FOAF Roll. All content is assumed to be the intellectual property of the originators unless they indicate otherwise.

May 29, 2015

Paul Barford (Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues)

US Ancient Coin Collectors, What is there not to Understand?


Intelligence of a cat...
I've been talking about responsible collection since 2000, and blogging here about it since summer 2008. You'd think by now that those who want to write disagreeing with what I propose would at least have had the opportunity to find out what it was. But to do that you would have to be able to read English and have a bit higher IQ than my cat.

Ed Snible over on the IAPN paid lobbyist's blog recounts his awful experiences with a coin he bought from a well-known dealer (Palmyra Heritage Morris Khouli Gallery). They are talking about "provenance" (they mean collecting history) and that responsible collecting is allegedly a "misnomer". Snible moans
I recently blogged about a coin with a provenance back to Pakistan in 1963. I was crowing online about the long provenance, and P[aul] B[arford] immediately called me to task for not seeking a 1963 Pakistani export license (this is for a sub-$30 value coin in 2015 dollars).
Nonsense. What I wrote about was collectors buying irresponsibly. In order that the coin in question had been exported legally, there would have to be documentation. Snible had no such documentation for his coin. I wrote of responsible collectors taking responsibility for the hygiene of their collection by buying only from dealers who have in their stockroom artefacts which have the paperwork allowing verification of their claims that they are licit. Such collectors would avoid the cowboys that continually palm off on them second-best. If a dealer cannot secure a supply of licit artefacts, then he's not the kind of dealer responsible collectors want in the market. What, actually, is so difficult for US coin collectors to understand here? It is not exactly rocket science, so why do they keep getting it wrong?

Perhaps the reality is they simply do not want to address the plain truth which seems to be that 99.98% of them are not in the slightest bothered about whether or not they are buying coins that have been smuggled and do not really care at all where that coin came from and how it got out of the ground and onto the market. That, certainly is what their actions, and constant attempts to dodge the issues, seem to suggest with utmost clarity.

May 28, 2015

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Open Access Journal: Ancient Asia: Journal of the Society of South Asian Archaeology

[First posted in AWOL 13 November 2009. Updated 28 May 2015]

Ancient Asia: Journal of the Society of South Asian Archaeology
ISSN: 2042-5937
http://www.ancient-asia-journal.com/local/images/header_middle.png
Ancient Asia is the official annual journal of the Society of South Asian Archaeology (SOSAA). The scope of the journal is vast - from Stone Age to the Modem times, including archaeology, history, anthropology, art, architecture, numismatics, iconography, ethnography, various scientific aspects including archaeobotany and archaeozoology, and theoretical and methodological issues. Amongst the goals of this society are to bring forth the research being conducted in areas that are not often well published such as the North Eastern States of India, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Central Asia, Iran, etc.
Vol 6 (2015)

Research Paper

Book Review





Vol 1 (2006)

Tom Elliott (Horothesia)

New in Maia: camwsgrads

I have just added the following blog to the Maia Atlantis feed aggregator:

title = camwsgrads
url = https://camwsgrads.wordpress.com/
description = The official blog of the Graduate Student Issues Committee for the Classical Association of the Middle West and South
feed = https://camwsgrads.wordpress.com/feed/

ASOR Syrian Heritage Initiative

SYRIAN HERITAGE INITIATIVE Weekly Report 38 (April 27, 2015)

Michael D. Danti, Cheikhmous Ali, Tate Paulette, Kathryn Franklin, Allison Cuneo, LeeAnn Barnes Gordon, and David Elitzer

Key points from this report:

  • Multiple tunnel bombs and barrel bombs were detonated in the Jdeidah quarter of the UNESCO World Heritage Site Ancient City of Aleppo. (pp. 28–29)
  • New data emerged on the looting of the Tell Sabi Abyad storehouses in Syria. (pp. 34–36)
  • Evidence of purported ISIL-issued licenses to loot archaeological sites was released.
  • The House Foreign Affairs Committee unanimously passed the Protect and Preserve International Cultural Property Act of 2015 (H.R. 1493).
  • The DGAM and other Syrian heritage groups released reports on heritage damage (especially looting) in the south of Syria. (pp. 10–18)

* This report is based on research conducted by the “Syria Preservation Initiative: Planning for Safeguarding Heritage Sites in Syria." Weekly reports reflect reporting from a variety of sources and may contain unverified material. As such, they should be treated as preliminary and subject to change.

Join the conversation on Facebook & Twitter:

facebook-icon


Mary Beard (A Don's Life)

The final straight

  Poverty-gap

I have to confess that I am currently in a combination state of complete exhaustion and perky light-at-the-end-of-the-tunnel energy. I am just finishing the penultimate chapter of the book, and I am looking to finish (apart from all the pics, the end material, the timelines, the whatever...) in about 2 weeks. I know what I want to argue in the last chapter, and if I can only do 1000 words a day, I am there.

Currently I am finishing off a chapter called "Haves and Have-Nots", which is partly trying to ask what we can really say about the culture of those who are not the elite, but also wondering about bigger social political issues.

That really comes down, in a way, to why there wasn't a Roman revolution (despite the title of Syme's book). How was it that the emperors occupied so much of the city (not just the whole of the Palatine, but all the spacious horti etc around the city edges), while a million people were crammed into tenement blocks.. and there wasn't class warfare?

I sort of come to the conclusion that there was more that bound the rich and poor than meets the eye, that there were more shared aspirations and cultural norms than there appear to be. I have always thought it interesting that there was no real difference, for example, between the style of decoration in rich houses from poor houses at Pompeii... only more money behind one than the other. Same things go for the non-elite organisations, such as collegia, which seem to organise themselves on the same principles and on the same terms as elite ones.

Apart from the low level guerilla warfare that went on between the haves and have-nots throughout Roman history, it is not clear what the rallying cries on either side would be. After all, everyone (especially the poor) in the first century CE (say) must have agreed that it was better to be rich than poor. The basic terms weren't contested. I guess (and this is what I shall say) that the revaluation of poverty (and with it the revaluation of the whole hierarchy that Romans took for granted) didnt come till the Christian, which for all its quick embedding in the hierarchy WAS or BECAME a thought revolution.

 

 

 

The Heroic Age

Journal of Literary Onomastics 5 (2016)

Call for Submissions: Journal of Literary Onomastics 5 (2016)
(a special issue on place and place-names in the early Insular world)
 
The deeply rooted importance of landscape, place, and place-names is a shared characteristic throughout the Insular cultures of the early Middle Ages, ranging from the material to the literary. From examinations of the early Irish dindshenchas tradition to recent archaeological investigations into the role of landscape in socio-political structures, the study of place has begun to receive more critical attention. We seek papers that treat the issue of landscape in the early Insular world from a variety of methodologies and approaches for a volume that will appear as a special issue of the Journal of Literary Onomastics (peer-reviewed).
 
Abstracts of 250 to 500 words should be sent to either Bryan Carella (bcarella@assumption.edu) or Joey McMullen (mcmull@fas.harvard.eduno later than July 7, 2015
 
Accepted articles should be approximately 6,000 to 8,000 words in length (including notes) and must be received no later than January 4, 2016.

Humanités numériques et Antiquité/ Digital Humanities and Antiquity DHANT

Researchers in ancient literature, text editors, historians, archaeologists, have long been the use of digital techniques. The need was felt to compare different uses of digital technology in these fields, to circulate knowledge to allow new uses, to consider possible developments.

The conference focuses on four main themes: publishing text and scholia, prosopography, epigraphy and ancient geography and archeology. It will be held in Grenoble (France) on 3 and 4 September 2015, and will be preceded by a day of workshops and a visit to FabLab MSTIC LIG Wednesday, September 2, 2015 and accompanied by a poster session. It will conclude with a panel discussion Friday, September 4th. The conference is supported by the Maison des Sciences de l'Homme-Alpes , universities Grenoble 2 and 3 Grenoble , the National Network of Houses of Human Sciences , Grenoble -alpes Métropole , the LIG , research teams HISOMA(UMR 5189), Litt & Arts-Translatio (EA 7355), GERCI . (EA 611) The registration   is compulsory but no charge for workshops and communications and must specify:
  • The workshops and visit fablab MSTIC which we want to participate: the number of participants is limited to 20 for each workshop and to visit
  • The day (s) of attendance at symposium
Late submissions for posters are now being accepted. Please send proposals to isabell.cogitore@msh-alpes.fr and elena.pierazzo@u-grenoble3.fr before June 10th, 2015.



Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Universität Wien: Theses and Dissertations on Antiquity

Universität Wien: Theses and Dissertations on Antiquity

Most are available for download.


 Ägyptische Sprache und Literatur

B

Brein, Georg (2008) Wurzelinkompatibilitäten im Wortschatz der Pyramidentexte.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Satzinger, Helmut

S

Schilk, Sheba Celina (2010) Steine der Freude.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Satzinger, Helmut

Z

Zelenkova, Lubica (2008) Die privaten Stiftungsinschriften des funerären Bereichs des Alten Reiches und der 1. Zwischenzeit.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Satzinger, Helmut



Alte Geschichte

A

Appl, Marlies (2010) Das Nyktostrategenamt im spätantiken Ägypten.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Tost, Sven

Auernheimer, Martin Julius (2012) Antiker Mythos in neuen Medien.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Haider, Hilde

B

Bauer, Hansjürgen (2013) Der Kircheneinbau im sog. Serapeion in Ephesos.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Pillinger, Renate Johanna
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Breitsprecher, Victoria Johanna (2013) "De nummis asylorum".
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Szaivert, Wolfgang

D

Dumitru, Victor (2010) Die dakischen Könige von Burebista bis Decebal.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Mitthof, Fritz
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

de Gracia Caraballo Hoyos, Maria (2013) Pagane und christliche Armeepriester.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Palme, Bernhard

F

Fabiankowitsch, Anna (2013) Die Fundmünzen der antiken Zivilstadt Lauriacum aus den archäologischen Grabungen der Jahre 1951 – 1959.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Alram, Michael
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Faustmann, Cornelia (2013) Studien zur Entwicklung der lateinischen Epigraphik in Österreich.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Hameter, Wolfgang
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Fellinger, Magdalena (2013) Die Rolle der Frau im Kaiserkult der Provinz Asia.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Corsten, Thomas

Fischer, Albert (2012) Die Unterstützer des Tiberius Gracchus (cos.133).
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Heftner, Herbert
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Fiska, Georg (2012) Das Teatro Marittimo in der Villa Hadriana.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Schmidt-Colinet, Andreas

Fleischhacker, Johann (2012) Imperator, Caesar und dominus noster.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Mitthof, Fritz

Frana, Zéa Ilse (2014) Die Kelten bei Dionysios von Halikarnassos.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Hofeneder, Andreas

G

Gavrili, Paraskevi (2011) Musical scenes of Roman daily life.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Reuter, Christoph

Grabenweger, Wilhelmine (2008) Falsche und fremde römische Inschriften in Norikum.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Weber, Ekkehard

H

Hensellek, Benedikt Anselm (2011) Bürgerrechtsverleihungen an römische Flottensoldaten.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Palme, Bernhard

Hirschler, Michael (2013) Provenienzstudien zu den griechischen Ehren-, Sieger- und Weihinschriften aus Olympia bis 400 v. Chr.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Taeuber, Hans
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Hirzbauer, Michael Klaus (2013) Altägyptischer Tempelbau und Herrscherlegitimierung zur Zeit der Argeaden und des ersten Ptolemäers.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Hölbl, Günther
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Hofmann, Vera (2009) Die Struktur der kleinasiatischen Städte in Strabons Geographika Buch XII.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Taeuber, Hans
Gesperrt bis: 2 June 2012
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Huber, Katharina (2012) Der Kaiser im Osten - Münzprägungen zu Neros Griechenlandreise.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Szaivert, Wolfgang
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Huber, Katharina (2013) Wesen und Funktion der Kistophoren in der Provinz Asia am Beispiel von Tralleis.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Szaivert, Wolfgang
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

J

Jankovich, Katarzyna (2008) ʿEzbet Helmi, Palastbezirk der Hyksoszeit und des Neuen Reichs: nichtkeramische Funde.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Bietak, Manfred
Gesperrt bis: 26 November 2011

Jesenko, Alexandra Stephanie (2012) Der Kosmet.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Palme, Bernhard

Juraske, Alexander (2011) Das Ende der römischen Republik im Historienfilm.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Weber, Ekkehard
Gesperrt bis: 1 February 2012

K

Kaiser, Anna Maria (2012) Militärorganisation im spätantiken Ägypten.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Palme, Bernhard
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Kovarik, Sophie (2014) Das spätantike Notariat.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Mitthof, Fritz
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Krenn, Katharina (2013) Von der Mater Magna zur Madonna.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Boaglio, Gualtiero
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Krenn, Katharina (2011) A pugione.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Mitthof, Fritz
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

König, Robert (2012) Die Annahme von Ideen - Platons Parmenides.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Fakultät für Philosophie und Bildungswissenschaft
BetreuerIn: Zeidler, Kurt Walter
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

L

Lappé, Kira (2013) "trans danuvium in expeditionem ...".
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Mitthof, Fritz
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Losehand, Joachim (2005) Die letzten Tage des Pompeius.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Dobesch, Gerhard

Lotz, Helmut (2013) Sparta und die griechischen Städte Kleinasiens 400 - 394 v. Chr.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Corsten, Thomas

Luger, Claudia (2008) Von Andromache bis Thetis.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Eder, Birgitta
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

M

Macho, Claudia (2010) Anakrisis - Vorverfahren und Beweisführung im attischen Prozess.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Harter-Uibopuu, Kaja
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Markwitz, Manuel (2014) Untersuchungen zu Leben, Wirken und Karriere des Gaius Marius nach seinem sechsten Konsulat (100 v. Chr. - 86 v. Chr.).
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Heftner, Herbert

Maurer, Karin (2012) Der Pontarch des westpontischen Koinons.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Mitthof, Fritz
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Michlits, Christian (2008) Die Geschichte Theras in hellenistischer und römischer Zeit.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Taeuber, Hans

Mitterlechner, Tina (2008) Die Entstehung öffentlicher Kulte im westlichen Mittelitalien.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Aigner-Foresti, Luciana
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

N

Neumeier, Barbara (2012) Untersuchungen zur Geschichte des britannischen Usurpators Magnus Maximus und seiner Zeit.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Heftner, Herbert

P

Pistofidou, Alexandra (2013) Acropolis.
Masterarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Schmale, Wolfgang

Potz, Andrea (2013) Flavius Eugenius.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Palme, Bernhard
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Preindl, Katharina (2013) Dionysos in Nikaia - Mythos und Kult.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Corsten, Thomas
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

R

Resel, Markus (2009) Staat und Wirtschaft im spätantiken Italien.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Cerman, Markus

Rockenbauer, Astrid (2010) Priesterämter in Lakonien.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Taeuber, Hans
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Rosenbaum, Malte (2013) Die Münzprägung des Kaisers Probus (276-282).
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Szaivert, Wolfgang

S

Samitz, Christoph (2008) Das solonische Vereinsgesetz (Dig. 47,22,4).
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Siewert, Peter
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Samitz, Christoph (2014) Die Finanzverwaltung griechischer Städte Kleinasiens in hellenistischer Zeit.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Taeuber, Hans
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Schachinger, Wolfgang (2010) Die Propaganda des Augustus im Spiegel seiner Münzprägung.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Weber, Ekkehard
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Scheriau, Alexandra (2009) Fulvia - Leben, Wirken und Diffamierung einer römischen Politikerin.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Mitthof, Fritz

Schinnerl, Alexander (2014) Der gallische Gott Ogmios.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Hofeneder, Andreas

Sänger, Patrick (2009) Römische Veteranen unter den Severern und frühen Soldatenkaisern in Äygpten.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Palme, Bernhard
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

T

Tauber, Patrick (2013) Die Gestaltung des wirtschaftlichen Lebens im Athen des 4. Jh. anhand der Reden des Demosthenes.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Bannert, Herbert

Tedesco, Paolo (2015) Late Roman Italy.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Pohl, Walter
Gesperrt bis: 15 February 2016
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Toifelhardt, Paul (2010) Die etruskische "puia".
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Amann, Petra

Trost, Monika Margit (2009) Die beiden Etruskerstädte Veii und Caere und ihre Beziehungen zum antiken Rom.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Weber, Ekkehard

U

Uebel, Katharina (2012) Boudicca - Verlauf und Hintergrund einer Rebellion gegen die römische Herrschaft und ihre Darstellung in den Quellen.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Mitthof, Fritz

V

Vlcek, Eva (2013) Römische Graffiti auf Wandmalerei aus Österreich.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Taeuber, Hans

W

Walters, Erik (2010) Unitas in latin antiquity.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Smolak, Kurt

Wengraf, Michael (2010) Die Mitglieder der catilinarischen Verschwörung.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Heftner, Herbert

Widauer, Jasmin Maria (2014) Aspekte spätantiker Kindheit in der patristischen Literatur.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Palme, Bernhard

Wieser, Ulrike (2010) Untersuchungen zum Ersten Punischen Krieg.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Heftner, Herbert

Z

Zechmeister, Michael (2012) Konfliktresolutionsmechanismen der eisenzeitlichen Keltiké.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Karl, Raimund

Alter Orient, Nordafrika

A

Abd, El Karem Mona (2013) Die Nutzung tierischer Ressourcen während des 5. und 4. Jahrtausends v. Chr. in Ägypten.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Köhler, Christiana

B

Buhl, Margot Elisabeth (2013) Die römischen Steinbrüche und Minen in der südlichen Ostwüste.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Hölbl, Günther
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

F

Fuchs, Dagmar (2009) Ägyptische Residenzen und Tempel.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Bietak, Manfred

H

Hinterplattner, Marleen Valentine (2011) Kann der europäische Kolonialismus als Wendepunkt in der Auseinandersetzung mit der Sklaverei in Nordafrika angesehen werden?
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Lohlker, Rüdiger

Hirzbauer, Michael Klaus (2013) Altägyptischer Tempelbau und Herrscherlegitimierung zur Zeit der Argeaden und des ersten Ptolemäers.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Hölbl, Günther
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Hudáková, Lubica (2013) The representations of women in the Middle Kingdom.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Jánosi, Peter-Christian
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Höflmayer, Felix (2010) Die Synchronisierung der minoischen Alt- und Neupalastzeit mit der ägyptischen Chronologie.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Bietak, Manfred

J

Jankovic, Bojana (2013) Aspects of Urukean agriculture in the first millennium BC.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Jursa, Michael

Jankovich, Katarzyna (2008) ʿEzbet Helmi, Palastbezirk der Hyksoszeit und des Neuen Reichs: nichtkeramische Funde.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Bietak, Manfred
Gesperrt bis: 26 November 2011

K

Kahlbacher, Andrea (2011) Raumfunktion und Dekorationsprogramm der Felsgräber des Alten und Mittleren Reiches.
Magisterarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Jánosi, Peter Christian

L

Linder, Nadia (2013) Frühgeschichtliche Untersuchungen zur "Schutzgottheit" LAMMA.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Selz, Gebhard J.

M

Morawetz, Franz (2012) Die Grabräuberpapyri.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Satzinger Helmut

Müller, Miriam (2012) Das Stadtviertel F/I in Tell el-Dabᶜa/Auaris.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Bietak, Manfred
Gesperrt bis: 9 August 2015

N

Naass, Marie (2013) Die politische Ökonomie der Krise in Ägypten.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Günay, Cengiz

Neumann, Michael Walter (2008) Kanalisationsanlagen, Wasserleitungen und sanitäre Einrichtungen im pharaonischen Ägypten.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Jánosi, Peter
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

R

Randl, Monika Silke (2008) Die Entwicklung der Salbkegel im Flachbild.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Satzinger, Helmut
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

S

Schilk, Sheba Celina (2010) Steine der Freude.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Satzinger, Helmut

Schnirzer, Martin (2013) Die Faszination des Reisens bei Ivan Bunin.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Poljakov, Fedor
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Steiner, Herwig (2008) Ägyptische Festungen und Stadtgründungen in Nubien von der Prädynastischen Zeit bis zum Ende des Neuen Reiches.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Bietak, Manfred

Strommer, Julia (2011) Die Geschichte der Katze in der religiösen Ikonographie des Alten Ägypten.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Satzinger, Helmut
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

W

Waser, Magdalena (2012) Die Kapellen und Gräber der königlichen Frauen Mentuhoteps II.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Jánosi, Peter-Christian

Z

Zelenkova, Lubica (2008) Die privaten Stiftungsinschriften des funerären Bereichs des Alten Reiches und der 1. Zwischenzeit.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Satzinger, Helmut


Altorientalische Archäologie, christliche Archäologie

G

Gavrili, Paraskevi (2011) Musical scenes of Roman daily life.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Reuter, Christoph

K

Kaplarevic, Marko (2011) Frühchristliche Malerei in Serbien.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Pillinger, Renate

Köck, Johanna (2008) Darstellungen von Schlaf und Tod auf spätantik-frühchristlichen Denkmälern.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Pillinger, Renate

L

Linder, Nadia (2013) Frühgeschichtliche Untersuchungen zur "Schutzgottheit" LAMMA.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Selz, Gebhard J.

M

Murel, Susanna (2012) Past in the Present.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Fakultät für Sozialwissenschaften
BetreuerIn: Gingrich, Andre

P

Pressler, Siana Ivova (2013) Die Konstantinische Wende im Bereich des heutigen Bulgarien im Spiegel der Denkmäler.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Pillinger, Renate Johanna

S

Schilk, Sheba Celina (2010) Steine der Freude.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Satzinger, Helmut

Siegl, Kathrin (2012) Die sog. Region der Mensores in der Domitillakatakombe in Rom.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Pülz, Andreas

V

von Dellemann, Evelyn (2013) Der Schleier in der frühchristlichen Kunst.
Masterarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Pillinger, Renate Johanna

W

Wurm, Vannina Maria (2009) Symbole und Mythen im populären Film.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Katholisch-Theologische Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Hödl, Hans Gerald 

Griechische Welt

A

Ambros, Gabriele Susanne (2011) Das Heiligtum der paphischen Göttin auf Zypern.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Specht, Edith
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

B

Breitsprecher, Victoria Johanna (2013) "De nummis asylorum".
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Szaivert, Wolfgang

C

Cvetojevic, Milan Mile (2013) Zwei Riesen und ein Zwerg.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Liedl, Gottfried

D

Dass, Oliver (2010) Die Abenteuer der schönen Chariklea.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Gissenwehrer, Michael

F

Fellinger, Magdalena (2013) Die Rolle der Frau im Kaiserkult der Provinz Asia.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Corsten, Thomas

G

Gavrili, Paraskevi (2011) Musical scenes of Roman daily life.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Reuter, Christoph

Gretscher, Martin Alexander (2013) Straßen in den griechischen Städten Lukaniens.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Gassner, Verena
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

H

Huber, Katharina (2012) Der Kaiser im Osten - Münzprägungen zu Neros Griechenlandreise.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Szaivert, Wolfgang
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Huber, Katharina (2013) Wesen und Funktion der Kistophoren in der Provinz Asia am Beispiel von Tralleis.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Szaivert, Wolfgang
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Hörwarthner, Dieter (2012) Untersuchungen zur Architektur des Heraions von Olympia.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Meyer, Marion
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

K

Kovarik, Sophie (2014) Das spätantike Notariat.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Mitthof, Fritz
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Krämer, Gabriela (2010) Frühe Handelsschifffahrt.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Szaivert, Wolfgang
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

L

Lotz, Helmut (2013) Sparta und die griechischen Städte Kleinasiens 400 - 394 v. Chr.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Corsten, Thomas

Lotz, Helmut (2012) Studien zur frühhellenistischen Alltagskeramik in Ephesos.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Kerschner, Michael
Gesperrt bis: 11 March 2014
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

M

Maurer, Karin (2012) Der Pontarch des westpontischen Koinons.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Mitthof, Fritz
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Merker, Raimund (2009) Hinter der Maske des Feldherrn.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Bannert, Herbert
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

N

Neuhauser, Alexandra (2008) Geschichte und Verwaltung der außerägyptischen Besitzungen des Ptolemäerreiches.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Palme, Bernhard

P

Pistofidou, Alexandra (2013) Acropolis.
Masterarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Schmale, Wolfgang

R

Ratschl, Lena Kristina (2010) Athena in Attika.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Meyer, Marion
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Reiter, Paul (2009) Herodot - Vater der Ethnologie?
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Fakultät für Sozialwissenschaften
BetreuerIn: Chevron, Marie-France

Rockenbauer, Astrid (2010) Priesterämter in Lakonien.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Taeuber, Hans
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

S

Schintlmeister, Luise (2013) Aphrodite in Ephesos.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Ladstätter, Sabine

Steinmüller, Martin (2008) Gleicheit, Freiheit, Geschwisterlichkeit.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Evangelisch-Theologische Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Öhler, Markus

T

Tauber, Patrick (2013) Die Gestaltung des wirtschaftlichen Lebens im Athen des 4. Jh. anhand der Reden des Demosthenes.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Bannert, Herbert

Tintel, Florian (2014) Das Bild der mutterländischen Griechen von der Magna Graecia.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Taeuber, Hans

Tomasitz, Dean (2008) Zur Geschichte der Kegelschnitte als Thema im Mathematikunterricht.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Fakultät für Mathematik
BetreuerIn: Humenberger, Johann

V

von Miller, Alexandra Christine Johanna (2013) Die archaischen Siedlungsbefunde von Ephesos.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Kerschner, Michael
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

W

Waldner, Alice (2009) Keramische Evidenzen zur Baugeschichte des unteren Embolos von Ephesos.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Ladstätter, Sabine
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Klassische Archäologie
  

B

Baer, Martin (2013) Konsekrationsprägungen der Augustae von Marciana bis Faustina II. (112 - 176 n. Chr.).
Masterarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Schmidt-Colinet, Andreas

Bauer, Hansjürgen (2013) Der Kircheneinbau im sog. Serapeion in Ephesos.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Pillinger, Renate Johanna
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Bernhardt, Katrin (2013) Die mykenische Welt und Kreta.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Alram-Stern, Eva
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Brzakovic, Marina (2014) Römische Hinterlassenschaften im Gemeindegebiet Kladovo in Serbien.
Masterarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Gassner, Verena

Börner, Christina (2013) St. Pölten, Klostergarten, Haus 1 und 2 - die Keramik.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Gassner, Verena

Bürge, Teresa (2011) Der Palast von Iraq al-Amir.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Schmidt-Colinet, Andreas

D

Darvish Zadeh, Ali (2012) Fingerprints in der Archäologie.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Neugebauer-Maresch, Christine
Gesperrt bis: 18 April 2014

E

Ebner, Desiree (2009) Entwicklung der archäologischen Forschung und deren museale Präsentation ab dem 20. Jahrhundert in Kärnten.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Theune-Vogt, Claudia

Eckl, Barbara (2013) Die skulpierten Steindenkmäler im norischen Teil Niederösterreichs.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Ladstätter, Sabine

F

Fabiankowitsch, Anna (2013) Die Fundmünzen der antiken Zivilstadt Lauriacum aus den archäologischen Grabungen der Jahre 1951 – 1959.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Alram, Michael
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Fegerl, Karin (2008) Archäozoologische Untersuchungen eines Fundkomplexes aus dem Tempelbezirk des Jupiter Heliopolitanus von Carnuntum.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Gassner, Verena

Fischbauer, Sonja (2010) Sammeln, Forschen, Ausstellen.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Theue-Vogt, Claudia

Fiska, Georg (2012) Das Teatro Marittimo in der Villa Hadriana.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Schmidt-Colinet, Andreas

Fuchs, Jördis (2011) Spätantike militärische horrea an Rhein und Donau.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Gassner, Verena

G

Gamper, Kathrin (2013) Werksteinarchitektur im Kontext privater Wohnbauten Westkleinasiens.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Thür, Hilke

Gavrili, Paraskevi (2011) Musical scenes of Roman daily life.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Reuter, Christoph

Goffriller, Gabriele (2008) Dimostrazioni.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Rosenauer, Artur
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Grammer, Benedikt (2013) Stadtentwicklung im 3. Jahrhundert n. Chr. in Pannonien.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Gassner, Verena
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Gretscher, Martin Alexander (2013) Straßen in den griechischen Städten Lukaniens.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Gassner, Verena
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Gugl, Rainer (2012) "Fürchtet Gott, ehrt den Kaiser!".
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Evangelisch-Theologische Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Öhler, Markus

H

Hirschler, Michael (2013) Provenienzstudien zu den griechischen Ehren-, Sieger- und Weihinschriften aus Olympia bis 400 v. Chr.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Taeuber, Hans
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Huller, Irina Marilyn (2013) Fresken in Tell el-Dab'a.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Bietak, Manfred

Hölbling, Eva (2008) Das römische Gräberfeld von Pottenbrunn.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Scherrer, Peter
Gesperrt bis: 27 October 2011

Hörwarthner, Dieter (2012) Untersuchungen zur Architektur des Heraions von Olympia.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Meyer, Marion
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

J

Jandl, Markus Franz (2012) Die fabrica des Legionslagers Vindobona.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Cech, Brigitte

K

Kaplarevic, Marko (2011) Frühchristliche Malerei in Serbien.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Pillinger, Renate

Kerschbaumer, Katharina (2013) Die Ta-Textserie aus Pylos aus archäologischer Perspektive.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Blakolmer, Fritz

Kertesz, Nikolett (2013) Die Pfeilerkrypta.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Blakolmer, Fritz

Kieweg-Vetters, Gudrun (2011) Die Wandmalerei der Villa von Bruckneudorf, Burgenland.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Pillinger, Renate
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Koch, Thomas (2012) Die Ziegelstempel von Vindobona.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Gassner, Verena

Kulovits, Clara (2014) Häfen bei Kastellen in Raetien und Noricum.
Masterarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Gassner, Verena

Köck, Johanna (2008) Darstellungen von Schlaf und Tod auf spätantik-frühchristlichen Denkmälern.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Pillinger, Renate

L

Ladurner, Mechthild (2011) Terrakotten im Schutt.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Gassner, Verena
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Lappé, Kira (2012) Die Praetoria der augusteischen Legionslager.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Gassner, Verena
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Lotz, Helmut (2012) Studien zur frühhellenistischen Alltagskeramik in Ephesos.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Kerschner, Michael
Gesperrt bis: 11 March 2014
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

M

Maschek, Dominik (2010) Ratio decoris.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Krinzinger, Friedrich
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Maspoli, Ana Zora (2012) Römische Militaria aus dem Legionslager, den canabae legionis und der Zivilstadt von Vindobona.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Groh, Stefan
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Mayrhofer, Petra (2012) Römische Haustechnik.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Thür, Hilke

Michlits, Christian (2012) Die archäologischen Zeugnisse Theras in hellenistischer und römischer Zeit.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Schmidt-Colinet, Andreas

Millgrammer, Maria (2009) Männliche Tonstatuetten in der minoischen und mykenischen Kultur.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Alram, Eva

Müller, Ingrid Katharina (2008) Die Grabung 1996 auf Parzelle 80 im römischen Vicus von Mautern-Favianis.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Groh, Stefan

O

Oremus, Katharina (2012) Antike Türen aus Pompeji – Studien zu Türkonstruktionen anhand ausgewählter Beispiele.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Thür, Hilke

P

Peloschek, Lisa (2012) Der Umgang mit Vergangenheit in peloponnesischen Heiligtümern im 1. Jahrtausend v. Chr.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Alram-Stern, Eva

Pistofidou, Alexandra (2013) Acropolis.
Masterarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Schmale, Wolfgang

Podgorschek, Fabia-Milena (2012) Die Basis von Sorrent.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Meyer, Marion
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Preindl, Katharina (2012) "ἀλλὰ γὰρ ἔστιν μοῦσα καὶ ἡμῖν" (Eur. Med. 1085) - [Alla gar estin musa kai hēmin].
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Meyer, Marion
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Pressler, Siana Ivova (2013) Die Konstantinische Wende im Bereich des heutigen Bulgarien im Spiegel der Denkmäler.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Pillinger, Renate Johanna

Profant, Elke (2010) Die feine graue Ware aus dem Heiligtum des Iuppiter Heliopolitanus in Carnuntum.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Gassner, Verena
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

R

Ratschl, Lena Kristina (2010) Athena in Attika.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Meyer, Marion
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Reichardt, Bettina (2013) Menschen und Mischwesen.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Meyer, Marion
Gesperrt bis: 16 May 2017
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Reiter, Johannes (2012) Die Gemma Augustea.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Glaser, Franz
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Rembart, Laura (2009) Die Datierung des sogenannten Serapeion in Ephesos anhand des stratifizierten Fundmaterials.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Ladstätter, Sabine

Räuchle, Viktoria Johanna (2008) Mythische Mörderinnen.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Meyer, Marion

S

Schintlmeister, Luise (2013) Aphrodite in Ephesos.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Ladstätter, Sabine

Schuh, Ulrike (2013) Das Heidentor von Carnuntum.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Jobst, Werner
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Soro, Laura (2013) Mykenische Funde auf Sardinien.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Trnka, Gerhard
Gesperrt bis: 30 April 2018

Svoboda, Dieta-Frauke (2013) Altäre und kleinformatige Kulteinrichtungen in Heiligtümern der Magna Graecia im Spannungsfeld zwischen griechischer Kolonisation und italischer Identität.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Gassner, Verena
Gesperrt bis: 6 March 2015
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

T

Thaler, Joachim (2013) Siedlungsstrukturen des municipium von Tridentum und seinem Territorium von der Spätantike bis zur langobardischen Eroberung.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Gassner, Verena

Tsoneva, Hristina (2008) Spätantik-frühchristliche Denkmäler im mittleren Strumatal.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Pillinger, Renate
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

V

von Miller, Alexandra Christine Johanna (2013) Die archaischen Siedlungsbefunde von Ephesos.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Kerschner, Michael
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

W

Waldner, Alice (2009) Keramische Evidenzen zur Baugeschichte des unteren Embolos von Ephesos.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Ladstätter, Sabine
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Waser, Magdalena (2010) Behinderte in der hellenistisch-römischen Kleinplastik.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Krierer, Karl Reinhard

Watzinger, Tanja (2013) Kultpraxis im archaischen Großgriechenland.
Masterarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Gassner, Verena

Weinberger, Ulrike (2012) Die Nebengebäude und Wirtschaftsflächen römischer Villen in den Donauprovinzen.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Thür, Hilke

Weisenhorn, Markus (2009) Der sog. "Dreiteilige Schrein" in Ikonographie und Architektur der ägäischen Bronzezeit.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Blakolmer, Fritz

Wiltschnigg, Hemma Sophia (2014) Bestattungssitten im minoischen Kreta.
Masterarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Blakolmer, Fritz

Wodtke, Petra (2010) Die historischen Regionen Epirus und Akarnanien in der römischen Kaiserzeit.
Masterarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Gassner, Verena 

Klassische Sprachen und Literaturen: Allgemeines  


A

Allesch, Clemens Andreas (2013) Ein Ständchen für Amaryllis - Untersuchungen zu Theokrits Komos (Idyll 3).
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Bannert, Herbert

B

Blank, Cornelia (2011) "Et statim gallus cantavit.".
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Smolak, Kurt

K

Kimeswenger, Irina Farah (2014) "Ist der Mensch rasend oder stellt er sich nur so?" - Friedrich Hölderlins Übersetzungen aus dem Griechischen.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Bannert, Herbert

T

Trenk, Bernd (2013) "Panem et Circenses".
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Grewing, Farouk
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.


Römisches Reich

A

Astl, Agnes (2012) Die osirianische Triade auf magischen Gemmen.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Satzinger, Helmut

B

Bauer, Hansjürgen (2013) Der Kircheneinbau im sog. Serapeion in Ephesos.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Pillinger, Renate Johanna
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Breitsprecher, Victoria Johanna (2013) "De nummis asylorum".
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Szaivert, Wolfgang

Bruna, Elisabeth (2013) Kaiser Tiberius zwischen literarischer Figur und historischer Gestalt.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Mitthof, Fritz

Buhl, Margot Elisabeth (2013) Die römischen Steinbrüche und Minen in der südlichen Ostwüste.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Hölbl, Günther
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

D

Dorfbauer, Lukas Julius (2009) Das Wunderbare in den politischen Gedichten Claudians.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Smolak, Kurt

de Gracia Caraballo Hoyos, Maria (2013) Pagane und christliche Armeepriester.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Palme, Bernhard

E

Ebner, Christoph (2010) "Familia gladiatoria pugnabit".
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Rechtswissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Memmer, Michael
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Eckl, Barbara (2013) Die skulpierten Steindenkmäler im norischen Teil Niederösterreichs.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Ladstätter, Sabine

F

Fabiankowitsch, Anna (2013) Die Fundmünzen der antiken Zivilstadt Lauriacum aus den archäologischen Grabungen der Jahre 1951 – 1959.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Alram, Michael
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Fellinger, Magdalena (2013) Die Rolle der Frau im Kaiserkult der Provinz Asia.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Corsten, Thomas

Fleischhacker, Johann (2012) Imperator, Caesar und dominus noster.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Mitthof, Fritz

Fröstl, Michael (2011) Sceleris vestigia nostri.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Smolak, Kurt

G

Gavrili, Paraskevi (2011) Musical scenes of Roman daily life.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Reuter, Christoph

Grammer, Benedikt (2013) Stadtentwicklung im 3. Jahrhundert n. Chr. in Pannonien.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Gassner, Verena
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Gretscher, Martin Alexander (2013) Straßen in den griechischen Städten Lukaniens.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Gassner, Verena
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

H

Happenhofer, Julian (2013) Rectius itaque Lucretius – Lukrez und Epikur in den Divinae institutiones des Laktanz.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Weber, Dorothea

Hensellek, Benedikt Anselm (2011) Bürgerrechtsverleihungen an römische Flottensoldaten.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Palme, Bernhard

High, Adrian (2013) Mehrsprachigkeit im römischen Südosteuropa.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Mitthof, Fritz

Huber, Katharina (2012) Der Kaiser im Osten - Münzprägungen zu Neros Griechenlandreise.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Szaivert, Wolfgang
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Huber, Katharina (2013) Wesen und Funktion der Kistophoren in der Provinz Asia am Beispiel von Tralleis.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Szaivert, Wolfgang
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

J

Jandl, Markus Franz (2012) Die fabrica des Legionslagers Vindobona.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Cech, Brigitte

Jesenko, Alexandra Stephanie (2012) Der Kosmet.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Palme, Bernhard

Jochum, Benjamin (2013) Analyse der inhaltlichen und didaktischen Aufbereitung des Ersten und Zweiten Punischen Krieges.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Hameter, Wolfgang

Juraske, Alexander (2011) Das Ende der römischen Republik im Historienfilm.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Weber, Ekkehard
Gesperrt bis: 1 February 2012

K

Kaplarevic, Marko (2011) Frühchristliche Malerei in Serbien.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Pillinger, Renate

Keglevic, Branka (2013) Die Briefe des Avitus von Vienne.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Pohl, Walter
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Klammer, Julia (2012) Altwegestrukturen im Hinterland von Mautern/Favianis.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Doneus, Michael

Koch, Thomas (2012) Die Ziegelstempel von Vindobona.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Gassner, Verena

Kostial, Natascha (2013) Die Annahme des Christentums und die Ansiedelung im Imperium am Beispiel der Goten.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Schwarcz, Andreas

Kovarik, Sophie (2014) Das spätantike Notariat.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Mitthof, Fritz
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Krenn, Katharina (2011) A pugione.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Mitthof, Fritz
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Krischke, Philipp (2011) Noricum in der Antike und im frühen Mittelalter bis 600 n. Chr.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Schwarcz, Andreas
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Krobath, Thomas (2013) Das Ende der römischen Herrschaft in der Diözese Britannien und im norischen Raum.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Pohl, Walter
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Krämer, Gabriela (2010) Frühe Handelsschifffahrt.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Szaivert, Wolfgang
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Kulovits, Clara (2014) Häfen bei Kastellen in Raetien und Noricum.
Masterarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Gassner, Verena

Köck, Johanna (2008) Darstellungen von Schlaf und Tod auf spätantik-frühchristlichen Denkmälern.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Pillinger, Renate

L

Losehand, Joachim (2005) Die letzten Tage des Pompeius.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Dobesch, Gerhard

M

Marth, Doris (2013) Der sogenannte "Antiquus Austriacus" und weitere auctores antiquissimi.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Weber, Ekkehard
Gesperrt bis: 20 November 2015
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Maspoli, Ana Zora (2012) Römische Militaria aus dem Legionslager, den canabae legionis und der Zivilstadt von Vindobona.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Groh, Stefan
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Matlschweiger, Melanie (2011) Henri Pirenne.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Fakultät für Psychologie
BetreuerIn: Liedl, Gottfried

Maurer, Karin (2012) Der Pontarch des westpontischen Koinons.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Mitthof, Fritz
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Mlenek, Esther (2010) Tod und Bestattung der stadtrömischen Heiden und Christen.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Palme, Bernhard

Müller, Martina (2012) Untersuchungen zu Leben, Karriere und Persönlichkeit des P. Cornelius Dolabella (cos. suff. 44).
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Heftner, Herbert

N

Neumeier, Barbara (2012) Untersuchungen zur Geschichte des britannischen Usurpators Magnus Maximus und seiner Zeit.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Heftner, Herbert

P

Potz, Andrea (2013) Flavius Eugenius.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Palme, Bernhard
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Preindl, Katharina (2013) Dionysos in Nikaia - Mythos und Kult.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Corsten, Thomas
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Preßmair, Gerhild (2013) Von der Fibel bis zur Pfeilspitze.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Theune-Vogt, Claudia

Profant, Elke (2010) Die feine graue Ware aus dem Heiligtum des Iuppiter Heliopolitanus in Carnuntum.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Gassner, Verena
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

R

Rembart, Laura (2009) Die Datierung des sogenannten Serapeion in Ephesos anhand des stratifizierten Fundmaterials.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Ladstätter, Sabine

Resel, Markus (2009) Staat und Wirtschaft im spätantiken Italien.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Cerman, Markus

Rosenbaum, Malte (2013) Die Münzprägung des Kaisers Probus (276-282).
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Szaivert, Wolfgang

S

Sawiuk, Przemyslaw (2012) Anfänge des Provinzialwesens in der römischen Republik.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Heftner, Herbert

Schachinger, Wolfgang (2010) Die Propaganda des Augustus im Spiegel seiner Münzprägung.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Weber, Ekkehard
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Schintlmeister, Luise (2013) Aphrodite in Ephesos.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Ladstätter, Sabine

Siegl, Kathrin (2012) Die sog. Region der Mensores in der Domitillakatakombe in Rom.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Pülz, Andreas

Stern, Matthias (2013) Der Pagarch und die Organisation des öffentlichen Sicherheitswesens im spätantiken Ägypten.
Masterarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Tost, Sven
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Sänger, Patrick (2009) Römische Veteranen unter den Severern und frühen Soldatenkaisern in Äygpten.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Palme, Bernhard
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

T

Tedesco, Paolo (2015) Late Roman Italy.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Pohl, Walter
Gesperrt bis: 15 February 2016
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Trenk, Bernd (2013) "Panem et Circenses".
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Grewing, Farouk
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

V

Vlcek, Eva (2013) Römische Graffiti auf Wandmalerei aus Österreich.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Taeuber, Hans

W

Waldner, Alice (2009) Keramische Evidenzen zur Baugeschichte des unteren Embolos von Ephesos.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Ladstätter, Sabine
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Walters, Erik (2010) Unitas in latin antiquity.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Smolak, Kurt

Weinberger, Ulrike (2012) Die Nebengebäude und Wirtschaftsflächen römischer Villen in den Donauprovinzen.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Thür, Hilke

Widauer, Jasmin Maria (2014) Aspekte spätantiker Kindheit in der patristischen Literatur.
Dissertation, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Palme, Bernhard

Wiedergut, Karin Maria (2010) Rechtsstreitigkeiten der publicani mit Städten in Kleinasien im 2. und 1. Jh. v. Chr.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Taeuber, Hans
Keine Volltext-Freigabe durch VerfasserIn.

Z

Zehetner, Stefan (2009) Der Signifer.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Mitthof, Fritz 

Semitische Sprachen und Literaturen: Allgemeines

M

Mayerhofer, Kerstin (2012) Die Slavische Abrahamsapokalypse und ihre Überlieferung.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Miklas, Heinz

O

Ostrovljanovic, Boban (2011) Das Deborah-Lied.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Jaroš, Karl

S

Schmidl, Martina (2012) Rhetorik neubabylonischer Privatbriefe.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Jursa, Michael

Subasi, Vera (2011) Dogs in Islam.
Diplomarbeit, University of Vienna. Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
BetreuerIn: Procházka, Stephan 



The Heroic Age

Textual Communities Workshop, KU Leuven 11 and 12 June 2015

Museumzaal (MSI 02.08, Erasmusplein 2, 3000 Leuven)

This workshop will serve three overlapping purposes.

First, it will introduce the Textual Communities system for creating scholarly editions in digital form. Textual Communities allows scholars and scholarly groups to make highest-quality editions in digital form, with minimal specialist computing knowledge and support.  It is particularly suited to the making of editions which do not fit the pattern of “digital documentary editions”: that is, editions of works in many manuscripts or versions, or editions of non-authorial manuscripts. Accordingly, Textual Communities includes tools for handling images, page-by-page transcription, collation of multiple versions, project management, and more. See the draft article describing Textual Communities at https://www.academia.edu/12297061/Some_principles_for_the_making_of_collaborative_scholarly_editions_in_digital_form.

Second, it will offer training to transcribers joining the Canterbury Tales project, and to scholars leading transcription teams within the project.  The project is undertaking the transcription of all 30,000 pages of the 88 pre-1500 witnesses of the Tales (18000 pages already transcribed but requiring checking; 12000 needing new transcription). Participants will be given accounts within the Textual Communities implementation of the Canterbury Tales project, introduced to the transcription system, and undertake their first transcriptions of pages from the Tales.  See http://www.textualcommunities.usask.ca/web/canterbury-tales/wiki/-/wiki/Main/Becoming+a+transcriber.

Third, it will offer an introduction to the principles of manuscript transcription for digital editions to any scholars or students considering undertaking a digital edition project based on a manuscript. The materials of the Canterbury Tales project will be used as a starting point for discussion of transcription, supplemented by reference to other textual traditions on which the workshop leaders have worked (including Dante, medieval Spanish and New Testament Greek).

This workshop will be useful to scholars undertaking a wide range of digital edition projects, especially of works existing in multiple witnesses.  Because both the architect of Textual Communities (Robinson) and its chief programmer (Xiaohan Zhang) will be present, it will be useful also for technical consultants who plan to work with the Textual Communities API. And, of course, it will be useful for transcribers joining the Canterbury Tales project.

There is no charge for this workshop, but places will be limited.  Please contact Barbara Bordalejo barbara.bordalejo@kuleuven.be or Peter Robinson peter.robinson@usask.ca to confirm attendance. For accommodation, see http://www.leuven.be/en/tourism/staying/index.jsp.

Digital Medievalist --  http://www.digitalmedievalist.org/
Journal Editors: editors _AT_ digitalmedievalist.org
Discussion list: dm-l@uleth.ca

41st Annual Conference Southeastern Medieval Association (SEMA)

Forty-First Annual Conference
Southeastern Medieval Association
Little Rock, AR October 22-24, 2015

"Heaven, Hell, and Little Rock" 
Call for Papers 


You are cordially invited to participate in the 2015 meeting of the Southeastern Medieval Association. This year’s meeting will take place at the Wyndham Riverfront Hotel in North Little Rock, Arkansas on Thursday, October 22, 2015 through Saturday, October 24, 2015, and is sponsored by the University of Central Arkansas.


The theme of this year’s meeting is “Heaven, Hell, and Little Rock,” in celebration of a host of anniversaries celebrated this year (the Fourth Lateran Council, the 750th anniversary of Dante’s birth, the burning of Jan Hus, the signing of the Magna Carta). We welcome submissions and encourage panels related to these anniversaries or on other medieval topics. Further, in acknowledgment of the pivotal role that Little Rock, this year’s conference location, played in the American civil rights movement. In the spirit of this significant step in; the civil rights movement, we would like to encourage for this conference an emphasis on the “Other” Middle Ages, and encourage panels on East Asia, South Asia, and Islam at the time of the European Middle Ages, as well as panels on the “Other” within medieval Christendom (e.g., Jews and other non-Christians, Norse encounters with “Skraelingas,” or the treatment of the disabled, diseased, sexually “deviant,” or “mad” in Christian society).

In addition, this year’s meeting will include several sessions devoted to undergraduate research. Please encourage students who have done especially good work to submit abstracts.

Please submit proposals for sessions and individual papers using the link at http://goo.gl/forms/KDyCGVPqoN no later than July 1, 2015.

Plenary Speakers:
Dr. Peter S. Hawkins of the Yale Divinity School (author of Dante’s Testaments: Essays on Scriptural Imagination and Dante: A Brief History among others) will give a plenary address called "Dante's 'Other': Thinking outside the Christian Box."

Dr. Thomas A. Fudge of the University of New England (author of Heresy and Hussites in Late Medieval Europe and The Trial of Jan Hus: Medieval Heresy and Criminal Procedure, among others) will give a plenary address on Hus and his martyrdom.

Dr. Stephen Owen of Harvard University (author of The Late Tang: Chinese Poetry of the Mid-Ninth Century (827-860) and The Making of Early Chinese Classical Poetryamong others) will give a plenary address on Tang poetry and culture.

The Ecology of Meter: Meter and Language – Meter and Literature – Meter’s Past, Present and Future A Special Issue of RMN Newsletter (February 2016)

The Ecology of Meter
Call for Papers

Metrics is sometimes described as discipline run by people who spend their lives counting syllables. Nothing could be farther from truth – poetic meters do not exist in a mathematical vacuum, and knowing the number of syllables, feet etc. per line rarely equals knowing what a given meter is and how it works. Meter is a creative tool that shapes, and is shaped by, language (John Miles Foley used to talk about “trademark symbiosis between metre and language”), tradition, textual and social environments, as well as other co-existing meters and ultimately the people who use, abuse and transmit texts composed in it. The combined action of these factors, seemingly extra-metrical, constitutes in fact what we would like to call the ecologly of meter. Meter is a living thing of  language(s) and literature(s) that depends on this ecology as much as the poetry itself; the two, consequently, can (and should) be approached from a variety of angles and studied by a variety of methods that touch upon and connect different aspects of a meter’s ecology. 




Robert Consoli (Squinches)

King Lykaon and the Wolf - The Ritual


"In great terror, evidently of being eaten 
up by the wolves, I screamed and woke up."
Dream of the Wolfman as recounted to Sigmund Freud

"...there was the bias toward what people saw
with their own eyes, or thought they had seen."
Michael Lewis, Moneyball, 2004[1]

In a previous post I described the myth of King Lykaon of Arkadia as it has come down to us in several sources.  I also mentioned that we are fortunate to have not only this myth but an account of the rite for which the myth seems to have formed the explanation or charter.  What was this rite and what was its purpose?[2]

The rite, sacred to Zeus Lykaios, was carried out on the southern peak of Mount Lykaion in Arcadia.  Our sources differ somewhat among themselves about the salient details.  I have charted them in a spreadsheet which I reproduce in fig. 1.  I have further described the several sources in footnotes 3 through 6.  The spreadsheet clearly shows that there are two variants of the rite; better to say 'two ways for Arcadians to turn into wolves'.  I refer to these as 'The Cannibal Meal' and 'The Body of Water'.

Fig. 1.    Transformation into a Wolf.  Rituals I and II.[3][4][5][6]


Mount Lykaion is one of the highest peaks in Arcadia (the places mentioned in this post are visible in the downloadble .kmz or .kml which can be retrieved here).  Formerly there was here a sacral complex which consisted of an altar flanked by an enormous cone-shaped pile of ashes  and which is about 100 m just to the north of the present-day chapel of  Hagios Īlías.  On the east side of the ash pile are the bases of two pillars which were surmounted in antiquity by columns and golden eagles.[6a]   About 620 meters to the east was a complex at which the Games of Lycaean Zeus were held.  The pile of ashes at the sacral site was excavated in 1903[7] but the excavators could find no human bones or any other sign of human sacrifice.  The story of men eating human entrails was, it seems, a fiction.



The ritual in question consisted of a sacrifice and a meal.  The sacrifice was almost certainly carried out for Zeus Lykaios on the top of Mount Lykaion in Arcadia and which have been conducted there since Mycenaean times.[8]  The sacrifice was reputed to involve animals as well as a human victim.  The meats of the sacrifice, including the human, were then mixed in cooking (boiled in a pot suspended from a tripod, probably) and then served at a cult meal.  The meal itself was probably conducted at night given the name of the some-time reputed victim in the myth, Lykaon's son Nyktimos.  Anyone who drew out human meat from the pot and consumed it was transformed into a wolf.  He retained that form for nine years and, after that time, if he had not tasted human flesh during that period, he was transformed back into a human.  After his retransformation he took on his proper human shape except that he was nine years older.

There's an important variant in our sources.  In this variant there is neither night-time rite nor human sacrifice.  The postulant disrobes and hangs his clothes on an oak tree.  He then swims across an  adjoining body of water and becomes a wolf when he reaches the other side.  As in the previous rite he remains a wolf for nine years and at the end of that time, again not having tasted human flesh, he swims back across the water and is transformed into a human.  He is nine years older in appearance; he dresses in his old clothes and rejoins human society.  In at least two cases these former wolf-men participated in Olympic games.  Pliny and Varro (in Augustine) give us both variants of this ritual.  Plato in the Republic, pseudo-Plato in the Minos, Pausanias, and Porphyry give us only the version with the human sacrifice.  It seems clear that many of our sources regard the story of human sacrifice as really taking place.  Pausanias finds the whole subject so disturbing that he conciously skips over the ritual details.  Given this belief it's curious that Kouroniotis could find no evidence of human bones.  The possibility of real human sacrifice had still a dark attraction for some scholars and his results were greeted with scepticism.  Madeleine Jost who has done heroic work in examining the cults of Arcadia was one of those; she sums up the various testimonies about human sacrifice with these words:

“Thus the testimonies (données) : it is clear that the ancients thought that human sacrifices were a reality; they were sceptical about the transformation into a wolf which, in their opinion, belonged to the realm of folk-lore.”[9]

With respect to the earlier excavations she says this:
  
“Summing up, despite the disappointing (décevants ) results of the excavation of K. Kourouniotis,  it [her previous analysis of the texts] rather gives more confidence to the ancient texts and we see in the rite on Mount Lykaion an authentic and unique trace in Greece of a ritual cannibalism perpetrated in the course of the banquet which followed the sacrifice of the Lykaia.”[10]

New excavations of the ash pile were carried out in 2007 by D.G. Romano and M.E. Voyatzis.  There is as yet no published result that I am aware of [11] but in a popular article of 2010 they give a quick survey of the results which includes, surprisingly, evidence that cult had been conducted at the site since at least the fourteenth century BC with a possible hiatus in the 10th and 9th centuries.  The many bone fragments were analyzed and reported as follows:

“A considerable amount of animal bone has been discovered in all of the levels of the altar trench, and most of it is burnt. From our faunal analyst, Britt Starkovich, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Arizona, we learned that most (close to 98%) of the bones are from sheep and goat, primarily the patellas, femurs, and tail bones of the animals. Most of the bones (close to 98%) are burnt. Other animals are represented in very low percentages and, importantly, no human bones have been identified.” (emphasis is mine) [12]

Parenthetically, I would remark that from the description it sounds like the cult habitually offered the sacrificial animal's thigh, wrapped in fat, to Zeus.


Dr. Jost's analysis of the texts is superb, second to none.  Yet one feels that this is not quite enough in this instance.  She tells us that 'the ancients thought that human sacrifices were a reality'.  That's right; most of them probably did.  To be absolutely certain that human sacrifice did not take place there the entire ash pile would have to be examined; this is a task that's not likely to ever happen.  Therefore the excavations, both recent and from a century ago, constitute 'samples'; they tend to support a result but can never guarantee it.  But we must not be misled.  It doesn't require very many samples before the odds of a contrary result diminish to the vanishing point.  In light of this new excavation the texts referring to human sacrifice and a cannibal meal are shown to have no probative value; from the statistical point of view they constitute 'observer bias'.  The rituals were secret, none of our authors had first-hand knowledge of them.  The table suggests that one author simply copied another (and why shouldn't Augustine, for example, believe the worst possible things about the old religion?).  'Everyone knew' what happened on Mount Lykaion.  Except that no one outside the inner circle did know.

  I think it better if we regard 'Arcadian Cannibalism' as a topos which was used by outsiders, as many topoi are, for moral instruction.  This was already the case as early as The Republic.

It seems more probable [13] that the rite was meant to choose or recruit young men for some purpose.  That in order to be chosen they had to renounce society for a time through a kind of fictive impiety.  Cannibalism could have been an efficacious way to accomplish this; the 'postulants' were made to believe that they had committed this crime.  Just as King Lykaon committed an impiety and was driven out of society as a wolf, so would they be.

What were these young men being chosen for?


[1] I believe Moneyball  (Lewis [2003]) to be an incredibly important book - every classical scholar should read it.


[2] For a careful description of the cult of Zeus Lykaios: Jost [1985] 258 ff.

[3] Minos of Ps.-Plato, 315.c; Pausanias, viii.2.6; Porphyry, de Abst., ii.27, online here.

[4] In Augustine, de Civitate Dei Contra Paganos, xviii.17: “he (Varro) also told the story of a certain individual named Demaenetus, who tasted the sacrifice that the Arcadians regularly offered to their god Lycaeus by the immolation of a boy, and who was turned into a wolf and in the tenth year, being restored to his proper shape, trained as a boxer…”
 

[5] Republicviii (565.d)  Plato is discussing the genesis of tyrannies and wonders if a leader, having executed men unjustly, thus becomes a tyrant:

Plato: “This, then, is clear, that when a tyrant emerges he comes from leadership stock and sprouts from no other source.”
Glaucon: “That is definitely clear.”
“What begins the change, then, from leader to tyrant? Or is it clear that it happens whenever the tyrant begins to behave like the man in the story which tells of the sanctuary of Lycian Zeus in Arcadia?”
“Which one’s that?”
“How whoever tastes human entrails when a man had been cut up among the innards of various other victims would inevitably turn into a wolf. Or haven’t you heard the story?”
“Yes, I have.”
(Slightly modified from Emlyn-Jones and Preddy [2013] 289.)

[6] Pliny the Elder, Natural History. viii.xxxiv (par. 82) in Rackham [1940] 58-61.  “We are bound to pronounce with confidence that the story of men being turned into wolves and restored to themselves again is false—or else we must believe all the tales that the experience of so many centuries has taught us to be fabulous; nevertheless we will indicate the origin of the popular belief, which is so firmly rooted that it classes werewolves among persons under a curse. Evanthes, who holds no contemptible position among the authors of Greece, writes that the Arcadians have a tradition that someone chosen out of the clan of a certain Anthus by casting lots among the family is taken to a certain marsh in that region, and hanging his clothes on an oak-tree swims across the water and goes away into a desolate place and is transformed into a wolf and herds with the others of the same kind for nine years; and that if in that period he has refrained from touching a human being, he returns to the same marsh, swims across it and recovers his shape, with nine years’ age added to his former appearance; Evanthes also adds the more fabulous detail that he gets back the same clothes! It is astounding to what lengths Greek credulity will go; there is no lie so shameless as to lack a supporter. Similarly Apollas the author of Olympic Victors relates that at the sacrifice which even at that date the Arcadians used to perform in honour of Lycaean Jove with a human victim, Daemenetus of Parrhasia tasted the vitals of a boy who had been offered as a victim and turned himself into a wolf, and furthermore that he was restored ten years later and trained himself in athletics for boxing and returned a winner from Olympia.”

[6a] I should observe, by the way, that the two columns on the top of Mount Lykaion remind me of the myth of Atlas who was supposed to bear up the sky.  This myth that the sky needs to be supported occurs in nearly every cultural sphere on earth; it can take the form of the sky being supported by a tree, a pole, a column, a large stone, or a mountain.  Mount Kyllene, on the opposite side of Arcadia, was thought to have been, at one time, the place from which Atlas supported the sky. See Witzel [2012] 131.    For details of Hermes' (grand-son of Atlas) cult on Mount Cyllene see Jost [1985] 33 ff.  In some sources of the myth Atlas was thought to support the sky by means of columns (Odyss., i.53-4).  ἔχει δέ τε κίονας αὐτὸς μακράς, αἳ γαῖάν τε καὶ οὐρανὸν ἀμφὶς ἔχουσιν. 
Mount Lykaion, I suspect - I cannot support this idea - may have been thought to have had such a supporting function at some very distant time in the past.

[7] K. Kontopoulos and K. Kourouniotis excavated the ash cone in the late 19th and early 20th century.  Their results were published in Praktika at that time; the bibliographic details are here.   

[8] Romano and Voyatzis [2010] 13.

[9] Jost [1985] 261.  "Telles sont les données : il est clair que les Anciens considéraient les sacrifices humains comme une realité; ils étaient sceptiques en revanche sur les métamorphoses en loup, qui relevaient è leur avis du domaine de la fable.”

[10] Ibid. 264. "Au total, en dépit des résultats décevants de la fouille de K. Kourouniotis, on accorde plutôt confiance aux textes des Anciens et l'on voit dans le rite du Lycée une trace authentique et unique en Grece d'un cannibalisme rituel perpétré au cours du banquet qui suivait le sacrifice des Lykaia."

[11] Although I see this for Dr. Romano and Dr. Voyatzis: B. M. Starkovich, G. W. L. Hodgins, M. E. Voyatzis and D. G. Romano, “Dating Gods: Radiocarbon Dates from the Sanctuary of Zeus at Mt. Lykaion (Arcadia, Greece),” Proceedings of the 21st International Radiocarbon Conference, ed. by A. J. T. Jull and C. Hatte’, Radiocarbon, 55, 2013, pp. 501-513.  Online here (Downloadable .pdf).

This paper concludes, in part (op. cit., 511): "Based on the dates presented here, a tentative model for the formation of the altar can be presented.  The site was initially used as a ritual space for thysia starting in the Early Mycenaean period. Considerable variation in dates from the lowest archaeological layers might suggest anthropogenic movement of sediments, but the large quantities of Mycenaean pottery sherds indicate a good deal of activity during this period. Between about 1000 and 500 BCE, the site was used extremely intensively, with over 40 cm of anthropogenic sediments deposited at this time. Ceramic and faunal evidence suggests a continuity of ritual behaviors throughout the use of the site. FTIR absorption peaks at 2012 cm–1 indicate that the bones offered to Zeus were either still fully covered in flesh, or were wrapped in fat as described by early texts that discuss thysia. This ritual behavior probably continued beyond the latest date presented here, because samples were not collected from the uppermost levels of the site."

'Thysia' is, of course, sacrifice or burnt offering.

For Dr. Romano's publications list see this. For Dr. Voyatzis' publication list see this.

[12] Romano and Voyatzis [2010] 12.   See the home page of the Mount Lykaion Excavation and Survey Project here.

[13] Burkert [1983] ii.1, 'Lykaia and Lykaion'. 84-93.

Bibliography

Burkert [1983]: Burkert, Walter.  Peter Bing (translator).  Homo Necans. University of California Press, Berkeley 94720.  1983.  Originally published as Homo Necans, Walter de Gruyter & Co.,  Berlin. 1972.

Emlyn-Jones and Preddy [2013]:  Emlyn-Jones, Christopher and William Preddy, edit. and trans.  Plato. Republic, Volume II: Books 6-10. Loeb Classical Library 276. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2013.

Jost [1985]: Jost, Madeleine., Sanctuaires et Cults d'Arcadie.  Paris: École française d'Athènes, Études Peloponnésiennes, 1985.  Online here.

Kershaw [2000]: Kershaw, Kris. The One-Eyed God: Odin and the (Indo-) Germanic Männerbunde.   Journal of Indo-European Studies.  Monograph no. 36.  Washington D.C.,  2000.  Institute for the Study of Man. 0-941694-74-7.

Levi [1971]: Levi, Peter trans.  Pausanias, Guide to Greece. Volume 2: Southern Greece.  Penguin. 1971.


Lewis [2004]: Lewis, Michael.  Moneyball.  W. W. Norton & Company.  2004.  978-0393324815



Rackham [1940]: Rackham, H. (trans.), Pliny. Natural History, Volume III: Books 8-11.  Loeb Classical Library 353. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1940.


Romano and Voyatzis [2010]: Romano, D.G. and M.E. Voyatzis, “Excavating at the Birthplace of Zeus," Expedition, vol. 52, 2010, pp. 9-21.  Online here.


Sanford and Green [1965]: Sanford, Eva M. and William M. Green (trans.). Augustine. City of God, Volume V: Books 16-18.35. Loeb Classical Library 415. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1965.

Witzel [2012]: Witzel,  E. J. Michael.  The Origins of the World's Mythologies.  Oxford.  2012.  978-0199812851

Adam C. McCollum (hmmlorientalia)

A short scholion on Scylla and Hydra in Armenian

Another short passage from ACC 119, f. 348v (cf. this post) is a scholion on Scylla and Hydra, unrelated to the surrounding texts.

ACC 119, f. 348v.

ACC 119, f. 348v.

So it reads,

Գի՛րք ասեն սիկղ՛ եւ հիդրայն ծով<ա>յինք սիկղ՛ն շու՛ն ասի գ գլխի եւ հիդրայն չար եւ՛ս քան զնայ

  • ծովային adj < ծով, -ուց sea
  • շուն, շանց dog

Books say Scylla and Hydra are sea-creatures. Scylla is said to be a dog with three heads, and Hydra to be more dangerous than that.

I have not found in Greek any lines exactly corresponding to these, but for what they’re worth, here are a few loosely related places from Greek literature. (Translations my own.) The following line from Anaxilas (= fr. 22) is quoted in Athenaeus, Deipn. 13.6:

τρίκρανος Σκύλλα, ποντία κύων.

three-headed Scylla, a dog of the sea

The Hydra is canonically described in Ps.-Apoll., Bibliotheca 2.77:

εἶχε δὲ ἡ ὕδρα ὑπερμέγεθες σῶμα, κεφαλὰς ἔχον ἐννέα, τὰς μὲν ὀκτὼ θνητάς, τὴν δὲ μέσην ἀθάνατον.

The Hydra had a huge body with nine heads, eight of them mortal and the middle one immortal.

The Hydra is described as ἀμφίκρανος in Eur., Her. fur. There (1274-1278) Herakles (also mentioning Cerberus) says

τὴν τ᾽ ἀμφίκρανον καὶ παλιμβλαστῆ κύνα

ὕδραν φονεύσας μυρίων τ᾽ ἄλλων πόνων

διῆλθον ἀγέλας κἀς νεκροὺς ἀφικόμην,

Ἅιδου πυλωρὸν κύνα τρίκρανον ἐς φάος

ὅπως πορεὐσαιμ᾽ ἐντολαῖς Εὐρυσθέως.

Having killed the dog with re-sprouting heads all around, the Hydra, Ι completed scores οf countless other toils and reached the dead, to bring to light at Eurystheus’ command Hades’ porter, the three-headed dog.

Hesychius says the Hydra is a water-snake (ὁ ὕδρος ὄφις. οἱ δὲ τὸν χέρσυδρον), and much later a specific description as “wicked” we find in Joannes Tzetzes, Chil. 2.36.263,

Καὶ πεντηκοντακέφαλος ὕδρα τις ἡ κακία.

And a Hydra, the evil with fifty heads.

Finally, the Ps.-Nonnos Scholia (surviving in Greek, Armenian, Syriac, and Georgian) have paragraphs on both creatures: Scholia Inv I 49 (Arm 46 [Manandian, p. 264]) on the Hydra, and 52 (Arm 49 [Manandian, pp. 264-265]), on Scylla. (I hope to offer a post on both of these paragraphs soon.)


Archaeological News on Tumblr

Israeli Burning Man festival torches ancient remains

The Israeli Antiquities Authority says revelers at a Burning Man festival famous for its pyrotechnic...

Scientists Just Mummified a Human Leg to Test Ancient Egyptian Techniques

Mummification isn’t exactly modern, but ancient Egyptian techniques for preserving corpses...

Archaeology Magazine

Cirencester Roman tombstoneCIRENCESTER, ENGLAND—It had been thought that a finely carved tombstone unearthed in western England was the first in Roman Britain to have remained with its intended grave, but researchers have found that even though the dedication on the tombstone named Boudicca, a woman, the skeleton in the grave was male. In addition, the gravestone dates to the second century A.D., while the skeleton dates to the fourth century A.D. The five-foot-long stone, which has a roughly carved back, may have originally hung on a mausoleum wall. “We believe the tombstone to have been reused as a grave cover perhaps as long as two centuries after it was first erected,” Ed McSloy of Cotswold Archaeology told Discovery News. Even so, the gravestone is notable because it is the first time that the name Boudicca has been found. And the limestone pediment is decorated with a unique image that depicts the Roman god Oceanus, which according to McSloy “is also hitherto unknown in funerary sculpture.” To read about the search for the great leader Boudicca's tomb, see "In Search of History's Greatest Rulers."

China Neolithic Site LootedBEIJING, CHINA—China’s Ministry of Public Security announced that 175 people were arrested for looting tombs in Niuheliang, a Neolithic site in northeastern Liaoning province. According to the South China Morning Post, the pillagers had been divided into ten gangs that specialized in tasks such as digging, retrieval, and keeping watch. Four archaeologists are suspected of assisting the well-organized, well-equipped gang and trafficking the stolen antiquities. More than 1,000 police officers participated in the operation, and they reportedly recovered 1,168 artifacts, including a coiled jade dragon thought to be one of the earliest of its kind. For more on looting in China, go to "The Tomb Raider Chronicles."

Japan mirror moldFUKUOKA PREFECTURE, JAPAN—A fragment of a mold used to cast bronze mirrors in 200 B.C. has been unearthed at the Sugu Takauta ruins in northern Kyushu. It had been thought that such tachukyo, or mirrors with knobs, had been imported from the Korean Peninsula at this time. The mold shows indentations to create knobs on the back of the mirror, which was circular in shape, and markings known as “rough patterns.” This mold may have been an early attempt to make mirrors with markings known as “detailed patterns” in Japan. Twelve mirrors with detailed patterns dating between the fourth and second centuries B.C. have been found in the tombs of powerful people in Yamaguchi Prefecture, Kyushu, and the Kinki region of the island of Honshu. “This has added a new chapter in uncovering the situation of early bronze tool production in Japan,” Junichi Takesue of Fukuoka University told The Asahi Shimbun. To read about Roman glass discovered in Japan, go to "Imported Glass in Japanese Tomb Identified."

He has a wife you know

theolduvaigorge: A taste for honey: bees in African rock artby...













theolduvaigorge:

A taste for honey: bees in African rock art

  • by Helen Anderson, Project Cataloguer of African Rock Art Image Project, British Museum

“In Summer 2014 the green roof of the newly opened World Conservation and Exhibitions Centre (WCEC) at the British Museum became home to a colony of bees. The bees were introduced as part of an initiative by an organisation called In midtown – to boost the diminishing population of bees and train Museum staff in the craft of beekeeping. I, along with a number of keen volunteers, have taken up the exciting challenge to look after our bees on the roof on a weekly basis until September.

My own fascination with bees goes back to my childhood in Norfolk. I vividly remember watching their comings and goings on an oversized lavender bush in our garden; an attraction which didn’t wane despite being stung on more than one occasion. However, my role as project cataloguer on the African Rock Art Image Project has firmly established that the human-bee relationship is one that is very likely to be several thousands, if not tens of thousands of years old. Depictions of bees, their nests and the harvesting of honey can be found at rock art sites across the African continent.

Recent genomic studies indicate that the honeybee, Apis mellifera, originated in Asia around 300,000 years ago and rapidly spread across Europe and Africa. While European populations contracted during Ice Ages, African populations expanded during these periods, suggesting environmental conditions were more favourable and that, historically, climate change has had a strong impact on honeybee populations.

image

Africa has more rock art relating to bees than any other continent where populations of bees are found (Europe, Asia and Oceania), although there are no secure dates for the origin of these images. Only a few engravings and paintings relating to bees exist in northern Africa, and these are at widely dispersed sites. The African honeybee builds a nest in dark cavities, typically trees. Where there are no suitable trees, such as in the Sahara, bees may nest in termite mounds, rock hollows, depressions or crevices, and the honeycombs of such nests are sometimes visible. In Libya, for example, nests are located in rock fractures in the steep sides of wadis (dried up riverbeds), which can be between 100 and 200 metres high. 

image

There are significantly more depictions associated with bees in the rock art south of the Sahara; why this should be the case is not entirely clear – it may be due to environmental conditions. I should, at this point, make the distinction between the activity of beekeeping in which I am engaged, and the more apt term of honey-hunters, which most closely explains the activities seen in the rock art representations of southern and eastern Africa. It has been suggested that historically hive beekeeping was never developed in these regions as there were sufficient nest sites that provided plentiful honey for local communities” (read more).

(Source: British Museum)

Paul Barford (Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues)

UNGA draft resolution "Saving the cultural heritage of Iraq"


Here is the text of the UNGA draft resolution Saving the cultural heritage of Iraq. I guess protecting the cultural; heritage of Syria will be a separate one then? The UN seems to accept as proven that the sale of antiquities here is "generating income for terrorist groups, which can support their recruitment efforts and strengthen their operational capability to organize and carry out terrorist attacks" (preamble). Glasgow's Donna Yates will probably not be pleased to hear that. Anyway the sixteen articles include:
9. Calls upon all States to assist the Iraqi authorities in fighting against trafficking in cultural property illegally excavated from archaeological sites and taken from museums, libraries, archives and manuscript collections, as required under Security Council resolutions 1483 (2003) and 2199 (2015), including through international cooperation regarding the restitution of stolen or illicitly exported cultural property, as appropriate, as well as in criminal justice matters and in meeting the challenge of repairing, restoring and conserving damaged or destroyed cultural heritage when security conditions allow; 
So that's an MOU from you, then, America. Note that "as appropriate" - dealers and their lobbyists, it seems, rarely do.
10. Expresses concern that ISIL and other individuals, groups, undertakings and entities associated with Al-Qaida are generating income from engaging directly or indirectly in the looting and trafficking of Iraqi cultural heritage items, which is being used to support their recruitment efforts and strengthen their operational capability to organize and carry out terrorist attacks;
Article 11 reminds of the obligations placed on Member States by Security Council resolution 2199 (2015) and related regulations.
12. Urges all States to take appropriate measures to ensure that all actors involved in the trade in cultural property, including, but not limited to, auction houses, art dealers, art collectors and museum professionals, are required to provide verifiable documentation of provenance as well as export certificates related to any cultural property imported, exported or offered for sale, including through the Internet;
Now there is something to gladden the heart of the lobbyists of the dugup antiquities trade. For years they've been banging on about the 1970 UNESCO Convention (and the US's atavistic CPIA) requiring "provenance" when they do not. But making silly claims like this year after year is a source of not a few bucks from the dealers' associations and other sponsors. Now the UN has obliged and added "provenance" (whatever that means here) so they can make some more money without even changing their tune. OK, UNESCO, time to rewrite that 1960-ish document the Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property.

Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

Open Access Journal: Paleobios

Paleobios
ISBN: 0294-121X
http://www.laboratoiredanthropologieanatomiqueetdepaleopathologiedelyon.fr/image001%20Paleobios%2083.jpg
En 1983,  les Travaux et Documents du Centre de Paléoanthropologie et de Paléopathologie [créés en 1974] s'ouvrent aux  chercheurs étrangers et deviennent Paleobios : revue internationale de Paléobiologie et en même temps vitrine de la Société Française de Paléobiologie [fondée  en 1985 et dissoute en 2009, faute de financement et de bonnes volontés].
En 2004, pour la première fois, une version électronique [html] est mise en ligne et précède la version papier.Parallèlement la version pdf des anciens numéros est progressivement mises en ligne.
Année
version internet
version papier
1983 - Vol. 1, n° 1-2
 épuisée
1983 - Vol. 1, n° 3
disponible (8)*
1986 - Vol. 2, n° 1
épuisée
1986 - Vol. 2, n° 2-3
épuisée
1987 - Vol. 3, n° 1
épuisée
1987 - Vol. 3, n° 2-3
disponible (23)
1988 - Vol. 4, n° 1
disponible (16)
1988 - Vol. 4, n° 2-3
disponible (89)
1989 - Vol. 5, n° 1
disponible (32)
1989 - Vol. 5, n° 2-3
disponible (67)
1990 - Vol. 6, n° 1
disponible (38)
1990 - Vol. 6, n° 2-3
disponible (46)
1991 - Vol. 7, n° 1
disponible (57)
1991 - Vol. 7, n° 2-3
disponible (48)
1992 - Vol.8, n° 1-2
épuisée
1993 - Vol. 9, n° 1-2
disponible (24)
1994 - Vol. 10, n° 1-2-3
épuisée
1995 - Vol. 11
disponible (19)
2000 - Vol. 12
disponible (16)
2004 - Vol. 13
[html : intégrale / par article]
disponible (6)
2006 - Vol. 14
[html : intégrale / par article]
pas de version papier
2007 - Vol. 15 
[html : intégrale / par article]
pas de version papier
2011 - Vol. 16
pas de version papier
2012 - Vol. 17
[ pdf : intégrale / par article]
pas de version papier
   
*Nombre d'exemplaires qui étaient encore disponibles en janvier 2014 : le déménagement auquel a été contraint  le Laboratoire en septembre 2014 et l'éparpillement des ouvrages de la bibliothèqeue rend caduque ce listing! Nous nous en excusons auprès des lecteurs. Dès que le Laboratoire aura trouvé un nouveau local un inventaire des exemplaires de Paléobios sera fait et indiqué en ligne.

  • par Auteur   

    Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

    Esplorare l'arte di Velázquez con i Google Glass

    Aperta lo scorso 25 marzo al Grand Palais di Parigi la mostra dedicata a Vélazquez, oltre alle guide audio e multimediali, offre ai visitatori l'opportunità di un tour mediante i Google Glass.

    Archaeology Magazine

    Ethiopia Australopithecus deyiremedaCLEVELAND, OHIO—Fossils of the upper and lower jaw of a new early human ancestor were discovered in the Woranso-Mille area of the Afar region of Ethiopia by an international team of scientists led by Yohannes Haile-Selassie of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. The Australopithecus deyiremeda fossils are 3.3 to 3.5 million years old, overlapping with Australopithecus afarensis, who lived from 2.9 to 3.8 million years ago. Australopithecus deyiremeda differs from the famous “Lucy” fossils in the size and shape of its thick-enameled teeth and its robust lower jaws, suggesting that the two closely related species had different diets. “Current fossil evidence from the Woranso-Mille study area clearly shows that there were at least two, if not three, early human species living at the same time and in close geographic proximity,” Haile-Salassie said in a press release. The name of the new species, deyiremeda, (day-ihreme-dah) means “close relative” in the language spoken by the Afar people. To read about more recent evolutionary history, go to "Our Tangled Ancestry." 

    Archaeological News on Tumblr

    Arch of Titus remains found

    Rome, May 28 - Archaeologists have discovered large Luna marble fragments belonging to a...

    ἐν ἐφέσῳ: Thoughts and Meditations

    Linguistic Book Deal

    Some of you know that I’m a bit of a bibliophile. Some of you also know that I am pretty good at tracking the prices of excessively expensive monographs, patiently waiting, and then swiping up a good deal.

    For example, I snatched up this pair of volumes for less than $40 for both of them:

    Morphology:  An International Handbook on Inflection and Word-Formation / Morphologie: Ein Internationales Handbuch Zur Flexion Und Wortbildung Volume 1

    Morphology: An International Handbook on Inflection and Word-Formation / Morphologie: Ein Internationales Handbuch Zur Flexion Und Wortbildung Volume 2

    That was a triumph. Granted that particular set is not quite as appealing to Greek students than linguists, but still.

    Anyway, recently, I noted that this volume (which is usually $300+ even used) had some significantly cheaper copies available (~$50). I own the book already, but I thought others might be interested.

    Tense and Aspect in the Languages of Europe (Empirical Approaches to Language Typology) edited by Östen Dahl

    If you’re working on tense and aspect and are looking for a state of the art discussion of cross-linguistic and typological research on the topic, this is a good place to go. Just don’t be deceived by the “in the languages of Europe” part. The relevance of the research is much larger than that.

    Anyway, just thought I’d pass that along.


    Filed under: Books, Language, Linguistics, Typology

    Archaeological News on Tumblr

    Humans migrated north, rather than south, in the main successful migration from Cradle of Humankind

    New research suggests that European and Asian (Eurasian) peoples originated when early Africans...

    Kristina Killgrove (Forbes)

    How 3D Printed Bones Are Revolutionizing Forensics And Bioarchaeology

    The fields of forensic anthropology and bioarchaeology are increasingly turning to digital models in research and outreach. But what are the ethical issues involved, and how can professionals in the field deal with them?

    Paul Barford (Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues)

    China: 175 arrests for Looting


    In one of the largest such raids in the history of the modern state, Chinese authorities arrested 175 people on 26th May for the theft and trafficking of more than 1,000 artefacts worth an estimated $80m.
    Those arrested include four archaeologists and one “master raider”, identified only by his last name Yao, who used feng shui to find the best places to dig for objects. The Chinese Cultural Relics Protection Bureau began investigating the illegal operation in June last year when they found signs of digging near Neolithic ruins in Liaoning province. According to the New York Times, police arrested three people who led them to the larger network.

    The operation spanned six Chinese provinces and involved a police task force of over 1,000 officers. The looted artifacts range from Neolithic times up to the Qing Dynasty. The looters were split into 10 gangs that handled everything from site excavation to sales. The thieves reportedly used knowledge of traditional feng shui, state of the art devices, and the help of archaeologists to find and dig for saleable relics.

    Richelle Simon, 'Chinese police arrest feng shui master and 174 others for looting antiquities ' Art Newspaper 27 May 2015

    Austin Ramzy, 'Chinese Tomb Robbers Used Feng Shui to Steal Antiquities' Sinosphere May 27, 2015.


    Mary Harrsch (Passionate About History)

    Most extensive WWI patriotic posters collection slated for auction

    A history resource article by Mary Harrsch © 2015

    As someone who appreciates history-related images, I enjoyed viewing examples of one of the most extensive collections of World War I poster art that will be coming up for auction next month. 

    Examples of the diverse WWI poster collection assembled by Colonel Edward H. McCrahon.  Image courtesy of Guernsey's.

    One of McCrahon's WWI bond
    posters.  Image courtesy of
    Guernsey's Auction House.
    On June 23-24, 2015 New York City-based auction house Guernsey’s will be conducting an unreserved auction of patriotic posters relating to World War I. Roughly half of the approximately 2,000 posters are from the United States, with the balance reflecting the many different nations involved in the Great War. The auction will be held on LiveAuctioneers.com.
    The collection was assembled by Brooklyn-born Edward H. McCrahon who was so passionate in his defense of the Allied nations that he joined the French Army two years prior to the United States entering the war. Once the U.S. became involved, McCrahon returned home, enlisted in the U.S. Army, and rose to the rank of Colonel. However, it was during his stint in France when he first became riveted by the compelling graphics of war poster art.  
    At the conclusion of the war, McCrahon devoted his energies towards assembling what is ultimately recognized as the most extensive collection of war posters known to exist. By the mid-1930s – after 16 years of collecting – the McCrahon Collection was widely exhibited and acknowledged in countless print articles, and even in Ripley’s Believe It or Not, as the very finest collection of its type.  
    The Colonel McCrahon Collection reflects true international flavor of the war, as numerous countries and their respective languages were used to inform and motivate the civilian public during this time of great crisis. (Of note are the many foreign language posters printed here in the United States that functioned as outreach to the large clusters of immigrants in cities such as New York.) Although all are patriotic at their roots, this Collection features posters that cover fundraising, food rationing, enlistment, women’s war efforts, and animal aid. Many of the posters collected by Col. McCrahon are the only known copies  to exist today.  

    An example of a WWI French language poster printed in
    the United States.  Image courtesy of Guernsey's Auction
    House. 
    Guernsey's auction company has specialized in history-related artifacts and memorabilia for 40 years. The John F. Kennedy, Franklin Roosevelt, Princess Diana, Elvis Presley, Jerry Garcia, John Coltrane, Dick Clark, Mickey Mantle and The Beatles events were all conducted by Guernsey's.  

    Guernsey’s has worked with the Library of Congress in the preservation of the complete Rosa Parks Archive. It has also handled the sale of the Holocaust-related poster collection of Dr. Hans Sachs. Other upcoming sales in 2015 include the Urban Archaeology Collection, Historic Artifacts from the Kennedy White House, Atocha Undersea Treasures, and a recently-discovered work by Pablo Picasso  

    I found a really interesting website with information about WWI & II artists who produced posters like these as well as images of combat as many of them also served in the military:

    World War Pictures: Posters, Photos, Poets and Artists       

    Farrago

    The Little Anabasis

    Xenophon, Hellenica III 1.1-2:
    Ἡ μὲν δὴ Ἀθήνησι στάσις οὕτως ἐτελεύτησεν. ἐκ δὲ τούτου πέμψας Κῦρος ἀγγέλους εἰς Λακεδαίμονα ἠξίου, οἷόσπερ αὐτὸς Λακεδαιμονίοις ἦν ἐν τῷ πρὸς Ἀθηναίους πολέμῳ, τοιούτους καὶ Λακεδαιμονίους αὐτῷ γίγνεσθαι. οἱ δ’ ἔφοροι δίκαια νομίσαντες λέγειν αὐτόν, Σαμίῳ τῷ τότε ναυάρχῳ ἐπέστειλαν ὑπηρετεῖν Κύρῳ, εἴ τι δέοιτο. κἀκεῖνος μέντοι προθύμως ὅπερ ἐδεήθη ὁ Κῦρος ἔπραξεν· ἔχων γὰρ τὸ ἑαυτοῦ ναυτικὸν σὺν τῷ Κύρου περιέπλευσεν εἰς Κιλικίαν, καὶ ἐποίησε τὸν τῆς Κιλικίας ἄρχοντα Συέννεσιν μὴ δύνασθαι κατὰ γῆν ἐναντιοῦσθαι Κύρῳ πορευομένῳ ἐπὶ βασιλέα.

    ὡς μὲν οὖν Κῦρος στράτευμά τε συνέλεξε καὶ τοῦτ’ ἔχων ἀνέβη ἐπὶ τὸν ἀδελφόν, καὶ ὡς ἡ μάχη ἐγένετο, καὶ ὡς ἀπέθανε, καὶ ὡς ἐκ τούτου ἀπεσώθησαν οἱ Ἕλληνες ἐπὶ θάλατταν, Θεμιστογένει τῷ Συρακοσίῳ γέγραπται.

    Alexander the Great in Lycian

    From Craig Melchert's online corpus: TL 29, line 9 (3rd free-standing word from the left).

    Archaeological News on Tumblr

    Mystery Deepens Over Rare Roman Tombstone

    Mystery has deepened over a Roman tombstone unearthed earlier this year in western England, as new...

    Cale Staley (Digging in the Digital Age)

    Sentiment Analysis of Philo of Alexandria

    Sentiment analysis is the process of identifying the emotions present in a text based on the emotive connotations of the language present. By analyzing the texts with the programming language R, I produced the following graphs representing the emotions and polarity present in the entire corpus of Philo as well as his views of “man,” “woman,” “women,” and “female.” Female_EmotionFemale_Polarityemo  Man Emotion Man Polarity Philo_Polarity Woman_Emotion Woman_Polarity Women_Emotion Women_Polarity

    For an more in-depth discussion of sentiment analysis and analysis of the graphs and Philo see: https://www.academia.edu/12469336/The_Feminine_Philo_Files


    Penn Museum Blog

    The Unusual Legacy of J. Ashley Sibley

    The Smith Creek Archaeological Project is a new Penn Museum research project, conducting its first season in the field during the late spring of 2015. The Penn Museum’s social media coordinator, Tom Stanley, is blogging about the project.


    Scattered archaeological work has been conducted on mound sites in the Lower Mississippi Valley dating back as far as the 1840s, but there’s no documentation of excavation at the Smith Creek site until the 1950s. That’s when a fellow by the name of J. Ashley Sibley visited the site, and brought with him the young members of the Junior Archaeological Society of Baton Rouge. Somewhat similar to a scout troop, this group of mostly boys and a few girls came to the site for a hands-on experience with prehistory, digging at a real Native American mound.

    Sibley was a teacher, an author, an avocational archaeologist, and eventual recipient of the Governor’s Award in Louisiana for “outstanding service in education and service in archaeology” for 1981. He cared about knowledge of Native Americans and he worked to instill in the Junior Archaeologists a kind of respect for Native culture. But his work at Smith Creek left something to be desired in a number of ways. For starters, Sibley and his young team chose to focus at Smith Creek on Mound B, the one mound of the three that contained human burials. Their team excavated the remains of several individuals and removed them from the site.

    Our project director, Meg Kassabaum, says this is something that our team will most certainly NOT be doing. When speaking to tribes about conducting archaeological work on prehistoric Native sites, Meg says that the main concern is often over ancient burials. Tribes don’t want Native remains dug out of the ground, especially when there’s no pressing research question that will be answered by doing so. So this year’s excavations are being conducted in areas of the site where there is no evidence for the presence of human remains.

    Next, it’s safe to say that Meg and her team will be doing a better job of documenting this year’s field season than Sibley’s team of Junior Archaeologists did. But that’s not to say they didn’t try. Indeed, Sibley had his young explorers draw up some pretty adorable records of some kind or another. See two examples here; one is a rudimentary map of the site, and the other is just kind of hilarious; supposedly showing the location of their excavation trench in the mound.

    Excavation records, circa 1964, created by the Junior Archaeological Society of Baton Rouge

    Excavation records, circa 1964, created by the Junior Archaeological Society of Baton Rouge. Image provided by Meg Kassabaum

    Proper fieldwork requires good documentation—a responsibility for our own good and for the good of the people who will study this site and its underlying culture in the future. Needless to say, our team will be producing much more in the way of archaeological records and field notes than Sibley’s team did, both in number and in detail. For comparison, below, you’ll see a map of the site created in 2013; this comes from a brief investigation of the site, conducted by a team from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill’s Research Laboratories of Archaeology; Meg was a field supervisor for this project.

    Smith Creek site map, 2013.

    Smith Creek site map, 2013. Image provided by Meg Kassabaum

    In fact, perhaps the most notable record of Sibley’s work at the site is a physical one—a gaping scar in Mound B, where he and the Junior Archaeologists dug and did not replace the soil afterwards. This is bad practice for a handful of reasons; beyond its obvious aesthetic damage, it greatly increases the risk of further damage to the site due to issues like erosion, or even looting. That also won’t be the case during this year’s excavations. Every hole that our team digs this year will be refilled at the conclusion of the season, despite the strong possibility that future seasons of excavation will be conducted at the site. The potential for hazards in leaving an open trench at a temporarily dormant site far outweighs any time advantage that would be gained during later excavations.

    Mind you, I don’t mean to be too critical of Sibley and his young adventurers. He meant well and made what I can only imagine to be a profound impression on those Junior Archaeologists. He also tried to preserve the artifacts he dug for future generations by housing them in a small museum just north of Shreveport, Louisiana. Sadly, after Sibley passed away, that museum was abandoned and fell into obscurity and disrepair. Recently, the materials in the shuttered museum were taken by Dr. Jeffrey Girard of Northwestern State University of Louisiana in Natchitoches. While the human bone from the museum has been analyzed by specialists at the Louisiana Department of Justice, Meg has analyzed the other artifacts and the preliminary analyses show them to be quite similar to objects discovered at Smith Creek during the brief 2013 site investigation.

    Sibley leaves a considerable legacy at Smith Creek. In the end, his work was done in the name of education. The kids in the Junior Archaeology Society got to experience archaeological work firsthand, which was surely an experience that stayed with them beyond their time in the field. And considering it’s not unusual to find mounds on private land, the experience may have led some of those Junior Archaeologists, in later years, to push for preservation of other sites that would have been bulldozed or otherwise destroyed if not for their feedback. In the future, Meg hopes to interview some of the people who were a part of this group and now live near the field site in Natchez, Mississippi.

    Ultimately, education is the goal of the Smith Creek Archaeological Project as well—especially for the students who will be participating in the fieldwork. We’ll meet this year’s team in our next Smith Creek blog post.

    P.S.—If you’d like to hear more about this project and the site on which it focuses, we’re creating a Smith Creek Archaeological Project Podcast as a companion to these blog posts. Click here to listen and download.

    ArcheoBlog

    Emozioni di Milano antica



    Invitiamo tutti ad andare a visitare la
    mostra fotografica “Emozioni di Milano antica“, allestita sul lato
    meridionale del Duomo, aperta a tutti e visibile giorno e notte fino al
    mese di luglio.

    La mostra nasce dalla
    collaborazione fra Veneranda Fabbrica del Duomo, Soprintendenza
    Archeologia della Lombardia, il gruppo di ricerca Milano
    Archeologia/Mediolanum MMXV – di cui Archeoframe IULM fa parte – e dal contributo di fotografi, disegnatori e archeologi.

    L'articolo Emozioni di Milano antica sembra essere il primo su ArcheoBlog.

    James F. McGrath (Exploring Our Matrix)

    Good and Evil

    Jonathan Bernier Good and Evil

    Let us now define the New Christian Right as people who get more upset about the possibility that they might have to bake a cake for a same-sex wedding than they do about revelations that their own representatives have not only molested children but covered up such molestation. If we can even call those “values” then they are deeply skewed, because where I come from molesting children is a far greater sin than baking a cake.

    I disagree with Jonathan Bernier when he suggests that most people are basically either good or evil. I think the line cuts through each of us, and that relatively few of us are at the extreme ends of the spectrum. But I do think that, just as people can allow one or the other to predominate, so too organizations, societies, and movements can come to be predominantly evil or predominantly good. And his analysis of the problematic values of the “Religious Right” in America seems to me largely on target. Click through to read the rest.

    Archaeological News on Tumblr

    Ancient mold used to cast bronze mirror earliest found in Japan

    KASUGA, Fukuoka Prefecture–A fragment of an ancient mold used to produce bronze mirrors that...

    ArcheoNet BE

    Vier vacante vacatures bij Onroerend Erfgoed

    OEBij het agentschap Onroerend Erfgoed is men op zoek naar vier nieuwe collega’s (m/v): een erfgoedconsulent industrieel en varend erfgoed, een projectmedewerker depotnetwerk (halftijds), een erfgoedonderzoeker beschermingsdatabank en een jurist. Solliciteren voor deze functies kan tot en met 14 juni. Je vindt de volledige vacatures op www.onroerenderfgoed.be.

    Paul Barford (Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues)

    Dodgy Cultural property returned to Italy, False provenances, Garbled Paper Trails


    Elisabetta Povoledo, '25 Looted Artifacts Return to Italy' May 26th 2015.
    At first glance the 25 artifacts displayed in the courtyard of a former convent just off the Tiber River here on Tuesday seemed to have little in common: three first-century B.C. fresco fragments from Pompeii were exhibited alongside fifth- and sixth-century B.C. Etruscan and Attic vases, a 17th-century Venetian cannon, a 12th-century mural fragment depicting Christ and three rare 17th-century books. What they shared was a nefarious past. Each had been looted from Italy and smuggled into the United States in recent decades, only to be recovered from American museums, auction houses, private collections and even a university.
    The articles were found in a number of regions of the USA, Homeland Security agents from New York City, Buffalo, Baltimore, Boston, Miami and San Diego were involved in the investigations leading to the returns.
    Each artifact returned to Italy had its own story. The three first-century B.C. fresco fragments depicting human figures, for example, were stolen on June 26, 1957, from the Culture Ministry offices at Pompeii. Tracked to a San Diego warehouse, they were taken by agents in September 2012 from the private collection of an unnamed “American magnate” before they could be sold at auction, Italian officials said. The authorities later identified the frescoes as belonging to the Allen E. Paulson Trust, which forfeited them to the United States government, which then returned them to Italy.

    An Etruscan black-figure vase with dolphins, dating to 510-500 B.C., was seized from the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio. The museum had acquired it in 1982 from Giacomo Medici, an international antiquities dealer. Mr. Medici had provided the museum with “false provenance documentation,” Italian officials said in a statement.

    An Attic red-figure vase, acquired from Mr. Medici in 1983, was recovered from the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, which returned the piece once its illegal provenance was determined. Several artifacts were seized from auction houses and art galleries.

    [...] no criminal charges had been filed regarding any of the returned artifacts. In some cases, the statute of limitations on any crimes would have expired. In others, the paper trail for an artifact’s import into the United States was too garbled to reconstruct.
    Dealers and collectors seem remarkably prone to problems keeping those paper trails free of garbling and loss... A cynic might begin to suspect that there is some ulterior motive in this rather than just sheer carelessness and poor business practices.

    AIA Fieldnotes

    Oklahoma Archaeology Day at Spiro Mounds

    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Spiro Mounds Archaeological Center
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    lecture
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 17, 2015

    Lectures during the day including Dennis Peterson on the history of the Spiro Mounds and Fort Coffee region.  Guided tour of Spiro Mounds at 2 p.m. Read more »

    Location

    AIA Society: 
    Name: 
    Dennis Peterson
    Telephone: 
    918-962-2062
    Call for Papers: 
    no

    Végh Zsuzsanna and Simon Zsolt (Agyagtábla, papirusz)

    JCS 67 (2015)

    Frances Pinnock: The King’s Standard from Ebla Palace G.

    Laurent Colonna d’Istria, Dominique Beyer: Erra-kibrī, ŠABRA d’Iddin-ilum et ses collègues.

    Ilan Peled: A New Manuscript of the Lament for Eridu.

    Jeremiah Peterson: An Adab Composition of Nergal/Meslamtaea at Lagaš and Ĝirsu for Šulgi.

    Jaan Puhvel: Discharge of Duty: Hittite /šahhan luzzi/

    Benjamin W. Fortson IV: An Illicit Hittite–Latin Affair.

    Yigal Bloch, Wayne Horowitz: Urahubullu XXII: The Standard Recension.

    John Marriott, Karen Radner: Sustaining the Assyrian Army among Friends and Enemies in 714 BCE

    Jamie Novotny: New Proposed Chronological Sequence and Dates of Composition of Esarhaddon’s Babylon Inscriptions.

    Samuel Mirelman: Birds, Balaĝs, and Snakes (K.4206+).

    J. M. Steele: A Late Babylonian Compendium of Calendrical and Stellar Astrology.

    John Z. Wee: Discovery of the Zodiac Man in Cuneiform.

    G.W. Schwendner (What's New in Papyrology)

    Singles in Antiquity Conference, Rome, Academia Belgica, 28-30 May, 2015


    Singles in Antiquity Rome, Academia Belgica, 28-30 May, 2015

    Singleness is not only represented as a new and rapidly increasing lifestyle in the present days. It also became a fashionable field of research of social history. In a series of sessions of the European Social Science History Conference (Glasgow, 2012) questions were raised concerning the structural and cultural particularities of 'single life' in the cities. A conference at the University of Antwerp (Singles in the Cities of North-West Europe, c. 1000-2000) in March 2013 further expanded upon the insights from the Glasgow-conference.
    In this new field of research, the silence of ancient historians is striking. This may be partly explained by the lack of demographical data: there are virtually no statistics or censuses enabling to show how many men or women lived single in the towns of the Roman Empire. But far more problematic is the definition of singleness. In a society which did not yet know the Christian concept of marriage, in an environment where both the contracting of a marriage and divorce were fast and easy, the lines between married and unmarried were somehow vague. This may explain why there is not a proper or much used Latin or Ancient Greek word to denote the status of a bachelor or a spinster. We might even raise the question whether singleness for the ancient period could possible be defined as being unmarried. But even without the criterium of marriage, other approaches towards singleness in Antiquity are possible.
    Since this is the first conference ever on the theme, aiming at a book volume which will set the path for further research, both a chronological and thematic scope will be used to answer a variety of fundamental questions. The questions will be framed within a comparative perspective - taking attention to the way historians of other periods deal with the question.
    (1) The possibility of some demographic insight into singleness - and the way it was distributed (widows, unmarried, divorced, orphan). Difference between urban and rural environment.
    (2) Gendered aspects of the issue.
    (3) Social and economic drawbacks or incentives for single persons.
    (4) Social networks and the possibility of a subculture of singles.
    (5) Juridic consequences of singleness.
    (6) Funerary commemoration and representation of singleness.
    (7) The impact of Christianity.
    Organisation
    Christian Laes, University of Antwerp, Free University of Brussels
    Sabine Huebner, University of Basel
    Dates, Location
    28-30th May 2015,
    Academia Belgica in Rome.
    Small conference, maximum two days.
    Programme
    Thursday
    15:30-16:00 Welcome; Coffee
    16:00-16:30 What’s in a Single? Roman Antiquity and a Comparative World Approach (Christian Laes)
    Panel I: Demographic, Archaeological, and Socio-Economic Approaches
    Chair: Christian Laes
    16:30 – 17:00 The Demographic Background for Singles: Roman Egypt and Beyond (Sabine Huebner)
    17:00 – 17:30  Looking for Singles in the Archaeological Record (Anna Boozer)
    17:30-18:00 Singleness as Business Strategy? Economic Incentives or Drawbacks of Living Alone (Wim Broekaert)
    18:00 – 18:30 Discussion
    18:30-19:30 Reception
    Friday
    Panel II: Singles in Judaism, Chair: Ville Vuolanto
    9:30-10:00 Ranon Katzoff „Age at Marriage of Jewish Girls in Late Antiquity and the Rabbinic Rejection of Singleness“
    10:00-10:30 John Martens „Was Jesus Single?“
    10:30-11:00 Coffee break
    11:00-11:30 Kevin Funderburk „Contesting the Temple: Nazirite vows and primitive Christian celibacy“
    11:30-12:00 Discussion
    12:00-14:00 Lunch
    Panel III: Being Single in the Roman world
    Chair: Sabine Huebner
    14:00– 14:30 Penalizing celibacy? A Socio-cultural approach to Augustus’ marriage legislation (Judith Evans Grubbs)
    14:30-15:00  Living “Single” by Catullus and Cicero (Harri Kiiskinen)
    15:00-15:30 Detecting Roman Ideas on Female Singleness: a Literary perspective (Elina Pyy)
    15:30-16:00 Coffee break
    16:00-16:30 Single Commemoration in Latin Epigraphy (Hanne Sigismund Nielsen)
    16:30-17:00 Single as a Lena. The Depiction of Procuresses in Roman Augustan Literature (Mina Petrova Petrova)
    17:00-17:30 Single Women and Slaves in Roman Antiquity (Ilse Mueller)
    17:30-18:00 Discussion
    Saturday
    Panel IV: Late antique Christianity: the rise of the ideal of being single
    Chair: John Martens
    9:00-9:30 Single Commemoration in Christian inscriptions from Rome (Thomas Goessens)
    9:30-10:00 Three Different Ways of Life: Being Single in the Fourth Century CE (Raffaela Cribiore)
    10:00-10:30 Singleness as a Continuity Strategy. Ascetics Between the Earthly and Heavenly Family (Ville Vuolanto)
    10:30-11:00 Augustine, “Philosophical Retirement” and the Singles Life (Geoff Nathan)
    11:00-11:30 Coffee break
    11:30-12:00 Singles in Early Byzantine Literature (Stephanos Efthymiadis)
    12:00-12:30 “Listen to my mistreatment”: Coptic evidence for the difficulties faced by single women in Late Antique and early Islamic Egypt  (Jennifer Cromwell)
    12:30-13:00 Discussion
    13:00-14:30 Lunch
    Panel V: Comparative voices; Chair: Christian Laes and Sabine Huebner
    14:30-15:00 Singles and Celibacy in Early Islam (Mohammed Hocine Benkheira)
    15:00-15:30 Singleness in the Early Modern Period: How Do Historians Cope with It? (Julie De Groot)
    15:30-16:00 Singleness in the Libri Animarum (19th Century Italy) (Matteo Manfredini)
    15:30-16:00 Final Discussion
    20:00 Conference Dinner

    Larry Rothfield (The Punching Bag)

    Sotheby's contributed $75K to support Syrian heritage protection efforts

    An interesting development on the heritage protection funding side mentioned in passing in an article in the Chronicle of Philanthropy:
    The Center is a partner in the Safeguarding the Heritage of Syria and Iraq project, or SHOSI, which brings together the Smithsonian Institution, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the U.S. Institute of Peace, and the Day After Association, a Syrian-led civil society group, to support the professional community on the ground in Iraq and Syria. (Sotheby’s recently gave $75,000 to the Smithsonian in support of the project.)
    I am not aware -- maybe others are -- of any similar contributions having been made by auction houses or dealers towards projects aimed at assisting the protection and securing of antiquities. It would be great to see this kind of giving replicated by the other auction houses and by antiquities dealers. Better still would be a concerted commitment by the players in the trade to make annual contributions to some non-profit entity -- perhaps the Smithsonian, perhaps an NGO -- that would distribute the funding in a timely way (for instance, for the kinds of emergency needs identified by Brian Daniels in the same article). Imagine the goodwill the trade might garner if the major dealers and auction houses -- and heck, why not also major collectors -- signed on to contribute 10% of their annual revenue from antiquities sales to such a fund. (Of course, 10% would be a lot more than $75,000 -- in 2014, two statues alone sold for a total of £25 million.)

    Taking such a step would not only give Sotheby's, Christie's, and responsible dealers such as James Ede a p.r. boost that might well lead to a thaw in relations with hostile "source" countries and heritage protection advocates, it might also forestall what is surely coming down the pipes eventually: the imposition of regulations -- including transparency requirements and a tax -- on the market. I myself would much prefer to see the trade regulated de jure, but voluntary self-regulation of the kind I am suggesting is a not-unhelpful second-best solution.

    James F. McGrath (Exploring Our Matrix)

    Mapping Romans 1-8

    Matthew Malcolm shared this map of Romans 1-8, using the rhetorical questions as signposts to the structure. What do you think of it?

    romans-1-8-map

    Farrago

    More late Christian lexical items in LSJ

    Further to στεφανοσταύριον, there is οἰκονόμισσα, cited from a fifth-century inscription
    and another (ep.pr. Sterrett, WE 216 n.345 [?PASCSA 3 1884-5] = MAMA VIII 399) that is not dated explicitly (Roman imperial).


    The name Doxa goes way back.

    There is a third instance, which may be second-century, and a fourth.

    Also, the passive of φιλοκαλέω is reported (s.v. 5) from a sixth-century inscription.

    Anthropology.net

    Say Hello to Australopithecus deyiremeda, A Newly Discovered 3.4 Million Year Old Hominid

    This fragment of upper jaw (shown) was discovered sitting on top of the sediment in the Woranso-Mille area of central Afar in Ethiopia. Anthropologists have now identified it as belonging to a new species of early human ancestor called Australopithecus deyiremeda that lived between 3.3 million and 3.5 million years ago

    This fragment of upper jaw (shown) was discovered sitting on top of the sediment in the Woranso-Mille area of central Afar in Ethiopia. Anthropologists have now identified it as belonging to a new species of early human ancestor called Australopithecus deyiremeda that lived between 3.3 million and 3.5 million years ago

    A study published in Nature today announces the 2011 discovery of Australopithecus deyiremeda a hominid that lived between 3.3 and 3.5 million years ago. The species is represented by a maxilla, mandible and dentition found in the Woranso-Mille area of the Afar region of Ethiopia about 22 miles from the spot where the remains of Australopithecus afarensis were found. A. afarenis is thought to have lived between 3.9 million and 2.9 million years ago.

    The size of the jawbone and the shape of the teeth of the new species resemble that of afarensis, but the researchers lay claim in their paper that some of the features are very distinct from it. Yohannes Haile-Selassie, curator of physical anthropology at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History who led the study, said Australopithecus deyiremeda appears to belong to a sister species of early Homo and other Australopithecines.

    This piece of lower jaw from Australopithecus deyiremeda shows that it had a more robust jawline than the famous early human, known as Lucy, but also had smaller front teeth that suggests it had a different diet

    This piece of lower jaw from Australopithecus deyiremeda shows that it had a more robust jawline than the famous early human, known as Lucy, but also had smaller front teeth that suggests it had a different diet.

    Australopithecus-deyiremeda-3

    This casts of the upper and lower jaws from the new species shows how they would have fitted together.

    Australopithecus-deyiremeda-4

    This left side of the lower jaw of Australopithecus deyiremeda was found 3.2ft (one metre) from the other side.


    Filed under: Blog, Physical Anthropology Tagged: afar, australopithecine, australopithecus, australopithecus afarensis, Australopithecus deyiremeda, ethiopia, human evolution, paleoanthropology

    Katy Meyers (Bones Don't Lie)

    Blogging Bioarchaeology: Open Access Publication Now Available!

    I’m happy to announce that my journal article with Kristina Killgrove (poweredbyosteons.org) on blogging bioarchaeology has finally published! It is featured in a special Internet Archaeology issue that was created by […]

    AIA Fieldnotes

    Zooarchaeology Laboratory Open House

    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    other
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 3, 2015 - 12:30pm

    Visit behind the scenes of a museum laboratory that helps archaeologists identify the animal bones found in their excavations. Researchers who study animal remains from ancient human-occupation sites (zooarchaeologists) demonstrate how this is done using skeletons of modern animals. If you have found a bone in your backyard, bring it with you and get it identified! A favorite archaeology event for children and for home-schoolers! Read more »

    Location

    Name: 
    Faith Sutter
    Telephone: 
    617-495-3397
    Call for Papers: 
    no

    Amazing Archaeology Fair at Harvard

    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Harvard Museums of Science & Culture
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    fair
    exhibition
    education
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 3, 2015 - 12:00pm

    The third annual celebration of archaeology from Mesoamerica, South America, China, the Ancient Near East and North America. Read more »

    Location

    Name: 
    Faith Sutter
    Telephone: 
    617-495-3397
    Call for Papers: 
    no

    Archaeological News on Tumblr

    Mystery men hunt cultural past stolen by ISIL

    ISIL’s destruction of antiquities in Syria and Iraq has prompted a secretive organisation to track...

    Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

    Open Access Journal: Internet Archaeology

    [First posted in AWOL 21 March 2012. Updated 28 May 2015]

    Internet Archaeology 
    ISSN: 1363-5387
    http://intarch.ac.uk/logo/ia-logo.gif
    Internet Archaeology has been publishing on the web since 1996 and is the premier e-journal for archaeology. Internet Archaeology is an open access, independent, not-for-profit journal. It publishes quality academic content and explores the potential of electronic publication through the inclusion of video, audio, searchable data sets, full-colour images, visualisations, animations and interactive mapping. Internet Archaeology is international in scope, a true journal without borders, and all content is peer-reviewed. Internet Archaeology is hosted by the Department of Archaeology at the University of York and digitally archived by the Archaeology Data Service.

    Issue 39. Critical Blogging in Archaeology

    Introduction: Critical Blogging in Archaeology - Colleen Morgan and Judith Winters
    Full text
    Theme proposal received/accepted: Feb 2014; Drafts received: October 2014; Published: May 2015
    Mapping the Structure of the Archaeological Web
    Shawn Graham (with comments by Andrew Bevan)

    Micro-blogging and Online Community
    Lorna-Jane Richardson (with comments by Gareth Beale)

    Vlog to Death: Project Eliseg's Video-Blogging
    Joseph Tong, Suzanne Evans, Howard Williams, Nancy Edwards and Gary Robinson (with comments by Seren Griffiths, Mark Hall, Ben Marwick and Katy Meyers Emery)

    Online Resistance to Precarious Archaeological Labour
    Sam Hardy (with comments by Paul Mullins)

    Bones, Bodies, and Blogs: Outreach and Engagement in Bioarchaeology
    Katy Meyers Emery and Kristina Killgrove (with comments by Scott D. Haddow and Lisa-Marie Shillito)

    Crime, Controversy and the Comments Section: Discussing archaeological looting, trafficking, and the illicit antiquities trade online
    Meg Lambert and Donna Yates (with comments by Neil Asher Silberman)

    From Blogs to Books: Blogging as Community, Practice and Platform
    William Caraher and Andrew Reinhard (with comments by Suzanne E. Pilaar Birch and Michael E. Smith)

    Blogging the Field School: Teaching Digital Public Archaeology
    Terry P. Brock and Lynne Goldstein (with comments by Whitney Battle-Baptiste)

    Changing the Way Archaeologists Work: Blogging and the development of expertise
    Sara Perry (with comments by Whitney Battle-Baptiste and Stuart Jeffrey)

    A Figurine and its Scale, a Scale and its Figurine
    Fotis Ifantidis (with comments by Jesse W. Stephen and Steven P. Ashby)

     1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39 
    See the full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies 

    American School of Classical Studies in Athens: News

    Summer Hours of the Gennadius Library

    From July 1 to August 31, 2015 the Gennadius Library will be open to the public: Monday-Thursday: 9.00-16.30, Friday 9.00-15.00 & Saturday closed. The Library will be closed: August 10 - 14, 2015.

    Archaeological News on Tumblr

    New human ancestor species from Ethiopia lived alongside Lucy's species

    A new relative joins “Lucy” on the human family tree. An international team of...

    Archaeological News on Tumblr

    Old Ahlat city excavations begin

    Excavation work has begun in the Ahlat Seljuk graveyard, considered the “Orkhon Inscriptions of...

    Paola Arosio and Diego Meozzi (Stone Pages' Archaeonews)

    Megalithic monuments discovered in India

    A team of archaeologists discovered several new megalithic monuments in Karbi Anglong district (Assam, north-eastern India). The team, which was headed by Director Dr Deepi Rekha Kouli and comprised the...

    The earliest depiction of a music scene

    Israeli archaeologists found what they think is Israel's most ancient depiction of a music scene, Israel Antiquities Authority announced. The scene appears on a rare 5,000-year-old large storage vessel from...

    American School of Classical Studies in Athens: Events

    Η στρατηγική κατοχής του ελληνικού εδάφους από τις ιταλικές μεραρχίες πεζικού

    June 11, 2015 - 12:22 PM - Σεμινάριο Στέλιος-Περικλής Καράβης, Διδάκτωρ Σύγχρονης Ιστορίας του ΑΠΘ, Υπότροφος Γ. Παπαϊωάννου 2014-2015

    Jim Davila (Paleojudaica.com)

    Palmyra video: ruins still seem to be intact

    PALMYRA WATCH: Islamic State says it won’t destroy Palmyra. Jihadists’ video shows spectacular ancient ruins still intact, though no word on fate of Hebrew inscriptions. It's not clear to me from the content of the article that ISIS have actually said that they won't destroy ancient Palmyra; they have just released that video of the apparently undamaged ruins, which they have also been using as a backdrop for executions.

    Background here and links.

    The Talmud's use of the Bible

    ASKING THE IMPORTANT QUESTIONS: How much of Tanach is in the Talmud? (Lev Israel, The Sefari Blog). Not surprisingly, the answer is complicated, but this blog post makes a good start.

    Via Ancient Jew Review.

    Hebrew Bible editions galore!

    NEWS YOU CAN USE: Articles on Five New Editions of the Hebrew Bible (Peter J. Gurry, ETC).
    I recently learned two things I didn’t know: there are five editions of the Hebrew Bible in various stages of production and there is a new Hebrew Bible journal with a number of good articles on these editions.

    [...]

    Sarah E. Bond

    Pleiades in the Classroom: A Mapping Webinar

    Join us online at 10 am – 11:30 am (ET) on Friday, May 29th for a webinar broadcast from the Center for Hellenic Studies to discuss how to use the geospatial data housed in Pleiades.Stoa.org to enrich your classroom and your research. We will explore the site itself, but will also illustrate how one might make maps (for teaching or for publication), run classroom exercises (e.g. mapping the path of the Justinianic plague), and allow students to contribute their own research to the site. At the conclusion of the workshop, we hope to open it up to questions and get some feedback on how you use Pleiades to teach. The site already houses almost 35,000 places from the ancient Mediterranean world, but with the help of others within the Pelagios consortium and Maxim Romanov’s digital Islam work, more and more late antique and medieval places are being added.
     
    Google Hangout:

    YouTube Link to Watch:
    Hope to see you there!
    The Pleiades Editorial Board

    Antiquity Now

    Strata: Portraits of Humanity, Episode 7, “Historical Archaeology in Downtown Boise” and “South Carolina Pottery Kiln Excavation”

    Episode 7 of the new documentary series Strata:  Portraits of Humanity, produced by AntiquityNOW’s partner, Archaeological Legacy Institute, considers what we uncover about a society through the remnants of its existence. In this two-part episode we observe how discarded items … Continue reading

    Blogging Pompeii

    News: Il sovrintendente Osanna: "Presto un museo diffuso"

    See Napoli.Repubblica.it for an interview with the current superintendent, Massimo Osanna:
    Il sovrintendente Osanna: "Presto un museo diffuso"
    DA POCO più di un anno a Pompei, Massimo Osanna, ha inaugurato la mostra " Pompei e l'Europa".

    Professore Osanna, si aspettava un'accoglienza così positiva per quella che è la sua prima grande uscita pubblica scientifica da soprintendente di Pompei?
    "Ero certo della qualità scientifica, dovuta ai miei collaboratori. Poi con l'architetto Francesco Venezia si è instaurata subito una condivisione di intenti: non volevo una mostra di cassetta, ma raccontare la seconda vita di Pompei e restituire una dimensione internazionale a Napoli. L'esposizione si poteva fare a Roma o all'Expo di Milano, ma abbiamo scelto la sede naturale che è l'Archeologico ".
     Read the full article here.

    Jim Davila (Paleojudaica.com)

    Review of Lieber, A Vocabulary of Desire

    H-JUDAIC REVIEW:
    Ulmer on Lieber, 'A Vocabulary of Desire: The Song of Songs in the Early Synagogue'

    Author: Laura Suzanne Lieber
    Reviewer: Rivka B. Ulmer

    Laura Suzanne Lieber. A Vocabulary of Desire: The Song of Songs in the Early Synagogue. Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2014. 450 pp. $210.00 (cloth), ISBN 978-90-04-23463-5.

    Reviewed by Rivka B. Ulmer (Bucknell University)
    Published on H-Judaic (May, 2015)
    Commissioned by Matthew A. Kraus

    "I am My Beloved's": The Mosaics of Love in Early Piyyut

    The title “Vocabulary of Desire” implies that payyetanim, liturgical poets, used the available words of the biblical Song of Songs as lexemes to construct richly woven, liturgical poetry. In post-biblical interpretation the Song of Songs expressed God’s love for Israel and Israel’s love for God, and it provided ancient Jewish exegetes with a powerful vocabulary. Perhaps of even greater significance, the poetry of the Song of Songs “provides a natural language for liturgical prayer. The Song, while hardly an overtly religious work, nevertheless offers a profound, and important, vocabulary for theology” (p. 22). The resulting piyyutim, liturgical poems, are examined in this book, which contains two parts. The two parts are successfully integrated and explain certain concepts concerning the structure and the religious messages of the piyyut and the culture that produced it.

    [...]
    I noted the release of the book last summer here.

    The Pharisees

    ELI KAVON: Who were the Pharisees? (Jerusalem Post, Past Imperfect Blog). Corrects the negative stereotypes about the Pharisees, but does so by reinforcing the ones about the Sadducees. Also, there does seem to be a relationship between the Pharisees and the Rabbinic sages, but the exact nature of the relationship is complex and still in need of clarification.

    A few past posts on the Pharisees are here, here, and here.

    Bryn Mawr Classical Review

    2015.05.38: Karanis Revealed: Discovering the Past and Present of a Michigan Excavation in Egypt. Kelsey Museum publications, 7

    Review of Terry G. Wilfong, Andrew W. S. Ferrara, Karanis Revealed: Discovering the Past and Present of a Michigan Excavation in Egypt. Kelsey Museum publications, 7. Ann Arbor, MI: 2014. Pp. viii, 192. $24.95 (pb). ISBN 9780974187396.

    2015.05.37: Monumenta sanctorum: Rom und Mailand als Zentren des frühen Christentums: Märtyrerkult und Kirchenbau unter den Bischöfen Damasus und Ambrosius. Spätantike -Frühes Christentum - Byzanz. Reihe B: Studien und Perspektiven, Bd 39

    Review of Markus Löx, Monumenta sanctorum: Rom und Mailand als Zentren des frühen Christentums: Märtyrerkult und Kirchenbau unter den Bischöfen Damasus und Ambrosius. Spätantike -Frühes Christentum - Byzanz. Reihe B: Studien und Perspektiven, Bd 39. Wiesbaden: 2013. Pp. 279; 69 p. of plates. €69.00. ISBN 9783895009556.

    Paul Barford (Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues)

    Last Month's London "Culture in Crisis" Conference Online


    The videos from the "Culture in Crisis" conference organised by the Victoria and Albert Museum in collaboration with the Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage, Yale University under the patronage of UNESCO are now available online.  The videos are filed here (Yale University You Tube channel, label "Culture in Crisis"). Here is the programme (from here) so you can see in what order they were presented:

    . 
     

    There are some interesting reflections from the meeting here: (Roya Arab, ' Reflections on the Culture in Crisis Conference, April 2015' Media Diversified May 15, 2015).

    and of course the dealers' friends are trying our patience by calling foul play as per usual (Anon. 'Culture in Crisis Conference: Platform for Restrictive German Law'. The Committee for Cultural Policy Updated May 27, 2015. And they wonder why only one dealer got to talk there. Ede's performance was hardly stellar, the usual moans and he apparently thinks it's all about "repatriation" and the Art Loss Register. Waste of time (oh and do compare what he actually said with the bowdlerised version printed by said THE (sic) Committee of Cultural Policy.

    Yemeni War Leads to Massive Destruction of Cultural Heritage


    Laura C. Mallonee, 'Yemeni War Leads to Massive Destruction of Cultural Heritage' Hyperallergic, May 27, 2015.
    In the past few months, a deadly civil war in Yemen between the Saudi Arabia-backed government and Houthi militants has claimed the lives of nearly 2,000 civilians and led to the state’s collapse. But as with other current conflicts in the region, it’s not just the country’s future that’s at risk, but also its past.

    Pierre-Yves Beaurepaire et al. (CITERE: Circulations, territoires et réseaux en Europe de l’âge classique aux Lumières)

    Review by Jill Walshaw (University of Victoria) of La Communication en Europe de l’âge classique au siècle des Lumières (Paris: Éditions Belin, 2014). 356 pp. ISBN-10: 2701182522

    H-France Review Vol. 15 (April 2015), No. 44

    Pierre-Yves Beaurepaire, ed., La Communication en Europe de l’âge classique au siècle des Lumières (Paris: Éditions Belin, 2014). 356 pp. 33€ (cl). ISBN-10: 2701182522.

    Review by Jill Walshaw, University of Victoria.

     

    This book treats the theme of communication in the early modern period in all its aspects, from physical infrastructure, to a variety of vectors (letters, learned journals, institutions and meeting places), to the travels of a host of protagonists, including scholars and journalists, pastors and priests, diplomats and princes. Although France holds a certain pride of place, the focus is resolutely European and even global, with trans-Atlantic communications included in more than one instance. It builds on some twenty years of intensified study of the process of communication demonstrating that the focus has moved away from the more abstract study of the diffusion and circulation of ideastowards a perspective that prioritizes the practice of communication, identifying individuals and following their communicative strategies as they negotiated space at the local, regional, national and international level. Project director Pierre-Yves Beaurepaire argues that by taking this original, yet practical approach, his team has identified a “European Age of Communication” in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries (p. 6), an age that gave birth to a Europe that was startlingly modern in its communicative mechanisms and networks.

     

    It is significant that Beaurepaire speaks of the work of his team, for this is not simply an edited volume of sollicited chapters or of individual contributions. La communication en Europe is the result of a four-year collaborative research project under the umbrella of the CITERE program (“Circulations, Territoires et Réseaux en Europe de l’âge classique aux Lumières”), funded by the Agence nationale de la Recherche (ANR) and supported by the Institut universitaire de France.[1] Its seven chapters and approximately 350 pages are the work of an international team of twenty scholars. Thirteen of the group are based at French institutions, with six other Europeans (from Italy, Belgium, Sweden and Finland) and one anglo-American, Kenneth Loiselle of Trinity University in San Antonio, whose work on friendship and networking in the eighteenth century makes him a good addition to the team.[2] Thus, these are the authors of the book, not contributors to it. Two chapters represent more individual endeavors, but the remaining five are co-written by an average of five scholars each, under the direction of one or more chapter coordinators. The coherence achieved in this exercise is, I would argue, somewhat limited: with individual studies neither completely independent nor blended into homogenous chapters, it retains some of the character of a collection of individual projects. Nevertheless, and entirely apart from its scholarly achievements, La communication en Europe provides an intriguing publication model in an age when research funding seems increasingly targeted to collaborative efforts.

     

    One of the most prominent features of La communication en Europe is its incorporation of a large number of original figures, primarily maps. Indeed, visual content occupies most or all of seventy-two pages, approximately twenty percent of the main body of the book. While this cartographic leaning recalls two key historical atlases of communication before and during the French Revolution, the atlases are in a different category.[3] They are indispensable if relatively brief reference works with shorter text segments, compared to the wider-ranging collection of in-depth, archivally-based case studies represented by the Beaurepaire volume. And, compared with the standard monograph, the maps here are used not just as illustrations but as an integral part of the authors’ arguments.

     

    The book aptly begins with the infrastructure of communication—roads in particular—examined from the perspective of travel. Stéphane Blond coordinates the first chapter, where, in a series of case studies (for example, on the emergence of travel maps as a genre, on a travel guide written by the Protestant Louis Dutens (1730-1812), and on the work-related travels of military engineer Jean Thomas) we perceive an itinerary of key destinationsaccording to contemporaries. Dutens’ guide was clearly aimed at a nervous audience, with tables enumerating expenses, exchange rates, and various units of measurement, and advising travelers to calculate travel times carefully (pp. 23, 26-29). And the peregrinations of the elite remind us of the social importance of hubs such as the town of Spa, where an ever-increasing number of visitors flocked for the benefits of being seen as much as for their health (p. 42).

     

    Chapters two and three work well together, addressing the communication networks of the scientific community. The authors of chapter two (coordinated by Pierre-Yves Beaurepaire) go beyond the classic notion of the “Republic of Letters” to focus on individual scholarly strategies, including personal contacts, scientific collaboration, and publishing networks. Whiletraditional correspondence continued to be important, the development of the periodical press and of learned journals in particular was key to building multi-faceted communications, and the increasing reach of scholarly publishing networks emerges clearly from the maps. Chapter three (coordinated by Jeanne Peiffer and Patrice Bret) focuses on the importance of translation to the continued expansion of scholarly communication. As international readership grew and translation became more common, journals that failed often did so for linguistic reasons. On the other hand, as scientists sought to learn about work being done in foreign countries, translation paved the way towards more specialized journals and a narrowing of disciplines (p. 104). As in chapter one, the case studies included here focus on the practices of contemporaries rather than the history of institutions. Smaller centers emerge as important because of thepresence of a particular scholar or learned journal, while more establisheduniversities barely register in the networks of correspondents.

     

    Half-way through the book, in chapter four, we are invited by Pierre-Yves Beaurepaire and Héloïse Hermant to take a step back and consider early modern communication using the notion of “dispositif,” a plan or mechanism with many individual parts developed in order to overcome an obstacle or to achieve a goal. In the context of the authors’ work, such mechanisms are seen to exist where the goal is to circulate illegal literature, or to overcome institutional or social barriers. This chapter focuses on several case studies in a laboratory-type atmosphere, as we examine how the actors perceived the communicative tools at their disposal and how they were inventive and strategic in their actions. For example, Florence Catherine demonstrates how the Swiss philosophe Albrecht von Haller used different avenues of communication to defend his position with respect to La Mettrie and Voltaire (p. 194), and Antony McKenna undertakes a similar project with respect to the intellectual quarrel between Pierre Bayle and Pierre Jurieu (p. 202).

     

    The chapters that follow build on this careful attention to individual agency in case studies while exploring further aspects of communication. Chapter five, co-authored by Emmanuelle Chapron and Anne Saada, engages with scholars of book history, examining the library not in an institutional sense but in its relationship with booksellers and consumers and with intellectual and political milieux. Comparing readership, book acquisition, and reputation of libraries in the cities of Florence (with its deep-seated political and cultural foundations) and Göttingen (in constrast, “lacking any scholarly tradition”), in particular, the authors suggest that the centrality of the library in the eighteenth century was not a given, but rather, a deliberate attempt on the part of the institution to insert itself into thescholarly urban landscape. Chapter six, by Daniel Droixhe, treats us to a micro-historical account of a 1760s police investigation which aimed to discover the inner workings of a network of illegal books in Paris. The secret agents sent in to round up the distributors of livres clandestins were surprised to find that most of the guilty parties—the criminals responsible for undermining public opinion—were women (p. 267).

     

    Finally, chapter seven, coordinated by Kenneth Loiselle, Gilles Montègre, and Charlotta Wolff, returns to the domain of interpersonal correspondence to focus specifically on the emotional and self-reflective aspects of communication. The social import of letter-writing, the concrete materiality of the act, and the behaviors and norms that it brought with it, were experienced by all correspondents, from Philip II as he wrote to his daughters (p. 304) to the friendly correspondence between a parish priest and a physician in Dauphiné (p. 323), marking it as one of the quintessential practices of early modern elite culture. In the end, the collaborative model used here, with co-authored chapters and multiple case studies, speaks to the central objective of the work to use concrete instances and the lives of ordinary individuals to shed light on a complex process ofchange, as Jean Boutier points out in his lucid conclusion (p. 344).

     

    In one sense, this book will be of interest primarily to specialists. Scholars of the emergence of the scientific disciplines, of the multitude of overlapping intellectual exchanges of the eighteenth century, and of the educated elite across Europe and beyond, will certainly zero in withdelight on one or another of the research findings presented in this densely packed and tremendously useful collection (and it is indeed unfortunate, for this reason, that the work lacks an index). In that same vein, it is important to recognize what this book is and what it is not. It is largely unconcerned with the non-elite, with the varied means of communication among the wider population, both urban and rural. The volume is presented as a “bilan d’étape,” a first stage in a longer-term project. The implication is that future expansion will address how European networks engaged with the challenge of extra-European communications (p. 8), but an equally fruitful avenue could see the creativity and cartographic expertise of such a team harnessed to examine the “age of communication” from below, its impact on broader society rather than on remarkable individuals. Without using the well-worn image of a “trickle-down” model, the nature of communications was also changing in popular quarters in this period, just as it was among the educated elite.

     

    That said, in both its method and its observations, this work highlights a number of key elements that will be of interest to all scholars of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The theme of Protestantism appears as a leitmotif throughout the book, the result of the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685 and the creation of an educated, well-connected and resourceful Protestant diaspora throughout Europe. And while Pierre-Yves Beaurepaire is adamant that the goal is not to paint a “nostalgic and narcissistic” image of harmonious communication across borders (p. 5), the blending of case studies demonstrates how individual relationships and networks worked to create a space for communication which did, in fact, go beyond institutional and politicalboundaries. Still owing something, therefore, to the older model of the international “Republic of Letters,” the association with particular institutions and structures has been replaced by a much more nuanced view of communicative strategies and objectives, a dynamic picture worthy of an era of change.

     

     

    NOTES

     

    [1] http://citere.hypotheses.org/. The program has resulted in five other publications since 2010, and Pierre-Yves Beaurepaire, who acts as the program’s coordinator in addition to his faculty appointment at the University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, is listed first as editor for three of them.

     

    [2] Kenneth Loiselle, Brotherly Love: Freemasonry and Male Friendship in Enlightenment France (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2014).

     

    [3] From the Éditions de l’ÉHÉSS, the series Atlas de la Révolution française selected “Routes et communications” as its first volume of ten back in 1987: Serge Bonin and Claude Langlois, Atlas de la Révolution française. 1. Routes et communications (Paris: Éditions de l’École des hautes études en sciences sociales, 1987); more recently, Pierre-Yves Beaurepaire and Silvia Margazalli co-wrote the Atlas de la Révolution française, Circulation des hommes et des idées, 1770-1804 (Paris: Éditions Autrement, 2010).

     

     

    Jill Walshaw

    Victoria University

    jwalshaw@uvic.ca

     

    Copyright © 2015 by the Society for French Historical Studies, all rights reserved. The Society for French Historical Studies permits the electronic distribution of individual reviews for nonprofit educational purposes, provided that full and accurate credit is given to the author, the date of publication, and the location of the review on the H-France website. The Society for French Historical Studies reserves the right to withdraw the license for edistribution/republication of individualreviews at any time and for any specific case. Neither bulk redistribution/republication in electronic form of more than five percent of the contents of H-France Review nor re-publication of any amount in print form will be permitted without permission. For any other proposed uses, contact the Editor-in-Chief of H-France. The views posted on H-France Review are not necessarily the views of the Society for French Historical Studies.

     

    ISSN 1553-9172

    Paul Barford (Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues)

    Dhamar, Yemen Museum Destroyed


    The Dhamar Regional Museum in Yemen, the main museum of the Dhamar governorate, was destroyed in a Saudi airstrike last Thursday. The Museum, built in 2002, is the repository of all work done in the province. Together with the building, it is not clear how much of the collection of pre-Islamic antiquities, including a number of  dedicatory stelae  and also the material produced by the Chicago Oriental Institute's work from 1978 onwards (see here too) have been lost. Some of the museum's artefacts were recently digitalised by CASIS an EU-funded project. 
    Saudi Arabia has been bombing Yemen in the last 62 days to bring its ally, fugitive president Mansour Hadi, back to power. The airstrikes have killed, at least, 3,912 Yemenis, according to FNA's independent tally. According to a recent report by Freedom House Foundation, most of the victims of the deadly Al Saud campaign are civilians, including a large number of women and children. Thousands of residential buildings have been destroyed, and hundreds of civil and public facilities were reduced to rubble as a result of the bombardments by Saudi warplanes on the Yemeni cities and towns, the group said.

    The city of Dahmar, 100 km to the south of Sana'a, was one of the famous Arabic and Islamic culture and scientific centres in Yemen.

    Source:
    'Saudi Warplanes Fully Destroy Dhamar Museum', Fars News Tue May 26, 2015

    Museums in Yemen.

    American School of Classical Studies in Athens: News

    Graduate Students of the Athens, Patras, and Aegean Universities at the ASCSA

    Μεταπτυχιακοί φοιτητές των πανεπιστημίων Αθηνών, Πατρών και Αιγαίου στην ΑΣΚΣΑ

    Laura Gibbs (Bestiaria Latina Blog)

    Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: May 28

    Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives.

    I was doing some work for my Indian Epics class, and I wrote a little javascript to make it easy to see the Blogger mobile version of the blog, which is better for printing, saving as a PDF, etc. You'll see the mobile-version button over in the top right sidebar of the blog. My students had asked for something like this, and I thought it might be useful to any of you who print the blog posts here.

    HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quintum Kalendas Iunias.

    MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Selene and Endymion; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


    TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

    3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Quam plurimis prodesse (English: To help as many as possible).

    3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Occasio facit furem (English: Opportunity makes the thief).

    RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: O bona fortuna, cur non es omnibus una? (English: O Good Luck, why are you not one and the same to everyone?).

    VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Nonne anima plus est quam esca? (Matt. 6:25). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

    ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Sero sapiunt Phryges: The Troyans are wise to late. When the saege of Troy had endured for the space of ten yeares, then at last the Troyans which now had suffred innumerable mischiefes, began to take counsaile, whether it were best to send home againe faire Helene, the occasion of al their miserie. But when theyr countrey was now with continual warres wasted and destroyed, it was to late to be wise. Even so it is of manie at this day, They be wise, but to late.

    BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Res Male Parta. Click here for a full-sized view.


    And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



    Esto tua sorte contentus.
    Be content with your lot in life.

    Frangit fortia corda dolor.
    Grief shatters strong hearts.

    TODAY'S FABLES:

    FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Canes Duo et Os, a story about two foolish dogs and one that was wiser (this fable has a vocabulary list).

    MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Mors et Cupido, a story about a cosmic mix-up!

    Cupido et Mors

    Greek Bible Art - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my Greek Bible Art graphics; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: ἄγγελος γὰρ ἀγαθὸς συμπορεύσεται αὐτῷ. Angelus Dei bonus comitetur ei. For the good angel will keep him company.

    Paul Barford (Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues)

    Coineys, Curios and Butterfly Minds



    The paid lobbyist for the International Association of Professional Numismatists (coinshop keepers) once again has written on what his clients mean when they call the coin trade a licit business. You see, according to him it is "Trade Professionals Speak Common Sense", while "Ivory Tower academics of the archaeological lobby" who consider that these claims require production of supporting documentation do not realise that such documentation does not exist. I suspect I am not to only one who fails to see in what way a trade which systematically obscures the origins and status of the commodities traded can in any way be regarded as  legitimate.  In a comment under that Dealer Dave ventures:
    It is only recently that this "responsible collecting" campaign has been organized [...] . Those behind it [...] in my view have little understanding of the actual workings of the numismatic and antiquities trades, and of numismatic and antiquities collecting. [...] traceability has been difficult because there are good, sensible reasons for sellers to insist upon anonymity
    Well, yes. That is the point, isn't it? There are good reasons for the origins of some of that material to be hidden. How much? Dealer Dave asserts:
    Recently unearthed "illicit" coins and antiquities are very far from being the majority of items traded.
    That sounds like an admission that such items are handled by the trade. But how can Welsh say how much of it there is, if the items he handles have absolutely no documentation? Dealer Alfredo suggests [on academis.edu if you please] that in the case of the coins he comes across in America, it is one in a thousand which has papers.These people ask us to accept that this is perfectly normal and acceptable that they and collectors have been throwing away the documentation of 99.9% (ninety-nine point nine percent!) of objects entering the collectors' market. How on earth can one refer to that as ethical or responsible business practices? This is especially the case when the trade has a definition in Art 3 of the 1970 UNESCO Convention specifying what the term "illicit" is taken to mean - something the documentation-discarders in the international dugup antiquities trade have been ignoring since 1970.

    However, not all collectors are so blasé about collecting history. Serious collectors of geological and palaeontological specimens require the name of the findspot from where the specimen was collected as the barest minimum on the accompanying label. It is the same with meteorites. These are classified according to their findspot - which has to be recorded, and the authenticity is determined by the labels showing who collected the specimen and then which collections it passed through. No meteorite collector would dream of throwing away those slips of paper detailing that, because the value (as a collectable and as material for study) would drop immensely. Of course there are teenagers who collect bits of unprovenanced stone with a visible ablation crust as "cool, rocks from space". In other words as trophy bragging pieces and curios.

    Its the same with shells, herbarium specimens, and butterflies. Serious conchologists want a specimen to have not only the name of the species, but where and when it was collected. Serious botanists go a step further, they want the name of the botanist who collected the specimen and the date. Serious lepidopterists have similar requirements, they too want the name of the entomologist who collected the specimen and the date. Without these details on the label beautiful animals have died for nothing, so their carcasses can become a curio in a collector's display case. Again none of these collectors would dream of separating the specimen from its label containing these data. It has been like that almost since the beginning of this collecting in the nineteenth century (and beyond). Serious conchologists and serious lepidopterists use this information to do amateur scholarship, often of a very high standard, but to do this their reference/study collection has to be properly arranged and documented. Other people just put an unprovenanced moth transfixed cruelly by a steel pin in a case on the wall to 'decorate' the room as a curio.

    So these numismatic collectors who give not a thought to documenting the coins in their possession, are they collectors of evidence  or curios? The people that sold them those items without the documentation, professionals or curio sellers?

    Tim Pestell in a recent video made the point that recent studies suggest that in pre-Roman East Anglia, there were many thousands of coin dies in use. Yet of their products, only a relatively few have any kind of findspot data recorded when they have been through the hands of the archaeologists of the Portable Antiquities Scheme. If one wanted to do a study of not only the characteristics but the spatial distribution of products of a hypothetical 'Pestell group X variant 132 die', the coin market is no help, they've thrown away the documentation of 99.9% of the finds. The best the coins on the market can achieve is "here is another one". That is hardly likely to advance our knowledge of the past in any useful way.
       

    Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

    Harpokration On Line

    Harpokration On Line
    About a year ago the Suda On Line [http://www.stoa.org/sol] passed an amazing milestone: all entries translated. This was an exciting moment, and one that resonated here at Duke: SOL was an inspiration for the Papyrological Editor (papyri.info), much of whose internals we call SoSOL, “Son of Suda On Line.”

    Around that time I was starting to get interested in Harpokration’s lexicon, mainly for the light that it shed on Athenian law. But before long I was in deep. As Fall set in, John Paul Aldrup-MacDonald, Mackenzie Zalin, and I decided it would be a fun service to translate Harpokration. We began to meet every couple weeks over lunch, took our time, learned from each other, did not rush. At some point we figured we ought to release a few hundred entries to the web and see whether anyone else wanted to join us, in a spirit similar to that which has driven SOL.

    I guess we had a little too much fun: by spring we had amassed draft translations of all but a few entries. Our colleague Ryan Baumann was kind enough to whip up a lightweight tool to support crowd translation.

    So, here we are; if you would like to join us,
    1. go to http://cite-harpokration.appspot.com, click on the link to ‘authorize'; use your google addressCITE-authorization
    2. close that window and go to http://dcthree.github.io/harpokration (authentication can be a little fussy; so, let us know if you encounter problems: dcthree@duke.edu)
    3. find an entry that you would like to translate (either newly or in order to correct mistakes that we have made)
    4. click on “Add translation for urn.cts:greekLit …” above the entryagoranomoiTranslated
    5. This will open a form in which you may enter a translation and any (plain text) notes that you would like to leave for others.agoranomoiEditor
    6. Translate, click “Submit,” move on.
    7. We have been adding pointers to corresponding Suda entries; this is not yet a feature of the translation form. We may add it later. If/when we do, you will enter simply, e.g., “alpha,302″.
    This is meant to be simple, fast, lightweight; both tool and translations are works in progress. Thus,
    • There is no peer-review in the formal and narrow sense of gate-keeping and quality control; just low barrier-to-entry, collegial, collaborative, translation. There is no fine-grained version control. We do not curate translations. We have no editorial board. Rather, we concatenate multiple attributed versions. If you notice that we have gotten a word or phrase wrong, you cannot merely change that word or phrase, but if you click on “Add a new version of translation urn:cite:dc3…” the form will open with the “Translation” field already populated with the version that you would like to correct. Make your changes, click Submit. The whole will be attributed to you, but anyone will be able to see that you have only changed a few words. It isn’t fancy, but it is easy and fast.
    • You will see tags in some of the Greek entries (indicating authors, works, citations, references, Pleiades IDs). This markup is not exhaustive and may contain errors;  some day we may do something with it. At the moment, we don’t.
    • About our translations. These are drafts, a first step toward something better and more complete. You will find errors, perhaps many, perhaps serious. If you see something wrong, please feel free to fix it. We have tried to reflect the grammar and style of the work as literally as possible. This sometimes results in a bit of chop and awkwardness. If in places this seems to come at the expense of clarity, please feel free to fix it. At this stage, we make little claim to nuance. There may be more (or less) to Harpokration’s use of verb tense (esp. the imperfect), or verbs of citation/attribution (μνημονεύει, λέγει, φησί, διείλεκται, vel sim.) than we have surfaced; or to the value of δέ (sometimes ‘and’, sometimes ‘but’), and so on. If you see clumsiness, please feel free to fix it (or to email us, in case of global problems).
    • The Greek is from Dindorf’s 1853 edition, generously shared by the TLG. Where Keaney’s 1991 edition is clearly superior, such that a translation should follow it, we indicate as much. To digitize Keaney and then weigh its merits against Dindorf was out of scope.
    We have now pushed draft translations of the first hundred entries. Please feel free to add, to correct, to improve. If you have a google account, you are good to go. For our part, we plan to push a new batch of drafts each week over the course of the summer–maybe 20, maybe 50, maybe 100 per week, depending on how things go.

    If this succeeds, who knows what comes next. A more robust, production-oriented site supporting crowd-translation of ancient lexica, scholia, and scholarship would certainly be a great thing to have and to build and to contribute to.

    In the meantime, feel free to pitch in.

    Josh Sosin (joshua.sosin@duke.edu)
    John P. Aldrup-MacDonald (john.smith.macdonald@duke.edu)
    Mackenzie Zalin (mack.zalin@duke.edu)

    Brice C. Jones

    P.Oxy. 3.475: A Fatal Attraction

    PictureA castanet dancer
    In the papyri from Greco-Roman Egypt, we learn about a variety of festival entertainers, including flute players, singers, dancers, actresses, and so on. Usually, these entertainers pop up in contracts used for hiring purposes. But they also emerge in private letters. In a Ptolemaic papyrus letter discussed on this blog some time ago, Demophon hires an effeminate male dancer and places an order for various sorts of instruments and delicacies for a certain women’s festival. When dancers were hired for festivities, parties, or celebrations, they were front-and-center. Dominic Montserrat (Sex and Society in Graeco-Roman Egypt [Routledge, 1996]) has suggested that these dancers, donned in their glamorous dancing costumes, ornaments, jewelry, and perfume, would have likely provided sexual services as well. According to Montserrat, “it is not hard to imagine that the tinkling of the dancer’s jewellery, her movements and the music, would have provided a powerful erotic stimulus for some spectators” (176).

    In one particular case, we learn that the attraction (of one sort or another) proved fatal. According to P.Oxy. 3.475, Leonides reports an accident in which an eight year old slave boy named Epaphroditus fell to his death while trying to watch dancing girls at a festival:

    “To Hierax, strategus, from Leonides alias Serenus, whose mother is stated as Tauris, of Senepta. Late yesterday evening, namely 6th Hathyr, while a festival was taking place at Senepta and the castanet dancers were giving their usual performance at the house of my son-in-law Ploution son of Aristodemos, his slave Epaphroditus, about 8 years old, tried to lean out of an upper room of the said house to see the castanet dancers, fell, and was killed.”

    Part of the document is a copy of an application to the strategus of Oxyrhynchus imploring him to order one of his assistants to give Epaphroditus a proper burial. We learn that the strategus did indeed order an assistant to view the dead body in the company of a public physician and to deliver it over for burial.

    A very sad ending for little Epaphroditus. 

    May 27, 2015

    Ancient Art

    “In this land of Veragua [present day Panama] I saw more signs...









    In this land of Veragua [present day Panama] I saw more signs of gold in the first two days than I saw in Espanola during four years…”

    -Christopher Columbus in 1493, in his letter to Ferdinand and Isabella (via).

    Upon his arrival in Panama, Columbus was struck by the sheer quantities of gold he observed. He noted that the people who came to greet him wore golden pendants -possibly not too dissimilar to the ones displayed in this post. The exact age of these pieces shown here is a bit ambiguous- they may date from 800 right through to Columbus’s time. All are from Panama. 

    The 2nd example depicts a shark, while the 3rd is of some form of bird. Given the latter, it is interesting that Columbus mentioned that some men wore ‘eagle’ pendants. The Walters discuss the 1st and 4th examples:

    Frogs were associated with rain and fertility, and were therefore quite popular; they could also symbolize transformation. This frog pendant has bells for eyes, and holds a double-headed snake in its mouth. Its large hind feet are flat and rectangular. […]

    This pendant represents a jaguar, with which a warrior would have wanted to associate. The head of the animal is turned aside as if to observe a potential viewer or enemy. On each foot is a ring for suspension.

    Shown artefacts courtesy of & can be viewed at the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore. Via their online collections57.29957.2872009.20.82 & 57.266.

    Calenda: Histoire grecque

    Autour des machines de Vitruve

    L’équipe caennaise, depuis longtemps spécialisée dans l’étude des textes scientifiques et techniques, dans l’édition de Vitruve et la restitution virtuelle des machines de l’Antiquité propose une rencontre interdisciplinaire prenant appui sur le contenu de l’œuvre de Vitruve pour faire un point sur l’état des connaissances dans les domaines de l’ingénierie romaine.

    ArcheoNet BE

    Al 18 aanvragen voor erkenning als archeoloog

    Tot op heden werden al 18 aanvragen voor aanduiding als erkend archeoloog ingediend, waarvan 4 als rechtspersoon en 14 als natuurlijk persoon. Dat blijkt uit het antwoord van Vlaams minister Geert Bourgeois op een schriftelijke vraag van parlementslid Robrecht Bothuyne. “Het agentschap Onroerend Erfgoed schat dat er 15 rechtspersonen en 40 natuurlijke personen aangeduid moeten zijn als erkende archeoloog om de uitvoering van het Onroerenderfgoeddecreet mogelijk te maken,” aldus Bourgeois. “De bedoeling is het benodigde aantal in 2015 te bereiken, zodat in 2016 het archeologiehoofdstuk van het nieuwe decreet in werking kan treden.”

    BiblePlaces Blog

    Was the James Brother of Jesus Ossuary Buried in the Talpiot Tomb? A Summary of Arguments

    (by Ryan Jaroncyk)

    Yesterday I shared a list of arguments concerning the identification of the Talpiot Tomb with the tomb of Jesus and his family. Last month proponents of that theory claimed that analysis of the “James son of Joseph brother of Jesus” ossuary reveals a geochemical fingerprint virtually identical to the Talpiot Tomb. If true, this means that the James Ossuary would have been buried in the Talpiot Tomb as well. Below I have gathered arguments presented in favor of this latest claim as well as significant objections.

    Supporting Arguments
     
    1. At least one geologist who was involved in the analysis believes the geochemical link is indisputable.

    2. A majority of scholars believe the entire inscription is authentic and from the 1st century.

    3. The latest statistical study concluded that it is likely only 1.7 individuals with that unique combination of names and their apparent relationships on the ossuary lived in 1st century Jerusalem. Moreover, the study calculated a 38% chance only 1 such individual existed, compared to a 32% chance for 2 individuals, 18% chance for 3, 8% chance for 4, etc.

    4. There are no other “James son of Joseph” ossuaries.

    5. The addition of “brother of” likely means that this brother “Jesus” was a well-known, influential public figure at the time. Jesus of Nazareth is an ideal candidate.

    6. Only one other “brother of” ossuary has been discovered from this era.

    Opposing Arguments

    1. The results have not yet been published or submitted to a peer-reviewed scientific journal.

    2. The sample size may be too small to yield meaningful conclusions.

    3. This ossuary’s photograph was dated to the 1970s by a former FBI director during an Israeli trial, four years before the Talpiot Tomb was even excavated.

    4. There is a 2nd-century reference and 4th-century literary evidence of James being buried in the Kidron Valley, not the Talpiot area.

    5. The possible soil match could be from another area of the East Talpiot region and not this specific tomb.

    6. This theory requires the Talpiot Tomb held 11 ossuaries, not 10 according to several of the original excavators.

    7. This ossuary would have just happened to be the one by the opening to the tomb, leaving it vulnerable to illicit removal.

    8. This would have just happened to be the only ossuary that was raided and stolen, while every other ossuary in the tomb was left untouched.

    9. There is a minority of reputable scholars who question the authenticity of the inscription, specifically the “brother of Jesus” part.

    10. Two statistical studies have estimated that there were 1.7 to 3.3 “James son of Joseph brother of Jesus” individuals alive during Jesus's lifetime. The most recent statistical analysis estimated the following: 38% chance there was only 1 “James son of Joseph brother of James,” 32% chance there were 2 “James son of Joseph brother of Jesus” individuals, 18% chance there were 3 individuals, 8% chance there were 4 individuals, etc. This suggests that there is a 62% chance there were 2 or more individuals with this full appellation in 1st-century Jerusalem, meaning it is not likely to be totally unique.

    11. At least three top scholars have argued that the “brother of Jesus” portion of the inscription is insufficient to link to Jesus of Nazareth, without any further descriptors.

    12. James originated from a relatively poor family and lived in relative poverty as leader of the Jerusalem church, yet the style of the ossuary is consistent with wealth.

    13. Josephus referred to James as the “brother of Jesus, who was called Christ” (Ant. 20.9.1 [§200]). This differs from the James Ossuary which calls James the “son of Joseph.” In addition, Josephus’s descriptor, “who was called Christ” offers a definitive link to Jesus of Nazareth that is not present in the ossuary.

    ArcheoNet BE

    Gezocht: coördinator erfgoedcel Kusterfgoed

    cotebelgeVoor de uitbouw van de nieuwe erfgoedcel ‘Kusterfgoed’ is men momenteel op zoek naar een coördinator (m/v). De erfgoedcel zal actief zijn in de gemeenten Blankenberge, De Haan, Oostende en Middelkerke. Kandidaten hebben een masterdiploma, minimum 3 jaar relevante ervaring, en een aantoonbare interesse in de erfgoedsector. Ervaring met vrijwilligerswerking is aanbevolen. Solliciteren voor deze voltijdse functie kan tot 15 juni.

    Geïnteresseerd? Download de volledige vacature (pdf).

    Archaeology Magazine

    Spain cranium blowsMADRID, SPAIN—Discovery News reports that a new analysis of Cranium 17 from Spain’s Sima de los Huesos suggests that the individual had been killed some 430,000 years ago by two blows to the head with the same object. The Sima de los Huesos, or Pit of Bones, is located at the bottom of a deep shaft in an underground cave system in northern Spain. It contains the remains of at least 28 individuals who are thought to be proto-Neanderthals and Neanderthals, but how the remains arrived in the pit has been a mystery until now. “Given that either of the two traumatic events was likely lethal, the presence of multiple blows implies an intention to kill,” wrote Nohemi Sala, a researcher at Centro Mixto UCM-ISCIII de Evolución y Comportamiento Humanos and lead author of the study published in PLOS One. Sala suggests that the blows to the skull indicate that the bodies of the dead must have been placed there. The Pit of Bones could thus “represent the earliest funerary behavior in the human fossil record.” To read about recent DNA research into the Sima de los Huesos remains, go to "Our Tangled Ancestry."

    Roger Pearse (Thoughts on Antiquity, Patristics, putting things online, and more)

    “His blood be upon us”: The use of Mt.27:25 and Acts 4:10 in patristic writers

    An email from a correspondent reached me earlier this week, asking an interesting question:

    Lately I’ve been tackling arguments that passages like Matt. 27:25 (“his blood be on us…”) were a huge influence on later anti-Semitism. …  The key issue being: Just how influential were passages like Matthew 27:25, and Acts 4:10 (“Be it known unto you all, and to all the people of Israel, that by the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, whom ye crucified, whom God raised from the dead, even by him doth this man stand here before you whole.”) when it came to inspiring anti-Semitic sentiments among later writers?

    If the question is being agitated, for whatever reason, then the first thing to do is to establish the facts.  A Google search on “Christ killer” – which is a term supposedly used by Christians about Jews – reveals copious invective but a remarkable lack of actual patristic data.

    Books can be (and have been) written on the general relation of the early Church to the Jews, and it would be too big a subject for an article.  But a list of the places where these two verses specifically are used seemed like a useful thing to attempt.

    Note that I am indebted to the marvellous BiblIndex site, where I performed a search on these two verses, to determine the references.  But even so, it has proven no small task to track down each passage, and I have not been able to do so in many cases.

    Naturally context is everything, and quotations can distort.  But I thought that it is worth recording what sort of impression I received.

    The first impression is that the early Christians were not, in the main, concerned with attitudes to Jews.  They were concerned with  their own identity, and how to understand the Old Testament, and relate it to themselves.  They were not concerned with demonising Jews, by race or religion, so much as with connecting themselves with OT prophecy.  Since, prior to 313 AD, they held no political power, any such attitudes would have meant nothing anyway.

    We must never forget that the history of Israel in the Old Testament is that of the people with whom God is dealing, and the church does not reject the OT, but accepts it.  The sins and failings of Israel are a theme that any exegesis must deal with; and “Israel” in this context also means the church,  rather than an alien racial/religious group.

    But while this approach persists, and is found copiously in the commentaries, a pronounced hostility to Jews as Jews does start to appear after the legalisation of the church, particularly towards the end of the 4th century.  It is clearest in Chrysostom’s Adversus Judaeos, where the tone is a bitter one.  Any reader of ecclesiastical histories will know that the same tone also appears towards heretical groups, together with an eagerness to identify opponents as “heretics” in order to demonise, marginalise, and extirpate.  Hate is becoming good politics; and expressing it has become a way to signal the speaker’s own virtue against those awful other people.   This evil habit of the Byzantine period begins during this time.

    Much the most interesting reference is one in ps.Cyprian, which reveals that, rather than Christians taunting Jews as Christ-killers,  some Jewish polemicists were not above taunting the Christians with the fact that the Jews had put the god of the Christians to death!  Tertullian in his Apologeticum also records a debauched Jew parading wearing the head of a donkey, as an anti-Christian act.  No doubt while Christianity was illegal, and Judaism was not, such incidents did take place.  Once Christianity was legal, and favoured by emperor after emperor, the boot was on the other foot.

    Here are the references, with the text of the passage in English.  Contributions are welcome!

    Mt 27:25

    • Melito, De Pascha. [1]  (Not in BiblIndex, curiously)

    80. … you sang songs, but he was judged; you issued the command, he was crucified; you danced, he was buried; you lay down on a soft bed, but he in a tomb and coffin.  81. O lawless Israel, why did you commit this extraordinary crime of casting your Lord into new sufferings–your master, the one who formed you, the one who made you, the one who honored you, the one who called you Israel?

    • Tertullian, Aduersus Iudaeos (Against the Jews),  8:18. [2]

    … in the Psalms it is prophesied, “They exterminated my hands and feet.” [18] And the suffering of this “extermination” was perfected within the times of the LXX hebdomads, under Tiberius Caesar, in the consulate of Rubellius Geminus and Fufius Geminus, in the month of March, at the times of the passover, on the eighth day before the calends of April, on the first day of unleavened bread, on which they slew the lamb at even, just as had been enjoined by Moses.  Accordingly, all the synagogue of Israel did slay Him, saying to Pilate, when he was desirous to dismiss Him, “His blood be upon us, and upon our children;” and, “If thou dismiss him, thou art not a friend of Caesar; ” in order that all things might be fulfilled which had been written of Him.

    • Tertullian, Adversus Marcionem (Against Marcion), II. 15.[3]

    … if the fathers’ blessing was also to be passed on to their seed, without any previous merit of theirs, why should not the fathers’ guilt also overflow upon their sons? … yet without prejudice to that decree which was afterwards to be made … that the father would not take upon him the son’s sin, nor the son his father’s sin, but that everyone would bear the guilt of his own sin: and thus, after Israel’s hardness, the hardness of the law might also be subdued, and justice no longer judge the nation but individuals. And yet, if you were to accept the gospel in its true form, you would learn to whom applies this judgement of God who turns the fathers’ sins back upon their children, namely to those who were, at a time then future, going of their own will to call down this judgement upon themselves, His blood be on our heads and on our children’s. So then God’s foresight in its fullness passed censure upon this which he  heard long before it was spoken.

    • Cyprian (pseudo), Aduersus Iudaeos (Against the Jews). [4]  Note that Cyprian, Ad Quirinum (Three books of testimonies against the Jews) (here) does not seem to make use of Matt. 27:25 at all.

    1. Now, then, incline your ear to me, and hear my words, and give heed, you Jew. Many a time do you boast yourself, in that you condemned Jesus of Nazareth to death, and gave Him vinegar and gall to drink; and you vaunt yourself because of this. Come therefore, and let us consider together whether perchance you do not boast unrighteously, O Israel, (and) whether that small portion of vinegar and gall has not brought down this fearful threatening upon you, (and) whether this is not the cause of your present condition involved in these myriad troubles.  2. Let him then be introduced before us who speaks by the Holy Spirit, and says truth— David the son of Jesse. He, singing a certain strain with prophetic reference to the true Christ, celebrated our God by the Holy Spirit, (and) declared clearly all that befell Him by the hands of the Jews in His passion; …

    • Hippolytus (pseudo), In sanctum pascha, gives an exegesis of Exodus 12, seeing the sacrifice of the passover lamb as a prediction of Christ’s death.[5]

    23.  The [passover] lamb is then slain “towards the evening”.  And in fact it is also at sunset that the Lamb sacred to God was put to death.  24.  “the whole assembly of the sons of Israel shall kill it.”  (Ez. 12:6) The unbelieving Israel in fact becomes responsible for this precious Blood, some then by pouring it out, the others until today in refusing to believe.  This is why the Holy Spirit witnesses against them and exclaims, “Your hands are full of blood.” (Is. 1:15)

    • Lactantius, Diuinae Institutiones (Divine Institutions), VII.1. [6]

    … in this book we will relate His second advent, which the Jews also both confess and hope for; but in vain, since He must return to the confusion of those for whose call He had before come. For they who impiously treated Him with violence in His humiliation, will experience Him in His power as a conqueror; and, God requiting them, they will suffer all those things which they read and do not understand; inasmuch as, being polluted with all sins, and moreover sprinkled with the blood of the Holy One, they were devoted to eternal punishment by that very One on whom they laid wicked hands. But we shall have a separate subject against the Jews, in which we shall convict them of error and guilt.

    For thus did we also fast, when our Lord suffered, for a testimony of the three days; and we were keeping vigil and praying and interceding for the destruction of the People, because that they erred and confessed not our Saviour. So do you also pray that the Lord may not remember their guilt against them unto the end for the guile which they used against our Lord, but may grant them a place of repentance and conversion, and forgiveness of their wickedness.

    For he who was a heathen and of a foreign people [cf. Gosp. of Peter 1], Pilate [[190]] the judge, did not consent to their deeds of wickedness, but took water and washed his hands, and said: I am innocent of the blood of this man [Mt 27.24]. But the People answered and said: His blood be upon us, and upon our children [Mt 27.25]; and Herod commanded that He should be crucified [cf. Gosp. of Peter 1]; and our Lord suffered for us on the Friday. Especially incumbent on you therefore is the fast of the Friday and of the Sabbath; and likewise the vigil and watching of the Sabbath, and the reading of the Scriptures, and psalms, and prayer and intercession for them that have sinned, and the expectation and hope of the resurrection of our Lord Jesus, until the third hour in the night after the Sabbath. And then offer your oblations; and thereafter eat and make good cheer, and rejoice and be glad, because that the earnest of our resurrection, Christ, is risen. And this shall be a law to you for ever, unto the end of the world. For to those who have not believed in our Saviour He is dead, because their hope in Him is dead; but to you who believe, our Lord and Saviour is risen, because your hope in Him is immortal and living for ever.

    Fast then on the Friday, because thereon the People killed themselves in crucifying our Saviour; and on the Sabbath also, because it is the sleep (p. 94) of our Lord; for it is a day which ought especially to be kept with fasting: even as blessed Moses also, the prophet of all (things touching) this matter, commanded. For because he knew by the Holy Spirit and it was commanded him by Almighty God, who knew what the People were to do to His Son and His beloved Jesus Christ, — as even then they denied Him in the person of Moses, and said: Who hath appointed thee head and judge over us? [Ex 2.14] — therefore he bound them beforehand with mourning perpetually, in that he set apart and appointed the Sabbath for them. For they deserved to mourn, because they denied their Life, and laid [[191]] hands upon their Saviour and delivered Him to death. Wherefore, already from that time there was laid upon them a mourning for their destruction.

    • Eusebius, Commentarii in Esaiam (Commentary on Isaiah). [8]  Both the text, and the English translation from IVP, are inaccessible to me.
    • Eusebius, Commentarii in Psalmos (Commentary on the Psalms)(in PG 23). [9]  These are explanations of the psalms, treating them as predictions of Christ.

    On Ps.21:12-14. For tribulation is very near: for there is none to help me. Many calves have surrounded me, strong bulls of Bashan have surrounded me. You will not depart from the truth, if you say the bulls of Bashan means the leaders of the Jewish people; or the leaders of the priests, the scribes, and the elders…  They opened against him their mouths, just like a lion raging and roaring, saying, Away with him, away with him, crucify him.  His blood be upon us and our descendants.  But Aquila reads Just like the lion, seizing and roaring; Symmachus: Just like a lion, coming and roaring.  But those who were thirsting for blood, and procuring that their children be responsible for the blood of the Saviour, were no different from a roaring lion.

    On Ps.34:23-26.  (I was unable to locate any reference here)

    On Ps.54:7-12.  And obviously the gospels tell in what way the voices of the whole population of the Jews were open against him to Pontius Pilate.  Which is declared likewise in the 21st psalm saying…

    On Ps.58:7-12.  (Same sort of material again, the “Jews” are not even mentioned)

    Os Ps.58:13.  And I’m amazed at the accuracy of the prophecy of the Holy Spirit.  Because in the time of our Saviour, the Jews could not put to death, but it was by the hand of the Romans, when Pilate gave judgement, after the soldiers surrounded and arrested him, and nothing was done by the Jews.  By law they could not put to death, but only prosecute.  For the leaders of the Jews went into council, and conspired to kill him.  And false witnesses and sycophants, eager for their pay, stood in the sight of the Saviour.  And the whole people with their voices and lips demanded his blood upon them and their children.  Remember that by law therefore they could not put to death, what Pilate decreed, his soldiers carried out; but the conspiracy of the leaders of the priests, the testimony of the sycophants, and the voice against him of the multitude.  [Apologies for this terrible translation of col. 545]

    • Eusebius, Commentarii in Psalmos (Pitra 2). [10]  I was unable to find anything relevant, so suspect I have the wrong work.
    • Eusebius, De solemnitate paschali. Here. [11]

    10. But he himself, before he suffered, ate the Pascha and celebrated the festival with his disciples, not with the Jews.  But when had celebrated the festival at evening, the chief priests came upon him with the traitor and laid their hands on him; … those who had become defiled already in soul and body by their bloodthirstiness against the Savior feared to come in under [Pilate’s] roof!  They, on the one hand, on that very day of the passion, ate the Pascha that was injurious to their own souls, and asked for the Savior’s blood—not on their own behalf, but to their own detriment; our Savior, on the other hand, not then, but the day before, reclined at table with his disciples and conducted the festival that was desirable to himself.  11. Do you see how from that time, he [i.e., Jesus] was separating himself from them and moving away from the Jews’ bloodthirstiness, but was joining himself with his disciples, celebrating the desirable festival together with them?  So then, we too ought to eat the Pascha with Christ, while purifying our minds from all leaven of evil and wickedness, and taking our fill of the unleavened bread of truth and sincerity, and having within ourselves, in our souls, the “Jew in secret” and the true circumcision, and anointing the doorposts of our minds with the blood of the Lamb who was sacrificed for us, to ward off our destroyer.

    • Eusebius, Demonstratio evangelicaVIII.3; IX.12 (or IX.11); X.3; X.8[12]  This is concerned with showing from the OT, verse by verse, how its prophecies have come to pass in the life of Christ.

    VIII.3   … all this it says will come to pass because of the sin of the house of Jacob, and the transgression of the house of Israel. And it goes on to describe this sin and transgression, “They that defile judgment and pervert all that is right, who build Sion with blood and Jerusalem with unrighteousness.” With blood! Yes, this was the cause of their final misery, for that they pronounced the impious curse upon themselves, saying, “His blood be on us and on our children.” Therefore, it says this, “Zion shall be plowed as a field, and Jerusalem shall be as a storehouse of fruit,” a prophecy which was only actually fulfilled after the impious treatment of our Saviour. For from that time to this utter desolation has possessed the land…

    IX.11   So, then, we that are the Gentiles know and receive the prophet that was foretold… while the Jewish nation, not receiving Him that was foretold, has paid the fit penalty according to the divine prediction which said, “And the man who will not hear all things whatsoever the prophet shall speak in My Name, I will exact vengeance on him.” Surely He has avenged on that people all the blood poured out on the earth, from the blood of Abel to the blood of Zechariah, yea, even to crown all to the Christ Himself, Whose blood they called down not only on themselves but on their children, and even now they pay the penalty of their presumptuous sin.

    X.3    And all this was fulfilled, when “The passers-by reviled him, wagging their heads and saying, He saved others, himself he cannot save.” And since, even now, the Jews draw down the curse of their fathers upon themselves, and are wont with blasphemy and impious words to anathematize our Lord and Saviour and all that believe on Him, He goes on to say:

    “They shall curse, but thou wilt bless. May they that arise against me be ashamed, but thy servant shall rejoice. Let them who speak evil of me be clothed with shame, and be clothed in confusion as with a cloak. But I will confess the Lord with my mouth, and amid many will I praise him, for he stood by the right hand of the poor, to save my soul from the persecutors.”

    And it is quite clear, even now, to what evils they that invoke curses in their synagogues have grown accustomed, never at all being able to recover from those same times, while He offers to His Father in the midst of many nations the praise of His new Covenant, having the Father working with Him, Who sits at His own right hand.

    X.8   The dogs that surrounded Him and the council of the wicked were the rulers of the Jews, the Scribes and High Priests, and the Pharisees, who spurred on the whole multitude to demand His blood against themselves and against their own children. … For when it was their duty, even if they could not acquire the character of shepherds, to protect like good sheepdogs their Master’s spiritual flock and the sheep of the house of Israel, and to warn by barking, and to fawn upon their Master and recognize Him, … they preferred like senseless dogs, yes, like mad dogs, to drive the sheep wild by barking… And all who even now conduct themselves like them in reviling and barking at the Christ of God in the same way may be reckoned their kin; …. Yea, all who to-day insult the Body of Christ, that is the Church, and attempt to destroy the hands and feet and very bones, are of their number…

    • Eusebius, Generalis elementaria introductio (Eclogae Propheticae.). [13]  This quotes the passage among others indicating how the prophecies of the messiah were ignored by the Jews.
    • Eusebius, Laudatio martyrum omnium (Encomium on the martyrs). Here[14]  I was unable to locate any reference to the passage in this text.
    • Athanasius, Epistulae festales (Festal Letters) 1-7 ; 11-14 ; 17-20 (syr.), PG 26 (1857), 1360-1397 ; 1403-1432. § 5 (p.1406).  Syriac translation Here.  But I was unable to find any reference to Matt.27:25 in these letters.
    • Basil of Caesarea, Enarratio in prophetam Esaiam. [15]  On Isaiah 1:15.

    37. You hands are full of blood.  This is the reason why God turns away his eyes, when they extend their hands, because their supplications themselves are the cause of his anger.  For if someone kills the beloved son of another, and then extends hands still stained with blood to his father, … will not the blood of the son itself exasperate the father?  In the same way today the prayers of the Jews, if they extend their hands, they recall to God the Father the wicked crime against his only-begotten son, and every extending of hands reveals those hands full of the blood of Christ.  For although in their blindness they continue, they are the heirs of the paternal murder.  “For his blood,” they said, “be upon us and our children.”

    • Gregory Nazianzen, Oration 41: For the day of Pentecost, ch. 17. [16]  This seems to be a an exposition from the biblical text.

    The captivity in Egypt and at Babylon was for a limited space and had long been ended by the return. That caused by the Romans had not yet taken place, but it would come, being a punishment for the audacity of the Jews against the Savior.

    • Gregory Nazianzen, Oration 4 (Against Julian). [17]

    68.  … You’re a persecutor like Herod, you’re a traitor like Judas, except you haven’t killed yourself like he did to show he repented; you’re a murderer of Christ like Pilate; you’re an hater of God like the Jews!

    • Gregory Nazianzen, Oration 6: On peace among the monks. Ch. 17.[18]  The quarrels of Israel drew on them their misfortunes.

    But when these men began to be ill, and quarrelled, some against the others, and divided themselves into numerous factions, when the cross reduced them to extremities, and their foolish temerity towards our God and Saviour, since they did not recognise God in man, and so drew on themselves the rod of iron which was threatening them from afar – I mean that authority and realm which actually had power – what happened, and what were their misfortunes?

    • Gregory of Nyssa, In luciferam sanctam Domini resurrectionem. GEBHARDT E., Gregorii Nysseni opera, 9, Sermones, Leiden 1967, 315-319. p.317, l.3
    • Epiphanius, De duodecim gemmis (On the 12 gems) (georg., arm., copt. fgt). [19]  This is a narrative about those of the dead who rose and went into Jerusalem when Christ rose from the dead.

    Those who had risen made reply: «Know you not that the earth quaked and the abysses gaped and the nethermost depths of hell were destroyed? What was it you did on that day, or what was this matter?» Then these [of the tribe of Israel] remembered and said : «We seized a certain deceiver called Jesus and crucified him.» Those who had risen, however, lifted up their voices and said : «Woe unto you! He it was Who came unto us; He destroyed the walls of hell and severed the bonds of death through His might and caused us to rise up from our biers». The saying was fulfilled in which it is said : «Let the dead rise and let all be exalted, who have dwelt on the biers», and the Lord of Life shall show that He has by his power severed the bonds of the souls who were confined in Hades, thanks to His descent into hell…

    • Didymus, De Spiritu sancto. (On the holy spirit[20]  The punishment of Israel by God predicted by the OT:

    219. Indeed, although they rushed into madness, to the point of killing Him who had been sent because of them, saying, “His blood be on us and on our children”, however, God raised Him from the earth, in which he remained for three days and three nights – as shepherd of his sheep, since the text continues: “who made the earth bring forth the shepherd of the sheep.” [Is.63:11]  220.  That our Lord Jesus Christ was the shepherd of the sheep that the text of the prophet mentions here…

    • Didymus, Fragmenta in Psalmos. MUHLENBERG E., Psalmenkommentare aus der Katenenüberlieferung, 2 (Patristische Texte und Studien 16), Berlin – New York 1977. § 583 (p.16, l.15); and § 717 (p.81, l.27).  This may also be in PG39, 1155-1400: I need to check.
    • Chrysostom, Against the Jews, homily 1, c.5; homily 6, 1:7  [21]  There are multiple references in homily 6 to the Jews killing Christ.

    Hom. 1, c.5:  But I must get back again to those who are sick. Consider, then, with whom they [Judaizing Christians] are sharing their fasts. It is with those who shouted: “Crucify him, Crucify him”, with those who said: “His blood be upon us and upon our children”. If some men had been caught in rebellion against their ruler and were condemned, would you have dared to go up to them and to speak with them? I think not. Is it not foolish, then, to show such readiness to flee from those who have sinned against a man, but to enter into fellowship with those who have committed outrages against God himself? Is it not strange that those who worship the Crucified keep common festival with those who crucified him? Is it not a sign of folly and the worst madness?

    Hom. 6, 1:7.  … it could be that they [the martyrs] will derive great pleasure from my conflict with the Jews; they might well listen most intently to a discourse given for God’s glory. For the martyrs have a special hatred for the Jews since the Jews crucified him for whom they have a special love. The Jews said: “His blood be on us and on our children” the martyrs poured out their own blood for him whom the Jews had slain. So the martyrs would be glad to hear this discourse.

    2:9-10.  (9) If he turns away from you now because of your sins, he should have done so all the more in those days. If he put up with you when you were living lives of ungodliness, he ought to put up with you all the more now that you venture no such enormities. Why, then, has he not put up with you? Even if you are too ashamed to give the reason, I will state it clearly. Rather, I will not state it, but the truth of the facts will do so.  (10) You did slay Christ, you did lift violent hands against the Master, you did spill his precious blood. This is why you have no chance for atonement, excuse, or defense. In the old days your reckless deeds were aimed against his servants, against Moses, Isaiah, and Jeremiah. Even if there was ungodliness in your acts then, your boldness had not yet dared the crowning crime. But now you have put all the sins of your fathers into the shade. Your mad rage against Christ, the Anointed One, left no way for anyone to surpass your sin. This is why the penalty you now pay is greater than that paid by your fathers. If this is not the reason for your present disgrace, why is it that God put up with you in the old days when you sacrificed your children to idols, but turns himself away from you now when you are not so bold as to commit such a crime? Is it not clear that you dared a deed much worse and much greater than any sacrifice of children or transgression of the Law when you slew Christ?

    • Chrysostom, Contra eos qui subintroductas habent uirgines (Against those who have virgins living with them), ch. 3.[22].  This argues that it is morally unsafe to have monks and nuns living together.

    “But what does that matter?”, they say, “we are not accountable for other people’s stupidity, and if someone offends stupidly, do I deserve to pay also for that folly?”  Well! Paul does not use this language: even if someone is falsely scandalized by weakness, he commands us to help him. We are freed from the penalty set, for the scandal caused, only if it results in a greater profit than the damage caused; because otherwise, if there is only scandal caused to others, whether they are scandalized wrongly or rightly or from weakness, their blood is upon our heads, and our hands must now answer to God for their souls.

    • Chrysostom, Homilia dicta in templo s.Anastasiae (Novarum hom. 8), PG 63, 493-500., p.500, l.10
    • Chrysostom, Homiliae 1-90 in Matthaeum (Homilies 1-90 on Matthew), homily 87. [23]  “They” is sometimes Jews, and sometimes Romans, in what follows.

    For as though they were afraid lest they should seem to fall short at all in the crime, having killed the prophets with their own hands, but this man with the sentence of a judge, so they do in every deed; and make it the work of their own hands, and condemn and sentence both among themselves and before Pilate, saying, “His blood be on us and on our children,” and insult Him, and do despite unto Him themselves, binding Him, leading Him away, and render themselves authors of the spiteful acts done by the soldiers, and nail Him to the cross. and revile Him, and spit at Him, and deride Him. For Pilate contributed nothing in this matter, but they themselves did every thing, becoming accusers, and judges, and executioners, and all.

    • Chrysostom, In principium Actorum homiliae 1-4 (4 homilies on the start of Acts).[24] Note these are not the same as the series of 51 homilies on Acts.

    They say, “Are you trying to lay on us the blame for this man’s blood?” (Acts 5:28)  Well if he was just a man, why are you worried about his blood?  You killed many of the prophets, and cut the throats of many of the just, O Jews, nor did you shrink from the blood of any of them.  So why do you shrink now?  Truly the crucified frightened them, and they could not hide their fear, … Indeed until they crucified him, they shouted saying, “His blood be on us and on our children”; so they despised his blood.  But after his passion, when they saw the brightness of his power, they were afraid, and worried, they said, “Are you trying to blame us for this man’s blood?”  But if he was a deceiver, and an enemy of God, as you say, O wicked Jews, why are you afraid of his blood?  If this was so, his murder should be a cause to glory in.  But since it was not such, they trembled.

    • Theodoret, Interpretatio in Esaiam. [25]

    On Isaiah 1:15.  They [Israel] are not accused of worshipping idols, nor of committing adultery, nor of giving into greed, but of staining themselves with a murder: more difficult to support than any impiety or every iniquity was their act of folly against the Lord.  In fact to them belongs the saying, “His blood be upon us and our children”.  This blood has deprived them of the blessings of others, it has made them the accursed of the world.  All the same in His goodness He has given them a glimpse of the way of salvation, saying: 16. “Wash and be clean.”

    On Isaiah 4:4.  The Lord will wash away the filth of the sons and daughters of Zion; he will cleanse the bloodstains from Jerusalem by a spirit of judgment and a spirit of fire.  Again he [Isaiah] refers to blood and purification.  By “blood” he means that which they brought on themselves and their children by crying, “His blood be on us and our children.”  By “purification” he predicts that which produces the bath of regeneration.  However, this done, he says, “by a spirit of judgement and a spirit of fire.” because as gold is purified by being dipped in fire, those who receive baptism lay down the poison of their sins.  The blessed John the Baptist said in his turn, “he will baptise you in the Holy Spirit and with fire.”

    On Isaiah 5:7.  Then he explains what he just said allegorically.  The vineyard of the LORD Almighty is the nation of Israel, and the people of Judah are the vines he delighted in. … Then he explains clearly the harvest and the thorns: And he looked for justice, but saw bloodshed; for righteousness, but heard cries of distress.  This passage allows us to recognise clearly that it is because they exercised their madness against the saviour that they were stripped of the divine grace.  It is by the “cries” that this madness is visible.  But the narrative of the holy gospels teaches precisely that they shouted as loudly as possible in turn with cries of “Put him to death! to death!” crucify him!” and “His blood be upon us and our children!”  The prophet condemns still other injustices….

    • Theodoret, Interpretatio in Psalmos. PG 80, 857-1997. ?
    • Hilary, Commentarius in Euangelium Matthaei I-XIII. DOIGNON J., SC 254 (1978). § 6 (p.98, l.5).  Inaccessible to me.
    • Hilary, Commentarius in Evangelium Matthaei XIV-XXXIII. DOIGNON J., SC 258 (1979). § 1 (p.248, l.7    Inaccessible to me.
    • Hilary, Tractatus mysteriorum. [26]  The SC editor heads this section: “The crime of Cain prefigures the passion of Christ.”

    The blood of Abel thus is claimed by those who, as had been prefigured in Cain, have persecuted the just and are accursed by the earth who, opening her mouth, has received the blood of his brother.  In the body of Christ, in fact in which are the apostles and the church, it is the blood of all the just that their race and their entire posterity has taken upon their own heads, crying “His blood be upon us and on our sons.”

    • Hilary, Tractatus super psalmos I – XCI. ZINGERLE A., CSEL 22 (1891), 3-354 ; 544-870. § 12 (p.45, l.21) & § 9 (p.103, l.24)
    • Ambrosiaster, Quaestiones Veteris et Noui Testamenti (numero CXXVII). SOUTER A., CSEL 50 (1908), 3-416. § 3. p.188, l.20
    • Jerome, Commentarii in Danielem (Commentary on Daniel). Here[27]  This discusses the chronology of the “weeks” in Daniel.

    And then, after our Lord’s passion, the sacrifice and offering ceased in the middle of the week. For whatever took place in the Temple after that date was not a valid sacrifice to God but a mere worship of the devil, while they all cried out together, “His blood be upon us and upon our children” (Matt. 27:25); and again, “We have no king but Caesar.” Any reader who is interested may look up this passage in the Chronicle of this same Eusebius, for I translated it into Latin many years ago.

    • Jerome,  Letter 129, To Dardanus, On the Promised Land[28]  A hasty letter responding to the question “what is the promised land”?

    6. These statements [limiting the scope of “the promised land”] are not intended to insult the country of Judea, according to the lies of a sycophant heretic, nor to destroy the historical reality, which is the foundation of spiritual interpretation, but to bring down the pride of the Jews, who prefer the narrowness of the synagogue to the width of the church. If they want to be content to follow the letter that kills, not the spirit that gives life, let them show us a Promised Land flowing with milk and honey. But if they admit that these terms are used by tropology for an abundance of all things, we have the right, too, prefer the land of divine praise, land of the living, to the land of spiny bushes.  …

    7. You have committed, O Jew, many crimes, you have been the slave of all the surrounding nations. For what reason? Certainly, because of your idolatry. …[a list of the conquerors of Jerusalem] … It is now a little less than four hundred years after the demolition of the temple, and nothing remains of the city and temple ruins. For what great crime? Certainly you do not worship idols; even when enslaved by the Persians and the Romans, and subjected to the yoke of captivity, you rejected the foreign gods.  Why has the so clement God, who has never forgotten you, now after such a long space of time, not been moved by your misfortunes to free you from your captivity – or, to speak more exactly, to send to you the Antichrist you are waiting for? For what enormous crime, I say, and for what execrable crime does he turn his eyes away from you?  Don’t you know? Remember the cry of your fathers: “His blood be on us and on our children”; and “Come, let us kill him and the inheritance will belong to us”; and again: “We have no king but Caesar. “You got what you chose: until the end of the world you will serve Caesar, “until all the Gentiles be come, then Israel as a whole will be saved “, so that the which formerly was first will be last.

    • Jerome, In Hieremiam prophetam libri VI. REITER S., CCL 74 (1960). § 2 (p.71, l.18 & § 3 (p.162, l.20 & § 3 (p.181, l.14
    • Cyril of Jerusalem, Catecheses ad illuminandos 12-18Lecture 13[29]

    21. The beginning of signs under Moses was blood and water; and the last of all Jesus’ signs was the same. First, Moses changed the river into blood; and Jesus at the last gave forth from His side water with blood. This was perhaps on account of the two speeches, his who judged Him, and theirs who cried out against Him; or because of the believers and the unbelievers. For Pilate said, I am innocent and washed his hands in water; they who cried out against Him said, His blood be upon us: there came therefore these two out of His side; the water, perhaps, for him who judged Him; but for them that shouted against Him the blood.

    • Cyril of Jerusalem, Epistula de aedificando templo. [30]

    12. This event took place on Monday at the third hour, and partly at the ninth hour of the night. There was great loss of life here. (It was) on 19 Iyyar of the year 674 of the kingdom of Alexander the Greek. This year the pagan Julian died, and it was he who especially incited the Jews to rebuild the Temple, since he favoured them because they had crucified Christ. Justice overtook this rebel at his death in enemy territory, and in this the sign of the power of the cross was revealed, because he had denied Him who had been hung upon it for the salvation and life of all.

    • Procopius of Gaza, Catena in Esaiam, PG 87 2, 1817-2718. § 1 (p.857); § 2 (p.352); § 2 (p.600)
    • Procopius of Gaza, Commentarii in Octateuchum, PG 87 1, 21-1220. (p.252); (p.491, l.46); (p.919); (p.923); § 1 (p.41)

    Acts 4:10

    • Origen, Contra Celsum, “SC 132, 136, 147, 150, 227. p.308, l.27″.  Biblindex does not specify the volume of the SC edition; the index of that edition doesn’t reference Acts 4:10 and no reference is given in Chadwick’s translation.
    • Eusebius, Commentarii in Esaiam. [31]  Inaccessible to me.
    • Athanasius, De sententia Dionysii (On the opinion of Dionysius), Here[32]

    But if they accuse the blessed man [Dionysius] (for the arguments of the Arians about him are in fact accusations against him) simply for writing thus, what will they do when they hear even the great and blessed Apostles in the Acts, firstly Peter saying (Acts ii. 22), `Ye men of Israel hear these words: Jesus of Nazareth, a man approved of God unto us by mighty works and wonders and signs which God did by Him in the midst of you, as ye yourselves know: Him, being delivered up by the determinate counsel and foreknowledge of God, ye by the hand of lawless men did crucify and slay;’ and again (ib. iv. 10), `In the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, Whom ye crucified, Whom God raised from the dead, even in Him doth this man stand here before you whole;’ and Paul, relating (ib. xiii. 22) in Antioch of Pisidia how God,`when He had removed Saul, raised up David to be king;…

    • Epiphanius, Ancoratus, ch. 41. [33] Arguments about whether Christ was divine or just a man.

    41.  (1) Again they [the Arians] strive after other vain notions, mixing them with the divine words and thinking contrarily, and they say: so how has it been written, “accept that the high priest of our con­fession was faithful to the one who made him,” and “let it be known to you, all the house of Israel, that this Jesus, whom you crucified, God made him Lord and Christ” (2) And a great wonder comes upon me, how those who possess the orderings [of Scripture] are ignorant of the meaning being declared in them. For the saying, “Accept that the high priest was faithful to the one who made him,” has not been said concerning the divinity.

    • Chrysostom, In Acta apostolorum homiliae 1-55 (55 Homilies on the Acts of the Apostles). [34]

    Homily 10. C.2. … What then says Peter? “Ye rulers of the people, and elders of Israel.” Mark the Christian wisdom of the man; how full of confidence it is: he utters not a word of insult, but says with respect… “By what means this man is made whole: be it known unto you all, and to all the people Israel; that by the Name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth:” – this is what would vex them most. For this was that which Christ had told the disciples, “What ye hear in the ear that preach ye upon the housetops. – That in the name of Jesus Christ,” he says, “of Nazareth, Whom ye crucified, Whom God raised from the dead, even by Him doth this man stand here before you whole.” (v. 10). (Matt. x. 27.) Think not, he says, that we conceal the country, or the nature of the death. “Whom ye crucified, Whom God raised from the dead, even by Him doth this man stand before you whole.”

    10, 3. … Do you observe too (in point of rhetoric) with what dignity they express themselves? Even in the use of words they were becoming expert by practice, and henceforth they were not to be beaten down. “Be it known unto you all,” etc. (v. 10.) Whereby he shows them that they rather do, in spite of themselves, preach Christ; themselves extol the doctrine, by their examining and questioning. O exceeding boldness – “Whom ye crucified! Whom God raised up” – this is bolder still! Think not that we hide what there is to be ashamed of.

    I was unable to locate the precise reference for homily 13.

    • Ambrose, Expositio de Psalmo CXVIII. PETSCHENIG M., CSEL 62 (1913, réimpr. 1962). § 43, p.64, l.20.

    No doubt there are more to be found![35]

    UPDATE 26/05/2015: I’ve translated a few more of the passages.  One in Gregory Nazianzen does, I think, strike the authentic note of anti-Semitism.  UPDATE: 27/05/2015.  A few more added.

    1. [1] On the Passover – Melito of Sardis – Kerux 4:1 (May 1989) http://www.kerux.com/doc/0401A1.asp
    2. [2] KROYMANN Aem., CCL 2 (1954), 1339-1396. § 18 (p.1364, l.144)
    3. [3] KROYMANN Aem., CCL 1 (1954), 441-726. § 3 (p.492, l.25)
    4. [4] DIERCKS G.F., CCL 4 (1972), 265-278., § 5 (p.269, l.20).  Quasten says that this is ANF 5, 219, the “Expository treatise against the Jews”, attributed to Hippolytus.
    5. [5] NAUTIN P., SC 27 (1950)., (p.151, l.19), who was the first editor.  An article on the text here.  Translation from the French by me.
    6. [6] BRANDT S., CSEL 19 (1890), 1-672. § 25 (p.585, l.24)
    7. [7] CONNOLLY R.H., Didascalia apostolorum…, Oxford 1929., p.190, l.2
    8. [8] ZIEGLER J., GCS (1975).. § 29 (p.23, l.8) & § 48 (p.362, l.20).
    9. [9] PG 23 (1857), passim 76-1393. (cols.208, 209, 313, 480, 541, 545, 744, 857). 208-209; “Vers. 12-14. Quoniam tribulatio proxima est, quoniam non est qui adjuvet. Circumdederunt me vituli multi, tauri pingues, obsederunt me. Nequaquam a vero aberraveris, si tauros pingues, principes Judaici populi; sive principes sacerdotum, scribas et seniores significare dixeris. Hujusce rei mentio habetur in sexagesimo septimo psalmo bis verbis : Increpa feras arundinis : congregatio taurorum in vaccis populorum. Hic porro populos, vaccas, populi duces, tauros nuncupavit. In praesenti item psalmo, illius loco. Circumdederunt me vituli multi, Symmachus sic habet, Juvenci tauri pingues saginati, circumplexi sunt me, inquit, et circumdederunt me; secundum Aquilam vero, Potentes Basan in spectaculum traduxerunt me; queis adumbratur militaris Pilati manus, Basan nuncupata, quae coronam spineam complicatam, diadematis loco, capiti ejus imposuit. Aperuerunt super eum os suum, sicut leo rapiens et rugiens, clamantes, Tolle, tolle, crucifige eum. Sanguis ejus super nos et super liberos nostros.  Aquila vero, Sicut leo, inquit, capiens et rugiens; Symmachus, Sicut leo venans rugiensque. Nam qui sanguinem sitiebant, suosque liberos Salvatoris sanguine reos esse procurabant, a leone rugiente nihil differebant.” “Et sane cujusmodi voces ad Pontium Pilatum totus Judaeorum populus contra eum ediderit, narrant Evangelia. Quod item in vicesimo primo psalmo declarabat dicens:…” 13. “Et mirari subit praedictionis sancti Spiritus accurationem. Quia enim tempore Salvatoris nostri, non Judaei ipsi mortem intulerunt, sed Romanorum manu id peractum est, judicium Pilato ferente, militibus comprehendentibus et abducentibus eum, et a Judaeis nihil eorum actum est; jure illis non ipsum necis actum ascribit, sed causam.  Principes namque Judaeorum concilium ineuntes, nullam non machinam moverunt, ut eum perderent; falsi testes autem et sycophantae, eorum gratiam aucupantes, in conspectu Salvatoris steterunt ; totusque populus vocibus labiisque suis sanguinem ejus super se et super filios suos expetierunt : jure ergo non necis facinus, quam decrevit Pilatus, perpetrarunt milites ejus, memorat; sed principum sacerdotum conspirationem, sycophantarum testimonium, contra ipsum acclamantis multitudinis vocem.” 744 and 857 do not appear to have relevant material.  Hasty translations by me from Migne’s Latin.
    10. [10] PITRA J.B., Analecta sacra, 3, Venetiis 1883.  (Here?)passim 204-515. P.415, l.5.
    11. [11] PG 24 (1857), 693-705., § 10 (p.705)
    12. [12] HEIKEL I.A., GCS 23 (1913), 2-496.  Here.   § 8 (p.393, l.6);   § 14 (p.430, l.6);   § 20 (p.460, l.16);  § 82 (p.487, l.4)
    13. [13] PG 22 (1857), 1021-1261 ; 1272-1273.  The reference is col.1073B.
    14. [14] HARRIS COWPER B., The Encomium of the Martyrs, The Journal of Sacred Literature, N.S. 6 (1865), 129-133. § 2 (p.132, l.21)
    15. [15] PG 30, 117-668. col.192: ”

      37. “Nam manus vestrae sanguine plenae”. Hoc est causae, quod Deus oculos avertat, cum extenderint manus, quod ipsa supplicationis symbola ad irritandum illum sint occasiones. Quemadmodum si quia dilectum alterius filium occiderit, ac manus suas adhuc ex caede cruentatas ad infensum sibi patrem exporrigat, dexteramque efflagitet amicitis, exposcatque veniam; nonne sanguis filii in ipsius interfectoris manu apparens patrem injuria affectum acrius exasperate? Nunc ejusmodi sunt Judaeorum preces; siquidem cum extendunt manus, admissum in Unigenitum Filium scelus Deo et Patri revocant in memoriam, atque per singulas extensiones suas ipsorum manus sanguine Christi plenas ostendunt. Enimvero qui in sua caecitate perseverant, caedis paternae sunt haeredes. “Sanguis enim ejus, inquiunt, super nos, et super filios nostros.””

    16. [16] Orationes 38-41. MORESCHINI C., GALLAY P., SC 358 (1990). § 17, p.352, l.11: “17. Et puisque c’est «aux juifs les plus pieux habitant Jérusalem, aux Parthes, aux Médes et aux Élamites, aux Égyptiens et aux Libyens, aux Cretois et aux Arabes, aux Mesopotamiens et aux Cappadociens», mes compatriotes, que les langues s’adressaient, ainsi qu’aux juifs qui venaient «de toutes les nations qui sont sous le ciel», et qui – s’il plait a quelqu’un de penser ainsi – s’etaient reunis la, il y a lieu de voir qui ils etaient et de quelle captivite ils venaient. La captivite en Egypte et a Babylone etait limitee dans l’espace et avait depuis longtemps pris fin par le retour. Celle due aux Romains n’avait pas encore eu lieu, mais elle devait venir, etant une punition de l’audace des juifs contre le Sauveur. Il ne reste done qu’a songer a celle qui eut pour auteur Antiochus et qui n’etait pas anterieure de beaucoup a ces evenements. Si l’on n’accepte pas cette explication, si on la tient pour trop subtile car la captivite en question n’etait pas ancienne et il n’y avait pas eu dispersion en beaucoup de pays et si l’on cherche l’explication la plus convaincante, il vaut peut-etre mieux penser que souvent et par le fait de multiples ennemis le peuple avait ete chasse, comme le rapporte Esdras, et que certaines tribus avaient ete rendues a leur patrie, tandis que d’autres etaient restees au loin : ainsi, vraisemblablement, des individus appartenant a des tribus disseminees en maintes nations se trouvaient alors la et participaient au prodige.”
    17. [17] BERNARDI J., SC 309 (1983). § 68 (p.178, l.10): “Tu te fais persécuteur à la suite d’Hérode, traître à la suite de Judas, mais sans te pendre comme l’a fait celui-ci pour montrer son repentir? Tu te fais meurtrier du Christ à la suite de Pilate et ennemi de Dieu à la suite des Juifs?”
    18. [18] Orationes 6-19. PG 35, 721-1064. § 17 col.744; but also in SC 405, p.165: “Mais lorsque ces hommes commencerent a etre malades, s’emporterent les uns contre les autres et se diviserent en de nombreuses fractions, quand la croix les eut reduits a l’extremites, ainsi que leur folle temerite vis-a-vis de notre Dieu et Sauveur, puisqu’ils avaient ignore Dieu en l’homme, et lorsqu’ils attirerent sur eux la verge de fer qui les menacait de loin – je veux parler de cette autorité et de ce royaume qui domine actuellement – qu’arrive-t-il et quels sont leurs malheurs?”
    19. [19] BLAKE R.P., DE VIS H., Epiphanius De gemmis, The Old Georgian version and the fragments of the Armenian version and the Coptic-Sahidic fragments (Studies and documents 2), London 1934, 99-193.  Here. P.163, l.13.
    20. [20] DOUTRELEAU L., SC 386 (1992). § 219 (p.340, l.2): “219. En effet, bien qu’ils se soient précipités dans la témérité au point de mettre à mort Celui qui avait été envoyé à cause d’eux, en disant : « Que son sang retombe sur nous et sur nos enfants», cependant, celui-là, Dieu l’a fait se relever de la terre, au sein de laquelle il était resté trois jours et trois nuits,  — en pasteur de ses brebis, puisque le texte poursuit ainsi : « qui fit sortir de la terre le pasteur des brebis».”
    21. [21] Aduersus Iudaeos et Iudaezantes sermones 1-7 et in eos qui prima Pascha ieiunant homilia. PG 48,843-942., col.850, l.20; col.905, l.16.
    22. [22] DUMORTIER J., Saint Jean Chrysostome: Les cohabitations suspectes, p.53, l.23: “« Mais que nous importe, dit-on, nous ne sommes pas comptables de la sottise d’autrui, et si quelqu’un se scandalise sans raison, mérité-je aussi de payer pour la sottise de celui-là ? » Hé bien ! Paul ne tient pas ce langage: même si quelqu’un se scandalise à tort, par faiblesse il nous a prescrit de le secourir. Nous ne sommes libérés de la réparation fixée pour le scandale causé que dans le cas où il en résulte un profit plus considérable que le dommage occasionné par là, car dans le cas contraire et s’il n’y a que scandale pour autrui, qu’ils se scandalisent à tort ou à raison ou par faiblesse, leur sang retombe sur notre tête et nos mains désormais  ont à répondre devant Dieu de leurs âmes. Voilà bien pourquoi, de peur qu’en toute occurrence nous n’ayons souci ou au contraire mépris des victimes du scandale, le Christ nous a tracé ainsi des limites et fixé une règle, faisant tantôt ceci, tantôt cela selon les circonstances opportunes.”
    23. [23] MIGNE J.-P., Sancti Joannis Chrysostomi Commentarius in sanctum Matthaeum evangelistam, PG 58 (1862)., p.769, l.50
    24. [24] PG 51, 65-112. col.110, l.37; col.111, l.1: “Vultis, inquiunt, inducere super nos sanguinem Hominis istius (lb. 5. 28 )? At enim si nudus homo est, cur ejus sanguinem pertimescis? quam multos prophetas occidisti, quam multos justos jugulasti, Judaeae, nec ullius illorum sanguinem reformidasti? cur igitur hic reformidas! Vere conscientiam terrebat illorum crucifixus, suamque formidinem cum occultare non possent, vel etiam inviti suam coram inimicis imbecillitatem fatentur. Ac dum illum quidem crucifigerent, clamabant dicentes, Sanguis ejus super nos, et super filios nostros (Matth. 27. 25); adeo sanguinem ejus spernebant. Post passionem autem cum effulgentem illius virtutem intuentur, pertimescunt et aestuant, dicuntque : Vultis inducere sanguinem hominis istius super nos ? At enim si seductor erat, et adversarius Dei, prout dicitis, scelesti Judaei, quam ob causam sanguinem ipsius timetis ? Etenim si talis erat, illius etiam fuerat caede gloriandum. Sed quoniam talis non erat, idcirco tremunt.”
    25. [25] MOEHLE A., Theodoret von Kyros Kommentar zu Jesaia, Mitteilungen des Septuaginta Unternehmens 5, Berlin 1932.  p.8, l.21; p.22, l.15; p.25, l.13.  Also SC274, p.171, On Isaiah 1:15: “15. Lorsque vous étendrez vos mains vers moi, je détournerai mes yeux de vous ; même si vous multipliez les prières, je ne vous écouterai pas : car vos mains sont pleines de sang. Après cet exposé détaillé qui concerne notamment l’abrogation de la Loi et la destruction du Temple, il a enseigné la nature du péché qui leur a valu de subir toutes sortes de châtiments. Il ne les accuse ni de rendre un culte aux idoles, ni de commettre l’adultère, ni de céder à la cupidité, mais de se souiller d’un meurtre : plus difficile à supporter que toute impiété et que toute iniquité fut leur acte de folie contre le Seigneur. Elle leur appartient en effet la parole : « Son sang sur nous et sur nos enfants. » Ce sang les a privés de l’heureux sort d’autrefois, ce sang a fait d’eux les métèques du monde.  Néanmoins dans sa bonté, il leur fait entrevoir le chemin du salut : 16. Lavez-vous, devenez purs.”  On Isaiah 4:4. “4. “Parce que le Seigneur lavera la souillure des fils et des filles de Sion et purifiera Jérusalem du sang jailli du milieu d’eux au souffle du jugement et au souffle de la brûlure.” Il fait, de nouveau, mention de sang et de purification ; par « sang », il entend celui qu’ils ont fait couler sur eux-mêmes et sur leurs enfants pour avoir crié : « Son sang sur nous et sur nos enfants », par « purification », il prédit celle que produit le bain de régénération. Or, cela s’accomplira, dit-il, « au souille du jugement et au souffle de la brûlure » ; car, tout comme on rend l’or de bon aloi en le fondant au feu, ceux qui reçoivent le baptême déposent le venin de leurs péchés. Le bienheureux Jean-Baptiste à son tour l’a dit : « Lui vous baptisera dans l’Esprit-Saint et dans le feu. »”  On Isaiah 5:7 (p.237): “Puis il explique ce qu’il vient de dire de manière figurée : 7. Eh bien ! le vignoble du Seigneur Sabaoth, c’esl la Maison d’Israël, et l’homme de Juda, c’esl son jeune plant bien-aimé. Il a mis en accusation toutes les tribus, car il appelle « Maison de Jacob » tous ceux qui sont issus de cet ancêtre. Quant à la tribu de Juda, en vertu du fait qu’elle détenait la Bénédiction de la Promesse et qu’elle avait le Temple pour ornement, il l’a nommée « jeune plant bien-aimé ». Puis il explique clairement ce que signifient la vendange et les épines : J’ai espéré qu’il produirait le droit, mais il a produit l’iniquité; au lieu de la justice, des cris. Ce passage permet de reconnaître clairement que c’est pour avoir exercé leur folie furieuse contre le Sauveur qu’ils ont été dépouillés de la grâce divine : c’est par les « cris » qu’il a fait voir cette folie. Or, le récit des saints Évangiles précisément apprend qu’ils vociféraient au plus haut point, tour à tour aux cris de : «A mort! à mort! crucifie-le! » et de « Son sang sur nous et sur nos enfants ! »” 
    26. [26] BRISSON J.P., SC 19 bis (1967), 72-162. § 7 p.90, l.17:  “Le sang d’Abel ainsi est reclame a celui qui, d’apres ce qui avait ete prefigure en Cain, a persecute les justes et a ete maudit par la terre qui, ouvrant sa bouche, a recueilli le sang de son frere. Dans le corps du Christ, en effet,en qui sont les Apotres et l’eglise, c’est le sang de tous les justes que leur race et leur posterite tout entiere a pris sur elle selon leurs propres cris : « Que son sang soit sur nous et sur nos fils!””
    27. [27] GLORIE F., CCL 75A (1964), 769-950. p.876, l.372
    28. [28] Epistulae 121-130. LABOURT J., Saint Jérôme, Lettres, t. 7, Collections des Universités de France, Paris 1961. p.165, l.26.
    29. [29] RUPP J., S. Patris nostri Cyrilli Hierosolymorum archiepiscopi opera quae supersunt omnia, 2, Monaci 1860 (Hildesheim 1967), 2-342. § 21, p.78, l.19.
    30. [30] BROCK S.P., A letter attributed to Cyril of Jerusalem on the rebuilding of the Temple, Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies 40 (1977), 267-286. § 12 p.276, l.19.  JSTOR.
    31. [31] ZIEGLER J., GCS (1975). § 28 (p.293, l.13
    32. [32] § 7 (p.50, l.19) OPITZ H.-G., Athanasius Werke, 2,1, Berlin-Leipzig, 1935, 46-67.
    33. [33] HOLL K., GCS 25 (1915), 2-149 ; y compris les lettres de Matidius et Palladius. § 1. p.51, l.12.  Eng. tr. Fathers of the Church 128, p.121.  Preview.
    34. [34] PG 60 (1862) 13-384.  Col.86, l.30 (=Homily 10, 2); Col.88, l.36 (Hom 10, 3); Col.107, l.49 (Hom.13, 3)
    35. [35] Some information may be found in Jeremy Cohen, Christ Killers: The Jews and the Passion from the Bible to the Big Screen. Preview; David Berger, History and Hate: The Dimensions of Anti-Semitism, Preview.  See also a passage in Fulgentius, Selected Works (The Fathers of the Church, Volume 95), ed. Robert B Eno, Preview, where the Christ killer is Judas, rather than the Jews.

    Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

    Micropasts: Conducting, designing and funding research into our human past

     [First posted in AWOL 23 October 2013, updated 27 May 2015]

     Micropasts: Conducting, designing and funding research into our human past
    http://micropasts.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/figurines_800px.png
    Micropasts is a web platform that brings together full-time archaeologists, archaeological societies and other interested members of the public to collaborate on new kinds of research about our human history. It is a place where archaeological enthusiasts not only can create high-quality research data together, but also can collaboratively design and fund entirely new research projects. In particular, we want to encourage better kinds of archaeology by improving the ways that people traditionally distinguished as ‘academics’, ‘professionals’ and ‘volunteers’ cooperate with one another (as well as with others out there who as yet have no more than a passing interest in archaeology).

    Through the Micropasts platform, we will develop and support a range of crowd-sourcing and crowd-funding projects. By joining Micropasts, you can help research, fund and/or design as many projects as you like, with as much or as little personal commitment as you wish. Some existing projects are about creating 3D models of archaeological artefacts, enriching old photographic archives or transcribing old archaeological excavation records, to name just a few that we have come up with so far. Other new projects will need your help with financing before they can begin, whilst yet others might be research topics that you want  to propose yourself (as an individual, as part of an organised archaeological society or in tandem with other interested people that you meet online). We cannot yet say  which projects will prove popular and which ones will not, and we hope that many as yet unanticipated agendas will be dreamt up collectively. In any case, we are keen for your ideas and your contributions wherever we can get them!

    In a more technical sense, MicroPasts supports (a) modular applications for massive online data collection about archaeology, history and heritage, as well as (b) a micro-funding model for supporting new (not-for-profit) research projects where collaboration between academic institutions and volunteers is a key feature. The software used to build the platform is entirely free and open source, and the data we create is also required to be open-licensed and publicly available.












    Archaeological News on Tumblr

    Lethal wounds on skull may indicate 430,000-year-old murder

    Lethal wounds identified on a human skull in the Sima de los Huesos, Spain, may indicate one of the...

    Archaeology Magazine

    Italy Artifact RepatriationROME, ITALY—The United States has returned 25 historic artifacts, including Etruscan vases, first-century frescoes, a third-century B.C. terracotta head, the cover of a second-century Roman sarcophagus, and a second-century bronze figurine to Rome. Some of the looted objects had been handed over to U.S. authorities by American museums, universities, and private collections when it became clear that the items had been stolen. Other artifacts were seized by police and customs officers. “Italy is blessed with a rich cultural legacy and therefore cursed to suffer the pillaging of important cultural artifacts,” U.S. Ambassador John Phillips said at a press conference reported by the Associated Press. He also said that the United States has returned more than 7,500 cultural artifacts to more than 30 countries since 2007. Interpol estimates that each year, antiquities trafficking produces $9 billion in profits. To read about earlier repatriations, see "A Tangled Journey Home."

    Paul Barford (Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues)

    ISIL Spokesman Statement on Palmyra


    ISIL will not bulldoze historical monuments in Palmyra, but will destroy statues says Abu Laith Al-Saoudi, ISIS Military Leader on Radio Alwan:

    Posted on You Tube by Alwan Syria 

    The western media concentrated public attention on the postulated fate of the ruins probably to deflect attention from the loss of a highly important strategic position right in the middle of a US-led campaign intended to 'cripple' ISIL. By this announcement, ISIL has drawn attention to the future administration of the region as part of the Islamic State. Letting the ruins stand for now is also an expression of power.



    Archaeological News on Tumblr

    HMS Erebus dive 'just scratching the surface' of Franklin expedition mystery

    They are among the smallest artifacts recovered from the recent dive to HMS Erebus, but the two...

    The Archaeology News Network

    New human ancestor species from Ethiopia lived alongside Lucy's species

    A new relative joins "Lucy" on the human family tree. An international team of scientists, led by Dr. Yohannes Haile-Selassie of The Cleveland Museum of Natural History, has discovered a 3.3 to 3.5 million-year-old new human ancestor species. Upper and lower jaw fossils recovered from the Woranso-Mille area of the Afar region of Ethiopia have been assigned to the new species Australopithecus deyiremeda. This hominin lived alongside the...

    [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

    Kristina Killgrove (Forbes)

    World's Oldest Cold Case: A 430,000-Year-Old Murder Victim Found In Pit Of Bones

    Researchers in Spain have found the oldest cold case in the world. Their evidence of cranial trauma will convince you this was murder most foul.

    Archaeology Magazine

    Canada Erebus artifactsNUNAVUT, CANADA—Last month, underwater archaeologists from Parks Canada with the support of Royal Canadian Navy divers descended to the wreck site of HMS Erebus, lost nearly 170 years ago during Sir John Franklin’s expedition to find the Northwest Passage. The ship, discovered late last summer in remote Arctic waters, was covered with kelp. Over the course of the five-day project, the team removed the kelp from the well-preserved ship’s port side. “It’s tedious, but all of a sudden you have a shipwreck that looks like a wreck site,” senior underwater archaeologist Ryan Harris told CBC News. “We haven’t identified what caused it to sink. Maybe on the starboard side we’ll see some evidence of trauma,” he added. The divers found Franklin’s cabin, and they recovered a cannon, ceramic plates, and two brass buttons from the uniform of a non-commissioned officer of the Royal Marines. “Those are the artifacts that are probably the most personal,” Harris said. To read more, see "Saga of the Northwest Passage." 

    England Staffordshire Hoard

    BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND—Fragments of artifacts from the Staffordshire Hoard have been cleaned and are being fitted together in work funded by Historic England and public donations. The seventh-century Anglo-Saxon artifacts include a rare high-status helmet and a unique form of sword pommel that was in 26 pieces when it was uncovered. The pommel “combines multiple different styles of ornament, much in the same way as the earliest seventh-century illuminated manuscripts do, like the Book of Durrow. It suggests the coming together of Anglo-Saxon and British or Irish high cultures,” project archaeologist Chris Fern said in a Birmingham Museums press release. The helmet was discovered in 1,500 thin, fragile sheets and strips of silver that had been stamped with designs depicting warriors, birds, animals, and mythical beasts. And it had a gilded helmet band, a decoration thought to have encircled the helmet. “The Staffordshire Hoard links us with an age of warrior splendor. The gold and silver war-gear was probably made in workshops controlled by some of England’s earliest kings, to reward warriors that served those rulers, when multiple kingdoms fought for supremacy,” Fern explained. The original find of the hoard was one of ARCHAEOLOGY's Top 10 Discoveries of 2009, to read more, go to "Anglo-Saxon Hoard."

    The Archaeology News Network

    New finds at Plassi, Marathon in Attica

    This year’s excavations of the Prehistoric-Classical site of Plassi, Marathon in Attica, conducted by the University of Athens, have been completed last week. The survey of the site began last year. Buildings and pottery kiln of the Prehistoric era [Credit: National and  Kapodistrian University of Athens]The Plassi excavation has once again brought to light important finds showing that the site remained the most important...

    [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

    ArcheoNet BE

    Wandtapijten uit de tijd van Keizer Karel

    Naar aanleiding van het festival Carolus V organiseert het Jubelparkmuseum een kleine maar bijzondere tentoonstelling rond de wandtapijtenreeks over O.L. Vrouw van de Zavel. Deze ‘caemer’ van tapisserieën werd geweven rond 1516-1518 naar het ontwerp van Brusselaar Bernard Van Orley. De vier wandtapijten werden door de tijd heen van elkaar gescheiden maar worden nu herenigd. Naast twee topstukken van het Jubelparkmuseum staat ook een bruikleen uit het Hermitage van Sint-Petersburg in de schijnwerpers, net als een wandtapijt van het Brusselse Broodhuis. Deze ‘caemer’ wordt aangevuld met drie andere uitzonderlijke weefsels uit de tijd van Keizer Karel. De tentoonstelling loopt tot 30 augustus. Meer info op www.kmkg.be.

    He has a wife you know

    archaeology: Astronomers show ancient Rome’s sun New Zealand...





    archaeology:

    Astronomers show ancient Rome’s sun

    New Zealand astronomers have helped re-create the skies above Rome for simulations showing how ancient emperors built structures to align with the movements of the sun.

    Peter Tompa (Cultural Property Observer)

    Trade Professionals Speak Common Sense

    The Ivory Tower academics of the archaeological lobby often speak about requiring "provenance information" and "export certificates" as proof that items are not the products of recent looting. However, those with actual practical experience in the international trade of cultural goods have once again demonstrated that coming up with such documentation is easier said than done.

    Numismatic professional Alfredo de la Fe has written about the lack of provenance information for most coins and antiquities dealer James Ede has explained the impossible task of supplying export certificates that simply don't exist.

    Hopefully, decision makers will give much needed consideration to these practical concerns raised by those in the know.

    AIA Fieldnotes

    Archaeology Talk: Late PaleoIndian Bison Hunters of the Oklahoma Panhandle

    Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
    Sponsored by Main Street Guymon
    Event Type (you may select more than one): 
    nad
    lecture
    Start Date: 
    Saturday, October 24, 2015 - 1:00am

    Event Lecturer Dr. Leland Bement from the Oklahoma Archeological Survey shall speak about recent excavations at the Ravenscroft bison kill site in wetern Beaver County, Oklahoma. Evidence uncovered of two episodes of bison hunting that occurred approximately 9000 years ago. The hunters belong to the Late Paleoindian cultures that roamed the area between the Arkansas and Canadian Rivers.  Utilizing spears and herding the animals on foot, these hunters maneuvered dozens of animals into dead-end gullies where the animals were killed and butchered. Read more »

    Location

    Name: 
    Melyn Johnson
    Telephone: 
    5803386246
    Call for Papers: 
    no

    Kristina Killgrove (Powered by Osteons)

    Who needs an osteologist? (Installment 27)

    I'm going to quote the inestimable Alison Atkin here, commenting on the headline "Church stunned as child's bones are dug up."  She says, "Missing from headline: '...dug up' [from church grounds, which if anywhere is where you'd expect them, no?'"

    But more to the point, the article quotes archaeologist Joe Abrams as saying these are the remains of a juvenile, a relatively young person.  That's a lot of vague language, which is fine, but the article doubles-down and says "the size of the bones suggests that it [the child] was between 10 and 18 years of age at the time of its death."

    Image of human bones from churchyard.
    Photo via Dunstable Today.

    Now check out that right proximal humerus.  Notice anything?  Or, rather, notice the lack of something?  There is no epiphyseal line; it is completely fused.  Fusion of the proximal humerus happens between about 18-22 years of age.

    This may be a relatively young person (and then, based on the small size and the gracility of that forehead, female), but not a child.

    ----


    Previous Installments of Who needs an osteologist?

    The Archaeology News Network

    HMS Erebus dive 'just scratching the surface' of Franklin expedition mystery

    They are among the smallest artifacts recovered from the recent dive to HMS Erebus, but the two brass tunic buttons are also offering the most personal glimpse yet into what mysteries the shipwreck may reveal about the ill-fated Franklin expedition in the High Arctic. Diver Yves Bernard heads back to the surface through an ice hole after a joint Parks Canada  and Navy operation to the wreck site of HMS Erebus, one of Franklin's...

    [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

    Farrago

    Some Greek compounds

    γλυκύ-πικρος (Sapph.130)
    γύν-ανδρος (S.fr.+) and ἀνδρό-γυνος (Hdt. Pl.+) and γυναικ-άνηρ (Epicharmos)

    ἱππό-ταυρος horse-bull LSJ, Heliodoros, Aithiopika X 29:
    καὶ τὸν Θεαγένην λαμπρῶς ἐκθειάζειν ξένην τινὰ ταύτην ἱπποταύρου ξυνωρίδα
    ζευξάμενον.
    κλαυσί-γελως smiles mingled with tears LSJ, X.Hell. VII 2.9:
    πάντας δὲ τοὺς παρόντας τότε γε τῷ ὄντι κλαυσίγελως εἶχεν.
    (?) cf. Sall.Cat.61.9: ita varie per omnem exercitum laetitia, maeror, luctus atque gaudia agitabantur.

    λευκο-έρυθρος (Arist.)
    -μέλᾱς grey (LSJ): a combination or mixture of white and black rather than of animals like pandas (though, cf. Ailuropoda melano-leuca black and white cat-footed one) and of things like chess boards that are white and black.

    χλωρο- (Galen), ὠχρό- (Dioscorides Ped.)

    Cf. Sanskrit nīla-lohitá dark blue and red = dark red (A.A. MacDonell, A Vedic Grammar for Students, § 186 B 1 'The adjectives that designate colours, their combination expressing a mixture of the two'.



    Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)

    Propylaeum-DOK: Digital Repository: Ancient History

    Propylaeum-DOK: Digital Repository: Ancient History
    http://archiv.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/propylaeumdok/images/propylaeumdok_header_label_en.gif
    Jump to: A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | K | L | M | P | R | S | T | V | W | Z
    Number of items at this level: 256.

    A

    Andreae, Bernard and Flashar, Hellmut (1977) Strukturäquivalenzen zwischen den homerischen Epen und der frühgriechischen Vasenkunst. In: Poetica, 9 (1977), pp. 217-266
    Assmann, Jan (2010) Globalization, Universalism, and the Erosion of Cultural Memory. In: Assmann, Aleida and Conrad, Sebastian (Hrsgg.): Memory in a Global Age. Discourses, Practices and Trajectories, Palgrave Macmillan Memory Studies. New York 2010, pp. 121-137

    B

    Borg, Barbara (2004) Introduction. In: Borg, Barbara (Hrsg.): Paideia: The World of the Second Sophistic. Berlin 2004, pp. 1-10

    C

    Chaniotis, Angelos (1988) Μίνωτκα Ευρηματα απο τον Αγίο Μυρωνα σε ενα Τουρκίκο εγραφο. In: Kretika Chronika, 28/29 (1988), pp. 58-63
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1990) Μία Αγηωστη πηγη γία τη Λατρία στο Ιδαίο αντρο στην Υστατη Αρχαίοτητα. In: Acts of the 6th Cretological Congress [Pepragmena tou 6. Diethnous Kretologikou Synedriou]. Chania 1990, pp. 393-401
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2000) Ονειροκρίτες Αρεταλογοί και προσκυνητες: Θρησκευτικες Δραστηρίοτητες Κρητων στην Ελληνιστικη Αίγυπτο. In: Karetsou, A. (Hrsg.): Crete – Egypt. Cultural Links of Three Millenia. Athen 2000, pp. 208-214
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1998) Το χρονικο της Ανακαλυψηξ μίας Ελληνίστίκης Πολης στην καρια 8Bucakköy; Συνετα). In: Deltion tou Kentrou Mikrasiatikon Spoudon, 12 (1998), pp. 13-41
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2005) Akzeptanz von Herrschaft durch ritualisierte Dankbarkeit und Erinnerung. In: Ambos, Claus and Hotz, S. and Schwedler, G. and Weinfurter, Stefan (Hrsgg.): Die Welt der Rituale. Von der Antike bis heute. Darmstadt 2005, pp. 188-204
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1988) Als die Diplomaten noch tanzten und sangen. Zu zwei Dekreten kretischer Städte in Mylasa. In: Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik, 71 (1988), pp. 154-156
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1992) Amnisos in den schriftlichen Quellen: Die Testimonien. Die Geschichte von Amnisos von Homer bis zur Eroberung Kretas durch die Türken. Amnisos von den Dunklen Jahrhunderten bis zum Ende der Kaiserzeit. Amnisos als ein Problem der historischen Geographie. In: Schäfer, J. (Hrsg.): Amnisos nach den archäologischen, historischen und epigraphischen Zeugnissen des Altertums und der Neuzeit. Gebr. Mann, Berlin 1992 51-127; 287-322; 350-355
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2002) Bemerkungen zu christlichen Inschriften aus Kreta und Kleinasien. In: Tekmeria, 7 (2002), pp. 157-162
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1996) Bemerkungen zum Kalender kretischer Städte in hellenistischer Zeit. In: Tekmeria, 2 (1996), pp. 16-41
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2004) Das Bankett des Damas und der Hymnos des Sosandros: Öffentlicher Diskurs über Rituale in den griechischen Städten der Kaiserzeit. In: Harth, Dietrich and Schenk, G. (Hrsgg.): Ritualdynamik. Kulturübergreifende Studien zur Theorie und Geschichte rituellen Handelns. Heidelberg 2004, pp. 291-304
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1987) Das Ehrendekret für Diophantos (IOSPE I2 352) und die Geschichtsschreibung. In: Fol, A. and Zhivkov, V. and Nedjalkov, N. (Hrsgg.): Acta Centri Historiae Terra Antiqua Balcanica. Sofia 1987, pp. 233-235
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2000) Das Jenseits: Eine Gegenwelt? In: Hölscher, Tonio (Hrsg.): Gegenwelten zu den Kulturen der Griechen und der Römer in der Antike. München - Leipzig 2000, pp. 159-181
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2003) Der Kaiserkult im Osten des Römischen Reiches im Kontext der zeitgenössischen Ritualpraxis. In: Cancik, H. and Hitzl, K. (Hrsgg.): Die Praxis der Herrscherverehrung in Rom und seinen Provinzen, Akten der Tagung in Blaubeuren vom 4. bis zum 6. April 2002. Tübingen 2003, pp. 3-28
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2004) Der Tod des Lebens und die Tränen des Peneios: Eine thessalische Grabelegie. In: Hornung, A. and Jäkel, C. and Schubert, W. (Hrsgg.): Studia Humanitatis ac Litterarum Trifolio Heidelbergensi dedicata. Festschrift für Eckhard Christmann, Wilfried Edelmaier und Rudolf Kettemann. Frankfurt 2004, pp. 39-43
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2007) Die Entwicklung der griechischen Asylie: Ritualdynamik und die Grenzen des Rechtsvergleichs. In: Burckhardt, L. and Seybold, K. and Ungern-Sternbert, J. von (Hrsgg.): Gesetzgebung in antiken Gesellschaften. Israel, Griechenland, Rom. Berlin 2007, pp. 233-246
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2006) Die hellenistischen Kriege als Ursache von Migration: Das Beispiel Kreta. In: Olshausen, E. and Sonnabend, H. (Hrsgg.): Migrationen in der antiken Welt. Stuttgarter Kolloquium zur Historischen Geographie des Altertums 8, 2002. Stuttgart 2006, pp. 98-103
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1996) Die kretischen Berge als Wirtschaftsraum. In: Olshausen, E. and Sonnabend, H. (Hrsgg.): Stuttgarter Kolloquium zur Historischen Geographie des Altertums 5, 1993, Gebirgsland als Lebensraum. Amsterdam 1996, pp. 255-266
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1994) Die sylan-Klausel im Vertrag zwischen Lyttos und Malla (Staatsverträge III 511). In: Savigny-Zeitschrift für Rechtsgeschichte, 111 (1994), pp. 421-424
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1990) Drei kleinasiatische Inschriften zur griechischen Religion. In: Epigraphica Anatolica, 15 (1990), pp. 127-133
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2001) Ein alexandrinischer Dichter und Kreta: Mythische Vergangenheit und gegenwärtige Kultpraxis bei Kallimachos. In: Böhm, S. and Eickstedt, K.-V. von (Hrsgg.): Ithake. Festschrift für Jörg Schäfer. Würzburg 2001, pp. 213-217
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1993) Ein diplomatischer Statthalter nimmt Rücksicht auf den verletzten Stolz zweier hellenistischer Kleinpoleis (Nagidos und Arsinoe). In: Epigraphica Anatolica, 21 (1993), pp. 33-42
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2005) Ein mißverstandenes Ritual der griechischen Diplomatie: Geschichte als Argument. In: Ambos, Claus and Hotz, S. and Schwedler, G. and Weinfurter, Stefan (Hrsgg.): Die Welt der Rituale. Von der Antike bis heute. Darmstadt 2005, pp. 106-109
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1987) Ein neuer genealogischer Text aus Milet. In: Epigraphica Anatolica, 10 (1987), pp. 41-44
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1986) Eine neue Ehreninschrift für Sabina aus Lyttos. In: Kretika Chronika, 26 (1986), pp. 82-88
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1985) Eine neue lateinische Ehreninschrift aus Knosos. In: Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik, 58 (1985), pp. 182-188
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1989) Eine spätantike Inschrift aus dem kretischen Lyttos. In: Tyche, 4 (1989), pp. 25-31
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1999) Empfängerformular und Urkundenfälschung: Bemerkungen zum Urkundendossier von Magnesia am Mäander. In: G. Khoury, R. (Hrsg.): Urkunden und Urkundenformulare im Klassischen Altertum und in den orientalischen Kulturen. Winter, Heidelberg 1999, pp. 51-69
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1986) Enteleia: Zu Inhalt und Begriff eines Vorrechtes. In: Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik, 64 (1986), pp. 159-162
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1991) Epigraphic Bulletin for Greek Religion 1987. In: Kernos, 4 (1991), pp. 187-311
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1992) Epigraphic Bulletin for Greek Religion 1987-1988. In: Kernos, 5 (1992), pp. 265-306
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1993) Epigraphic Bulletin for Greek Religion 1987-1989. In: Kernos, 6 (1993), pp. 309-342
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1994) Epigraphic Bulletin for Greek Religion 1990. In: Kernos, 7 (1994), pp. 287-354
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2004) Epigraphic evidence for the philosopher Alexander of Aphrodisias. In: Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies, 47 (2004), pp. 79-81
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1999) The Epigraphy of Hellenistic Crete. The Cretan Koinon: New and Old Evidence. In: Atti del XI Congresso Internazionale di Epigrafia Greca e Latina. Rom 1999, pp. 287-300
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2006) Familiensache: Demonstration von Zusammengehörigkeit im altgriechischen Grabritual. In: Reichmann, R. (Hrsg.): “Der Odem des Menschen ist eine Leuchte des Herrn”. Aharon Agus zum Gedenken, Heidelberg (2006), pp. 205-209
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2002) Foreign soldiers - native girls? Constructing and crossing boundaries in Hellenistic cities with foreign garrisons. In: Chaniotis, Angelos and Ducrey, P. (Hrsgg.): Army and Power in the Ancient World. Stuttgart 2002, pp. 99-113
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2004) From communal spirit to individuality: the epigraphic habit in Hellenistic and Roman Crete. In: Creta Romana e Protobizantina. Atti del Congresso Internazionale, Iraklion, 23–30 settembre 2000. Padua 2004, pp. 75-87
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1991) Gedenktage der Griechen: Ihre Bedeutung für das Geschichtsbewußtsein griechischer Poleis. In: Assmann, Jan (Hrsg.): Das Fest und das Heilige. Religiöse Kontrapunkte zur Alltagswelt. Gütersloher Verlagshaus, Gütersloh 1991, pp. 123-145 (Studien zum Verstehen fremder Religionen ; 1)
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2005) Griechische Rituale der Statusänderung und ihre Dynamik. In: Steinicke, M. and Weinfurter, Stefan (Hrsgg.): Griechische Rituale der Statusänderung und ihre Dynamik. Köln-Weimar 2005, pp. 43-61
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1988) Habgierige Götter - habgierige Städte. Heiligtumsbesitz und Gebietsanspruch in den kretischen Staatsverträgen. In: Ktema, 13 (1988), pp. 21-39
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1996) Hamarties, arosties kai gaitries ste Mikra Asia stous protous metachristianikous aiones. In: Deltion tou Kentrou Mikrasiatikon Spoudon, 11 (1996), pp. 13-44
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2001) Heiligtum und Stadtgemeinde im klassischen und hellenistischen Kreta. In: Kyriatsoulis, A. (Hrsg.): Kreta und Zypern: Religion und Schrift. Altenburg 2001, pp. 319-328
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2006) Heiligtümer überregionaler Bedeutung auf Kreta. In: Freitag, K. and Funke, Peter and Haake, M. (Hrsgg.): Kult - Politik - Ethnos. Überregionale Heiligtümer im Spannungsfeld von Kult und Politik. Stuttgart 2006, pp. 196-209
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2000) Hellenistic Lasaia (Crete): A Dependent Polis of Gortyn. New Epigraphic Evidence from the Asklepieion near Lasaia. In: Eulimene, 1 (2000), pp. 55-60
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1995) Illness and Cures in the Greek Propitiatory Inscriptions and Dedications of Lydia and Phrygia. In: Hormannshoff, H.F.J. and van der Eijk, Ph..J. and Schrijvers, P.H. (Hrsgg.): Ancient Medicine in its Socio-Cultural Context. Papers Read at the Congress Held at Leiden University, 13-15 April 1992. Amsterdam-Atlanta 1995, pp. 323-344
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2005) Inscribed instrumenta domestica and the economy of Hellenistic and Roman Crete. In: Archibald, Z.H. and Davies, J.K. and Gabrielsen, V. (Hrsgg.): Making, moving, and managing. The new world of ancient economies. Oxford 2005, pp. 92-116
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1998) Inscriptions from Bucak Köyü (Ancient Syneta?). In: American Journal of Archaeology, 102 (1998), pp. 248-250
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2002) The Jews of Aphrodisias: new evidence and old problems. In: Scripta Classica Israelica, 21 (2002), pp. 209-242
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2004) Justifying territorial claims in Classical and Hellenistic Greece. The beginnings of international law. In: Harris, E.M. and Rubinstein, L. (Hrsgg.): The law and the courts in ancient Greece. London 2004, pp. 185-213
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1987) Klassiki kai ellenistiki Kriti. In: Panagiotakis, N.M. (Hrsg.): Kriti: Istoria kai Politismos (Kreta: Geschichte und Kultur). Heraklion 1987, pp. 173-284
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1986) Kleine Beiträge zu kretischen Inschriften. In: Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik, 62 (1986), pp. 193-197
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1995) Kretische Inschriften. In: Tekmeria, 1 (1995), pp. 15-36
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2003) Livia Sebaste, Iulia Sebaste, Caius Caesar Parthikos, Domitian Anikeitos Theos: Inofficial titles of emperors in the early Principate. In: Acta Antiqua Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae, 43 (2003), pp. 341-344
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2005) Macht und Volk in den kaiserzeitlichen Inschriften von Aphrodisias. In: Urso, G. (Hrsg.): Popolo e potere nel mondo antico. Atti del convegno internazionale Cividale del Friuli, 23-25 settembre 2004. Pisa 2005, pp. 47-61
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1999) Milking the Mountains: Economic Activities on the Cretan Uplands in the Classical and Hellenistic Period. In: Chaniotis, Angelos (Hrsg.): From Minoan Farmers to Roman Traders. Sidelights on the Economy of Ancient Crete. Steiner, Stuttgart 1999, pp. 181-220
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2004) Mobility of persons during the Hellenistic wars: state control and personal relations. In: Moatti, C. (Hrsg.): La mobilité des personnes en Méditerranée, de l\'Antiquité à l\'époque moderne. II. La mobilité négociée. Procédures de contrôle et documents d\'identification. Rom 2004, pp. 481-500
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1990) Neue Fragmente des Preisedikts von Diokletian und weitere lateinische Inschriften aus Kreta. In: Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik, 80 (1990), pp. 189-202
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1992) Neue Inschriften aus dem kaiserzeitlichen Lyttos, Kreta. In: Tyche, 7 (1992), pp. 27-38
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1991) Neue lateinische Inschriften aus Knosos. In: eitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik, 89 (1991), pp. 191-195
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1997) New Inscriptions from Old Books. Inscriptions of Aigion, Delphi and Lesbos copied by Nicholas Biddle and Stavros Táxis. In: Tekmeria, 3 (1997), pp. 7-21
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2004) New inscriptions from Aphrodisias (1995-2001). In: American Journal of Archaeology, 108 (2004), pp. 377-416
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1994) Oi Archanes sta istorika chronia, 1000 p.Ch.-100 m.Ch. In: Archaiologia, 53 (1994), pp. 68-74
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2002) Old wine in a new skin: tradition and innovation in the cult foundation of Alexander of Abonouteichos. In: Dabrowa, E. (Hrsg.): Tradition and Innovation in the Ancient World (Electrum 6). Krokow 2002, pp. 67-85
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1987) Plutarchos, praeses Insularum (Prosopography of the Later Roman Empire I Plutarchus 4). In: Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik, 68 (1987), pp. 227-231
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1995) Problems of 'Pastoralism' and 'Transhumance' in Classical and Hellenistic Crete. In: Orbis Terrarum, 1 (1995), pp. 39-89
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1997) Reinheit des Körpers - Reinheit des Sinnes in den griechischen Kultgesetzen. In: Assmann, Jan and Sundermeier, Th. (Hrsgg.): Schuld, Gewissen und Person. Gütersloher Verlagshaus, Gütersloh 1997, pp. 142-179 (Studien zum Verstehen fremder Religionen ; 9)
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2007) Religion und Mythos in der hellenistischen Welt. In: Weber, G. (Hrsg.): Kulturgeschichte des Hellenismus. Von Alexander dem Großen bis Kleopatra. Stuttgart 2007, pp. 448-454
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2005) Ritual dynamics in the Eastern Mediterranean: case studies in ancient Greece and Asia Minor. In: Harris, W.V. (Hrsg.): Rethinking the Mediterranean. Oxford 2005, pp. 141-166
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2002) Ritual dynamics: the Boiotian festival of the Daidala. In: Horstmanshoff, H.F.J. and Singor, H.W. and Straten, F.T. van (Hrsgg.): Kykeon. Studies in Honour of H.S. Versnel. Brill, Leiden-Boston-Köln 2002, pp. 23-48
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2006) Rituals between norms and emotions: rituals as shared experience and memory. In: Stavrianopoulou, Eftychia (Hrsg.): Ritual and Communication in the Graeco-Roman World. Liège 2006, pp. 211-238
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1995) Sich selbst feiern? Städtische Feste des Hellenismus im Spannungsfeld von Religion und Politik. In: Zanker, P. and Wörrle, M. (Hrsgg.): Stadtbild und Bürgerbild im Hellenismus. München 1995, pp. 147-172
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2002) Some Cretan bastards. In: Cretan Studies, 7 (2002), pp. 51-57
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1989) Some More Cretan Names. In: Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik, 77 (1989), pp. 67-81
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1998) Sources épigraphiques / Epigraphical Sources, 1986-1997. In: Motte, A. and Wathelet, P. (Hrsgg.): Mentor 2. 1986-1990. Guide bibliographique de la religion grecque, (Kernos, Supplément 6. Liège 1998, pp. 38-44
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1997) 'Tempeljustiz' im kaiserzeitlichen Kleinasien: Rechtliche Aspekte der Sühneinschriften Lydiens und Phrygiens. In: Thür, G. and Vélissaropoulos-Karakostas, J. (Hrsgg.): Symposion 1995. Vorträge zur griechischen und hellenistischen Rechtsgeschichte (Korfu, 1.-5. September 1995). Böhlau, Köln, Weimar, Wien 1997, pp. 353-384
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2007) Theatre rituals. In: Wilson, P. (Hrsg.): The Greek Theatre and Festivals. Documentary Studies. Oxford 2007, pp. 48-66
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1997) Theatricality Beyond the Theater. Staging Public Life in the Hellenistic World. In: Le Guen, B. (Hrsg.): De la scène aux gradins. Thêatre et représentations dramatiques après Alexandre le Grand dans les cités hellénstiques. Actes du Colloque, Toulouse 1997 (Pallas, 41). Toulouse 1997, pp. 219-259
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2007) Thynnara: Ein neuer karischer Ortsname. In: Fellmeth, U. and Guyot, P. and Sonnabend, H. (Hrsgg.): Historische Geographie der alten Welt. Grundlagen, Erträge, Perspektiven. Festgabe für Eckart Olshausen aus Anlass seiner Emeritierung. Hildesheim 2007, pp. 83-85
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2004) Under the watchful eyes of the gods: divine justice in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor. In: Colvin, S. (Hrsg.): The Greco-Roman East. Politics, Culture, Society (Yale Classical Studies 31). Cambridge 2004, pp. 1-43
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2005) Victory' verdict: the violent occupation of territory in Hellenistic interstate relations. In: Bertrand, J.-M. (Hrsg.): La violence dans les mondes grec et romain. Paris 2005, pp. 455-464
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1991) Vier kretische Staatsverträge. Verträge zwischen Aptera und Kydonia, einer ostkretischen Stadt und Melos, Olus und Lyttos, Chersonesos und Rhodos. In: Chiron, 21 (1991), pp. 241-264
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1988) Vinum Creticum excellens: Zum Weinhandel Kretas. In: Münstersche Beiträge zur antiken Handelsgeschichte, 7 (1988), Nr. 1. pp. 62-89
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2003) Vom Erlebnis zum Mythos: Identitätskonstruktionen im kaiserzeitlichen Aphrodisias. In: Schwertheim, E. and Winter, E. (Hrsgg.): Stadt und Stadtentwicklung in Kleinasien. Bonn 2003, pp. 69-84
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2004) Von Ehre, Schande und kleinen Verbrechen unter Nachbarn: Konfliktbewältigung und Götterjustiz in Gemeinden des antiken Anatolien. In: Pfetsch, F. R. (Hrsg.): Konflikt (Heidelberger Jahrbücher 48). Heidelberg 2004, pp. 233-254
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1991) Von Hirten, Kräutersammlern, Epheben und Pilgern: Leben auf den Bergen im antiken Kreta. In: Siebert, G. (Hrsg.): Nature et paysage dans la pensée et l. De Boccard, Paris 1991, pp. 91-107
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1992) Watching a Lawsuit: A New Curse Tablet from Southern Russia. In: Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies, 33 (1992), pp. 69-73
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1998) Willkommene Erdbeben. In: Olshausen, E. and Sonnabend, H. (Hrsgg.): Stuttgarter Kolloquium zur historischen Geographie des Altertums 6, 1996. \"Naturkatastrophen in der antiken Welt\". Stuttgart 1998, pp. 404-416
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1988) Zu den Inschriften von Amnisos. In: Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik, 71 (1988), pp. 157-160
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1990) Zur Frage der Spezialisierung im griechischen Theater des Hellenismus und der Kaiserzeit. In: Ktema, 15 (1990), pp. 89-108
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2002) Zwischen Konfrontation und Interaktion: Christen, Juden und Heiden im spätantiken Aphrodisias. In: Ackermann, A. and Müller, K.E. (Hrsgg.): Patchwork: Dimensionen multikultureller Gesellschaften. Bielefeld 2002, pp. 83-128
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2003) The divinity of Hellenistic rulers. In: Erskine, A. (Hrsg.): A Companion to the Hellenistic World. Oxford 2003, pp. 431-445
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2006) A dodecahedron of rock crystal from the Idaean cave and evidence for divination in the sacred cave of Zeus. In: Gabrilaki, I. and Tzifopoulos, Y. (Hrsgg.): Actes of the International Symposium ‘Mylopotamos, from Antiquity to our Days’ [Πρακτικ. Διεθνο.ς Συνεδρίου «. Μυλοπόταμος .π. τ.ν .ρχαιότητα .ς σήμερα»]. Rethymnon 2006, pp. 205-216
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2001) An epitaph from Nipiditos in Crete. In: Tekmeria, 6 (2001), pp. 123-125
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2005) The great inscription, its political and social institutions, and the common institutions of the Cretans. In: Greco, E. and Lombardo, M. (Hrsgg.): La Grande Iscrizione di Gortyna. Centoventi anni dopo la scoperta. Atti del I Convegno Internazionale di Studi sulla Messarà. Athen 2005, pp. 175-194
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2003) The perception of imperial power in Aphrodisias: The epigraphic evidence. In: de Blois, L. and Erdkamp, P. and Hekster, O.J. and de Kleijn, G. and Mols, S. (Hrsgg.): he Representation and Perception of Roman Imperial Power. Proceedings of the Third Workshop of the International Network Impact of Empire, Rome, March 20-23, 2002. Amsterdam 2003, pp. 250-260
    Chaniotis, Angelos and Chiai, Gian Franco (2007) Die Sprache der religiösen Kommunikation im römischen Osten: Konvergenz und Differenzierung. In: Rüpke, J. (Hrsg.): Antike Religionsgeschichte in räumlicher Perspektive. Tübingen 2007, pp. 117-124
    Chaniotis, Angelos and Thaler, Ulrich (2006) Die Altertumswissenschaften an der Universität Heidelberg 1933-1945. In: Eckart, W.U. and Sellin, V. and Wolgast, H. (Hrsgg.): Die Universität Heidelberg im Nationalsozialismus. Heidelberg 2006, pp. 391-434

    D

    Dieudonné, Adolphe (1909) Numismatique syrienne. L'aigle d'Antioche et les ateliers de Tyr et d'Émèse. In: Revue Numismatique, 4 (1909), Nr. 13. pp. 458-480
    Dörpfeld, Wilhelm (1885) Das choragische Monument des Nikias. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 10 (1885), pp. 219-230
    Dörpfeld, Wilhelm (1885) Die Propyläen der Akropolis von Athen I. Das ursprüngliche Project des Mnesikles. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 10 (1885), pp. 38-56
    Dörpfeld, Wilhelm (1885) Die Propyläen der Akropolis von Athen II. Ueber die Gestalt des Südwestflügels. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 10 (1885), pp. 131-144

    E

    Eck, Werner (2012) Caesarea Maritima – eine römische Stadt? In: Hartmann, Andreas and Weber, Gregor (Hrsgg.): Zwischen Antike und Moderne. Festschrift für Jürgen Malitz zum 65. Geburtstag. Speyer 2012, pp. 233-244
    Eckert, Martin (2007) Piräus: Der Hafen als Wirtschafts-, Kontakt- und Problemzone der klassischen Polis.

    F

    Färber, Roland (2012) Zeit ist Geld. Kalendermanipulation und die ökonomische Bedeutung des Schaltmonats. In: Hartmann, Andreas and Weber, Gregor (Hrsgg.): Zwischen Antike und Moderne. Festschrift für Jürgen Malitz zum 65. Geburtstag. Speyer 2012, pp. 53-77
    Funke, Peter (2001) Acheloos' Homeland. New Historical-Archaeological Research on the Ancient Polis Stratos. In: Isager, J. (Hrsg.): Foundation and Destruction. Nikopolis and Northwestern Greece. The archaeological evidence for the city destructions, the foundation of Nikopolis and the synoecism (= Monographs of the Danish Institute at Athens, Vol. 3). Athen 2001, pp. 189-203
    Funke, Peter (2007) Alte Grenzen - neue Grenzen. Formen polisübergreifender Machtbildung in klassischer und hellenistischer Zeit. In: Albertz, R. and Blöbaum, A. and Funke, Peter (Hrsgg.): Räume und Grenzen. Topologische Konzepte in den antiken Kulturen des östlichen Mittelmeerraumes. München 2007, pp. 187-204
    Funke, Peter (1980) Armenien, Iran und Mesopotamien in hellenistischer und römischer Zeit. In: Der Große Ploetz,. Würzburg 1980, pp. 310-317
    Funke, Peter (1998) Athen und Kleinasien im 4. Jh. v. Chr. Überlegungen zum historisch-politischen Kontext eines neuen Proxeniedekretes aus Kaunos. In: Kadmos, 37 (1998), pp. 211-228
    Funke, Peter (1994) Chronikai syntaxeis kai historiai. Die rhodische Historiographie in hellenistischer Zeit. In: Klio, 76 (1994), pp. 255-262
    Funke, Peter (2009) “Concilio Epirotarum habitato”. Überlegungen zum Problem von Polyzentrismus und Zentralorten im antiken Epirus. In: Forsén, B. (Hrsg.): Thesprotia Expedition I. Towards a Regional History. Papers and Monographs of the Finish Institute at Athens 15. Helsinki 2009, pp. 97-112
    Funke, Peter (1998) Das antike Griechenland: Eine gescheiterte Nation? Zur Rezeption und Deutung der antiken griechischen Geschichte in der deutschen Historiographie des 19. Jahrhunderts. In: Storia della storiografia, 33 (1998), pp. 17-32
    Funke, Peter (2008) Die Aitoler in der Ägäis. Untersuchungen zur sogenannten Seepolitik der Aitoler im 3. Jh. v. Chr. In: Winter, E. (Hrsg.): v. Bonn 2008, pp. 253-267
    Funke, Peter (1998) Die Bedeutung der griechischen Bundesstaaten in der politischen Theorie und Praxis des 5. und 4. Jh. v. Chr. (Auch eine Anmerkung zu Aristot. pol. 1261a 22-29). In: Schuller, W. (Hrsg.): Politische Theorie und Praxis im Altertum. Darmstadt 1998, pp. 59-71
    Funke, Peter (2005) Die Nabel der Welt. Überlegungen zur Kanonisierung der "panhellenischen" Heiligtümer. In: Schmitt, T. and Schmitz, W. and Winterling, A. (Hrsgg.): Gegenwärtige Antike - antike Gegenwarten. Kolloquium zum 60. Geburtstag von Rolf Rilinger. München 2005, pp. 1-16
    Funke, Peter (2007) Die Perser und die griechischen Heiligtümer in der Perserkriegszeit. In: Bleckmann, B. (Hrsg.): Herodot und die Epoche der Perserkriege. Realitäten und Fiktionen. Kolloquium zum 80. Geburtstag von Dietmar Kienast. Köln - Weimar - Wien 2007, pp. 21-34
    Funke, Peter (2006) Die griechische Staatenwelt in klassischer Zeit (500 – 336 v. Chr.). In: Gehrke, H.-J. and Schneider, H. (Hrsgg.): Geschichte der Antike. Ein Studienbuch. Stuttgart 2006, pp. 129-194
    Funke, Peter (2007) Die griechische Staatenwelt in klassischer Zeit (550 – 336 v. Chr.). In: Gehrke, H.-J. and Schneider, H. (Hrsgg.): Geschichte der Antike - Quellenband. Stuttgart 2007, pp. 59-143
    Funke, Peter (2007) Die staatliche Neuformierung Griechenlands. Staatenbünde und Bundesstaaten. In: Weber, G. (Hrsg.): Kulturgeschichte des Hellenismus. Von Alexander dem Großen bis Kleopatra. Stuttgart 2007 78-98 ; 436-439
    Funke, Peter (1996) Die syrisch-mesopotamische Staatenwelt in vorislamischer Zeit. Zu den arabischen Macht- und Staatenbildungen an der Peripherie der antiken Großmächte im Hellenismus und in der römischen Kaiserzeit. In: Funck, B. (Hrsg.): Hellenismus. Beiträge zur Erforschung von Akkulturation und politischer Ordnung in den Staaten des hellenistischen Zeitalters. Tübingen 1996, pp. 217-238
    Funke, Peter (2002) Europäische lieux de mémoire oder lieux de mémoire für Europa im antiken Griechenland? In: Jahrbuch für Europäische Geschichte, 3 (2002), pp. 3-16
    Funke, Peter (2006) Fremde und Nicht-Bürger in den griechischen Heiligtümern der antiken Mittelmeerwelt. Eine historische Einführung. In: Naso, A. (Hrsg.): Stranieri e non cittadini nei santuari greci. Atti del convegno internazionale. Grassina 2006, pp. 1-12
    Funke, Peter (2003) Gli ombelichi del mondo. Riflessioni sulla canonizzazione dei santuari 'panellenici'. In: Geographia Antiqua, 12 (2003), pp. 57-65
    Funke, Peter (2000) Grenzfestungen und Verkehrsverbindungen in Nordost-Attika. Zur Bedeutung der attisch-boiotischen Grenzregion um Dekeleia. In: Flensted-Jensen, P. and Heine Nielsen, T. and Rubinstein, L. (Hrsgg.): Polis and Politics. Studies in Ancient Greek History. Presented to M. H. Hansen on his Sixtieth Birthday, August 20, 2000. Kopenhagen 2000, pp. 121-131
    Funke, Peter (2004) Herodotus and the major sanctuaries of the Greek World. In: Karagheorgis, V. and Taifacos, J. (Hrsgg.): The World of Herodotus. Proceedings of an International Conference held at the Foundation Anastasios G. Leventis, Nicosia, September 18-21, 2003. Nicosia 2004, pp. 159-167
    Funke, Peter (1983) Konons Rückkehr nach Athen im Spiegel epigraphischer Zeugnisse. In: Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik, 53 (1983), pp. 149-189
    Funke, Peter (1999) Miltiades. In: Brodersen, K. (Hrsg.): Große Gestalten der griechischen Welt von Homer bis Kleopatra. München 1999, pp. 301-310
    Funke, Peter (1984) Nochmals zu den Wechselfällen rhodischer Politik zu Beginn des IV. Jahrhunderts v. Chr. In: Hermes, 112 (1984), pp. 115-119
    Funke, Peter (1999) Peraia: Einige Überlegungen zum Festlandbesitz griechischer Inselstaaten. In: Gabrielsen, V. and Bilde, P. and Engberg-Pedersen, T. and Hannsetad, L. and Zahle, J. (Hrsgg.): Hellenistic Rhodes: Politics, Culture, and Society (= Studies in Hellenistic Civilization, vol. 9). Aarhus 1999, pp. 55-75
    Funke, Peter (2005) Philippos III. Arrhidaios und Alexander IV. - "von Amun auserwählt". In: Alonso Troncoso, V. (Hrsg.): Diádochos tes basileías. La figura del sucesor en las monarquías de época helenística (= Gerión Anejos, vol. 9). Madrid 2005, pp. 45-56
    Funke, Peter (2004) "Polis wird in vielerlei Bedeutungen verwandt." Städtische Welten in der griechischen Antike. In: Johanek, P. and Post, F.-J. (Hrsgg.): Vielerlei Städte. Der Stadtbegrif. Köln - Weimar - Wien 2004, pp. 91-105
    Funke, Peter (1997) Polisgenese und Urbanisierung in Aitolien im 5. und 4. Jh. v. Chr. In: Hansen, M.H. (Hrsg.): he Polis as an Urban Centre and as a Political Community (= Acts of the Copenhagen Polis Centre, Vol. 4; Det Kongelige Danske Videnskabernes Selskab, Historisk-filosofiske Meddelelser 75). Kopenhagen 1997, pp. 145-188
    Funke, Peter (2003) Politische und soziale Identitätsformen jenseits der Polis. In: Hölkeskamp, K.-J. and Rüsen, J. and Stein-Hölkeskamp, E. and Grutter, H.T. (Hrsgg.): Sinn (in) der Antike. Orientierungssysteme, Leitbilder und Wertkonzepte im Altertum. Mainz 2003, pp. 221-224
    Funke, Peter (1997) Rhodos und die hellenistische Staatenwelt an der Wende vom 4. zum 3. Jh. v. Chr. In: Dabrowa, E. (Hrsg.): Donum Amicitiae. Studies in Ancient History published on the occasion of the 75th Anniversary of Foundation of the Department of Ancient History of the Jagiellonian University (= Electrum, vol. 1). Krakau 1997, pp. 35-41
    Funke, Peter (1989) Rom und das Nabatäerreich bis zur Aufrichtung der Provinz Arabia. In: Drexhage, H.-J. and Sünskes, J. (Hrsgg.): Migratio et Commutatio. Studien zur Alten Geschichte und deren Nachleben. Festschrift Th. Pekáry. St. Katharinen 1989, pp. 1-18
    Funke, Peter (2004) Sparta und die peloponnesische Staatenwelt zu Beginn des 4. Jahrhunderts und der Dioikismos von Mantineia. In: Tuplin, Chr. (Hrsg.): Xenophon and his World. Papers from a conference held in Liverpool in July 1999 (= Historia-ES, Bd. 172). Stuttgart 2004, pp. 427-435
    Funke, Peter (1994) Staatenbünde und Bundesstaaten. Polis-übergreifende Herrschaftsorganisationen in Griechenland und Rom. In: Buraselis, K. (Hrsg.): Enoteta kai enotetes tes archaiotetas. anakoinoseis apo hena symposio stus Delphus, 5. - 8.4.1992 / Unity and Units of Antiquity. Papers from a Colloquium at Delphi, 5.-8.4.1992. Athen 1994, pp. 125-136
    Funke, Peter (1993) Stamm und Polis. Überlegungen zur Entstehung der griechischen Staatenwelt in den "Dunklen Jahrhunderten". In: Bleicken, J. (Hrsg.): Colloquium aus Anlaß des 80. Geburtstages von Alfred Heuss (= Frankfurter Althistorische Studien, Bd. 13). Kallmünz 1993, pp. 29-48
    Funke, Peter (1980) Stasis und politischer Umsturz in Rhodos zu Beginn des IV. Jahrhunderts. v. Chr. In: Eck, Werner and Galsterer, H. (Hrsgg.): Studien zur antiken Sozialgeschichte. Festschrift F. Vittinghoff. Köln - Wien 1980, pp. 59-70
    Funke, Peter (1991) Strabone, la geografia storica e la struttura etnica della Grecia nord-occidentale. In: Prontera, F. (Hrsg.): Geografia storica della Grecia antica. Bari 1991, pp. 174-193
    Funke, Peter (2009) Was ist der Griechen Vaterland? Einige Überlegungen zum Verhältnis von Raum und politischer Identität im antiken Griechenland. In: Geographia Antiqua, 18 (2009), pp. 123-131
    Funke, Peter (2001) Wendezeit und Zeitenwende: Athens Aufbruch zur Demokratie. In: Papenfuß, D. and Strocka, Volker Michael (Hrsgg.): Gab es das griechische Wunder? Griechenland zwischen dem Ende des 6. und der Mitte des 5. Jahrhunderts v. Chr. Tagungsbeiträge des 16. Fachsymposiums der Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung vom 5. bis 9. April 1999 in Freiburg im Breisgau. von Zabern, Mainz 2001, pp. 1-20
    Funke, Peter (2006) Western Greece (Magna Graecia). In: Kinzl, K. (Hrsg.): A Companion to the Classical Greek World (= Blackwell Companions to the Ancient World). Oxford 2006, pp. 153-173
    Funke, Peter (1991) Zur Ausbildung städtischer Siedlungszentren in Aitolien. In: Olshausen, E. and Sonnabend, H. (Hrsgg.): Stuttgarter Kolloquium zur Historischen Geographie des Altertums 2, 1984 und 3, 1987 (= Geographica Historica Bd. 5). Bonn 1991, pp. 313-332
    Funke, Peter (1987) Zur Datierung befestigter Stadtanlagen in Aitolien. Historisch-philologische Anmerkungen zu einem Wechselverhältnis zwischen Siedlungsstruktur und politischer Organisation. In: Boreas, 10 (1987), pp. 87-96
    Funke, Peter (2000) Zur Datierung der aitolischen Bürgerrechtsverleihung an die Bürger von Herakleia am Latmos (IG IX 1(2),1,173). In: Chiron, 30 (2000), pp. 505-517
    Furtwängler, Adolf (1882) Altlakonisches Relief. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 7 (1882), pp. 160-173
    Furtwängler, Adolf (1878) Büste Pans in Terracotta. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 3 (1878), pp. 155-160
    Furtwängler, Adolf (1880) Statue von der Akropolis. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 5 (1880), 20-42, Taf. 1.

    G

    Grieshaber, Frank (2002) Stellenregister zu Bonneau, Le régime administratif de l'eau du Nil.

    H

    Hagedorn, Dieter (1985) Zum Amt des dioiketes im römischen Ägypten. In: Yale Classical Studies, 28 (1985), pp. 167-201
    Hartmann, Andreas (2012) Judenhass und Märtyrertum. Zum kulturgeschichtlichen Kontext der Acta Alexandrinorum. In: Hartmann, Andreas and Weber, Gregor (Hrsgg.): Zwischen Antike und Moderne. Festschrift für Jürgen Malitz zum 65. Geburtstag. Speyer 2012, pp. 119-209
    Hartmann, Andreas and Weber, Gregor (2012) Schriftenverzeichnis Jürgen Malitz. In: Hartmann, Andreas and Weber, Gregor (Hrsgg.): Zwischen Antike und Moderne. Festschrift für Jürgen Malitz zum 65. Geburtstag. Speyer 2012, pp. 7-10
    Hartmann, Andreas and Weber, Gregor (2012) Vorwort [Zwischen Antike und Moderne. Festschrift für Jürgen Malitz zum 65. Geburtstag]. In: Hartmann, Andreas and Weber, Gregor (Hrsgg.): Zwischen Antike und Moderne. Festschrift für Jürgen Malitz zum 65. Geburtstag. Speyer 2012, pp. 11-13

    K

    Köhler, Ulrich (1878) Ueber die Zeit und den Ursprung der Grabanlagen in Mykene und Spata. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 6 (1878), pp. 1-13
    Körte, Gustav (1879) Bemerkungen zu den antiken Sculpturen aus Boeotien. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 4 (1879), pp. 268-276
    Kuhs, Clemens (1996) Das Dorf Samareia im griechisch-römischen Ägypten. Eine papyrologische Untersuchung.
    Kunze, Max (1999) Archäologie aus der Sicht Winckelmanns. In: Von der Schönheit weißen Marmors. Zum 200. Todestag von B. Cavaceppi. Mainz 1999, pp. 11-16
    Kunze, Max (1977) Der "Winckelmannsche Faden" und Goethes Antikeverständnis. Bemerkungen zu Goethes Winckelmannschrift. In: Mitteilungen der Winckelmann-Gesellschaft Stendal, 41 (1977), pp. 9-12
    Kunze, Max (1990) Der Winckelmann-Übersetzer Michael Huber an Chr. C. von Murr - ein unbekannter Brief in der Berliner Antikensammlung. In: Johann Joachim Winckelmann. Neue Forschungen. Eine Aufsatzsammlung. Stendal 1990, pp. 105-109
    Kunze, Max (1986) "In Deiner Mine diese stille Größe und Seelenruh' zu sehn" - Winckelmann bei Wieland. In: Kunze, Max (Hrsg.): Christoph Martin Wieland und die Antike. Eine Aufsatzsammlung. Stendal 1986, pp. 65-75
    Kunze, Max (1998) Jacob Burckhardt, die Archäologen und die hellenistische Kunst. In: Jacob Burckhardt und die Antike. Mainz 1998, pp. 77-88
    Kunze, Max (1975) Kolloquium in Nöthnitz 1974 zum Thema: Winckelmann als Bibliothekar und Exzerptor. In: Mitteilungen der Winckelmann-Gesellschaft Stendal, (1975), pp. 15-17
    Kunze, Max (2005) Lehr- und Vorlagenbücher im 18. Jahrhundert. In: Kunst und Aufklärung im 18. Jahrhundert. Kunstausbildung. Kunstvermittlung. Kunstsammlung, Ausst.-Kat. Stendal, Halle und Wörlitz. Ruhpolding 2005, pp. 45-70
    Kunze, Max (2006) Lorenz Beger und die Wiederentdeckung Homers im späten 17. Jahrhundert. In: 300 Jahre Thesaurus Brandenburgicus. München 2006, pp. 111-118
    Kunze, Max (1986) Neue Forschungen zu Winckelmann. Ein Literaturbericht. In: Gaehtgens, Thomas W. (Hrsg.): Johann Joachim Winckelmann 1717-1768. Hamburg 1986, pp. 11-30
    Kunze, Max (1989) Winckelmann e la lettura visiva dei monumenti greci. In: Il nuovo sentire. Natura, arte e cultura nel \'700. Mailand 1989, pp. 57-75
    Kunze, Max (1990) Winckelmanns Sicht der griechischen Denkmäler. In: Johann Joachim Winckelmann. Neue Forschungen. Eine Aufsatzsammlung. Stendal 1990, pp. 8-20
    Kunze, Max (1983) Zur Umrisszeichnung in der Illustration - John Flaxman bei August Wilhelm von Schlegel. In: Marginalien. Zeitschrift für Buchkunst und Bibliophilie, Nr. 92 (1983), pp. 40-52

    L

    Lange, Konrad (1880) Die Athena Parthenos. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Athenische Abteilung, 6 (1880), pp. 370-379

    M

    Malitz, Jürgen (2005) "Auch ein Wort über unser Judenthum". Theodor Mommsen und der Berliner Antisemitismusstreit. In: Wiesehöfer, J. and Börm, H. (Hrsgg.): Theodor Mommsen: Gelehrter, Politiker und Literat. Stuttgart 2005, pp. 137-164
    Malitz, Jürgen (2003) Autobiographie und Biographie römischer Kaiser im I. Jhdt. n. Chr. In: Weber, G. and Zimmermann, M. (Hrsgg.): Propaganda - Selbstdarstellung - Repräsentation im römischen Kaiserreich des 1. Jhs. n. Chr., Historia-Einzelschrift. 164. Stuttgart 2003, pp. 227-242
    Malitz, Jürgen (1972) C. Aurelius Cotta Cos. 75 und seine Rede in Sallusts Historien. In: Hermes. Zeitschrift für klassische Philologie, 100 (1972), pp. 359-386
    Malitz, Jürgen (1984) Caesars Partherkrieg. In: Historia. Zeitschrift für Alte Geschichte, 33 (1984), pp. 21-59
    Malitz, Jürgen (1994) Claudius (FGrHist 276) - der Princeps als Gelehrter. In: Strocka, Volker Michael (Hrsg.): Die Regierungszeit des Kaisers Claudius (41-54 n.Chr.). Umbruch oder Episode ? Internationales interdisziplinäres Symposion aus Anlaß des hundertjährigen Jubiläums des Archäologischen Instituts der Universität Freiburg i.Br. 16.-18. Februar 1991. Mainz 1994, pp. 133-141
    Malitz, Jürgen (2012) ConcEyst, GBD und NBE. Drei Computerprojekte am Eichstätter Lehrstuhl für Alte Geschichte. In: Hartmann, Andreas and Weber, Gregor (Hrsgg.): Zwischen Antike und Moderne. Festschrift für Jürgen Malitz zum 65. Geburtstag. Speyer 2012, pp. 15-36
    Malitz, Jürgen (1990) Das Interesse an der Geschichte. Die griechischen Historiker und ihr Publikum. In: Verdin, H. and Schepens, G. and de Keyser, E. (Hrsgg.): Purposes of History. Studies in Greek Historiography from the 4th to the 2nd Centuries B.C. Proceedings of the International Colloquium Leuven, 24-26 May 1988, Studia Hellenistica 30. Löwen 1990, pp. 323-349
    Malitz, Jürgen (2008) Der Preis des Krieges. Thukydides und die Finanzen Athens. In: Burrer, F. and Müller, H. (Hrsgg.): Kriegskosten und Kriegsfinanzierung in der Antike. Darmstadt 2008, pp. 28-45
    Malitz, Jürgen (2001) Der Umgang mit Fremden in der Welt der Griechen: "natives", Perser, Juden. In: Schreiber, W. (Hrsg.): Kontakte Konflikte Kooperationen. Der Umgang mit Fremden in der Geschichte. ars una. Eichstätter Kontaktstudium zum Geschichtsunterricht, Band 2. Neuried 2001, pp. 47-76
    Malitz, Jürgen (1987) Die Kalenderreform Caesars. Ein Beitrag zur Geschichte seiner Spätzeit. In: Ancient Society, 18 (1987), pp. 103-131
    Malitz, Jürgen (1987) Die Kanzlei Caesars - Herrschaftsorganisation zwischen Republik und Prinzipat. In: Historia. Zeitschrift für Alte Geschichte, 36 (1987), pp. 51-72
    Malitz, Jürgen (2000) Globalisierung? Einheitlichkeit und Vielfalt des Imperium Romanum. In: Schreiber, W. (Hrsg.): Vom Imperium Romanum zum Global Village. \"Globalisierungen\" im Spiegel der Geschichte. Neuried 2000, pp. 37-52
    Malitz, Jürgen (1985) Helvidius Priscus und Vespasian. Zur Geschichte der »stoischen« Senatsopposition. In: Hermes. Zeitschrift für Klassische Philologie, 113 (1985), pp. 231-246
    Malitz, Jürgen (1988) "Ich wünschte ein Bürger zu sein". Theodor Mommsen im wilhelminischen Reich. In: Christ, K. and Momigliano, A. (Hrsgg.): Die Antike im 19. Jahrhundert in Italien und Deutschland. Bologna ; Berlin 1988, pp. 321-359
    Malitz, Jürgen (2003) Imperium Romanum und Europagedanke. In: Michler, A. (Hrsg.): Blicke auf Europa: Kontinuität und Wandel. Neuried 2003, pp. 79-101
    Malitz, Jürgen (1984) J. Hornblower, Hieronymus of Cardia (1981). In: Gnomon, 56 (1984), pp. 38-45
    Malitz, Jürgen (1991) Misthos. Die Besoldung des Bürgers in der athenischen Demokratie.
    Malitz, Jürgen (1996) Mommsen, Caesar und die Juden. In: Cancik, H. (Hrsg.): Geschichte - Tradition - Reflexion. Festschrift für Martin Hengel zum 70. Geburtstag, Bd. II: Griechische und Römische Religion. Tübingen 1996, pp. 371-387
    Malitz, Jürgen (2004) Nero. Der Herrscher als Künstler. In: Hartmann, Andreas and Naumann, M. (Hrsgg.): Mythen Europas. Schlüsselfiguren der Imagination. Antike. Regensburg 2004, pp. 145-164
    Malitz, Jürgen (2004) "O puer qui omnia nomini debes". Zur Biographie Octavians bis zum Antritt seines Erbes. In: Gymnasium. Zeitschrift für Kultur der Antike und Humanistische Bildung, 111 (2004), Nr. 4. pp. 381-409
    Malitz, Jürgen (1999) Poseidonios. In: Brodersen, K. (Hrsg.): Grosse Gestalten der griechischen Antike. 58 historische Portraits von Homer bis Kleopatra. München 1999, pp. 426-432
    Malitz, Jürgen (2006) Rom, Athen und Jerusalem: Kaiser Hadrian auf Reisen. In: Schreiber, W. and Gruner, C. (Hrsgg.): Von den Olympischen Spielen bis zur Potsdamer Konferenz. Standardthemen des Geschichtsunterrichts forschungsnah. Eichstätter Kontaktstudium zum Geschichtsunterricht. Band 6. Neuried 2006, pp. 125-162
    Malitz, Jürgen (1998) Römertum im "Dritten Reich": Hans Oppermann. In: Kneissl, P. and Losemann, V. (Hrsgg.): Imperium Romanum. Studien zu Geschichte und Rezeption. Festschrift für Karl Christ zum 75. Geburtstag. Stuttgart 1998, pp. 519-543
    Malitz, Jürgen (1995) Sokrates im Athen der Nachkriegszeit (404 - 399 v. Chr). In: Kessler, H. (Hrsg.): Sokrates. Geschichte, Legende, Spiegelungen. Sokrates-Studien II. Kusterdingen 1995, pp. 11-38
    Malitz, Jürgen (1982) Thukydides' Weg zur Geschichtsschreibung. In: Historia. Zeitschrift für Alte Geschichte, 31 (1982), pp. 257-289
    Malitz, Jürgen (1997) Vespasian (69 - 79). In: Clauss, M. (Hrsg.): Die römischen Kaiser. 55 historische Portraits von Caesar bis Iustinian. München 1997, pp. 86-94
    Malitz, Jürgen (2007) Von Alexander zu Kleopatra. Die politische Geschichte. In: Weber, G. (Hrsg.): Kulturgeschichte des Hellenismus. Von Alexander dem Großen bis Kleopatra. Stuttgart 2007 13-55 ; 427-434
    Malitz, Jürgen (1999) Walter Schmitthenner (1915 - 1997). In: Gnomon, 71 (1999), Nr. 2. pp. 174-180
    Malitz, Jürgen and Hartmann, Andreas (2008) ConcEyst. Eichstätter Konkordanzprogramm zur griechischen und lateinischen Epigraphik.
    Malitz, Jürgen and Weber, Gregor (2006) Gnomon Bibliographische Datenbank. Internationales Informationssystem für die Klassische Altertumswissenschaft.
    Marx, Friedrich (1885) Marmorgruppe aus Sparta. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 10 (1885), pp. 177-199
    Milchhoefer, Arthur (1880) Nymphenrelief aus Athen. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Athenische Abteilung, 5 (1880), 206-223, Taf. VII.
    Milchhoefer, Arthur (1879) Sphinx. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 4 (1879), pp. 45-78

    P

    Panagiotopoulos, Diamantis (2007) Geschenke und Abgaben in der mykenischen Palastkultur. In: Klinkott, H. and Kubisch, S. and Müller-Wollermann, R. (Hrsgg.): Geschenke und Steuern, Zölle und Tribute. Antike Abgabenformen in Anspruch und Wirklichkeit. Leiden / Boston 2007, pp. 347-367

    R

    Rebenich, Stefan (2006) Adolf Erman und die Berliner Akadamie der Wissenschaften. In: Schipper, Bernd U. (Hrsg.): Ägyptologie als Wissenschaft. Adolf Erman (1854-1937) und in seiner Zeit. Berlin/New York 2006, pp. 340-370
    Rebenich, Stefan (1999) Akademie. In: Der Neue Pauly. Rezeptions- und Wissenschaftsgeschichte (DNP). Stuttgart/Weimar 1999, pp. 40-56
    Rebenich, Stefan (2000) Alfred Heuß: Ansichten seines Lebenswerkes. Mit einem Anhang: Alfred Heuß im Dritten Reich. In: Historische Zeitschrift, 271 (2000), pp. 661-673
    Rebenich, Stefan (2001) Alte Geschichte zwischen Demokratie und Diktatur. Der Fall Helmut Berve. In: Chiron, 31 (2001), pp. 457-496
    Rebenich, Stefan (2003) "Da steht mir der Verstand still". Adolf Harnack und Ulrich von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff über die Schmidt-Spiegelberg-Kontroverse. In: Mülke, M. (Hrsg.): Wilamowitz und kein Ende. Hildesheim 2003, pp. 189-207
    Rebenich, Stefan (2001) Der Briefwechsel zwischen Theodor Mommsen und Friedrich Althoff. Ein Editionsvorhaben der Historischen Kommission bei der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften. In: Jahrbuch der historischen Forschung in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, (2001), pp. 29-34
    Rebenich, Stefan (2001) Der alte Meergreis, die Rose von Jericho und ein höchst vortrefflicher Schwiegersohn: Mommsen, Harnack und Wilamowitz. In: Nowak, Kathrin and Oexle, O.G. (Hrsgg.): Adolf von Harnack. Theologe, Historiker, Wissenschaftspolitiker ( Veröffentlichungen des Max-Planck-Institutes für Geschichte Bd. 161). Göttingen 2001, pp. 39-69
    Rebenich, Stefan (2004) Die Altertumswissenschaften im 19. und 20. Jahrhundert. In: Wirbelauer, E. (Hrsg.): Oldenbourg Geschichte Lehrbuch: Antike. München 2004, pp. 457-468
    Rebenich, Stefan (1999) Die Altertumswissenschaften und die Kirchenväterkommission an der Akademie: Theodor Mommsen und Adolf Harnack. In: Kocka, J. (Hrsg.): Die Königlich Preußische Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Berlin im Kaiserreich. Berlin 1999, pp. 199-233
    Rebenich, Stefan (2004) Die Erfindung der "Großforschung". Theodor Mommsen als Wissenschaftsorganisator. In: von Kaenel, H.-M. (Hrsg.): Geldgeschichte versus Numismatik. Theodor Mommsen und die antike Münze. Berlin 2004, pp. 5-20
    Rebenich, Stefan (2002) From Thermopylae to Stalingrad. The Myth of Leonidas in German Historiography. In: Powell, A. and Hodkinson, St. (Hrsgg.): Sparta. Beyond the Mirage. London 2002, pp. 323-349
    Rebenich, Stefan (1995) Giovanni Battista de Rossi und Theodor Mommsen. In: Lebendige Antike. Rezeptionen der Antike in Politik, Kunst und Wissenschaft der Neuzeit (Mannheimer Historische Forschungen Bd. 6). Mannheim 1995, pp. 173-186
    Rebenich, Stefan (2005) Hermann Bengtson an Walther Wüst. In: Bernhard, A. and Raulff, U. (Hrsgg.): Briefe aus dem 20. Jahrhundert. Frankfurt a.M. 2005, pp. 126-131
    Rebenich, Stefan (2000) Historismus I. Allgemein. In: Der Neue Pauly. Rezeptions- und Wissenschaftsgeschichte (DNP). Stuttgart/Weimar 2000, pp. 469-485
    Rebenich, Stefan (2006) Leonidas und die Thermopylen. Zum Spartabild in der deutschen Altertumswissenschaft. In: Luther, A. and Meier, M. (Hrsgg.): Das Frühe Sparta. Stuttfgart 2006, pp. 193-215
    Rebenich, Stefan (1999) "Mommsen ist er niemals näher getreten". Theodor Mommsen und Hermann Diels. In: Calder, W.M. and Mansfeld, J. (Hrsgg.): Hermann Diels (1848-1922) et la science de l’Antiquité, Entretiens sur l\'Antiquité classique 45. Genf/Vandoeuvres 1999, pp. 84-142
    Rebenich, Stefan (1997) Mommsen, Harnack und die Prosopographie der Spätantike. In: Studia Patristica 29: Papers presented at the Twelfth International Conference on Patristic Studies held in Oxford 1995. Leuven 1997, pp. 109-118
    Rebenich, Stefan (2005) Nationalsozialismus und Alte Geschichte. Kontinuität und Diskontinuität in Forschung und Lehre. In: Stark, I. (Hrsg.): Elisabeth Charlotte Welskopf und die Alte Geschichte in der DDR. Beiträge der Konferenz vom 21. bis 23. November 2002 in Halle/Saale. Stuttgart 2005, pp. 42-64
    Rebenich, Stefan (2003) Orbis Romanus. Deutungen der römischen Geschichte im Zeitalter des Historismus. In: Nowak, Kathrin and Oexle, O.G. and Rendtorff, T. and Selge, K.-V. (Hrsgg.): Adolf von Harnack. Christentum, Wissenschaft und Gesellschaft (Veröffentlichungen des Max-Planck-Institutes für Geschichte, Bd. 204). Göttingen 2003, pp. 29-49
    Rebenich, Stefan (2000) Otto Seeck und die Notwendigkeit, Alte Geschichte zu lehren. In: Calder, W.M. and Hose, M. and Dubischar, M. and Vogt-Spira, Gregor (Hrsgg.): Wilamowitz in Greifswald. Hildesheim 2000, pp. 262-298
    Rebenich, Stefan (1998) Otto Seeck, Theodor Mommsen und die "Römische Geschichte". In: Kneissl, P. and Losemann, V. (Hrsgg.): Imperium Romanum. Studien zu Geschichte und Rezeption. Festschrift für Karl Christ zum 75. Geburtstag. Stuttgart 1998, pp. 582-607
    Rebenich, Stefan (2005) Römische Wertbegriffe: Wissenschaftsgeschichtliche Anmerkungen aus althistorischer Sicht. In: Haltenhoff, A. and Heil, A. and Mutschler, F.-H. (Hrsgg.): Römische Werte als Gegenstand der Altertumswissenschaft. Leipzig 2005, pp. 23-46
    Rebenich, Stefan (1993) Theodor Mommsen und das Verhältnis von Alter Geschichte und Patristik. In: Herzog, Rudolf and Fontaine, J. and Pollmann, K. (Hrsgg.): Patristique et Antiquité tardive en France et en Allemagne de 1870 à 1930. Influence et échanges, Actes du Colloque franco-allemand de Chantilly (25-27 octobre 1991). Paris 1993, pp. 131-154
    Rebenich, Stefan (2005) Theodor Mommsen, die deutschen Professoren und die Revolution von 1848. In: Demandt, A. and Goltz, A. and Schlange-Schöningen, H. (Hrsgg.): Theodor Mommsen. Wissenschaft und Politik im 19. Jahrhundert. Berlin/New York 2005, pp. 13-35
    Rebenich, Stefan (2003) Theodor Mommsen. Wissenschaftler, Politiker, Literaturnobelpreisträger. In: Numismatisches Nachrichtenblatt, 52 (2003), pp. 445-449
    Rebenich, Stefan (2003) Universität III. Neuzeit ab 1800. In: Der Neue Pauly. Rezeptions- und Wissenschaftsgeschichte (DNP). 2003, pp. 902-922
    Rebenich, Stefan (2005) "Unser Werk lobt keinen Meister". Theodor Mommsen und die Wissenschaft vom Altertum. In: Wiesehöfer, J. (Hrsg.): Theodor Mommsen: Gelehrter, Politiker und Literat. Stuttgart 2005, pp. 185-205
    Rebenich, Stefan (2001) Zwischen Anpassung und Widerstand? Die Berliner Akademie der Wissenschaften von 1933 bis 1945. In: Näf, B. (Hrsg.): Antike und Altertumswissenschaft in der Zeit von Nationalsozialismus und Faschismus. Mandelbachtal/Cambridge 2001, pp. 203-244
    Röllig, Wolfgang (1992) Asia Minor as a Bridge Between East and West. The Role of the Phoenicians and Aramaeans in the Transfer of Culture. In: Kopcke, Günter and Tokumaru, I. (Hrsgg.): Greece between East and West: 10th-8th Centuries B.C. 1992, pp. 93-102

    S

    Sarti, Laury (2007) Charakteristik und gesellschaftliche Bedeutung von Waffenträgern im merowingischen Gallien des 6. Jahrhunderts.
    Schmitzer, Ulrich (2003) Dichtung und Propaganda im 1. Jahrhundert n. Chr. In: Zimmermann, M. and Weber, G. (Hrsgg.): Selbstdarstellung, Propaganda, Repräsentation im römischen Kaiserreich des 1. Jhs. n. Chr. (Historia Einzelschriften 164). Stuttgart 2003, pp. 205-226
    Schmitzer, Ulrich (2002) Die Macht über die Imagination. Literatur und Politik unter den Bedingungen des frühen Prinzipats. In: Rheinisches Museum für Philologie, 145 (2002), pp. 281-394
    Schmitzer, Ulrich (2010) Julia - die Ohnmacht der Erotik. In: Feichtinger, Barbara (Hrsg.): Gender Studies in den Altertumswissenschaften: Aspekte von Macht und Erotik in der Antike. Trier 2010, pp. 151-176
    Schmitzer, Ulrich (2005) Rom in der (nach-)antiken Literatur. (Re-)Konstruktion und Transformation der urbanen Gestalt der Stadt von der augusteischen Zeit bis zur Moderne. In: Gymnasium, 112 (2005), pp. 241-268
    Schmitzer, Ulrich (1994) Von Wölfen und Lämmern (Hor. epod. 4). In: Koster, Severin (Hrsg.): Horaz-Studien (Erlanger Forschungen A,66). Erlangen 1994, pp. 31-50
    Schmitzer, Ulrich (2008) Wann kam Tityrus nach Rom? Ein Versuch der Annäherung an Vergils Eklogen. In: in: Vergil und das antike Epos. Festschrift Hans Jürgen Tschiedel. Stuttgart 2008, pp. 149-178
    Stupperich, Reinhard (1995) Bemerkungen zum römischen Import im sogenannten Freien Germanien. In: Franzius, G. (Hrsg.): spekte römisch-germanischer Beziehungen in der frühen Kaiserzeit. Vortragsreihe zur Sonderausstellung \"Kalkriese - Römer im Osnabrücker Land\" 1993 in Osnabrück ( Quellen und Schrifttum zur Kulturgeschichte des Wiehengebirgsraumes B 1). Bramsche 1995, pp. 45-98
    Sybel, Ludwig von (1879) Zwölfgötteraltar aus Athen. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 4 (1879), pp. 337-350

    T

    Toepffer, Johannes (1891) Koisches Sakralgesetz. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Athenische Abteilung, 16 (1891), pp. 406-432
    Trebeleva, Galina (2008) The organization of Taman's defense from the mid 1st century BC to the turn of the 2nd century AD: a historical simulation based on GIS technologies. In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, 2.-6. April, 2007 (Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10). Bonn 2008 279 (Abstract)
    Tschiedel, Hans Jürgen (2012) Caesar im Bellum Hispaniense. In: Hartmann, Andreas and Weber, Gregor (Hrsgg.): Zwischen Antike und Moderne. Festschrift für Jürgen Malitz zum 65. Geburtstag. Speyer 2012, pp. 37-51

    V

    von Alten, Georg (1878) Die Thoranlagen bei der Hagia Triada zu Athen. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 3 (1878), 28-18, Taf. III-IV.

    W

    Walter, Uwe (2012) Alfred Heuß und Theodor Mommsen – ein lebenslanger Dialog. In: Hartmann, Andreas and Weber, Gregor (Hrsgg.): Zwischen Antike und Moderne. Festschrift für Jürgen Malitz zum 65. Geburtstag. Speyer 2012, pp. 245-273
    Wenning, Robert (1997) Bemerkungen zur Gesellschaft und Religion der Nabatäer. In: Albertz, R. (Hrsg.): Religion und Gesellschaft. Studien zu ihrer Wechselbeziehung in den Kulturen des Antiken Vorderen Orients. Münster 1997, pp. 177-201
    Wenning, Robert (1993) Das Ende des Nabatäischen Königreichs. In: Invernizzi, A. and Salles, J.-F. (Hrsgg.): Arabia Antiqua. Hellenistic centres around Arabia. Proceedings of the First International Conference \"Arabia Antiqua\". Rome, May 27 - June 1 1991. Rom 1993, pp. 81-103
    Wenning, Robert (1986) Eine römische Grabbüste aus Palästina in Münster. In: Boreas, 9 (1986), 221-225, Taf. 37, 1-2.
    Wenning, Robert (2007) The Nabataeans in History (Before AD 106). In: Politis, K.D. (Hrsg.): The World of the Nabataeans. Volume 2 of the International Conference The World of the Herods and the Nabataeans held at the British Museum, 17-19. April 2001. Oriens et Occidens 15. Stuttgart 2007, pp. 25-44
    Wenning, Robert (1990) Two forgotten Nabataean inscriptions. In: AbouZayd, Sh. (Hrsg.): Proceedings of \"The First International Conference of ARAM: The Nabataeans\", Oxford, September 27th - 29th , 1989. Aram 1990, pp. 143-150
    Wenning, Robert and Merklein, Helmut (1997) Die Götter in der Welt der Nabatäer. In: Wenning, Robert and Weber, Th. (Hrsgg.): Petra. Antike Felsstadt zwischen arabischer Tradition und griechischer Norm. Sonderheft der Antiken Welt. Zaberns Bildbände zur Archäologie. Mainz 1997, pp. 105-110

    Z

    Ziller, Ernst (1877) Untersuchungen über die antiken Wasserleitungen Athens. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 2 (1877), pp. 107-131
    This list was generated on Wed May 27 01:33:49 2015 CEST.

    Propylaeum-DOK: Digital Repository: Classical Archaeology

    Propylaeum-DOK: Digital Repository: Classical Archaeology
    http://archiv.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/propylaeumdok/images/propylaeumdok_header_label_en.gif

    Jump to: A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z | [ | Š
    Number of items at this level: 683.

    A

    Abdelhamid, Selma (2009) »Ein Ostwind wird Dich mitten auf dem Meer zerbrechen«. Phönizische Schiffswracks vom 8. bis 6. Jh. v. Chr. (Daidalos 4).
    Alexakis, Dimitris and Astaras, Theodoros and Sarris, Apostolos and Vouzaxakis, Kostas (2008) Reconstructing the neolithic landscape of Thessaly through a GIS and geological approach. In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, April 2–6, 2007. Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10. Bonn 2008 411
    Alexander, Craig (2008) The Bedolina map – an exploratory network analysis. In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, 2.-6. April 2007. Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10. Bonn 2008, pp. 366-371
    Amelung, Walther (1894) Fragment eines Votivreliefs aus dem Capitolinischen Museum. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 9 (1894), pp. 66-73
    Amelung, Walther (1894) Weiblicher Kopf. In: in: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 9 (1894), pp. 162-169
    Amelung, Walther (1893) Zeus in Villa Albani. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 8 (1893), pp. 184-187
    Anderson, Michael (2008) Putting the "reality" in virtual reality: new advances through game engine technology. In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, 2.-6. April, 2007 (Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10). Bonn 2008 144 (Abstract)
    Andreae, Bernard (1995) Aeneas oder Julus in Sperlonga und auf dem Großen Kameo von Frankreich? In: Rößler, Detlef and Stürmer, Veit (Hrsgg.): odus in rebus. Gedenkschrift für Wolfgang Schindler. Berlin 1995 93-95 , Taf. 16-17
    Andreae, Bernard (1979) Alexander Severus. Bronzeporträt. In: Imdahl, Max and Kunisch, Norbert (Hrsgg.): Plastik. Antike und moderne Kunst der Sammlung Dierichs in der Ruhr-Universität Bochum. Kassel 1979, pp. 98-111
    Andreae, Bernard (1996) "Am Birnbaum": Gärten und Parks im antiken Rom, in den Vesuvstädten und in Ostia.
    Andreae, Bernard (1980) Antisthenes Philososphos Phyromachos epoiei. In: Eikones, Studien zum griechischen und römischen Bildnis. Hans Jucker zum sechzigsten Geburtstag gewidmet, Antike Kunst Beiheft 12. Bern 1980 40-48; Taf. 12-13
    Andreae, Bernard (1962) Der Zyklus der Odysseefresken im Vatikan. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts Römische Abteilung, 69 (1962), pp. 106-117
    Andreae, Bernard (2005) Die Aphrodite von Melos. In: Strocka, Volker Michael (Hrsg.): Meisterwerke; internationales Symposium anläßlich des 150. Geburtstages von Adolf Furtwängler. München 2005, pp. 193-201
    Andreae, Bernard (2005) Die Bildnisse des Gaius Cilnius Maecenas in Arezzo und an der Ära Pacis. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 112 (2005), pp. 121-161
    Andreae, Bernard (2004) Die Tomba Francois. Anspruch und historische Wirklichkeit eines etruskischen Familiengrabes. In: Andreae, Bernard and Hoffmann, A. and Prayon, F. and Weber-Lehmann, Cornelia (Hrsgg.): Die Etrusker. Luxus für das Jenseits. Bilder vom Diesseits – Bilder vom Tod. München 2004, pp. 176-207
    Andreae, Bernard (1980) Die antiken Sarkophagreliefs (1,2): Die Sarkophage mit Darstellungen aus dem Menschenleben: Die römischen Jagdsarkophage.
    Andreae, Bernard (2002) Die neronischen Wandmalereien in der Villa der Poppaea von Oplontis. In: Castagna, Luigi and Vogt-Spira, Gregor (Hrsgg.): Pervertere: Ästhetik der Verkehrung. Literatur und Kultur neronischer Zeit und ihre Rezeption. München 2002 59-62, 5 Abbildungen
    Andreae, Bernard (1992) Die römischen Kopien in Marmor nach griechischen Meisterwerken in Bronze als Ausdruck der römischen Kultur. In: Studi italiani di filologia classica, 10 (1992), pp. 21-31
    Andreae, Bernard (1978) Drei neue Vasen in den Kunstsammlungen der Ruhr-Universität und die homerischen Epen. In: Jahrbuch der Ruhr-Universität Bochum. Bochum 1978, pp. 117-124
    Andreae, Bernard (1956) Ein Amazonengemälde. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 63 (1956), 32-45 , Taf. 12.
    Andreae, Bernard (2008) „Einer neuen Wahrheit ist nichts schädlicher als ein alter Irrtum." Noch einmal zum Praetorium Speluncae. In: Franek, C. and Lamm, S. and Neuhauser, T. and Porod, B. and Zöhrer, K. (Hrsgg.): Thiasos. Festschrift für Erwin Pochmarski zum 65. Geburtstag. Wien 2008, pp. 57-61
    Andreae, Bernard (2001) Erden, Erze, Steine im Vergleich bei Plinius, Naturalis Historia 36, 37. In: Evers, Cécile and Tsingarida, Athène (Hrsgg.): Rome et ses provinces. Genèse & diffusion d’une image de pouvoir. Hommages à Jean Charles Balty. Brüsseö 2001, pp. 29-48
    Andreae, Bernard (1958) Gefässkörper und Malerei bei der Giganten-Amphora aus Melos im Louvre. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 65 (1958), 33-41 , Taf. 25-29.
    Andreae, Bernard (1962) Herakles und Alkyoneus. In: Jahrbuch des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, 77 (1962), pp. 130-210
    Andreae, Bernard (1962) „Igni et aqua accipi". Zur Aldobrandinischen Hochzeit. In: Festschrift für Engelbert Kirschbaum, Römische Quartalsschrift. 1962, pp. 3-16
    Andreae, Bernard (1999) Ist die Hypothese vom Polyphem-Giebel in Ephesos bereits falsifiziert? In: Friesinger, H. and Krinzinger, F. (Hrsgg.): 100 Jahre Österreichische Forschungen in Ephesos, Akten des Symposiums Wien 1995. Wien 1999, pp. 531-533
    Andreae, Bernard (1993) Kurze Geschichte des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts in Rom. Dargestellt im Wirken seiner leitenden Gelehrten. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 100 (1993), pp. 5-41
    Andreae, Bernard (1986) Laokoon und Lykophron. Zur Bedeutung der Laokoon-Gruppe in hellenistischer Zeit. In: Braun, Karin and Furtwängler, Andreas (Hrsgg.): Studien zur Klassischen Archäologie. Friedrich Hiller zu seinem 60. Geburtstag am 12. März 1986. Saarbrücken 1986, pp. 123-141
    Andreae, Bernard (1991) Laokoon und die Kunst von Pergamon: die Hybris der Giganten.
    Andreae, Bernard (1993) Laurea Coronatur. Der Lorbeerkranz des Asklepios und die Attaliden von Pergamon. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts Römische Abteilung, 100 (1993), 83-106 , Taf. 12-16.
    Andreae, Bernard (1979) Lorenzo Lotto in Ponteranica und l'lnfinito von Giacomo Leopardi. In: Ars naturam adiuvans. Festschrift für Matthias Winner zum 11. März 1996. Mainz 1979, pp. 132-138
    Andreae, Bernard (1988) Michelangelo und die Laokoon-Gruppe. In: Büsing, Hermann and Hiller, Friedrich (Hrsgg.): Bathron. Beiträge zur Architektur und verwandten Künsten für Heinrich Drerup zu seinem 80. Geburtstag von seinen Schülern und Freunden. Saarbrücken 1988, pp. 31-39
    Andreae, Bernard (1956) Motivgeschichtliche Untersuchungen zu den römischen Schlachtsarkophagen.
    Andreae, Bernard (1982) Odysseus: Archäologie des europäischen Menschenbildes.
    Andreae, Bernard (1987) Plinius und der Laokoon.
    Andreae, Bernard (1969) Processus Consularis. Zur Deutung des Sarkophags von Acilia. In: Zazoff, Peter (Hrsg.): Opus Nobile, Festschrift zum 60. Geburtstag von Ulf Jantzen. Wiesbaden 1969 1-13 , Taf. 1-2
    Andreae, Bernard (1995) Proportion. Vortrag aus Anlaß der Aufstellung des Löwenjagdsarkophages aus der Sammlung Peter und Irene Ludwig im Antikenmuseum Basel. In: Jacobs, Rainer and Scheps, Marc and Zehnder, Frank Günter (Hrsgg.): In medias res. Festschrift zum siebzigsten Geburtstag von Peter Ludwig. Köln 1995, pp. 301-312
    Andreae, Bernard (1975) Rekonstruktion des großen Oecus der Villa des P. Fannius Synistor in Boscoreale. In: Andreae, Bernard and Kyrieleis, Helmut (Hrsgg.): Neue Forschungen in Pompeji, und den anderen vom Vesuvausbruch 79 n. Chr. verschütteten Städten. Recklinghausen 1975 71-83 mit 7 Farbtafeln
    Andreae, Bernard (1976) Schmuck eines Wasserbeckens in Sperlonga. Zum Typus des sitzenden Knäbleins aus dem Schiffsfund von Mahdia. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 83 (1976), 287-309 , Taf. 97-105.
    Andreae, Bernard (1998) Schönheit des Realismus: Auftraggeber, Schöpfer, Betrachter hellenistischer Plastik.
    Andreae, Bernard (2004) Seleukos Nikator als Pezhétairos im Alexandermosaik. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 111 (2004), pp. 69-82
    Andreae, Bernard (1962) Statuette einer Tänzerin aus Fianello Sabino. In: Himmelmann-Wildschütz, N. and Biesantz, H. (Hrsgg.): Festschrift für Friedrich Matz. Mainz 1962 73-79 , Taf. 19-23
    Andreae, Bernard (1963) Studien zur römischen Grabkunst.
    Andreae, Bernard (2011) Wolfgang Heibig: Zweiter Sekretär des Instituto di Corrispondenza Archeologica und dessen Nachfolgeinstitution des Archäologischen Instituts des deutschen Reiches 1865-1887. In: Wolfgang Helbig e la scienza dell’antichità del suo tempo, Atti del Convegno Internazionale in occasione del 170. compleanno di Wolfgang Helbig, Institutum Romanum Finlandiae 2.2.2009, a cura di Simo Örmä e Kaj Sandberg. Rom 2011, pp. 61-67
    Andreae, Bernard (1979) Zum Dekorationssystem der geometrischen Amphora 804 im Nationalmuseum von Athen. In: Kopcke, Günter and B. Moore, Mary (Hrsgg.): Studies in classical art and archeology. A tribute to Peter Heinrich von Blanckenhagen. New York 1979 1-16 ; Taf. 1
    Andreae, Bernard (1956) Zum Relief Ruesch. In: Marburger Winckelmann-Programm, (1956), pp. 7-11
    Andreae, Bernard (1994) Zur Einheitlichkeit der Statuenausstattung im Nymphäum des Kaisers Claudius bei Baiae. In: Strocka, Volker Michael (Hrsg.): Die Regierungszeit des Kaisers Claudius (41-54 n. Chr.). Umbruch oder Episode? Internationales interdisziplinäres Symposion aus Anlaß des hundertjährigen Jubiläums des Archäologischen Instituts der Universität Freiburg i. Br. 16.-18. Februar 1991. Mainz 1994, pp. 221-243
    Andreae, Bernard (1968) Zur Komposition des großen Ludovisischen Schlachtsarkophages. In: Festschrift Gottfried von Lücken, Wissenschaftliche Zeitschrift der Universität Rostock 17, 1968, (Gesellschafts- und Sprachwissenschaftliche Reihe, Heft 7/8). 1968, pp. 633-640
    Andreae, Bernard and Flashar, Hellmut (1977) Strukturäquivalenzen zwischen den homerischen Epen und der frühgriechischen Vasenkunst. In: Poetica, 9 (1977), pp. 217-266
    Arnese, Alessio (2008) Applying ecological niche factor analysis for predictive modelling in the Kaulonia field survey. In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, 2.-6. April 2007. Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10. Bonn 2008 306 (Abstract)
    Arnolds, Markus (2005) Funktionen republikanischer und frühkaiserzeitlicher Forumsbasiliken in Italien.
    Auinger, Johanna (2011) Das Berliner Skulpturennetzwerk. Aufarbeitung der Archivalien.
    Austin, Tony and Mitcham, Jenny and Richards, Julian D. (2008) From questions to answers: outcomes from the 'big data' project. In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, 2.-6. April 2007. Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10. Bonn 2008, pp. 194-199

    B

    Barbini, Agostino (1886) Tomba scoperta presso Grosseto. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 1 (1886), pp. 91-93
    Barceló, Juan A. (2008) Towards a true automatic archaeology: integrating technique and theory. In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, April 2–6, 2007. Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10. Bonn 2008, pp. 413-417
    Bemmann, Katrin (2011) Propylaeum, die Virtuelle Fachbibliothek der Altertumswissenschaften - Aspekte fächerübergreifender Recherche und Vernetzung.
    Bencker, Max (1982) Ciste mit Perseusdarstellung. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 7 (1982), pp. 223-227
    Benndorf, Otto (1876) Bemerkungen zur griechischen Kunstgeschichte. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Athenische Abteilung, 1 (1876), pp. 45-66
    Benndorf, Otto (1886) Osservazioni sul Museo Torlonia. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 1 (1886), pp. 112-120
    Bienkowski, Piotr (1891) Lo scudo di Achille. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 6 (1891), pp. 183-207
    Bloch, Leo (1892) Eine Athletenstatue der Uffiziengallerie. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 7 (1892), pp. 81-105
    Bobowski, Bogdan and Walczak, Krzysztof and Stawniak, Miroslaw (2008) Hybrid 3D visualisations of archaeological sites: dynamic 3D visualisations of Harris Matrix data for rescue town excavations, Gdansk / Szafarnia site, Poland. In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, 2.-6. April 2007. Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10. Bonn 2008 7 (Abstract)
    Boehlau, Johannes (1888) Böotische Vasen. In: Jahrbuch des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, 3 (1888), pp. 325-364
    Borg, Barbara (1999) Allegorie der Kunst – Kunst der Allegorie. Winckelmanns "Kunstbeschreibungen" als archäologischer Kommentar. In: Most, G.W. (Hrsg.): Commentaries – Kommentare. Aporemata IV. Göttingen 1999, pp. 282-295
    Borg, Barbara (2007) Aphrodisians on display: the public image of the local élite. Rezension R.R.R. Smith, with Sheila Dillon, Christopher H. Hallett, Julia Lenaghan and Julie van Voorhis, Aphrodisias II. Roman Portrait Statuary from Aphrodisias (Mainz 2006). In: Journal of Roman Archaeology, 2007 (2007), pp. 583-588
    Borg, Barbara (1999) Bilder aus dem Wüstensand. Mumienporträts aus dem Ägyptischen Museum Kairo. Ausstellungskatalog des Kunsthistorischen Museums Wien (Mailand/Wien 1998) – Mumien aus dem Alten Ägypten. Zur Mumienforschung im Kunsthistorischen Museum Wien (Mailand/Wien 1998). In: Antike Welt. Zeitschrift für Archäologie und Kulturgeschichte, 30 (1999), Nr. 1. 93.
    Borg, Barbara (2004) Bilder zum Hören – Bilder zum Sehen: Lukians Ekphraseis und die Rekonstruktion antiker Kunstwerke. In: Millenium, 1 (2004), pp. 25-27
    Borg, Barbara (2001) Blinde Flecken: Die frühe griechische Allegorie als Beispiel kollektiver Verdrängung. In: Altekamp, S. and Hofter, M. and Krumme, M. (Hrsgg.): Posthumanistische Klassische Archäologie, Kolloquium Berlin, 19.2.-21.2. 1999. München 2001, pp. 391-400
    Borg, Barbara (2005) Christoph Reusser (Hrsg.), Griechenland in der Kaiserzeit: Neue Funde und Forschungen zu Skulptur, Architektur und Topographie. Heft des Archäologischen Seminars der Universität Bern 4. Beiheft (Bern 2001). In: American Journal of Archaeology, 109 (2005), pp. 818-820
    Borg, Barbara (2009) Das Bild des Philosophen und die römischen Eliten. In: Dion von Prusa. Der Philosoph und sein Bild, SAPERE 13. Tübingen 2009, pp. 211-240
    Borg, Barbara (2000) Das Gesicht der Aufsteiger - Römische Freigelassene und die Ideologie der Elite. In: Braun, M. and Haltenhoff, A. and Mutschler, F.-H. (Hrsgg.): Moribus antiquis res stat Romana. Römische Werte und römische Literatur im 3. und 2. Jh. v. Chr. Beiträge zur Altertumskunde 134. Leipzig 2000, pp. 285-299
    Borg, Barbara (1999) Das Gesicht der Elite. Multikulturelle Identitäten im römischen Ägypten. In: Felber, H. and Pfisterer-Haas, S. (Hrsgg.): Ägypter – Griechen – Römer. Begegnung der Kulturen. Kanobos. 1999, pp. 83-93
    Borg, Barbara (1997) The Dead as a Guest at Table? Continuity and Change in the Egyptian Cult of the Dead. In: Bierbrier, M.L. (Hrsg.): Portraits and Masks. Burial customs in Roman Egypt. Colloquium London 13.-14.7.1995. London 1997, pp. 26-32
    Borg, Barbara (1998) Die unsichtbaren Steinbrüche. Zur Bausteinprovenienz des Apollon-Heiligtums von Didyma. In: Antike Welt, 29 (1998), Nr. 6. pp. 509-518
    Borg, Barbara (2010) Epigrams, art and epic: The ‘Chest of Kypselos’. In: Petrovic, I. and Petrovic, A. and Baumbach, M. (Hrsgg.): Archaic and Classical Greek Epigram. Cambridge 2010, pp. 81-99
    Borg, Barbara (2001) Eunomia oder: Vom Eros der Hellenen. In: Hoff, Ralf von den and Schmidt, St. (Hrsgg.): , Konstruktionen von Wirklichkeit. Bilder im Griechenland des 5. und 4. Jahrhunderts v. Chr. Stuttgart 2001
    Borg, Barbara (2005) Eunomia or "make love not war"? Meidian personifications reconsidered. In: Stafford, E.J. and Herrin, J. (Hrsgg.): Personification in the Greek World. Aldershot u.a. 2005, pp. 193-210
    Borg, Barbara (2000) The Face of the Elite. In: Arion, 8 (2000), Nr. 1. pp. 63-96
    Borg, Barbara (2003) From Small Quarries to Large Temples – The Enigmatic Source of Limestone for the Apollo Temple at Didyma, W-Anatolia. In: Lazzarini, L. (Hrsg.): Interdisciplinary studies on ancient stone. ASMOSIA VI; proceedings of the sixth international conference of the \"Association for the Study of Marble and Other Stones in Antiquity\", Venice, June 15-18 2000. Venedig 2003, pp. 427-436
    Borg, Barbara (2006) Gefährliche Bilder? Gewalt und Leidenschaft in der archaischen und klassischen Kunst. In: Seidensticker, R. and Vöhler, M. (Hrsgg.): Gewalt und Ästhetik. Zur Gewalt und ihrer Darstellung in der griechischen Klassik. Berlin 2006, pp. 223-257
    Borg, Barbara (2004) Glamorous intellectuals: Portraits of pepaideumenoi in the second and third centuries AD. In: Borg, Barbara (Hrsg.): Paideia: The World of the Second Sophistic. Berlin 2004, pp. 157-178
    Borg, Barbara (2003) The History of Apollo's Temple at Didyma, as told by Marble Analyses and Historical Sources. In: Lazzarini, L. (Hrsg.): Interdisciplinary studies on ancient stone. ASMOSIA VI; proceedings of the sixth international conference of the \"Association for the Study of Marble and Other Stones in Antiquity\", Venice, June 15-18 2000. Venedig 2003, pp. 271-278
    Borg, Barbara (2003) Ilona Skupinska-Løvset, Portraiture in Roman Syria. A study in social and regional differentiation within the art of portraiture (Lodz 1999). In: Gnomon, 75 (2003), pp. 151-155
    Borg, Barbara (2004) Introduction. In: Borg, Barbara (Hrsg.): Paideia: The World of the Second Sophistic. Berlin 2004, pp. 1-10
    Borg, Barbara (2005) Jenseits des mos maiorum: Eine Archäologie römischer Werte? In: Haltenhoff, A. and Heil, A. and Mutschler, F.-H. (Hrsgg.): Römische Werte als Gegenstand der Altertumswissenschaft. Leipzig 2005, pp. 47-75
    Borg, Barbara (2005) K. Schade, Frauen in der Spätantike - Status und Repräsentation. Eine Untersuchung zur römischen und frühbyzantinischen Bildniskunst (Mainz 2003). In: Sehepunkte, 5 (2005), Nr. 11.
    Borg, Barbara (2009) [Katalogbeiträge]: VI,4 - VI,12; VI,14 - VI,15. In: La Rocca, Eugenio (Hrsg.): S. Ensoli et al., Roma. La pittura di un Impero. Roma, Scuderie del Quirinale, 24 settembre 2009 - 17 gennaio 2010. Mailand 2009, pp. 304-308
    Borg, Barbara (2004) Konzepte ethnischer Identitäten. Die 'griechisch-römische' Sepulkralkunst Ägyptens. In: Bol, R. and Kreikenbom, D. (Hrsgg.): Sepulkral- und Votivdenkmäler östlicher Mittelmeergebiete (7. Jh. v. Chr. – 1. Jh. n. Chr.). Kulturbegegnungen im Spannungsfeld von Akzeptanz und Resistenz, Internationales Symposium Mainz, 1.-3.11.2001. Möhnesee-Wahmel 2004, pp. 95-110
    Borg, Barbara (1997) L. H. Corcoran, Portrait Mummies from Roman Egypt (I - IV centuries A.D.) with a catalog of portrait mummies in Egyptian museums (1995). In: American Journal of Archaeology, 101 (1997), pp. 187-188
    Borg, Barbara (2005) Literarische Ekphrasis und künstlerischer Realismus. In: Büchsel, M. and Schmidt, P. (Hrsgg.): Realität und Projektion. Wirklichkeitsnahe Darstellung in Antike und Mittelalter. Berlin 2005, pp. 33-53
    Borg, Barbara (2009) Lo sguardo interiore. Memoria di sé nell’Egitto romano. In: Ensoli, S. (Hrsg.): Roma. La pittura di un Impero. Roma, Scuderie del Quirinale, 24 settembre 2009 - 17 gennaio 2010. Mailand 2009, pp. 67-75
    Borg, Barbara (2001) Marmor für Apoll - Ein Beitrag zur Baugeschichte des jüngeren Didymaion und der historischen Topographie seiner Umgebung. In: Bergemann, J. (Hrsg.): Wissenschaft mit Enthusiasmus. Beiträge zu antiken Bildnissen und zur historischen Landeskunde, Klaus Fittschen gewidmet. Rahden 2001, pp. 79-101
    Borg, Barbara (1993) Mumienporträts, Kat.-Nr. 92-94. In: Beck, H. (Hrsg.): Wissenschaftliche Kataloge. Liebieghaus - Museum Alter Plastik Frankfurt am Main. Ägyptische Bildwerke III. Melsungen 1993, pp. 403-413
    Borg, Barbara (2010) Performanz und Bildinszenierung am Übergang zur Spätantike. In: Kost, C. and Juwig, C. (Hrsgg.): Bilder in der Archäologie – Archäologie der Bilder? Tübingen 2010, pp. 235-248
    Borg, Barbara (1995) Problems in the Dating of the Mummy Portraits. In: Doxiadis, E. (Hrsg.): The Mysterious Fayum Portraits. Faces from Ancient Egypt. London 1995, pp. 229-233
    Borg, Barbara (2007) R. Neudecker - P. Zanker (Hrsg.), Lebenswelten, Bilder und Räume in der römischen Stadt der Kaiserzeit. Symposium am 24. und 25. Januar 2002 zum Abschluß des von der Gerda Henkel Stiftung geförderten Forschungsprogramms "Stadtkultur in der römischen Kaiserzeit", Palilia 16 (Wiesbaden 2005). In: The Journal of Roman Studies, 97 (2007), pp. 132-135
    Borg, Barbara (1997) Severisches Mumienporträt eines Mädchens, Kat.-Nr. 221. In: Schmidt, St. (Hrsg.): Katalog der ptolemäischen und kaiserzeitlichen Objekte aus Ägypten im Akademischen Kunstmuseum Bonn. München 1997, pp. 138-140
    Borg, Barbara (2004) Traumland Ägypten - Zur Rezeption ägyptischer Luxusmotive. In: Städel-Jahrbuch, 19 (2004), pp. 191-200
    Borg, Barbara (1996) V. Kockel, Porträtreliefs stadtrömischer Grabbauten (1993). In: Göttingische Gelehrte Anzeigen, 248 (1996), pp. 70-91
    Borg, Barbara (2011) Who Cared about Greek Identity? Athens in the First Century BCE. In: Wiater, N. and Schmitz, Th. (Hrsgg.): The Struggle for Identity. Greeks and their Past in the First Century BCE. Stuttgart 2011, pp. 213-234
    Borg, Barbara and Borg, Gregor (2000) From small quarries to large temples – The enigmatic source of limestone for the Apollo temple at Didyma, W-Anatolia (Abstract). In: ASMOSIA 2000. VI international conference, Venice, June 15-18 2000, Abstract Volume. Venedig 2000, pp. 27-28
    Borg, Barbara and Borg, Gregor and Strauss, Harald (2000) A combined isotopic, petrographic, and archaeological provenance study of the marble sources for the Apollo temple of Didyma, W-Anatolia. In: Rammlmair, D. (Hrsg.): Applied Mineralogy in Research, Economy, Technology, Ecology and Culture. Proceedings of the sixth international congress on applied mineralogy ICAM 2000/Göttingen/Germany/17-19 July 2000. Rotterdam 2000, pp. 951-954
    Borg, Barbara and Borg, Gregor and Strauss, Harald (2000) A combined isotopic, petrographic, and archaeological provenance study of the marble sources for the Apollon temple of Didyma, W-Anatolia (Abstract). In: ASMOSIA 2000. VI international conference, Venice, June 15-18 2000, Abstract Volume. Venedig 2000, pp. 25-26
    Bötticher, Carl (1866) Ergänzungen zu den letzten Untersuchungen auf der Akropolis: Der Altar des Eleusinion zu Athen. In: Philologus, 24 (1866),
    Brasse, Christiane and Heine, Katja and Zhao, Dexu and Wulf, Ulrike (2008) A 3D solution for a web-based building information system. In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, 2.-6. April, 2007 (Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10). Bonn 2008 241 (Abstract)
    Brückner, Alfred (1889) Porosskulpturen auf der Akropolis. I. Der Typhongiebel. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Athenische Abteilung, 14 (1889), pp. 67-87
    Brückner, Alfred (1890) Porosskulpturen auf der Akropolis. II. Der größere Tritongiebel. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Athenische Abteilung, 15 (1890), pp. 84-125
    Bruer, Stephanie-Gerrit (1986) Der Archäologe Giovanni Pietro Bellori. In: Ausstellung zur archäologischen Forschung im 17. Jahrhundert in Italien. Stendal 1986 12 ff.
    Bruer, Stephanie-Gerrit (1990) Die Wirkung Winckelmanns in der Geschichte der klassischen Archäologie. In: Johann Joachim Winckelmann, neue Forschungen. Stendal 1990, pp. 21-26
    Bruer, Stephanie-Gerrit (2003) Gedanken zum Verständnis des Kairos bei Winckelmann und Heyne. In: "Der fruchtbare Augenblick". Zum Problem der Gattungsgrenzen in der Kunst aus wissenschaftsmethodischer Sicht. Stendal 2003, pp. 11-14
    Bruer, Stephanie-Gerrit (1988) Johann Joachim Winckelmann. Ein bedeutender Altertumsforscher des 18. Jahrhunderts.
    Bruer, Stephanie-Gerrit (2002) Pelike mit Darstellung der Entführung des Tithonos durch Eos. In: Kunze, Max (Hrsg.): Griechische Vasen aus der Sammlung von Fritz Lichtenhahn. Stendal 2002 10-11, 20
    Bruer, Stephanie-Gerrit (1990) Von Pompeji bis Troja: archäologische Entdeckungen von Winckelmann bis Schliemann; Ausstellung im Winckelmann - Museum vom 8. Dezember 1990 bis 10. März 1991.
    Bruer, Stephanie-Gerrit (1989) Winckelmann und der Barock. Gedanken zu seiner Nachahmungstheorie. In: Antike und Barock, Winckelmann-Gesellschaft. Vorträge und Aufsätze. Stendal 1989, pp. 17-24
    Brunn, Heinrich (1882) Marmorköpfchen aus Meligu. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 7 (1882), pp. 115-125
    Bulle, Heinrich (1893) Bestrafung der Dirke. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 8 (1893), pp. 246-250
    Bulle, Heinrich (1894) Die Karyatiden von der Via Appia. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 9 (1894), pp. 134-161
    Buschor, Ernst (1919) Das Krokodil des Sotades. In: Münchner Jahrbuch der bildenden Kunst, 11-13 (1919), pp. 1-43

    C

    Chaniotis, Angelos (1990) Μία Αγηωστη πηγη γία τη Λατρία στο Ιδαίο αντρο στην Υστατη Αρχαίοτητα. In: Acts of the 6th Cretological Congress [Pepragmena tou 6. Diethnous Kretologikou Synedriou]. Chania 1990, pp. 393-401
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2006) Προσδιορισμοὶ ταυτότητας στὴν ἑλληνιστικὴ Κρήτη. In: Acts of the 9th Cretological Congress [Πεπραγμένα Θ΄ Διεθνο.ς Κρητολογικο. Συνεδρίου]. Heraklion 2006, pp. 9-24
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2005) Akzeptanz von Herrschaft durch ritualisierte Dankbarkeit und Erinnerung. In: Ambos, Claus and Hotz, S. and Schwedler, G. and Weinfurter, Stefan (Hrsgg.): Die Welt der Rituale. Von der Antike bis heute. Darmstadt 2005, pp. 188-204
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2002) Bemerkungen zu christlichen Inschriften aus Kreta und Kleinasien. In: Tekmeria, 7 (2002), pp. 157-162
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1996) Conflicting Authorities: Greek Asylia between Secular and Divine Law in the Classical and Hellenistic Poleis. In: Kernos, 9 (1996), pp. 65-86
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2004) Das Bankett des Damas und der Hymnos des Sosandros: Öffentlicher Diskurs über Rituale in den griechischen Städten der Kaiserzeit. In: Harth, Dietrich and Schenk, G. (Hrsgg.): Ritualdynamik. Kulturübergreifende Studien zur Theorie und Geschichte rituellen Handelns. Heidelberg 2004, pp. 291-304
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2003) Der Kaiserkult im Osten des Römischen Reiches im Kontext der zeitgenössischen Ritualpraxis. In: Cancik, H. and Hitzl, K. (Hrsgg.): Die Praxis der Herrscherverehrung in Rom und seinen Provinzen, Akten der Tagung in Blaubeuren vom 4. bis zum 6. April 2002. Tübingen 2003, pp. 3-28
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2004) Der Tod des Lebens und die Tränen des Peneios: Eine thessalische Grabelegie. In: Hornung, A. and Jäkel, C. and Schubert, W. (Hrsgg.): Studia Humanitatis ac Litterarum Trifolio Heidelbergensi dedicata. Festschrift für Eckhard Christmann, Wilfried Edelmaier und Rudolf Kettemann. Frankfurt 2004, pp. 39-43
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2006) Die hellenistischen Kriege als Ursache von Migration: Das Beispiel Kreta. In: Olshausen, E. and Sonnabend, H. (Hrsgg.): Migrationen in der antiken Welt. Stuttgarter Kolloquium zur Historischen Geographie des Altertums 8, 2002. Stuttgart 2006, pp. 98-103
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2001) Ein alexandrinischer Dichter und Kreta: Mythische Vergangenheit und gegenwärtige Kultpraxis bei Kallimachos. In: Böhm, S. and Eickstedt, K.-V. von (Hrsgg.): Ithake. Festschrift für Jörg Schäfer. Würzburg 2001, pp. 213-217
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2004) Epigraphic evidence for the philosopher Alexander of Aphrodisias. In: Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies, 47 (2004), pp. 79-81
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2006) Familiensache: Demonstration von Zusammengehörigkeit im altgriechischen Grabritual. In: Reichmann, R. (Hrsg.): “Der Odem des Menschen ist eine Leuchte des Herrn”. Aharon Agus zum Gedenken, Heidelberg (2006), pp. 205-209
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2002) Foreign soldiers - native girls? Constructing and crossing boundaries in Hellenistic cities with foreign garrisons. In: Chaniotis, Angelos and Ducrey, P. (Hrsgg.): Army and Power in the Ancient World. Stuttgart 2002, pp. 99-113
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2004) From communal spirit to individuality: the epigraphic habit in Hellenistic and Roman Crete. In: Creta Romana e Protobizantina. Atti del Congresso Internazionale, Iraklion, 23–30 settembre 2000. Padua 2004, pp. 75-87
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2005) Griechische Rituale der Statusänderung und ihre Dynamik. In: Steinicke, M. and Weinfurter, Stefan (Hrsgg.): Griechische Rituale der Statusänderung und ihre Dynamik. Köln-Weimar 2005, pp. 43-61
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2001) Heiligtum und Stadtgemeinde im klassischen und hellenistischen Kreta. In: Kyriatsoulis, A. (Hrsg.): Kreta und Zypern: Religion und Schrift. Altenburg 2001, pp. 319-328
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2006) Heiligtümer überregionaler Bedeutung auf Kreta. In: Freitag, K. and Funke, Peter and Haake, M. (Hrsgg.): Kult - Politik - Ethnos. Überregionale Heiligtümer im Spannungsfeld von Kult und Politik. Stuttgart 2006, pp. 196-209
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2000) Hellenistic Lasaia (Crete): A Dependent Polis of Gortyn. New Epigraphic Evidence from the Asklepieion near Lasaia. In: Eulimene, 1 (2000), pp. 55-60
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2002) The Jews of Aphrodisias: new evidence and old problems. In: Scripta Classica Israelica, 21 (2002), pp. 209-242
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2004) Justifying territorial claims in Classical and Hellenistic Greece. The beginnings of international law. In: Harris, E.M. and Rubinstein, L. (Hrsgg.): The law and the courts in ancient Greece. London 2004, pp. 185-213
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1987) Klassiki kai ellenistiki Kriti. In: Panagiotakis, N.M. (Hrsg.): Kriti: Istoria kai Politismos (Kreta: Geschichte und Kultur). Heraklion 1987, pp. 173-284
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2003) Livia Sebaste, Iulia Sebaste, Caius Caesar Parthikos, Domitian Anikeitos Theos: Inofficial titles of emperors in the early Principate. In: Acta Antiqua Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae, 43 (2003), pp. 341-344
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2004) Nachwort. In: Droysen, J. G. (Hrsg.): Alexander der Große. Frankfurt 2004, pp. 715-739
    Chaniotis, Angelos (1994) Oi Archanes sta istorika chronia, 1000 p.Ch.-100 m.Ch. In: Archaiologia, 53 (1994), pp. 68-74
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2002) Old wine in a new skin: tradition and innovation in the cult foundation of Alexander of Abonouteichos. In: Dabrowa, E. (Hrsg.): Tradition and Innovation in the Ancient World (Electrum 6). Krokow 2002, pp. 67-85
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2007) Religion und Mythos in der hellenistischen Welt. In: Weber, G. (Hrsg.): Kulturgeschichte des Hellenismus. Von Alexander dem Großen bis Kleopatra. Stuttgart 2007, pp. 448-454
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2005) Ritual dynamics in the Eastern Mediterranean: case studies in ancient Greece and Asia Minor. In: Harris, W.V. (Hrsg.): Rethinking the Mediterranean. Oxford 2005, pp. 141-166
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2002) Ritual dynamics: the Boiotian festival of the Daidala. In: Horstmanshoff, H.F.J. and Singor, H.W. and Straten, F.T. van (Hrsgg.): Kykeon. Studies in Honour of H.S. Versnel. Brill, Leiden-Boston-Köln 2002, pp. 23-48
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2002) Some Cretan bastards. In: Cretan Studies, 7 (2002), pp. 51-57
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2004) Under the watchful eyes of the gods: divine justice in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor. In: Colvin, S. (Hrsg.): The Greco-Roman East. Politics, Culture, Society (Yale Classical Studies 31). Cambridge 2004, pp. 1-43
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2003) Vom Erlebnis zum Mythos: Identitätskonstruktionen im kaiserzeitlichen Aphrodisias. In: Schwertheim, E. and Winter, E. (Hrsgg.): Stadt und Stadtentwicklung in Kleinasien. Bonn 2003, pp. 69-84
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2002) Zwischen Konfrontation und Interaktion: Christen, Juden und Heiden im spätantiken Aphrodisias. In: Ackermann, A. and Müller, K.E. (Hrsgg.): Patchwork: Dimensionen multikultureller Gesellschaften. Bielefeld 2002, pp. 83-128
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2003) The divinity of Hellenistic rulers. In: Erskine, A. (Hrsg.): A Companion to the Hellenistic World. Oxford 2003, pp. 431-445
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2006) A dodecahedron of rock crystal from the Idaean cave and evidence for divination in the sacred cave of Zeus. In: Gabrilaki, I. and Tzifopoulos, Y. (Hrsgg.): Actes of the International Symposium ‘Mylopotamos, from Antiquity to our Days’ [Πρακτικ. Διεθνο.ς Συνεδρίου «. Μυλοπόταμος .π. τ.ν .ρχαιότητα .ς σήμερα»]. Rethymnon 2006, pp. 205-216
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2001) An epitaph from Nipiditos in Crete. In: Tekmeria, 6 (2001), pp. 123-125
    Chaniotis, Angelos (2003) The perception of imperial power in Aphrodisias: The epigraphic evidence. In: de Blois, L. and Erdkamp, P. and Hekster, O.J. and de Kleijn, G. and Mols, S. (Hrsgg.): he Representation and Perception of Roman Imperial Power. Proceedings of the Third Workshop of the International Network Impact of Empire, Rome, March 20-23, 2002. Amsterdam 2003, pp. 250-260
    Chaniotis, Angelos and Chiai, Gian Franco (2007) Die Sprache der religiösen Kommunikation im römischen Osten: Konvergenz und Differenzierung. In: Rüpke, J. (Hrsg.): Antike Religionsgeschichte in räumlicher Perspektive. Tübingen 2007, pp. 117-124
    Chaniotis, Angelos and Thaler, Ulrich (2006) Die Altertumswissenschaften an der Universität Heidelberg 1933-1945. In: Eckart, W.U. and Sellin, V. and Wolgast, H. (Hrsgg.): Die Universität Heidelberg im Nationalsozialismus. Heidelberg 2006, pp. 391-434
    Conze, Alexander (1890) Griechische Kohlenbecken. In: Jahrbuch des Kaiserlich Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, 5 (1890), pp. 118-141
    Corte, Matteo della (1913) Sui monumenti scoperti fuori la porta del Vesuvio. Brevi note di epigrafia pompeiana. In: Memorie dell\'Accademia di Archeologia, Lettere e Belle Arti di Napoli/2, 2 (1913), pp. 178-200
    Crompton, Shirley (2008) 3D lithic analysis. In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, 2.-6. April 2007. Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10. Bonn 2008, pp. 147-152
    Curtius, Ernst (1876) Die Atlasmetope von Olympia. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 1 (1876), pp. 206-215

    D

    De Beenhouwer, Jan (2008) Data management for moulded ceramics and digital image comparison: a case study of Roman terra cotta figurines. In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, 2.-6. April, 2007 (Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10). Bonn 2008, pp. 160-163
    De Felice, Giuliano and Mangialardi, Nunzia Maria and Sibilano, Maria Giuseppina and Volpe, Giuliano (2008) Late Roman villa at Faragola (Foggia, Italy): laser scanning for a global documentation methodology during field research. In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, 2.-6. April 2007. Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10. Bonn 2008 98 (Abstract)
    Degering, H. (1898) Ueber die militaerischen Wegweiser in Pompeji. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 13 (1898), pp. 124-146
    Dieudonné, Adolphe (1906) Numismatique syrienne. Émèse. In: Revue numismatique, 4 (1906), Nr. 10. pp. 132-155
    Doerpfeld, Wilhelm (1884) Der Tempel von Sunion. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 9 (1884), pp. 324-337
    Dörpfeld, Wilhelm (1885) Das choragische Monument des Nikias. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 10 (1885), pp. 219-230
    Dörpfeld, Wilhelm (1886) Der Tempel in Korinth. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Athenische Abteilung, 11 (1886), 297-308 ; Taf. VII-VIII.
    Dörpfeld, Wilhelm (1886) Der alte Athenatempel auf der Akropolis. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Athenische Abteilung, 11 (1886), pp. 337-351
    Dörpfeld, Wilhelm (1887) Der alte Athenatempel auf der Akropolis. III. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Athenische Abteilung, 12 (1887), pp. 190-211
    Dörpfeld, Wilhelm (1885) Die Propyläen der Akropolis von Athen I. Das ursprüngliche Project des Mnesikles. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 10 (1885), pp. 38-56
    Dörpfeld, Wilhelm (1885) Die Propyläen der Akropolis von Athen II. Ueber die Gestalt des Südwestflügels. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 10 (1885), pp. 131-144
    Dörpfeld, Wilhelm (1883) Ueber das Schatzhaus der Sikyonier in Olympia. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 8 (1883), pp. 67-70
    Dörpfeld, Wilhelm (1886) Ueber die Ausgrabungen auf der Akropolis. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Athenische Abteilung, 11 (1886), pp. 162-169
    Dörpfeld, Wilhelm (1881) Untersuchungen am Parthenon. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 6 (1881), pp. 383-302
    Ducke, Benjamin and Kroefges, Peter C. (2008) From points to areas: constructing territories from archaeological site patterns using an enhanced Xtent model. In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, 2.-6. April, 2007 (Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10). Bonn 2008, pp. 245-251
    Duhn, Friedrich Carl von (1886) Due bassirilievi del Palazzo Rondinini. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 1 (1886), pp. 167-172
    Duhn, Friedrich Carl von (1887) La necropoli di Suessula. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 2 (1887), pp. 235-275
    Dümmler, Ferdinand (1887) Ueber eine Classe griechischer Vasen mit schwarzen Figuren. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 2 (1887), pp. 171-192
    Dümmler, Ferdinand (1888) Vasenscherben aus Kyme in Aeolis. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 3 (1888), pp. 159-180
    Dunn, Stuart and Gold, Nicolas and Hughes, Lorna (2008) CHIMERA: a service oriented computing approach for archaeological research. In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, 2.-6. April, 2007 (Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10). Bonn 2008 218 (Abstract)
    Durm, Josef (1890) Die makedonischen Königssarkophage. In: Centralblatt der Bauverwaltung, 10 (1890), pp. 329-332
    Durm, Josef (1890) Zum Kampf um Troja [1]. In: Centralblatt der Bauverwaltung, 10 (1890), pp. 409-411
    Durm, Josef (1890) Zum Kampf um Troja [2]. In: Centralblatt der Bauverwaltung, 10 (1890), pp. 423-424
    Durry, Marcel (1928) Note sur la tenue des centurions. In: Revue archéologique, 5 (1928), Nr. 27. pp. 303-308

    E

    Eckert, Martin (2007) Piräus: Der Hafen als Wirtschafts-, Kontakt- und Problemzone der klassischen Polis.
    Effinger, Maria (2000) Zierde für das Diesseits und das Jenseits: Bronzezeitlicher Schmuck aus Kreta. In: Im Labyrinth des Minos: Kreta - die erste europäische Hochkultur [Ausstellung des Badischen Landesmuseums, 27.1. bis 29.4.2001, Karlsruhe, Schloss]. München 2000 161ff.
    El-Hakim, Sabry F. and Remondino, Fabio and Gonzo, Lorenzo and Voltolini, Francesca (2008) Effective high resolution 3D geometric reconstruction of heritage and archaeological sites from images. In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, 2.-6. April 2007. Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10. Bonn 2008, pp. 43-50

    F

    Fabricatore, Giulio and Cantone, Francesca (2008) Pushing the archaeological interpretation by analysing workflow protocols: the variable transparency image stacker and DATARCH© archaeological data management system. In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, 2.-6. April 2007. Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10. Bonn 2008 8 (Abstract)
    Fabricius, Ernst (1884) Alterthümer auf der Insel Samos. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 9 (1884), pp. 163-197
    Fabricius, Ernst (1884) Die Skulpturen vom Tempel in Sunion. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Athenische Abteilung, 9 (1884), pp. 338-353
    Faist, Betina (2005) C. Zaccagnini (Hrsg.), Mercanti e politica nel mondo antico, Roma, 2003. In: Die Welt des Orients, 35 (2005), pp. 232-235
    Festa, Vincenzo (1918) Skinnis. Storia di un'antica danza. In: Memorie dell\'Accademia di Archeologia, Lettere e Belle Arti di Napoli, 3 (1918), pp. 37-74
    Fiz, Ignacio and Orengo, Hèctor A. (2008) The application of 3D reconstruction techniques in the analysis of ancient Tarraco's urban topography. In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, 2.-6. April, 2007 (Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10). Bonn 2008 343 (Abstract)
    Franck, Sara (2008) Spectral and GIS analysis for quarry location in ancient Messene, Greece. In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, 2.-6. April, 2007 (Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10). Bonn 2008, pp. 164-170
    Freydank, Jörg (2000) Die Wesstor-Nekropole von Assos in klassischer und hellenistischer Zeit.
    Fröhlich, Thomas (1998) Die Bilddatenbank. In: "Außer Rom ist fast nichts schönes in der Welt". Römische Antikensammlungen im 18. Jahrhundert. Mainz 1998, pp. 194-195
    Fröhlich, Thomas (2011) Winckelmann als Commissario delle Antichitä. In: Festschrift für Max Kunze "...die Augen ein wenig zu öffnen". Ein Blick auf die antike Kunst von der Renaissance bis heute. Mainz-Ruhpolding 2011, pp. 55-64
    Fröhlich, Thomas (1998) Winckelmann und die Stadt Rom. In: "Außer Rom ist fast nichts schönes in der Welt". Römische Antikensammlungen im 18. Jahrhundert. Mainz 1998, pp. 1-10
    Führer, Joseph (1895) Ein Fund im Stadtgebiet des alten Syrakus. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 10 (1895), pp. 193-209
    Führer, Joseph (1892) Zur Geschichte des Elagabaliums und der Athena Parthenos des Pheidias. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 7 (1892), pp. 158-165
    Funke, Peter (2001) Acheloos' Homeland. New Historical-Archaeological Research on the Ancient Polis Stratos. In: Isager, J. (Hrsg.): Foundation and Destruction. Nikopolis and Northwestern Greece. The archaeological evidence for the city destructions, the foundation of Nikopolis and the synoecism (= Monographs of the Danish Institute at Athens, Vol. 3). Athen 2001, pp. 189-203
    Funke, Peter (2005) Die Nabel der Welt. Überlegungen zur Kanonisierung der "panhellenischen" Heiligtümer. In: Schmitt, T. and Schmitz, W. and Winterling, A. (Hrsgg.): Gegenwärtige Antike - antike Gegenwarten. Kolloquium zum 60. Geburtstag von Rolf Rilinger. München 2005, pp. 1-16
    Funke, Peter (2000) Grenzfestungen und Verkehrsverbindungen in Nordost-Attika. Zur Bedeutung der attisch-boiotischen Grenzregion um Dekeleia. In: Flensted-Jensen, P. and Heine Nielsen, T. and Rubinstein, L. (Hrsgg.): Polis and Politics. Studies in Ancient Greek History. Presented to M. H. Hansen on his Sixtieth Birthday, August 20, 2000. Kopenhagen 2000, pp. 121-131
    Funke, Peter (2004) Herodotus and the major sanctuaries of the Greek World. In: Karagheorgis, V. and Taifacos, J. (Hrsgg.): The World of Herodotus. Proceedings of an International Conference held at the Foundation Anastasios G. Leventis, Nicosia, September 18-21, 2003. Nicosia 2004, pp. 159-167
    Funke, Peter (2001) New Historical-Archaeological Research on the Ancient Polis Stratos. In: Isager, J. (Hrsg.): Foundation and Destruction. Nikopolis and Northwestern Greece. The archaeological evidence for the city destructions, the foundation of Nikopolis and the synoecism (= Monographs of the Danish Institute at Athens, Vol. 3). Athen 2001, pp. 189-203
    Funke, Peter (2010) Pausanias und die griechischen Heiligtümer und Kulte. In: Marco Simón, F. and Pina Polo, F. and Remesal Rodríguez, J. (Hrsgg.): Viajeros, peregrinos y aventureros en el Mundo Antiguo. Barcelona 2010, pp. 219-226
    Funke, Peter (2005) Philippos III. Arrhidaios und Alexander IV. - "von Amun auserwählt". In: Alonso Troncoso, V. (Hrsg.): Diádochos tes basileías. La figura del sucesor en las monarquías de época helenística (= Gerión Anejos, vol. 9). Madrid 2005, pp. 45-56
    Funke, Peter (2009) Polis und Asty. Einige Überlegungen zur Stadt im antiken Griechenland. In: Fouquet, G. and Zeilinger, G. (Hrsgg.): Die Urbanisierung Europas von der Antike bis in die Moderne. Frankfurt 2009, pp. 63-79
    Funke, Peter (2004) Sparta und die peloponnesische Staatenwelt zu Beginn des 4. Jahrhunderts und der Dioikismos von Mantineia. In: Tuplin, Chr. (Hrsg.): Xenophon and his World. Papers from a conference held in Liverpool in July 1999 (= Historia-ES, Bd. 172). Stuttgart 2004, pp. 427-435
    Funke, Peter (2006) Western Greece (Magna Graecia). In: Kinzl, K. (Hrsg.): A Companion to the Classical Greek World (= Blackwell Companions to the Ancient World). Oxford 2006, pp. 153-173
    Funke, Peter (1991) Zur Ausbildung städtischer Siedlungszentren in Aitolien. In: Olshausen, E. and Sonnabend, H. (Hrsgg.): Stuttgarter Kolloquium zur Historischen Geographie des Altertums 2, 1984 und 3, 1987 (= Geographica Historica Bd. 5). Bonn 1991, pp. 313-332
    Funke, Peter (1987) Zur Datierung befestigter Stadtanlagen in Aitolien. Historisch-philologische Anmerkungen zu einem Wechselverhältnis zwischen Siedlungsstruktur und politischer Organisation. In: Boreas, 10 (1987), pp. 87-96
    Furtwängler, Adolf (1882) Altlakonisches Relief. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 7 (1882), pp. 160-173
    Furtwängler, Adolf (1878) Büste Pans in Terracotta. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 3 (1878), pp. 155-160
    Furtwängler, Adolf (1900) Der Apollo Stroganoff. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Athenische Abteilung, 25 (1900), pp. 280-285
    Furtwängler, Adolf (1881) Marmore von der Akropolis. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 6 (1881), pp. 174-190
    Furtwängler, Adolf (1880) Statue von der Akropolis. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 5 (1880), 20-42, Taf. 1.
    Füßli, Johann Heinrich (1816) Winkelmann (Johann). In: Allgemeines Künsterlexikon. Zürich 1816, pp. 6090-6112

    G

    Gauthier, Estelle (2008) Consumption and circulation of prehistoric products in Europe: characterization of spatial evolutions by using map algebra. In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, 2.-6. April, 2007 (Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10). Bonn 2008 375 (Abstract)
    Georges-Leroy, Murielle and Tolle, Florian and Nouvel, Pierre (2008) Analysis of the intensity of agrarian exploitation by spatial analysis of ancient field systems preserved by forest cover. In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, 2.-6. April, 2007 (Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10). Bonn 2008 281 (Abstract)
    Georgopoulos, Andreas and Ioannidis, Charalabos and Ioannides, Marinos (2008) 3D virtual reconstructions at the service of computer assisted archaeological measurements. In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, 2.-6. Apri, 2007 (Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10). Bonn 2008 144 (Abstract)
    Gothein, Marie (1909) Der griechische Garten. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Athenische Abteilung, 34 (1909), pp. 100-144
    Graef, Botho (1890) Die Gruppe der Tyrannenmörder und stilistisch verwandte Werke in Athen. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Athenische Abteilung, 15 (1890), pp. 1-39
    Graef, Botho (1889) Herakles des Skopas und Verwandtes. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 4 (1889), pp. 189-226
    Graef, Botho (1888) Zu den Skulpturen von Olympia. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Athenische Abteilung, 13 (1888), pp. 402-407
    Greco, Giovanna and Ferrara, Bianca and Cantone, Francesca (2008) Museo narrante: the Foce Sele Hera sanctuary virtual museum. In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, 2.-6. April, 2007 (Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10). Bonn 2008, pp. 418-425
    Greve, Anika (2006) Die Felsfassadengräber von Kyrene.
    Gurlitt, L. (1881) Ein Kriegerrelief aus Kleitor. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 6 (1881), pp. 154-166

    H

    Haciguzeller, Piraye (2008) Modeling human circulation in the Minoan palace at Malia. In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, April 2–6, 2007. Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10. Bonn 2008, pp. 336-341
    Hallo, Rudolf (1926) Über einige Antikenfälschungen und -Nachbildungen im Casseler Museum. In: Repertorium für Kunstwissenschaft, 47 (1926), pp. 265-283
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam (1966) Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Bau und Test eines Meilerbrandes (Film 1).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Becher aus Formschüsseln mit Bemalung (Film 2, Teil 1).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Bemalung und Brände (Film 9, Teil 2).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam (1967) Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Brand bemalter Ware und Kapselbrand (Film 8, Teil 1).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam (1969) Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Brand im Kuppelofen (Film 9, Teil 1).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam (1971) Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Brand von Buccero (Film 3, Teil 2).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam (1972) Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Brandversuche (Film 4, Teil 4).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Fayence im ägyptischen und griechischen Ofen (Film 6, Teil 1).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Fayence im ägyptischen und griechischen Ofen (Film 6, Teil 2).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Formung und Bemalung gleicher Becher (Film 3, Teil 4).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Formung, Bemalung und Brand gleicher Schälchen (Film 3, Teil 3).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Gefäßdrehen auf der Scheibe (Film 4, Teil 1).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam (1973) Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Gefäßdrehen auf der Scheibe (Film 4, Teil 3).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam (1971) Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Heidelberger Exkursion 1971 anlässlich experimenteller Keramikbrände (Film 3, Teil 1).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Herstellung und anschließende Verwendung einer römischen Formschüssel (Film 2, Teil 2).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam (1970) Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Impressionen aus dem Jahr 1970 im Rauenthal (Film 2, Teil 4).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam (1965) Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Meilerbrand mit Drainage (Film 7, Teil 3).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Ofenmodell und Reduktionsbrand (Film 9, Teil 3).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam (1970) Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Pithosbau und Brand (Film 10, Teil 2).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam (1970) Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Pithosbau und Brand, Verschnitt (Film 10, Teil 3).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam (1973) Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Rechteckofen, Bau und Brand (Film 4, Teil 2).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Reduktionsbrand (Film 8, Teil 3).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam (1968) Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Testbrand in einem Kuppelofen (Film 10, Teil 1).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam (1965) Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Tonaufbereitung, Politur und Meilerbrand (Film 7, Teil 2).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam (1966) Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Unterschiedliche Versuche zum Grubenbrand (Film 5).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam (1968) Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Unterschiedliche Versuche zum Grubenbrand (Film 8, Teil 2).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Verschiedene Töpferscheiben (Film 2, Teil 3).
    Hampe, Roland and Winter, Adam (1965) Experimente zur Keramikherstellung: Wülsten, Brand und Brotbacken (Film 7, Teil 1).
    Hartwig, Paul (1891) Zwei Schalenbilder des Epiktet. In: Jahrbuch des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, 6 (1891), pp. 250-257
    Hauser, Friedrich (1895) Basaltstatue vom Palatin. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 10 (1895), pp. 97-119
    Heberdey, Rudolf (1898) Das Weihrelief des Lakrateides aus Eleusis. In: Festschrift für Otto Benndorf; zu seinem 60. Geburtstage gewidmet von Schülern, Freunden und Fachgenossen. Wien 1898, pp. 111-116
    Heitz, Christian (2008) Burying the palaces? Ideologies in the Shaft Grave period.
    Helbig, Wolfgang (1887) Scavi di Corneto. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 2 (1887), pp. 153-158
    Helbig, Wolfgang (1887) Sopra un ritratto di Livia. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 2 (1887), pp. 3-13
    Helbig, Wolfgang (1887) Sopra una fibula d'oro trovata presso Palestrina. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 2 (1887), pp. 37-39
    Helbig, Wolfgang (1886) Viaggio nell'Etruria e nell'Umbria. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 1 (1886), pp. 214-242
    Helm, Christoph (2001) Dankesrede anläßlich der Verleihung der Winckelmann-Medaille 2001 - "Kulturpolitik in den neuen Ländern". In: Mitteilungen der Winckelmann-Gesellschaft. 2001, pp. 1-8
    Helm, Christoph (2000) Ludwig Ross und seine Bedeutung für die Klassischen Altertumswissenschaften. In: Kunze, Max (Hrsg.): Akzidenzen 12. Flugblätter der Winckelmann-Gesellschaft. Stendal 2000, pp. 3-24
    Herder, Johann Gottfried von (1888) Johann Winckelmann. In: Herder, Johann Gottfried von (Hrsg.): Sämmtliche Werke (hrsg. von Bernhard Suphan), Bd.15. Berlin 1888, pp. 36-50
    Herzog, Rudolf (1907) Aus dem Asklepieion von Kos. In: Archiv für Religionswissenschaft, 10 (1907), pp. 400-415
    Herzog, Rudolf (1907) Aus dem Asklepieion von Kos. In: Archiv für Religionswissenschaft, 10 (1907), pp. 201-228
    Hesse, Katrin (2006) Kindsmord und Wahnsinn: Untersuchungen zur Überlieferung mordender Eltern in der Antike.
    Hettner, Hermann (1925) Winckelmann. In: Hettner, Hermann (Hrsg.): Geschichte der deutschen Literatur im achtzehnten Jahrhundert, Zweites Buch. Braunschweig 1925, pp. 325-353
    Hoff, Ralf von den (2005) "Achill, das Vieh". Zur Problematisierung transgressiver Gewalt in klassischen Vasenbildern. In: Moraw, S. and Fischer, G. (Hrsgg.): Die andere Seite der Klassik: Gewalt im 5. und 4. Jahrhundert. v. Chr. Stuttgart 2005, pp. 225-246
    Hoff, Ralf von den (2009) Alexanderporträts und Bildnisse frühhellenistischer Herrscher. In: Hansen, S. (Hrsg.): Alexander der Große und die Öffnung der Welt, Asiens Kulturen im Wandel. Regensburg 2009, pp. 47-53
    Hoff, Ralf von den (2002) Brigitte Knittlmayer: Die attische Aristokratie und ihre Helden. Untersuchungen zu Darstellungen des trojanischen Sagenkreises im 6. und frühen 5. Jahrhundert v. Chr. In: Gnomon, 74 (2002), pp. 36-42
    Hoff, Ralf von den (2009) Caligula. Zur visuellen Repräsentation eines römischen Kaisers. In: Archäologischer Anzeiger, (2009), pp. 239-263
    Hoff, Ralf von den (2005) Commodus als Hercules. In: Giuliani, Luca (Hrsg.): Meisterwerke der antiken Kunst,. München 2005, pp. 115-135
    Hoff, Ralf von den (1997) Der 'Alexander Rondanini'. Mythischer Heros oder heroischer Herrscher? In: Münchner Jahrbuch für bildende Kunst, 48 (1997), pp. 7-28
    Hoff, Ralf von den (2009) Die Bildnisstatue des Demosthenes als öffentliche Ehrung eines Bürgers in Athen. In: Haake, Matthias and Mann, Christian and Hoff, Ralf von den (Hrsgg.): Rollenbilder in der Athenischen Demokratie: Medien, Gruppen, Räume im politischen und sozialen System. Wiesbaden 2009, pp. 193-220
    Hoff, Ralf von den (2001) Die Posen des Siegers. Die Konstruktion von Überlegenheit in attischen Theseusbildern des 5. Jahrhunderts v. Chr. In: Hoff, Ralf von den and Schmidt, Stefan (Hrsgg.): Konstruktionen von Wirklichkeit: Bilder im Griechenland des 5. und 4. Jahrhunderts v. Chr.,. Stuttgart 2001, pp. 73-88
    Hoff, Ralf von den (2002) Die Pracht der Schalen und die Tatkraft des Heros. Theseuszyklen auf Symposiongeschirr in Athen. In: Heilmeyer, Wolf Dieter (Hrsg.): Die griechische Klassik, Idee oder Wirklichkeit. Mainz 2002, pp. 331-337
    Hoff, Ralf von den (2007) Eine neue Replik des Plutos aus der Statuengruppe der Eirene des Kephisodot. In: Steuben, Hans, von (Hrsg.): MOΥΣEION. Beiträge zur antiken Plastik. Festschrift zu Ehren von P. C. Bol. Möhnesee 2007, pp. 307-319
    Hoff, Ralf von den (2009) Hellenistische Gymnasia: Raumgestaltung und Raumfunktionen. In: Matthaei, A. and Zimmermann, M. (Hrsgg.): Stadtbilder im Hellenismus. Berlin 2009, pp. 245-275
    Hoff, Ralf von den (2009) Herakles, Theseus and the Athenian Treasury at Delphi. In: Hoff, Ralf von den and Schulz, Peter (Hrsgg.): Structure, Image, Ornament: Architectural Sculpture of the Greek World. Oxford 2009, pp. 96-104
    Hoff, Ralf von den (2004) Horror and amazement: Colossal mythological statue groups and the new rhetoric of images in late second and early third century Rome. In: Borg, Barbara (Hrsg.): Paideia: The World of the Second Sophistic. Berlin 2004, pp. 105-129
    Hoff, Ralf von den (2008) Images and prestige of cult personnel in Athens between the sixth and first centuries BC. In: Trampedach, Kai and Dignase, Beate (Hrsgg.): Practitioners of the Divine: Greek Priests and Religious Officials from Homer to Heliodorus, Kolloquium Washington D. C. 2004. Washington 2008, pp. 107-141
    Hoff, Ralf von den (2011) Kaiserbildnisse als Kaisergeschichte(n). Prolegomena zu einem medialen Konzept römischer Herrscherporträts. In: Winterling, A. (Hrsg.): Zwischen Strukturgeschichte und Biographie. Probleme und Perspektiven einer römischen Kaisergeschichte. München 2011, pp. 15-44
    Hoff, Ralf von den (2011) Klassische Archäologie und ihre Prägungen. Fragen - Methoden - Perspektiven. In: Freiburger Universitätsblätter , 192 (2011), Nr. 2. pp. 43-59
    Hoff, Ralf von den (1997) Klaus Stemmer (Hrsg.), Standorte. Kontext und Funktion antiker Skulptur. In: Klio 79, 1997, S. 564-566, 79 (1997), pp. 564-566
    Hoff, Ralf von den (2010) Media for Theseus, or: The different images of the Athenian polis-hero. In: Foxhall, Lin and Gehrke, Hans-Joachim and Luraghi, Nino (Hrsgg.): History – Spinning Time in Ancient Greece. Stuttgart 2010, pp. 161-188
    Hoff, Ralf von den (2011) New research in Aizanoi 2007 - 2009. In: Bilgen, N. (Hrsg.): Archaeological Research in Western Central Anatolia. Kütahya 2011, pp. 122-139
    Hoff, Ralf von den (2009) Odysseus in der antiken Bildkunst. In: Gehrke, Hans-Joachim and Kirschkowski, Mirko (Hrsgg.): Odysseus. Irrfahrten durch die Jahrhunderte. Freiburg 2009, pp. 39-64
    Hoff, Ralf von den (2007) Ornamenta γυμνασιώδη? Delos und Pergamon als Beispielfälle der Skulpturenausstattung hellenistischer Gymnasien. In: Scholz, P. and Kah, D. (Hrsgg.): Das hellenistische Gymnasion. Berlin 2007, pp. 373-405
    Hoff, Ralf von den (1998) Stefan Ritter, Hercules in der römischen Kunst von den Anfängen bis Augustus. In: Klio, 80 (1998), pp. 564-565
    Hoff, Ralf von den (2005) Theseus, der Klitias-Krater und Athen im 6. Jh.v.Chr. In: Kulturwissenschaftliches Forschungskolleg / SFB 485 „Norm und Symbol. Die kulturelle Dimension sozialer und politischer Integration“: Diskussionsbeiträge 59, Mai 2005. Konstanz 2005
    Hoff, Ralf von den and Bentz, Martin (1997) "Orchideenfächer": Die Stiefkinder der Hochschulreform? In: Archäologische Informationen, 20 (1997), Nr. 2. pp. 256-258
    Hoff, Ralf von den and Flashar, Martin (1993) Die Statue des sogenannten Philosophen Delphi im Kontext einer mehrfigurigen Stiftung. In: Bulletin de correspondance hellénique, 17 (1993), pp. 407-433
    Hoffmann, Friedhelm and Steinhart, Matthias (1998) Apries und die ostgriechische Vasenmalerei. In: Jahreshefte des Österreichischen Archäologischen Institutes, 67 (1998), pp. 49-61
    Hölscher, Tonio and Möllendorff, Peter von (2008) „Niemand wundere sich, sieht er dies Bild!“ – Bild und Text auf der Grabstele des Antipatros von Askalon. In: Poetica, 40 (2008), pp. 289-333
    Holwerda, Antonie Ewoud Jan (1890) Korinthisch-attische Vasen. In: Jahrbuch des Kaiserlich Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, 5 (1890), pp. 237-268
    Horst, Katarina (1996) Die anthropomorphen Terrakotten aus Lato. Von der mittelminoischen Zeit bis zum Ende des VI. Jhs. v. Chr.
    Hülsen, Christian (1889) Antichità di Monte Citorio. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 4 (1889), pp. 41-64
    Hülsen, Christian (1893) Das Comitium und seine Denkmäler in der republikanischen Zeit. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 8 (1893), pp. 79-94
    Hülsen, Christian (1895) Untersuchungen zur Topographie des Palatins. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 10 (1895), pp. 252-283
    Hülsen, Christian (1895) Untersuchungen zur Topographie des Palatins. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 10 (1895), pp. 3-37
    Huvila, Isto (2008) To whom it may concern? The users and uses of digital archaeological information. In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, 2.-6. April 2007. Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10. Bonn 2008 427 (Abstract)

    J

    Jastrzębowska, Elżbieta (1987) Archetyp ewangelii Pseudo-Mateusza. Jego powstanie na przełomie IV i V stulecia w świetle ikonografii starochrześcijańskiej. In: Studia Źródłoznawcze, 30 (1987), pp. 151-157
    Jastrzębowska, Elżbieta (1991) Deux sarcophages d'enfants aux catacombes de Novatien à Rome. In: Paganism in the Later Roman Empire and in Byzantium. Krakau 1991, pp. 35-44
    Jastrzębowska, Elżbieta (1982) La basilique des Apôtres à Rome, fondation de Constantin ou de Maxence? In: Mosaïque. Recueil d’Hommages à Henri Stern. Paris 1982, pp. 223-229
    Jastrzębowska, Elżbieta (1979) Les scènes de banquet dans les peintures et sculptures chrétiennes des IIIe et IVe siècles. In: Recherches Augustiniennes, 14 (1979), pp. 3-90
    Jastrzębowska, Elżbieta (1997) Najstarsze zachowane dewocjonalia pielgrzymie z Jerozolimy. In: Jerozolima w kulturze europejskiej. Warschau 1997, pp. 59-71
    Jastrzębowska, Elżbieta (1992) A proposito di due frammenti di una pittura delle catacombe dei SS. Marcellino e Pietro a Roma. In: 50 Years of Polish Excavations in Egypt and the Near East. Warschau 1992, pp. 130-134
    Jettmar, Karl (1990) 2000 Jahre Kunst am Oxus-Fluß in Mittelasien. In: Spektrum der Wissenschaft, 3 (1990), pp. 30-32
    Jettmar, Karl (1955) Die Entstehung des skythischen Tierstils. In: Die Umschau in Natur und Technik, 55 (1955), Nr. 7. pp. 203-205
    Jettmar, Karl (1961) Die Fürstengräber der Skythen im Altai. In: Die Umschau für Wissenschaft und Technik, 12 (1961), pp. 368-371
    Jördens, Karl Heinrich (1810) Johann Joachim Winckelmann. In: Jördens, Karl Heinrich (Hrsg.): Lexikon deutscher Dichter und Prosaisten. 1810, pp. 507-553
    Julius, Leopold (1876) Ueber den Südflügel der Propylaeen und den Tempel der Athena Nike zu Athen. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 1 (1876), pp. 216-228

    K

    Käfer, Markus (1994) Aspekte zu Voltaires und Winckelmanns Auffassung von Geschichte und Mythologie. In: Mythe et identité dans la littérature de langue allemande, Actes du Colloque organis. par les Instituts d'Études Germaniques: Univ. Lumière - Lyon II ... Réunis par J.-Ch. Margotton. Nizza 1994, pp. 21-30
    Käfer, Markus (1989) Aspekte zu Winckelmanns Allegorientheorie. In: Antike und Barock. Winckelmann-Gesellschaft. Vorträge und Aufsätze. Stendal 1989, pp. 25-35
    Käfer, Markus (1990) J. J. Winckelmann - ein Ancien? In: Johann Joachim Winckelmann. Neue Forschungen. Eine Aufsatzsammlung. Stendal 1990, pp. 73-78
    Käfer, Markus (1983) Jacob Spon et Bernard de Montfaucon. In: Bulletin de l\'Association Guillaume Budé, (1983), pp. 414-426
    Käfer, Markus (2000) Johann Joachim Winckelmann. Von der Historie zum Nachahmungspostulat. In: Altertumskunde im 18. Jahrhundert: Wechselwirkungen zwischen Italien und Deutschland. Stendal 2000, pp. 121-132
    Käfer, Markus (1996) Simon Richter, Patrick McGrath, Representing Homosexuality: Winckelmann and the Aesthetics of Friendship, in: Monatshefte für deutschen Unterricht, deutsche Sprache und Literatur, Bd. 86 (1994) S. 45-56. In: Mitteilungen der Winckelmann-Gesellschaft, 59 (1996), 39.
    Käfer, Markus (1986) Winckelmanns hermeneutische Prinzipien. In: Heidelberger Forschungen, Bd. 27 (1986). Winter, Heidelberg 1986
    Kalkmann, August (1891) Fedra. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 6 (1891), pp. 246-249
    Kampel, Martin and Zaharieva, Maia (2008) Optical recognition of modern and Roman coins. In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, 2.-6. April 2007. Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10. Bonn 2008 172 (Abstract)
    Karo, Georg (1925) Altetruskische Baukunst. In: Die Antike, 1 (1925), pp. 213-243
    Karo, Georg (1904) Altkretische Kultstätten. In: Archiv für Religionswissenschaft, 7 (1904), pp. 117-156
    Karo, Georg (1905) Archäologische Funde und Forschungen. In: Archiv für Religionswissenschaft, 8 (1905), pp. 511-525
    Karo, Georg (1905) Ausgrabungen im östlichen Kreta. In: Archiv für Religionswissenschaft, 8 (1905), pp. 148-149
    Karo, Georg (1922) Der Palast des Minos zu Knossos. In: Orientalistische Literaturzeitung, 10 (1922), pp. 377-389
    Karo, Georg (1900) Di un vaso etrusco trovato a Chiusi. In: Bullettino di Paleontologia Italiana, 36 (1900), pp. 33-47
    Karo, Georg (1915) Die Schachtgräber von Mykenai. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Athenische Abteilung, 40 (1915), pp. 113-230
    Karo, Georg (1903) Die italienischen Ausgrabungen in Phaistos auf Kreta. In: Berliner Philologische Wochenschrift, 41 (1903), pp. 1309-1311
    Karo, Georg (1905) Funde. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Athenische Abteilung, 30 (1905),
    Karo, Georg (1903) Gilliérons Nachbildungen mykenischer Altertümer. In: Archäologischer Anzeiger, (1903), pp. 157-162
    Karo, Georg (1909) Götterversammlung und Gigantomachie am Knidier-Schatzhaus in Delphi. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Athenische Abteilung, 34 (1909), pp. 167-178
    Karo, Georg (1930) Johann Joachim Winckelmann. In: Kommission für die Provinz Sachsen und für Anhalt, Historische (Hrsg.): Mitteldeutsche Lebensbilder. Magdeburg 1930, pp. 130-162
    Karo, Georg (1911) Minoische Rhyta. In: Jahrbuch des Deutschen Archäologischen Institut, 26 (1911), pp. 249-270
    Karo, Georg (1905) Neue Funde von Knosos. In: Archiv für Religionswissenschaft, 8 (1905), pp. 144-148
    Karo, Georg (1899) Notes on Amasis and ionic black-figured pottery. In: The Journal of Hellenistic Studies, 19 (1899), pp. 135-164
    Karo, Georg (1904) Tombe arcaiche di Cuma. In: Bullettino di Paletnologia Italiana, 30 (1904), pp. 1-29
    Karo, Georg (1914) Zwei mykenische Fragmente. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Athenische Abteilung, 39 (1914), 256.
    Keil, Josef (1915) Denkmäler des Meter-Kultes. In: Jahreshefte des Österreichischen Archäologischen Institutes in Wien, 18 (1915), pp. 66-78
    Kekulé, Reinhard (1888) Über eine Statue in der Glyptothek in München. In: Jahrbuch des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, 3 (1888), pp. 37-45
    Keller, Otto (1890) Wandbild der Villa Pamfili. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 5 (1890), pp. 157-160
    Kerig, Tim (2008) Towards an econometrically informed archaeology: the Cologne Tableau (KöTa). In: Posluschny, A. and Lambers, K. and Herzog, I. (Hrsgg.): Layers of Perception. Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Berlin, 2.-6. April, 2007 (Koll. Vor- u. Frühgesch. 10). 2008 372 (Abstract)
    Kieseritzky, Gangolf (1883) Athena Parthenos der Ermitage. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 8 (1883), pp. 291-315
    Kleibl, Kathrin (2003) Die Wasserkrypten in den hellenistischen und römischen Heiligtümern der ägyptischen Götter im Mittelmeerraum.
    Kockel, Valentin (2005) Altes und Neues vom Forum und vom Gebäude der Eumachia in Pompeji. In: Neudecker, Richard and Zanker, Paul (Hrsgg.): Lebenswelten. Bilder und Räume in der römischen Stadt der Kaiserzeit. (= Palilia 16). Wiesbaden 2005, pp. 51-72
    Kockel, Valentin (1983) Die Grabbauten vor dem Herkulaner Tor in Pompeji.
    Kockel, Valentin (2004) Die antiken Denkmäler und ihre Abbildungen in der ‘Encyclopédie’ Diderots. In: Stammen, Th. and Weber, W. (Hrsgg.): Wissenssicherung, Wissensordnung und Wissensverarbeitung: Das europäische Modell der Enzyklopädien. Kolloquium Augsburg 2001. Berlin 2004, pp. 339-370
    Kockel, Valentin (1987) Im Tode gleich? Die sullanischen Kolonisten und ihr kulturelles Gewicht in Pompeji am Beispiel der Nekropolen. In: Hesberg, Henner von and Zanker, Paul (Hrsgg.): Römische Gräberstraßen. Selbstdarstellung - Status - Standard; Kolloquium in München vom 28. bis 30. Okt. 1985. 1987, pp. 183-198 (Abhandlungen / Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Philosophisch-Historische Klasse ; NF 96)
    Koepp, Friedrich (1886) Archaische Skulpturen in Rom II. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 1 (1886), pp. 200-202
    Köhler, Ulrich (1884) Praxiteles der ältere. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Athenische Abteilung, 6 (1884), pp. 78-82
    Köhler, Ulrich (1878) Ueber die Zeit und den Ursprung der Grabanlagen in Mykene und Spata. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 6 (1878), pp. 1-13
    Körte, Gustav (1879) Bemerkungen zu den antiken Sculpturen aus Boeotien. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes, Athenische Abteilung, 4 (1879), pp. 268-276
    Krause, Celia (2007) Möglichkeiten der Interaktion von Vasenbild und Inschriften mit wörtlicher Rede auf Keramik.
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (1993) Agamemnon Istor. Namensbeischriften auf praenestinischen Cisten und späten etruskischen Spiegeln. In: Indogermanica et Italica. Festschrift für Helmut Rix zum 65. Geburtstag. Innsbruck 1993, pp. 252-263
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (1998) Artemis. In: I culti stranieri in Etruria, Colloquio Orvieto, Fondazione Faina Dez.1988, Annali della Fondazione per il Museo \"Claudio Faina\" 5. Rom 1998, pp. 171-206
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (1994) Astral’nye boñestva v Etrurii. In: Etruski i sredizemnomor’e. Materialy Meñdunarodnogo kollokviuma 9-11 aprelja 1990 goda (Moskva). Moskau 1994, pp. 127-144
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (1986) Culsans und Culsu. In: Beiträge zur altitalischen Geistesgeschichte. Festschrift für Gerhard Radke,. Münster 1986, pp. 156-163
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (2009) Der Krummstab: Hirten, Priester, Könige und Bischöfe. In: Bandini, Ditte and Kronauer, Ulrich (Hrsgg.): Früchte vom Baum des Wissens. Eine Festschrift der wissenschaftlichen Mitarbeiter. 100 Jahre Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften. Heidelberg 2009, pp. 61-69
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (1990) Der Schild der Parthenos und der Typus der Medusa Rondanini - Tarent, Orvieto und Athen. In: Kunst und Kultur der Magna Graecia. Ihr Verhältnis zum Mutterland und zum italischen Umfeld. Symposium des Deutschen Archäologenverbands. Mönchengladbach 8.-10.1.1988 (Schriften des Deutschen Archäologen Verbandes 11). Tübingen 1990, pp. 22-34
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (1980) Die Ausfahrt des Amphiaraos auf Amphoren der tyrrhenischen Gruppe. In: Tainia. Festschrift für Roland Hampe. Mainz 1980, pp. 105-116
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (2005) Die Verehrer des Dionysos in Etrurien. In: Aemnestos. Miscellanea di studi per Mauro Cristofani. Florenz 2005, pp. 611-619
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (2000) Die geflügelte Helena und andere Flügelfiguren auf etruskischen Skarabäen. In: Agathos Daimon. Mythes et cultes. Études d\'iconographie en l\'honneur de Lilly Kahil, Suppl. Bulletin de Correspondance Hellénique 38. Paris 2000, pp. 279-285
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (2002) Dämonenbilder in der antiken Kunst. Einige Beobachtungen. In: Horn, Hans-Jürgen (Hrsg.): Jakobs Traum. Dämonen, Engel. Zur Bedeutung der "Zwischenwelt" in der Tradition des Platonismus, Kolloquium Mannheim 22.-23.11.1999. St. Katharinen 2002, pp. 57-64
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (1986) Edipo nell'arte antica. In: Edipo. Il teatro greco e la cultura europea. Atti del Convegno Internazionale (Urbino 15.-19. novembre 1982). Urbino 1986, pp. 327-341
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (1977) Eine attisch schwarzfigurige Hydria in Heidelberg. In: Archäologischer Anzeiger, (1977), pp. 13-37
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (2009) Etruskische Kultgeräte zwischen Griechenland und Rom. Einige Überlegungen. In: Etruria e Italia preromana. Studi in onore di Giovannangelo Camporeale. Pisa 2009, pp. 501-506
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (1981) Etruskische und griechische Kannen der Form VI im 5. Jahrhundert. In: Die Aufnahme fremder Kultureinflüsse und das Problem des Retardierens in der etruskischen Kunst. Symposium des Deutschen Archäologenverbands Mannheim 8.-10.1980 (Schriften des Deutschen Archäologen-Verbandes 5). Mannheim 1981, pp. 146-155
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (1980) Ganymed und der Schwan. In: Forschungen und Funde. Festschrift für Bernhard Neutsch. Innsbruck 1980, pp. 243-248
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (1992) Himmlische Wasserträgerinnen. In: Kotinos. Festschrift für Erika Simon. Mainz 1992, pp. 350-355
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (2000) I Sette contro Tebe nell'arte etrusca arcaica e classica. In: Dei ed eroi greci in Etruria: l'altorilievo di Pyrgi con i Sette contro Tebe, Atti del colloquio internazionale Roma 14.-16.4.97. 2000, pp. 497-510 (Scienze dell' Antichità ; 10)
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (2000) I miti tebani nell'iconografia di altre regioni greche. In: Presenza e funzione della città di Tebe nella cultura greca, Atti del Convegno Internazionale Urbino 7-9.7.1997. Pisa Rom 2000, pp. 291-315
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (2000) Ikonographische Parallelen im Bereich der Götter- und Dämonenbilder. In: Der Orient und Etrurien. Internationales Kolloquium Tübingen 12.-13.6.1997. Pisa ; Rom 2000, pp. 315-322
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (1992) Il ciclo delle metope del primo thesauros della Foce del Sele e l’Etruria. In: Zanotti Bianco, Umberto (Hrsg.): Atti e memorie della Società Magna Grecia, Terza Serie 1. Rom 1992, pp. 219-231
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (1997) Influences grecques et orientales sur les représentations de dieux étrusques. In: Les Etrusques, les plus religieux des hommes. Actes du Colloque international. Paris 17.-19.11.92. Paris 1997, pp. 25-36
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (1999) Interesse privato nel mito. Il caso degli scarabei etruschi. In: Le mythe grec dans l\'Italie antique. Fonction et image. Actes du colloque international, École Française de Rome 14.-16.11.96. Rom 1999, pp. 405-421
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (1980) La 'Schnabelkanne' della collezione Watkins nel Fogg Art Museum e vasi affini. In: Prospettiva, 20 (1980), pp. 7-16
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (1981) Leukothea nach den antiken Quellen. In: Akten des Kolloquiums zum Thema \"Die Göttin von Pyrgi\".Tübingen 16.-17.1.1979 (Biblioteca di Studi Etruschi 12). Florenz 1981, pp. 137-148
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (1998) Nachklänge etruskischer Unterwelts- und Dämonenbilder in der römischen Literatur und Bildkunst. In: Aigner-Foresti, Luciana (Hrsg.): Die Integration der Etrusker und das Weiterwirken etruskischen Kulturgutes im republikanischen und kaiserzeitlichen Rom. Wien 1998, pp. 357-367
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (1986) Perseus und die Sphinx. Ein Ödipus-Rätsel weniger. In: Archäologischer Anzeiger, (1986), pp. 95-101
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (1995) Schnabelkannen und Griffphialen aus Bronze und Ton. In: Archäologischer Anzeiger, (1995), pp. 501-526
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (2011) Seefahrergeschichten – Göttergeschichten oder Der Hunger nach Bildern. Zur Faszination des griechischen Mythos in der etruskischen Kultur. In: COROLLARI. Scritti di antichità etrusche e italiche in omaggio all’opera di Giovanni Colonna. Pisa, Rom 2011, pp. 133-137
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (1995) Servizi etruschi - "griechische" Vasen aus Porzellan. In: Stupperich, Reinhard (Hrsg.): Lebendige Antike. Rezeptionen der Antike in Politik, Kunst und Wissenschaft der Neuzeit. Kolloquium für Wolfgang Schiering. Mannheim 1995, pp. 125-134
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (1984) Terrakotta-Imitationen der Bronzekannen der Form Beazley VI in Athen, Westgriechenland und Etrurien. In: Ancient Greek and Related Pottery. Proceedings of the International Vase Symposium. Amsterdam 12.-15.4. 1984. Amsterdam 1984, pp. 83-87
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (2001) Thysthla, Thyrsoi und Narthekophoroi. Anmerkungen zur Geschichte des dionysischen Kultstabes. In: Thetis, 8 (2001), pp. 47-52
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (2006) Was war in der Situla? In: Amann, Petra (Hrsg.): Italo - Tusco - Romana. Festschrift für Luciana Aigner-Foresti zum 70. Geburtstag am 30. Juli 2006. Wien 2006, pp. 259-269
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (2001) Wein- und Wasserkannen. Zur unterschiedlichen Exportsituation verschiedener etruskischer Schnabelkannen. In: Guggisberg, Martin A. (Hrsg.): Die Hydria von Grächwil. Zur Funktion und Rezeption mediterraner Importe in Mitteleuropa im 6. und 5. Jahrhundert v.Chr. Bern 2001, pp. 127-135
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (1985) Zum Datum der Gorgoneia von Populonia. In: Schweizerische Numismatische Rundschau, 64 (1985), pp. 61-69
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (1983) Zur Datierung der etruskischen Löwenkopfmünzen. In: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Römische Abteilung, 90 (1983), pp. 223-232
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (1995) Überlegungen zur zeitlichen Diskrepanz zwichen [zwischen] Metallgefässen und ihren Nachbildungen in Ton. In: Vaisselle métallique - vaisselle céramique. Rencontre d'études sur les vases étrusques, Nantes Mai 1994. 1995, pp. 77-87 (Revue des études anciennes ; 97)
    Krauskopf, Ingrid (2006) The grave and beyond in Etruscan religion. In: Simon, Erika and Thomson de Grummond, Nancy (Hrsgg.): The Religion of the Etruscans. The Sixth Annual Langford Conference, Florida State University Tallahassee 18.-20.2.1999. Austin 2006, pp. 66-89
    Krauskopf, Ingrid and Ambos, Claus (2010) The curved staff in the ancient Near East as a predecessor of the etruscan lituus. In: